Mesothelioma Patients Can Benefit from Genetic Testing
All patients diagnosed with malignant mesothelioma should undergo genetic testing to better identify the most appropriate treatment plan, according to Dr. Michele Carbone, the director of thoracic oncology at the University of Hawaii Cancer Center. Genetic testing also could lead to a more accurate prognosis and help family members determine if they are more susceptible to the cancer. Carbone estimates only one-third of all mesothelioma patients today have undergone the testing. “Some of these patients could definitely benefit from genetic testing,” Carbone told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com. Carbon...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 13, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Department of Justice Looking Closer at Asbestos Trusts
The U.S. Department of Justice has increased its scrutiny of asbestos trust funds in recent months, urging more accountability and transparency. Those who administer the funds believe they work just fine. The trust funds are designed mostly to compensate workers who were sickened by negligent companies that sold or manufactured asbestos products. Currently there are more than 60 trust funds with an estimated $30 billion combined, stemming from companies seeking bankruptcy protection and avoiding future liabilities related to asbestos exposure. Since the first trust was established in 1988, they have paid out more than $20 ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 7, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Alimta-Related Skin Reactions with and Without Oral Steroids
This study supports the use of intravenous dexamethasone 10 mg before pemetrexed infusion in place of three days of oral dexamethasone 4 mg twice daily at UNMCCC,” the authors wrote. The post Alimta-Related Skin Reactions with and Without Oral Steroids appeared first on Mesothelioma Center - Vital Services for Cancer Patients & Families. (Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News)
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 5, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Radiation Could Make Mesothelioma Immunotherapy More Effective
Doctors at the Princess Margaret Cancer Center in Toronto are studying the use of hypofractionated radiation to increase the effectiveness of immunotherapy for patients with mesothelioma. They are expected to launch soon a clinical trial that will add an immunotherapy combination to the high-dose radiation and aggressive surgery mix that has been so successful in Toronto. “There are a lot of questions that still need to be answered, but if I was a betting man, I’d lay odds on it [working well],” Dr. John Cho of the cancer center’s clinical research unit, told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com....
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 2, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

French Study Reveals Potential Mesothelioma Treatment Target
A team of French researchers led by Dr. Christophe Blanquart has identified a substance that may better define the severity of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) in the body and provide clues to more effectively manage the rare cancer. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, as the name indicates, is a protein found in the brain. BDNF is a growth factor and also appears in other tissues in the body. “It seems that BDNF could be a prognostic marker for MPM patients,” Blanquart told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com. “The level of BDNF in pleural fluids could reflect the severity of disease.” The...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 31, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

U.S. Asbestos Imports Surge in August, Report Finds
The amount of raw chrysotile asbestos imported into the United States increased significantly between July and August, according to a recent analysis from the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization and the Environmental Working Group. The U.S. International Trade Commission and Department of Commerce provided the two advocacy organizations the data for their report. According to the investigation, the U.S. imported 272 metric tons (approximately 600,000 pounds) of asbestos in August — an increase of nearly 2,000 percent from the 13 metric tons in July. EWG and ADAO on Tuesday attributed the alarming spike to the g...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 24, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Early Detection Getting Closer with Blood Test
German scientists are advancing a new, more reliable blood test that could lead to earlier detection and better prognosis for malignant mesothelioma. Instead of the typically lengthy and invasive process, the simple blood test could identify early stage disease almost a year before symptoms appear, making it much more treatable. The advancement stems from a study analyzing a combination of calretinin and mesothelin, two blood-based proteins that are overexpressed when mesothelioma tumors start growing. “This is a real breakthrough,” biochemist Dr. Georg Johnen, lead study researcher and head of Molecular Medici...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 23, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Canada Announces Asbestos Ban with Exemptions
The Canadian government released the final draft last week of its much-anticipated ban on asbestos, making it illegal to import, manufacture, sell, trade or use products made with the toxic mineral. The ban, which goes into effect Dec. 30, 2018, contains exemptions that still allow its use in the chlor-alkali industry, the military, nuclear facilities and for magnesium extraction from asbestos mining residue. It will be known as The Prohibition of Asbestos and Products Containing Asbestos Regulations. Canadian Environment Minister Catherine McKenna touted the tough new regulations during the announcement, but critics stil...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 22, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Canada Announces Ban of Asbestos, But with Exemptions
The Canadian government released the final draft last week of its much-anticipated ban on asbestos, making it illegal to import, manufacture, sell, trade or use products made with the toxic mineral. The ban, which goes into effect Dec. 30, 2018, contains exemptions that still allow its use in the chlor-alkali industry, the military, nuclear facilities and for magnesium extraction from asbestos mining residue. It will be known as The Prohibition of Asbestos and Products Containing Asbestos Regulations. Canadian Environment Minister Catherine McKenna touted the tough new regulations during the announcement, but critics stil...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 22, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Study Highlights Surgery Benefits of P/D over EPP for Mesothelioma
This study focused on 30-day mortality and postoperative complications. It included a meta-analysis of 39 previous studies from 1990 to 2017, along with the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System database from 1995 to 2012. Study results included: 30 Day Mortality: EPP 5 percent; P/D 2 percent Postoperative Complications: EPP 46 percent; P/D 24 percent Postoperative Arrhythmias: EPP 20 percent; P/D 5 percent. Although there is no cure for pleural mesothelioma, aggressive surgery — with either the P/D or EPP — has been proven to extend survival times. According to a recent study pub...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 19, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

UK Study Matches Mesothelioma Treatments to Genetic Profile
University of Leicester researchers soon will open the first molecularly stratified clinical trial for malignant mesothelioma with the hope of moving the future of treatment toward more personalization. The phase II trial in the United Kingdom is designed to match therapy with a patient’s specific genetic profile. “We’re trying to bring the right drug to the right patient at the right time,” Professor Dean Fennell, chair of thoracic medical oncology at Leicester and chief trial investigator, told Asbestos.com. “We need to find different treatments that work for different people. This is a step...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 12, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Asbestos Case Among First for Kavanaugh in Supreme Court
The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday will hear a product liability case filed by widows of Navy sailors seeking to recover damages for injuries related to asbestos exposure. It will be the third case on the docket for Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who was sworn in Saturday by Chief Justice John Roberts and retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy. The asbestos case, Air and Liquid Systems Corp. v. DeVries, involves a group of Navy sailors who developed mesothelioma from asbestos exposure. Defendants include Air & Liquid Systems and other large companies that manufactured equipment used by the Navy. Key facts about the case: Eq...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 10, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Brooklyn Opens Its Mesothelioma Specialty Center
Mesothelioma patients from Brooklyn won’t need to travel far from home anymore to receive specialized care for this rare and aggressive cancer. The Brooklyn Mesothelioma Center has opened. Maimonides Medical Center is the top cancer facility in Brooklyn. It has been treating mesothelioma patients for many years, but the arrival of thoracic surgeon Dr. Ory Wiesel has taken its program to another level. “We can provide the care now that these patients, before, maybe went elsewhere to find,” Wiesel told Asbestos.com. “We’re creating a dedicated mesothelioma program, with the expertise necessary, ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 8, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

Review Highlights Better Targets for Mesothelioma Therapy
A review on targeted therapies for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) provides fresh insight into why this cancer is so difficult to treat and ideas for improving outcomes. “Despite more than two decades of intensive research on the possible treatments for MPM, the results have so far been disappointing,” the authors wrote. According to the in-depth review, published in Critical Reviews in Hematology/Oncology, the next steps toward more tailored mesothelioma treatment will come from learning more about the changes driving abnormal cell communication. Researchers will use this information to personalize treatm...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 4, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

CAR T-Cell Therapy May ‘ Change the Paradigm of Treating Mesothelioma ’
Thoracic surgeon and scientist Dr. Prasad Adusumilli at Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK) Cancer Center believes customized gene therapy will soon change the way pleural mesothelioma is treated. Adusumilli, director of the Mesothelioma Program at MSK, has worked for a decade on developing tumor immunology for thoracic malignancies. He is currently the principal investigator of a phase I clinical trial involving specially prepared immune cells — chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells — that have shown impressive efficacy with mesothelioma. “I think this is going to change the paradigm of treating mesotheliom...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 1, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

J & J Dodges Verdict in Mesothelioma Trial, Imerys Settles
Johnson & Johnson’s latest trial over claims its iconic baby powder causes mesothelioma ended in mistrial this week after a California jury couldn’t reach a decision in the case of school counselor Carolyn Weirick. Lawyers for Weirick asked jurors for $25 million in compensation for past and future pain and suffering related to her mesothelioma, a rare cancer linked to asbestos exposure. Weirick, 59, was diagnosed with mesothelioma in 2017 and said her only exposure to asbestos came from the use of J&J’s talc-based products for more than 40 years. A state judge in Pasadena, California, declared a ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 28, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

International Symposium on Mesothelioma to Focus on Immunotherapy
The eighth annual International Symposium on Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma Saturday at UCLA will reflect the rapidly evolving philosophy on future treatment of this rare cancer. Change is coming. The Symposium, which was first held in 2011 to help bring awareness to lung-sparing surgery, will highlight groundbreaking discoveries and the latest advances in immunotherapy and gene therapy — believed to be the future of cancer care. The longtime chemotherapy and surgery standard-of-care routine is fading. The symposium at the Luskin Conference Center on the UCLA campus in Los Angeles will help explain why. “There ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 26, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Study: Aggressive Surgery Underutilized with Pleural Mesothelioma
Aggressive surgery for the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma is being underutilized, costing patients significant survival time, according to a recent study. Researchers found mesothelioma patients from all three histological subtypes — epithelioid, biphasic and sarcomatoid — can benefit from surgery, despite a reluctance to perform it today. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), a nationwide alliance of leading cancer centers, encourages surgery only for epithelioid patients. This eliminates the option for almost 40 percent of those diagnosed with mesothelioma. “Surgery is underutil...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 25, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Government Report: EPA Failed to Properly Monitor Asbestos in Schools
A recent report from the Environmental Protection Agency’s internal watchdog shows the agency isn’t doing enough to minimize asbestos risks in U.S. schools. From 2011 through 2015, the EPA conducted only 13 percent of the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) inspections it was responsible for nationwide, according to a report released Monday by the EPA’s Office of Inspector General. States with jurisdiction over their own inspections performed 87 percent, more than six times that of federal implementation jurisdictions. “Our objective was to determine whether the EPA was performing suffici...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 21, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Enhancing Cancer Immunotherapy with Artificial Intelligence
Physicians may soon use artificial intelligence (AI) and medical images to study tumors without a biopsy. The techniques developed to study tumors in this new way are described in the September 1 issue of The Lancet Oncology. Along with helping physicians learn more about tumors without surgery, the new approach should help identify which cancer patients will respond best to cutting-edge immunotherapy treatments. The AI techniques could be useful for “predicting clinical outcomes of patients treated with immunotherapy when validated by further prospective randomized trials,” the authors wrote. Immunotherapy tre...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 19, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Novel Mesothelioma Treatment Closer to FDA Approval
Standard-of-care treatment for patients with pleural mesothelioma may soon include Tumor Treating Fields (TTF), a novel therapy involving electric currents that disrupt cancer cell division and inhibit tumor growth. In the wake of recently released results from Novocure’s STELLAR phase II clinical trial, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is expected to approve the treatment within the next six months, giving mesothelioma patients another much-needed option. “At this point, it should be a relatively rapid approval process,” Dr. Eilon Kirson, chief science officer at Novocure, the oncology company...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 17, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Ripley Named New Director of Mesothelioma Center at Baylor
Thoracic surgeon Dr. R. Taylor Ripley comes to the Mesothelioma Treatment Center at Baylor College of Medicine with the highest possible endorsement. Dr. David Sugarbaker, the world’s most prominent mesothelioma specialist and former director of the prestigious Baylor Lung Institute, recruited Ripley. It was like being anointed by the king. Ripley spent the previous four years at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bethesda, Maryland, where he built a sterling reputation for surgical, clinical and investigational research excellence. “Dr. Sugarbaker wanted someone to help grow his program. He recruited me to...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 12, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

Dr. R. Taylor Ripley Leads Mesothelioma Center at Baylor
Thoracic surgeon Dr. R. Taylor Ripley comes to the Mesothelioma Treatment Center at Baylor College of Medicine with the highest possible endorsement. Dr. David Sugarbaker, the world’s most prominent mesothelioma specialist and director of the prestigious Baylor Lung Institute, recruited Ripley. It was like being anointed by the king. Ripley spent the previous four years at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bethesda, Maryland, where he built a sterling reputation for surgical, clinical and investigational research excellence. “Dr. Sugarbaker wanted someone to help grow his program. He recruited me to do tha...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 12, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

Surgery for Mesothelioma No Longer Recommended in UK
Aggressive surgery for the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) — unless part of a clinical trial — is no longer being recommended in the United Kingdom. The British Thoracic Society recently published its Mesothelioma Management Guidelines for 2018 and removed surgery from its recommendations. The belief was that potential harm was not worth the risk. The backtrack on surgery included the extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP), the extended pleurectomy and decortication (P/D) and the partial pleurectomy (PP) — all of which are being done at cancer centers in the United States. “Surgery is a ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

9/11 Cancer Deaths Continue to Rise
John Feal believes more people will die from illnesses related to 9/11 than from the terrorist attack at the World Trade Center. He should know. He’s a first responder who witnesses it every day. And he is not alone in his belief. Feal, a longtime advocate for Sept. 11 survivors and those dying from diseases related to the terrorist attacks, will again host the annual naming ceremony at the 9/11 Responders Remembered Park in Smithtown, Long Island. Each year he reads the names of those who have died within the past year. And each year, the list is longer than the last. On the 17th anniversary of the terrorist attack...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 10, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Alternative Cancer Treatment Clinic Reopening in Bahamas
Jerry Lampe and Ruth Phillips — two of America’s longest-living mesothelioma survivors — won’t feel so helpless now when a newly diagnosed patient asks for their secret to success. The controversial Immune Augmentation Therapy (IAT) Clinic in Freeport, Bahamas, is set to reopen in October, giving mesothelioma patients a proven, alternative therapy option once again. IAT operated outside of U.S. regulation from 1977 to 2016. The name has been changed to Quantum Immunologics, but the philosophy surrounding cancer treatment is exactly the same, a throwback to when Lampe and Phillips were treated origi...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 5, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Florida Developer Sentenced on Negligent Asbestos Removal
A Florida real estate developer has been sentenced on a single misdemeanor count of negligent removal of asbestos and putting workers in imminent danger from the cancer-causing mineral. In addition to 48 months of probation, Philip J. Farley III was ordered to pay $250,000 to fund a treatment and medical monitoring program for 90 workers who may have been exposed to asbestos during a renovation project in downtown St. Petersburg, Florida, in 2010. The sentencing comes three years after Farley was indicted on several federal charges. Farley reportedly hired cheap labor to start a massive renovation of a 480-unit complex now...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 31, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Dr. David Sugarbaker, Mesothelioma Treatment Pioneer, Dies at 65
Thoracic surgeon Dr. David Sugarbaker, a world leader in advancing the treatment of pleural mesothelioma for nearly 30 years, has died. He was 65. Sugarbaker was director of the Lung Institute at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Dr. Raja Flores, thoracic surgeon and mesothelioma specialist at Mount Sinai Cancer Center, expressed his respect for the famed surgeon. “He was a giant in the field. He not only took care of the mesothelioma patients, he trained a whole generation of doctors who will continue taking care of those patients,” said Flores, who trained under Sugarbaker. “It’s a sad...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 29, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

What ’s Included in the EPA’s New Asbestos Use Rule?
The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is moving forward with a proposed rule critics fear will expand the commercial use of asbestos — a toxic mineral known to cause mesothelioma and other diseases. The EPA received nearly 6,000 comments about its significant new use rule (SNUR) as of Aug. 10, the last day for public commenting. In June, the agency proposed SNUR under the reformed Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). It would allow companies to manufacture, import and process more than a dozen asbestos-containing products no longer in use as long as the EPA approves them first. The EPA’s summa...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 24, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Specialty Centers Rank on Best Hospitals List
The MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston was named the No. 1 cancer care hospital in America by U.S. News & World Report for the fourth consecutive year. MD Anderson has been a leading specialty center for pleural mesothelioma treatment, which contributed to its top billing in the 2018-19 rankings. The center is in the recruiting or active-and-not recruiting stage for 15 different clinical trials involving mesothelioma. Memorial-Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, Dana-Farber and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and the Cleveland Clinic, respectively, round ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 20, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Radiofrequency Ablation Fixes Mesothelioma Recurrence in Case Study
Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used successfully in Japan to treat post-surgery recurrence of malignant pleural mesothelioma, according to a case study published recently by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Although RFA has been utilized for several years to treat various thoracic lesions, the study authors believe this is the first time it worked effectively with mesothelioma cancer cells. “It shows promising efficacy,” the authors wrote. “Radiofrequency should be considered an option for treating recurrence of MPM [malignant pleural mesothelioma].” RFA is a minimally invasive medical proc...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 15, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Moving Toward an Earlier Diagnosis of Mesothelioma
This study provided proof of concept for the presence of ctDNA in blood of treatment-naive MPM [malignant pleural mesothelioma] patients by the detection of somatic variants that were identified by analysis of a tumor sample,” the authors wrote. “This opens perspective towards its use in MPM.” The post Moving Toward an Earlier Diagnosis of Mesothelioma appeared first on Mesothelioma Center - Vital Services for Cancer Patients & Families. (Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News)
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 13, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Improving Surgery for Mesothelioma with Glowing Tumor Technology
Thoracic surgeon Dr. Sunil Singhal at the Abramson Cancer Center has developed glowing tumor technology that should increase the effectiveness of aggressive surgery for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Singhal has shown recently that by adding a contrast agent that makes tumor cells glow, a more complete surgery can be done. This potentially avoids the now almost-inevitable cancer recurrence. “This is a big deal. We could potentially help a lot of patients with this,” Singhal told Asbestos.com. “It could change the entire field [of surgery for mesothelioma].” Singhal and his colleagues from the Abram...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 9, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Op-Ed: EPA Opens the Door to a Silent Killer — Asbestos
This article represents his opinions. The Environmental Protection Agency would like you to think it is taking an “unprecedented” stand against the hazards of asbestos, the mineral that kills nearly 40,000 Americans each year from mesothelioma, lung cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. It is not. In fact, on June 1, the EPA announced a significant new use rule (SNUR) that will allow companies to manufacture, import and process new asbestos-containing products after it evaluates their potential health dangers. The standards to evaluate those health risks, which are included in a nearly 1,500-page docume...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 8, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Crayons Sold by Dollar Tree, Amazon Test Positive for Asbestos
A recent test from a consumer advocacy group found toxic levels of asbestos — a mineral that can lead to lung cancer and mesothelioma if inhaled or ingested — in a popular brand of crayons sold by Dollar Tree, Amazon.com and other retailers. The U.S. Public Interest Research Group (U.S. PIRG) Education Fund tested 36 packs of Playskool crayons purchased from a Dollar Tree store in Chicago. All contained dangerous amounts of tremolite asbestos fibers, according to Kara Cook-Schultz, toxics director for U.S. PIRG. The results were part of U.S. PIRG’s “Safer School Supplies: Shopping Guide,” rele...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 7, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Researchers Find New Mesothelioma Genes in Family Study
This study strengthens the suspicion that, next to germline BAP1 alterations, other genetic factors might predispose families to the development of MM,” the authors wrote. Mutations in only one gene called BAP1 have been shown to increase risk of mesothelioma. However, experts suspect other genes may play a role in the disease. This new study supports the idea that other genes can predispose a person — or even an entire family — to mesothelioma. Hints of Genetic Influence on Mesothelioma Risk Asbestos exposure is the No. 1 cause of mesothelioma. However, some families seem to have more cases of mesothe...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 6, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Yale Study: Complementary Medicine Can Shorten Cancer Survival
Cancer patients — including those with mesothelioma — who receive complementary therapy are likely to die sooner than those who use only conventional treatment, according to researchers at Yale School of Medicine. Patients receiving complementary medicine also were more inclined to forego at least one component of their conventional treatment regimen. The study was done by a team from the Yale Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale School of Medicine. JAMA Oncology published the study July 19. “The study was about patients who were using unproven therapies for treatment...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 1, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Radiation Therapy Can Increase Mesothelioma Survival Time
Too many patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma are going without adjuvant radiotherapy that could extend their lives significantly, according to Dr. Bin Teh at Houston Methodist Hospital in Texas. Teh is the senior author of a recent study — the largest of its kind — that examined the role and extent of radiation therapy in the overall treatment of mesothelioma. He and his colleagues found only 3.1 percent of patients diagnosed with pleural mesothelioma underwent radiotherapy treatment in combination with aggressive surgery. “Surgery plus radiation improves overall survival,” Teh, vice chair ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 30, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Fire Rips Through Forests Around Libby Asbestos Site
Specially trained firefighters, equipped with high-tech gear designed to prevent the inhalation of toxic asbestos fibers, continued battling forest fires into the weekend near Libby, Montana. The blaze remains at least a mile from the now-closed W.R. Grace vermiculite mine, but firefighters continued working with their full-faced respirators in the asbestos-laced forest. Libby is home to the longest-running, man-made environmental disaster in American history, stemming from more than 70 years (1919-1990) of mining vermiculite tainted by toxic asbestos. Hundreds of miners and nearby residents have died from asbestos-related...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 27, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

PI3K Inhibitors and Keto Diet Better Than Drug Alone
Many mesothelioma experts believe the route to better disease management — and possibly a cure — lies with drugs that target genes and cell pathways that promote cancer growth. New research published July 4 in the journal Nature supports a novel approach for making PI3K inhibitors, medications that inhibit cancer growth, more effective. Trials on these drugs have been mixed, and now cancer experts may know why. PI3K inhibitors seem to work poorly in the presence of high glucose (sugar) and insulin levels. The new study in cells and mice shows reducing glucose and insulin with a ketogenic diet, popularly known ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 27, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Immunotherapy Clinical Trial Aims for Mesothelioma Cure
Medical oncologist Dr. Bernardo Goulart at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) believes his latest clinical trial might be the most curative approach to treatment of pleural mesothelioma. He also believes it could work. Goulart is the principal investigator at SCCA, which has embraced a novel clinical trial that combines the immunotherapy drug Tecentriq (atezolizumab) with a multimodal regimen of chemotherapy, surgery and radiation. “The trial design is very intense, requiring multidisciplinary involvement,” Goulart told Asbestos.com. “I think it could provide insight into the next step of research th...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 25, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Case Report Touts Success with Opdivo
Not every mesothelioma patient benefits from the immunotherapy drug Opdivo, but for the ones that do, the response can be lifesaving. Opdivo, known generically as nivolumab, continues to produce dramatic results, inching it closer to FDA approval for mesothelioma cancer. A recently published individual case report describes “an exceptional and sustained response.” Treatment with Opdivo allowed one patient to go from a downward spiral, with only weeks to live, back into the workforce. “We were blown away by the patient’s response,” lead author Riley Jones, now in his fellowship at the Universit...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 23, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

Asbestos Covers Parts of NYC After Steam Pipe Explosion
An underground steam pipe explosion and the resulting fountain of vapor filled with toxic asbestos fibers caused the evacuation of 28 buildings and the closing of several surrounding streets in New York City Thursday. Only five minor injuries were reported, but the force of the blast and the steady stream of smoke pouring from the resulting crater covered nearby buildings and sent commuters running for shelter. The fear of asbestos contamination dominated the early cleanup efforts. Inhaling or ingesting microscopic asbestos fibers can eventually lead to serious health problems, including asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothe...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 19, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Trial Adds Gemcitabine to Pleural Mesothelioma HIOC Therapy
Results of a phase I clinical trial highlight how the addition of a drug to an existing treatment option appears safe and may improve outcomes in certain patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). The primary goal of the trial was to determine the maximum tolerated dose of gemcitabine added to cisplatin when these drugs are delivered together as heated intraoperative chemotherapy (HIOC) during surgery. Researchers have studied cisplatin alone for HIOC. The addition of gemcitabine — a chemotherapy drug often used to treat pancreatic, ovarian and breast cancers — is new. The Journal of Thoracic Oncology...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 18, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Researchers Find Link Between Vitamin D and Asbestosis
This study was not designed to explain whether supplementing with vitamin D will protect against asbestosis. This new research also does not examine if taking vitamin D will slow down the progression of existing ILD. Still, there are a lot of good reasons to pay attention to the sunshine vitamin. Regardless of whether a person has been exposed to asbestos, no one should ignore very low vitamin D levels. People already diagnosed with an asbestos-related cancer, may benefit from a quick check of vitamin D levels. According to the medical literature, up to 80 percent of people with cancer may be vitamin D deficient. People ca...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 16, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

J & J Hit with $4.7B Verdict in Talc Asbestos Cancer Case
A Missouri jury Thursday ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay $4.69 billion to 22 women who claim asbestos in the company’s talc products caused them to develop ovarian cancer. It is the largest verdict to date the consumer goods giant has faced in an asbestos-talc case. The Circuit Court of the City of St. Louis handed down $550 million in compensatory damages and $4.14 billion in punitive damages in the verdict, averaging about $25 million apiece for the 22 plaintiffs. J&J currently faces roughly 9,000 cases that blame its talc products — including the company’s iconic Johnson’s Baby Powder &m...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 13, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Russian Company Brands Asbestos with Trump ’ s Face
The world’s largest producer of chrysotile asbestos is now marketing its signature product with President Donald Trump’s image, according to a recent Facebook post from the Russian mining company Uralasbest. On June 25, the company, which operates a giant asbestos mine in the Ural Mountains in Western Russia, posted photos of its asbestos on palettes wrapped in plastic and stamped with a seal of Trump’s face in red ink. A message of support for Trump and former Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administrator Scott Pruitt accompanied the photos. In an English translation provided by the Environmental...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Surgery Plus HIPEC Only ‘ Potential for Cure ’ of Peritoneal Mesothelioma
This study contributes to a better understanding of how CRS and HIPEC work and who is likely to receive the best benefit from this combination treatment. For patients with the most aggressive peritoneal mesothelioma cancers, additional options — such as immunotherapy or ongoing, post-surgical delivery of chemotherapy into the peritoneal cavity — may be additional treatments to consider. The post Surgery Plus HIPEC Only ‘Potential for Cure’ of Peritoneal Mesothelioma appeared first on Mesothelioma Center - Vital Services for Cancer Patients & Families. (Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News)
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 10, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Study Details Significant Increase in Asbestos-Related Deaths
Deaths attributed to asbestos exposure — within the United States and worldwide — have been significantly underestimated, according to the latest study by the International Commission of Occupational Health (ICOH). Asbestos is killing more people than anyone thought. Based on the most extensive study to date, occupational asbestos-related diseases killed 39,275 people within the U.S. and 222,321 people throughout the world in 2016. Both figures were more than double the commonly used estimates that stem from various governmental and nongovernmental health agencies. “The asbestos burden is worse than peopl...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 9, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Cancer Treatment Less Effective in Older Patients
As age increases, so does the risk for cancer. More than half of all cancer cases occur in people over 65. This is especially true for mesothelioma. The average age at diagnosis for pleural mesothelioma — the most common form of the disease — is 69. Despite cancer being more common among the elderly, many cancer treatments work best in younger patients. Researchers now have an idea of why certain cancer treatments don’t work as well in older patients. These important findings were published in June in the medical journal Cell Reports. “While it is clear that primary T cell responses decline in the ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 6, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news