Students Return to California School After Asbestos Scare
A school asbestos abatement project that forced hundreds of California public students to commute nearly 18 miles to other schools is now over. The younger students at Oak View Elementary School returned to their regular school earlier this month, nearly two years after the discovery of asbestos required Ocean View School District officials to shut down Oak View, Lake View and Hope View elementary schools — displacing more than 1,600 students. Transformation of the school building, including renovations and asbestos abatement, began a year and a half ago at a cost of nearly $6 million, according to KABC-Channe...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 24, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

Comedian Quincy Jones Has Mesothelioma, Lands HBO special
Mesothelioma patients often talk about leaving something behind for family and friends to remember them. Comedian Quincy Jones, who was diagnosed with mesothelioma, will leave his legacy, too, but in a rather unique way. He will leave everyone laughing. Later this spring, HBO will broadcast Jones’s one-hour stand-up special that will be taped April 4. It was his dying wish. Jones, not to be confused with the legendary music producer of the same name, was diagnosed in July with peritoneal mesothelioma, a rare and aggressive cancer that starts in the thin lining around the abdomen. It is caused typically b...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 23, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Celebrities Source Type: news

New Mesothelioma Immunogene Clinical Trial Set to Launch
For more than a decade, pulmonologist Dr. Dan Sterman has believed immunotherapy would become the catalyst for major advancements in the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma. Today, he is closer than ever to proving that point. Sterman, director of pulmonary medicine at New York University, soon will help launch a multicenter clinical trial involving a powerful immunogene therapy combination that may change the way this deadly asbestos-related cancer is viewed. “I believe that immunotherapy will become the fourth pillar of treatment for mesothelioma (joining chemotherapy, radiation and surgery),&rdquo...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 22, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Garlock, EnPro Reach $480M Settlement for Asbestos Claims
EnPro Industries has agreed to establish a $480 million trust fund to settle all current and future asbestos claims against subsidiary Garlock Sealing Technologies, which filed for bankruptcy in 2010. The asbestos trust fund would begin with a $400 million cash contribution from EnPro within a year of the deal’s conclusion and an additional $80 million by the first anniversary. The settlement was reached with the court-appointed committee representing current claimants and legal representatives for future claimants, according to the announcement earlier this week. The deal still must be approved by the U.S....
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 18, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

Improving Mesothelioma Survival by Targeting New Genetic Mutations
Research from Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center in Boston recently identified a distinct spectrum of genetic mutations in pleural mesothelioma tumors, a blockbuster finding that should significantly improve future treatment of the disease. It was the breakthrough the mesothelioma community was anticipating. “This is probably the most significant advancement in the treatment of mesothelioma since the advent of cytoreductive surgery,” thoracic surgeon Dr. David Sugarbaker, director of the Lung Institute at Baylor College of Medicine and America’s foremost authority on pleural mesothelioma, told ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 10, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Canada Admits Using Asbestos in New Public Buildings
The argument to ban asbestos in Canada is growing stronger after government officials admitted using the carcinogen in the renovation and construction of federal buildings. Members of the nation’s trade union association also say the importation of asbestos-containing materials, specifically asbestos cement pipes installed in government buildings, is on the rise. "That they're continuing to use a known carcinogen in the workplace is just unbelievable," said Laura Lozanski, occupational health and safety officer at the Canadian Association of University Teachers. Government officials with Public Ser...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 7, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

Moffitt Launches New Mesothelioma Clinical Trials in Tampa
The mesothelioma program at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa opened two new clinical trials recently, expanding efforts to provide patients throughout the state with more treatment options. Both mesothelioma-specific, phase II trials are designed as second-line therapies involving options that have shown success with other types of cancer. “If a patient is willing and able, we would encourage them to look at these opportunities,” said Dr. Tawee Tanvetyanon, Moffitt medical oncologist and mesothelioma specialist. “People look to trials today because they can find the newest, and sometimes the best,...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 3, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Tremelimumab Failed to Extend Mesothelioma Survival Rates
The highly touted immunotherapy drug tremelimumab failed to extend the lives of malignant mesothelioma patients, according to the London-based manufacturer after it ended its multicenter clinical trial Monday. Researchers were testing tremelimumab — with considerable fanfare — as a second- and third-line treatment for unresectable mesothelioma in a phase IIb trial. The immunotherapy drug already had shown success with other cancers. “We are disappointed that tremelimumab monotherapy did not demonstrate a survival benefit in this patient population,” Robert Iannone, head of immuno-oncology at A...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 1, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Johnny Lattner: Heisman Winner and Steeler Dies of Mesothelioma
Heisman Trophy winner and two-time college football All-American Johnny Lattner died of mesothelioma earlier this month, joining a growing list of famous people stricken by this rare and aggressive cancer. Another hero lost to the horror of asbestos. Lattner, who died at 83, won the Heisman in 1953 as a senior at the University of Notre Dame. He was featured that year on the cover of Time Magazine, which hailed him as a shining star. He played only one year in the National Football League with the Pittsburgh Steelers, was selected to the Pro Bowl, but then enlisted in the U.S. Air Force, where he suffered a career...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 26, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Celebrities Source Type: news

EPA Is Close to Finishing Libby Asbestos Cleanup
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) this month announced its final remedial plans for the Libby Asbestos Superfund Site, bringing closure to the largest, longest-running asbestos cleanup project in American history. The EPA project began almost 17 years ago in Montana, stemming from seven decades of vermiculite mining that led to toxic asbestos contamination throughout Libby and nearby Troy. Health officials believe the mines killed more than 400 Libby residents and sickened an estimated 3,000. Exposure to asbestos can lead to several serious illnesses, including asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma. T...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 19, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Tissue Bank Will Get $5.5M Funding Grant
The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) plans to award a five-year, $5.5 million grant to continue funding the much-needed National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank (NMVB) through 2021. The NMVB is a biospecimen registry designed to facilitate scientific research of mesothelioma, the rare and aggressive cancer caused by exposure to asbestos. It is the only federally funded program designed exclusively for mesothelioma research. "It's often difficult to pull enough material together for [researching] a disease like this," Dr. Ainsley Weston, associate director for science at NIOSH, told As...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 16, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Orlando Firefighters Exposed to Asbestos Were Not Warned
More than a dozen Orlando firefighters were exposed to asbestos earlier this month because their supervisors failed to warn them of the known dangers. The families of many of those firefighters worry secondhand exposure to the deadly mineral could place them at risk of developing mesothelioma or other asbestos-related diseases. “It’s everywhere, you know?” said Andrea Donohoe, wife of one of the Orlando Fire Department firefighters exposed to asbestos. “Our baby is riding in his car. I was riding in his car. We’re all now exposed to asbestos.” Her husband, Anthony Donohoe, and m...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 12, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

Asbestos Exposure at Gateway Arch Closes Museum
An asbestos exposure mishap at the Gateway Arch in St. Louis not only delayed a renovation project at an estimated cost of $350,000, but it also exposed park service employees and others to the cancer-causing mineral. And now there’s uncertainty as to who’s responsible for covering the cost of removing asbestos from the iconic U.S. landmark. After a month-long standstill in response asbestos exposure at the Museum of Westward Expansion, the Gateway Arch’s underground museum, major improvement work resumed Dec. 15. Breathing the microscopic asbestos fibers is known to cause the deadly cancer know...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 8, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

Senate Considers FACT Act, Asbestos Claims
The U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee today will begin discussing the Furthering Asbestos Claims Transparency (FACT) Act — despite growing, widespread opposition. Groups of veterans, teachers, firefighters, municipal, county and state workers delivered letters Monday to ranking Senate Judiciary Committee members, voicing their disapproval. The bill would require new, stiffer requirements for those seeking compensation from asbestos trusts. The U.S. Bankruptcy Code established asbestos trusts to compensate victims of asbestos exposure. These trusts are worth an estimated $30 billion. Earlier this year, the FACT...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 3, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

Increased Asbestos Waste Leads to High Cost and Illegal Dumping
Every few months, Andrew Morrison gets a call about a pile of asbestos that’s been illegally dumped. Morrison, the owner of Andrew’s Asbestos Solutions in Victoria, Australia, says the cost of proper asbestos disposal sometimes makes people feel forced to find their own solution. But when it comes to asbestos, cutting corners can lead to harmful exposures and serious health risks, including mesothelioma and other cancers. “They’ll ring up wanting to do the right thing, but they can’t believe how much it costs,” he told the Sydney Morning Herald report. Much of Morrison&rsquo...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 1, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

New Mesothelioma Clinical Trial Hopes to Improve Chemotherapy
This study is part of a broad development program that includes a number of additional planned studies." TRACON Pharmaceuticals develops novel targeted cancer therapies. Its TRC105 antibody is directed at renal cell carcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. This clinical trial with TRC102 is one of five nationally involving methoxyamine, but one of more than 200 trials for mesothelioma. (Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News)
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 27, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

NY Sen. Charles Schumer Rallies to Block FACT Act in Senate
U.S. Senator Chuck Schumer of New York launched his effort to block proposed legislation that would call for new, stiffer requirements for those seeking compensation from asbestos trusts. Schumer, a Democrat and member of the Senate Finance Committee's subcommittee on Health Care, said the Furthering Asbestos Claims Transparency (FACT) Act of 2016, which recently passed in the U.S. House of Representatives, would unfairly target military veterans. He vows to stop it from getting through the Senate. "This is plain wrong," Schumer said during a conference call with reporters earlier this week. "I'll g...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 25, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

SEER Study: Surgery Still Extends Mesothelioma Survival
Aggressive surgery at a specialty center could more than double the survival period of a patient diagnosed today with malignant pleural mesothelioma. Surgery may buy precious time. Although oncologists and patients often advise and opt against it, surgery remains an effective tool that significantly extends lives, according to an analysis of 14,228 mesothelioma patients across the U.S. The sample of patients is among the largest in similar studies. "There are limitations to the data, but people just do better with surgery," thoracic surgeon Andrea Wolf, of Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City, tol...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 20, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Center at Loyola Will Grow Under Vigneswaran
Renowned thoracic surgeon Dr. Wickii Vigneswaran left the Loyola University Health System 10 years ago to help start the lung transplant program at nearby University of Chicago Medical Center. He returned to Loyola this year to direct a mesothelioma specialty center, bringing his decade of experience from one of the country's finest research facilities. "I've got the best of both worlds now, and I think patients will really benefit from that," Vigneswaran told Asbestos.com. "We'll continue to collaborate with the best researchers, but now I'll have a broader clinical base at Loyola. It's a win-win situ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 18, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

FACT Act Legislation Passes House, Moves to Senate
The U.S. House of Representatives last week approved legislation that included the FACT Act, which sets new, stiffer requirements for victims of asbestos seeking compensation through the legal system. This is the third time in four years the House has passed a version of the Furthering Asbestos Claims Transparency (FACT) Act, but the first time it was attached to the Fairness in Class Action Litigation Act, also known as H.R. 1927. It now moves to the U.S. Senate, where it has stalled in the past and is expected to fail again. This is the first time it has come to the Senate when Republicans were in the majority, whi...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 13, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

Mayo Doctors Will Test Cryotherapy for Mesothelioma Tumors
The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, opened a mesothelioma clinical trial involving intrapleural cryotherapy before surgery to trigger an anti-tumor response. It is the only cryotherapy clinical trial for mesothelioma conducted in the U.S. Two previous cryotherapy trials for mesothelioma at other cancer centers in 2009 and 2011 were withdrawn or terminated. Cryotherapy involves dissipating small cancer tumors by freezing them with controlled nitrogen vapors. It has been used with other cancers, but it remains a controversial procedure as an adjuvant therapy for mesothelioma. The Pacific Meso Center in Los Ang...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 8, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Top 10 Mesothelioma News Stories of 2015
We're making progress in the fight against malignant pleural mesothelioma. Doctors are treating it more aggressively. New drugs are emerging. Survivors are living longer. Therapies are becoming more precise and individualized. And specialty centers are becoming more prominent and comprehensive. Even the highly criticized U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is taking it more seriously now. There is growing hope on the horizon. Here are the most prominent stories of 2015, providing a glimpse of what will come in 2016. FDA Approves Keytruda and Opdivo for Lung Cancer The U.S. Food and Drug Administrati...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 31, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Sen. Markey: US Schools Fail Asbestos Management
Thirty years ago, Congress acted to protect schools from deadly asbestos. But today, it appears the majority of states overlook the law passed to safeguard students, teachers and administrators across the nation. Two congressional legislators this year queried all 50 state governors to determine compliance of the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) enacted three decades ago. Disappointingly, less than half replied. Five of those governors did not answer questions specifically and failed to provide information regarding their observance of the law. Details of AHERA Legislation Enacted into law in 1986, AHERA requ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 21, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

Vote on Newest Asbestos FACT Act Possible Before End of Year
Legislators are again considering a bill that will legally hurt asbestos victims and rob them of their privacy if Congress approves it. At the start of 2015, U.S. Rep. Blake Farenthold, R-Texas, introduced the newest version of the Furthering Asbestos Claims Transparency (FACT) Act, also known as H.R. 526. The bill would place heavy burdens on the asbestos trusts established by negligent companies to compensate workers and their families who are affected by asbestos. The proposed legislation seeks to add costly reporting requirements that will delay compensation, as well as public disclosure of sensitive and private inf...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 17, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

Zadroga Act Extended for 9/11 Mesothelioma Victims
The 9/11 World Trade Center Health Program, which aides those diagnosed with an asbestos-related disease, will receive a 75-year extension as part of a $1.1 trillion spending bill signed Friday by President Barack Obama. Also included in the massive spending bill is $50 million for the Department of Defense, Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program — the same amount provided in 2015. That program, which is aimed at helping military veterans, has allocated almost $12 million for mesothelioma research since 2008. The World Trade Center Health Program is within the $8.1 billion reauthorization of the James Zadroga 9/11 H...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 16, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

Congress Set to Pass Zadroga Act for 9/11 Mesothelioma Victims
The 9/11 World Trade Center Health Program, which aides those diagnosed with an asbestos-related disease, will receive a 75-year extension as part of a $1.1 trillion spending bill expected to be approved by Congress. The program is within the $8.1 billion reauthorization of the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act designed to help those injured by the historic terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. The reauthorization comes as a relief to thousands of residents and first responders sickened by the toxic air and smoldering debris that lingered for months in New York City after the terrorist attack. "It is pe...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 16, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

SMART Approach Is Advancing Mesothelioma Survival Rates
Accelerated high-dose radiation just before extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) surgery — a reversal of the traditional order at most U.S. specialty centers — continues to produce impressive results for pleural mesothelioma patients in Toronto. Specialists at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and Toronto General Hospital estimated the median overall survival and disease-free survival at 51 and 47 months, respectively, for patients with the most common subtype of the disease. Surgeon Marc de Perrot presented the findings of an ongoing study earlier this year at the American Association for Thoracic Surgery in S...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 14, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Hefty Asbestos Removal Costs Delay Demolitions
Discussions about its fate are mixed, from restoration and rebuilding to razing the 3.5-million-square-foot structure. The automotive plant is laden with asbestos, and regardless of the final decision, asbestos removal will be the first step, and it will come with a price tag in the tens of thousands. Activity on the project moves slowly as owner Fernando Palazuelo expects to begin removing debris from the 40-acre site as the first phase in a 10- to 15-year plan to revive the complex, a Detroit News report shows. In the meantime, the decaying expanse of brick and mortar continues to invite unwelcome guests and add to th...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 9, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

Nestor Villamizar Grows Mesothelioma Program in Miami
Thoracic surgeon Nestor Villamizar saw the glaring need for a comprehensive mesothelioma program in bustling South Florida, even when he was 1,500 miles away in Boston. He is filling that void today. Villamizar joined the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center in 2014, hoping to slow the stream of mesothelioma patients who are leaving Florida to seek treatment at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. He has been a much-welcomed addition to the state. The early results are impressive. "When I was working at the Brigham, we kept seeing more and more mesothelioma patients coming for surgery from Florida, and it alw...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 3, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Lung Cancer Community Can Learn from Breast Cancer Progress
Thoracic surgeon Dr. Jacques Fontaine at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa believes there is a well-marked path to improving the stubbornly high mortality rate for lung cancer. The breast cancer community already has blazed the trail. "Some of the things that really changed the face of breast cancer 20 years ago, are now taking hold with lung cancer," Fontaine told Asbestos.com. "Hopefully, we're going to start seeing more progress." November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month, a time to focus on what needs to be done, what should be done better, and what breast cancer has taught everyone. While progr...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 24, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Toyota Warns Australians of Fake Brake Pads with Asbestos
Toyota, the world’s largest automaker, recently announced dealers and independent mechanics in Australia may have unknowingly installed thousands of counterfeit brake pads containing deadly asbestos in more than 500,000 vehicles. The vehicles that may contain the fake brakes pads include HiAce models (2005-2015), HiLux models (2004-2015) and commuter buses, according to News Corp Australia, which broke the story. “We are cracking down on counterfeit parts that put customer safety at risk. It is very concerning to us that not only do these parts contain asbestos, but they are able to be sold in Australia,&rdqu...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 19, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Lorraine Kember Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

Early CT Screening Is Critical to Reducing Lung Cancer Deaths
Thoracic surgeon and robotics innovator Dr. Farid Gharagozloo believes regular early screenings and better follow-up care will significantly reduce the annual number of Americans dying of lung cancer by almost two-thirds. Gharagozloo, director of cardiothoracic surgery at Florida Hospital Celebration Health, says the medical establishment in the U.S. and patients themselves share the blame for the unreasonably high number of lung cancer deaths today. Patients need to be more assertive. Doctors need to be more aggressive. Together, they can make a big difference. "We can turn this thing around — change the who...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 10, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

How America Let Asbestos Kill Its Veterans
Discussions among doctors about the dangers of asbestos started in the early 1920s, and while the medical and scientific research communities released confirmations about its deadly side effects, the U.S. military didn’t heed their warnings and continued to build its vessels. 1922 Medical professionals held discussions linking asbestos to various health problems. 1924 Dr. W...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 9, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Veterans & Military Source Type: news

New Lung Cancer Drugs Raise Hope for Mesothelioma Patients
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently granted approval for immunotherapy drugs Keytruda and Opdivo to fight non-small cell lung cancer, raising the hopes of patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. Drugmakers Merck & Co. and Bristol-Myers Squibb manufacture Keytruda (pembrolizumab) and Opdivo (nivolumab), respectively. Both drugs target PD-1 and PD-L1, specific proteins that block a body's immune system from attacking the cancer cells. Those same proteins were identified in a subset of mesothelioma patients with the shortest survival times. The University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center r...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 5, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Role of Genetic Testing & Peritoneal Mesothelioma Survival
Genetic testing may soon become a determining factor in treatment for peritoneal mesothelioma. The recent findings of a retrospective study found a major drop in overall survival and progression-free survival among patients with alterations in the CDKN2A and NF2 genes. The prognostic significance of the two genetic clues could change the way doctors determine a patient's eligibility for major aggressive surgery. Modern Pathology published the study last month. Officials at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) and Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta supplied the research. The study involved 86...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 2, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Henderson May Annex Eldorado Valley Land Containing Asbestos
Officials in Henderson, Nevada, forge ahead with plans to possibly annex and develop parts of the Eldorado Valley despite geologists’ concerns about the presence of naturally occurring asbestos in the ground. While official annexation remains delayed, city officials continue studying the proposal and negotiating with developers, Henderson Public Works assistant director Robert Herr told TV8 News. The city council in June voted to consider the proposal after developers and landowners pitched the idea of building homes and businesses on a four-square-mile site mostly south of current city limits. This comes despite ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 19, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

Celebration Health Adds Robotic Surgery Mesothelioma Specialist
The "I'm going to Disney World" proclamation popularized by Super Bowl champions and Most Valuable Player award winners might soon be associated with another small but select group — mesothelioma survivors. Dr. Farid Gharagozloo, one of the nation’s most innovative thoracic surgeons, recently joined Florida Hospital Celebration Health, located in the Walt Disney World-planned community of Celebration. He believes his success with robotic surgery can change the way malignant pleural mesothelioma is treated today. "The patients coming here should get a Disneyesque experience. Not a fantasy one, b...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 15, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Boston VA Pioneers Heated Chemo for Pleural Mesothelioma
Thoracic surgeon Dr. Abraham Lebenthal in Boston recently performed the first intraoperative heated chemotherapy procedure in the VA health care system for a patient with malignant pleural mesothelioma. The procedure should improve care and long-term survival for veterans who rely on the VA for their health care needs. It will help in the fight against this rare and aggressive cancer. Lebenthal is hoping more veterans with mesothelioma take advantage of what he can offer now at the Boston VA, which utilizes a long-term, collaborative relationship with nearby Brigham and Women's Hospital and the International Mesothelioma...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 12, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Crews Demolish Asbestos Homes, Neighbors Not Warned
Kimberly Koehler dropped everything when a neighbor called her to report a plume of dust after a construction crew demolished a house in their Portland, Oregon, subdivision. Koehler, an Eastmoreland Neighborhood Association board member, immediately went to the site and confronted one of the workers. She demanded proof the house was asbestos-free. When he failed to produce any documentation, she immediately contacted the state agency that oversees worker safety. Within two hours, investigators isolated the site and began sampling for asbestos contamination that later tested positive. The demo crew consisted of ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 8, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

Age Should Not Limit Aggressive Mesothelioma Surgery
Age should not be a deterrent to aggressive, potentially curative surgery for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Renowned thoracic surgeon Dr. Wickii Vigneswaran in Chicago believes too many patients with mesothelioma today are being misguided into bypassing major surgery because of their age. Vigneswaran, a surgeon for more than 25 years, wants to dispel the lingering myth that many patients are too old to benefit from a therapeutic option that could improve their quality of life and extend survival. "There has always been this tendency to say 'He's a little too old for surgery.' But the decision [to have surgery] today...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 7, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Researchers Stop Once-Promising Mesothelioma Clinical Trial
Researchers halted the once-promising clinical trial involving defactinib (VS-6063) and the targeting of malignant pleural mesothelioma stem cells because of the drug's poor performance. The phase II trial, which began in 2014 with high hopes at 11 different centers across the U.S., stopped enrollment this week following a Data Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) review of an interim analysis. That analysis showed VS-6063 was well-tolerated with few side effects, but the level of efficacy was too low, according to Robert Forrester, president and CEO of Verastem, the biopharmaceutical company in Boston producing the drug. Forres...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 1, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Statistical Model Improves Prognosis Accuracy
Doctors may soon be giving pleural mesothelioma surgical patients a much clearer, more precise look at their future, replacing the often muddled, best-guess prognosis they have been providing. Researchers in Italy are developing a promising statistical model that will offer patients a more definitive understanding of their likely survival times. The model also could be used to improve the personalization of treatments. "Our model could be easily applied," thoracic surgeon Dr. Giovanni Leuzzi of the National Cancer Institute in Rome told Asbestos.com. "We have factors that may be combined into a scoring syste...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 30, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Trimodality Treatment Extends Survival
Trimodality treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma will improve survival time significantly, according to a recent retrospective study from the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle. The approach includes surgery, chemotherapy and radiation, and it provides a clear contrast to a less aggressive treatment plan that many patients still pursue. Patients using the trimodality therapy in the study had a median survival of 14.6 months after diagnosis. Patients treated with less than the three options had a median survival of only 8.6 months. "The study validates some of the work we've been doing here,"...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 29, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

High Hopes for New Mesothelioma Center in Maryland
Thoracic surgeon Dr. Joseph Friedberg spent almost a decade building a well-respected mesothelioma program at the Abramson Cancer Center in Philadelphia. He is building an even better one now in Baltimore. The University of Maryland recently named Friedberg director of its new Mesothelioma and Thoracic Oncology Treatment and Research Center, expecting to create a flagship that is second to none. "We intend to make this the most comprehensive program in the country for mesothelioma," Friedberg told Asbestos.com. "It might be presumptuous to just say 'we're the best,' although I hope that's the case. I like to...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 22, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Asbestos Violations Exposed at Texas VA Hospital
Federal investigators supported a San Antonio whistleblower that exposed the unsafe handling of toxic asbestos at the Audie L. Murphy Memorial Veterans Hospital in south Texas. The worker, who has served as a maintenance mechanic and janitor at the South Texas VA Health Care System hospital since 1974, told federal authorities that hospital management for years failed to protect its workers from airborne asbestos, which can lead to deadly cancers such as mesothelioma. A U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs medical inspector conducted an investigation in 2014. This month, the U.S. Office of Special Counsel sent President Ba...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 21, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

Mesothelioma 5K Inspires Family to Raise Cancer Funding
Chuck Jarvis Jr. will never forget how giving his father was, how wonderfully he lived his life and just how horribly he died. It's all part of him now. Jarvis, 37, is a police officer and doting father of two toddlers in Los Angeles, but he also is known as an unabashed supporter of the Pacific Meso Center (PMC), renowned surgeon Dr. Robert Cameron and his staff. Jarvis will be participating for the fourth consecutive year in PMC's 5K Walk/Hike for Meso on Sept. 27, raising research money to help uncover better treatment options for the pleural mesothelioma that killed his father. "My dad was the best man I've ever k...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 18, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Jon Stewart Lobbies Congress for 9/11 First Responders
Comedian Jon Stewart turned serious this week when he joined a group of almost 200 police, fire and rescue workers in Washington D.C., lobbying Congress to renew the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act that will expire soon. The Health and Compensation Act provides benefits to first responders and residents sickened by the toxic air and smoldering debris following the historic terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York City 14 years ago. Of particular long-term concern is a belief by medical professionals that the incidence of cancers, such as malignant pleural mesothelioma caused by inhalation of as...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 17, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Celebrities Source Type: news

Moffitt Will Break New Ground with Mesothelioma Trial
The Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa later this month will launch the first pleural mesothelioma clinical trial in the U.S. that will deliver repeated, high-dose chemotherapy directly to the site of tumors. The trial is designed as a second-line therapy for patients with inoperable or recurrent mesothelioma that no longer responds to standard chemotherapy or radiation. Although the treatment does not aim to cure the cancer, researchers expect it to extend survival and improve quality of life. During the procedure, doctors will identify the specific blood vessels that feed the tumors, and then they will overload them with che...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 17, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Asbestos Diseases Still Looming After 9/11 Attacks
Thoracic surgeon Dr. Raja Flores believes an alarming number of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma, will start emerging soon in New York City, stemming from rescue and cleanup efforts after the historic 9/11 terrorist attack at the World Trade Center 14 years ago. He compared it to Libby, Montana, where hundreds of miners, family members and nearby residents have died or been sickened by the asbestos dust pouring from vermiculite mines decades ago. "I hope I'm wrong, but I don't think so," Flores, chief of thoracic surgery at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York, told Asbestos.com. "We've se...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 10, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

Students Return to Class After Asbestos Cleared from Schools
Hundreds of Orange County school kids can set their alarm clocks a little later this year. Beginning Sept. 9, the first day back to school, most will ride the bus to their own local school rather than making a long trek to another district according to a report published in The Los Angeles Times. Last October, Ocean View School District officials shut down three elementary schools, displacing 1,600 Huntington Beach students after concerns of asbestos exposure at the schools. Transporting children by bus to eight other schools in separate districts that year cost the Ocean View School Board $50,000 a week. One School Remai...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 9, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news