Increased Asbestos Waste Leads to High Cost and Illegal Dumping
Every few months, Andrew Morrison gets a call about a pile of asbestos that’s been illegally dumped. Morrison, the owner of Andrew’s Asbestos Solutions in Victoria, Australia, says the cost of proper asbestos disposal sometimes makes people feel forced to find their own solution. But when it comes to asbestos, cutting corners can lead to harmful exposures and serious health risks, including mesothelioma and other cancers. “They’ll ring up wanting to do the right thing, but they can’t believe how much it costs,” he told the Sydney Morning Herald report. Much of Morrison&rsquo...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 1, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

New Mesothelioma Clinical Trial Hopes to Improve Chemotherapy
This study is part of a broad development program that includes a number of additional planned studies." TRACON Pharmaceuticals develops novel targeted cancer therapies. Its TRC105 antibody is directed at renal cell carcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. This clinical trial with TRC102 is one of five nationally involving methoxyamine, but one of more than 200 trials for mesothelioma. (Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News)
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 27, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

NY Sen. Charles Schumer Rallies to Block FACT Act in Senate
U.S. Senator Chuck Schumer of New York launched his effort to block proposed legislation that would call for new, stiffer requirements for those seeking compensation from asbestos trusts. Schumer, a Democrat and member of the Senate Finance Committee's subcommittee on Health Care, said the Furthering Asbestos Claims Transparency (FACT) Act of 2016, which recently passed in the U.S. House of Representatives, would unfairly target military veterans. He vows to stop it from getting through the Senate. "This is plain wrong," Schumer said during a conference call with reporters earlier this week. "I'll g...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 25, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

SEER Study: Surgery Still Extends Mesothelioma Survival
Aggressive surgery at a specialty center could more than double the survival period of a patient diagnosed today with malignant pleural mesothelioma. Surgery may buy precious time. Although oncologists and patients often advise and opt against it, surgery remains an effective tool that significantly extends lives, according to an analysis of 14,228 mesothelioma patients across the U.S. The sample of patients is among the largest in similar studies. "There are limitations to the data, but people just do better with surgery," thoracic surgeon Andrea Wolf, of Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City, tol...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 20, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Center at Loyola Will Grow Under Vigneswaran
Renowned thoracic surgeon Dr. Wickii Vigneswaran left the Loyola University Health System 10 years ago to help start the lung transplant program at nearby University of Chicago Medical Center. He returned to Loyola this year to direct a mesothelioma specialty center, bringing his decade of experience from one of the country's finest research facilities. "I've got the best of both worlds now, and I think patients will really benefit from that," Vigneswaran told Asbestos.com. "We'll continue to collaborate with the best researchers, but now I'll have a broader clinical base at Loyola. It's a win-win situ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 18, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

FACT Act Legislation Passes House, Moves to Senate
The U.S. House of Representatives last week approved legislation that included the FACT Act, which sets new, stiffer requirements for victims of asbestos seeking compensation through the legal system. This is the third time in four years the House has passed a version of the Furthering Asbestos Claims Transparency (FACT) Act, but the first time it was attached to the Fairness in Class Action Litigation Act, also known as H.R. 1927. It now moves to the U.S. Senate, where it has stalled in the past and is expected to fail again. This is the first time it has come to the Senate when Republicans were in the majority, whi...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 13, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

Mayo Doctors Will Test Cryotherapy for Mesothelioma Tumors
The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, opened a mesothelioma clinical trial involving intrapleural cryotherapy before surgery to trigger an anti-tumor response. It is the only cryotherapy clinical trial for mesothelioma conducted in the U.S. Two previous cryotherapy trials for mesothelioma at other cancer centers in 2009 and 2011 were withdrawn or terminated. Cryotherapy involves dissipating small cancer tumors by freezing them with controlled nitrogen vapors. It has been used with other cancers, but it remains a controversial procedure as an adjuvant therapy for mesothelioma. The Pacific Meso Center in Los Ang...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 8, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Top 10 Mesothelioma News Stories of 2015
We're making progress in the fight against malignant pleural mesothelioma. Doctors are treating it more aggressively. New drugs are emerging. Survivors are living longer. Therapies are becoming more precise and individualized. And specialty centers are becoming more prominent and comprehensive. Even the highly criticized U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is taking it more seriously now. There is growing hope on the horizon. Here are the most prominent stories of 2015, providing a glimpse of what will come in 2016. FDA Approves Keytruda and Opdivo for Lung Cancer The U.S. Food and Drug Administrati...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 31, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Sen. Markey: US Schools Fail Asbestos Management
Thirty years ago, Congress acted to protect schools from deadly asbestos. But today, it appears the majority of states overlook the law passed to safeguard students, teachers and administrators across the nation. Two congressional legislators this year queried all 50 state governors to determine compliance of the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) enacted three decades ago. Disappointingly, less than half replied. Five of those governors did not answer questions specifically and failed to provide information regarding their observance of the law. Details of AHERA Legislation Enacted into law in 1986, AHERA requ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 21, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

Vote on Newest Asbestos FACT Act Possible Before End of Year
Legislators are again considering a bill that will legally hurt asbestos victims and rob them of their privacy if Congress approves it. At the start of 2015, U.S. Rep. Blake Farenthold, R-Texas, introduced the newest version of the Furthering Asbestos Claims Transparency (FACT) Act, also known as H.R. 526. The bill would place heavy burdens on the asbestos trusts established by negligent companies to compensate workers and their families who are affected by asbestos. The proposed legislation seeks to add costly reporting requirements that will delay compensation, as well as public disclosure of sensitive and private inf...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 17, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

Zadroga Act Extended for 9/11 Mesothelioma Victims
The 9/11 World Trade Center Health Program, which aides those diagnosed with an asbestos-related disease, will receive a 75-year extension as part of a $1.1 trillion spending bill signed Friday by President Barack Obama. Also included in the massive spending bill is $50 million for the Department of Defense, Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program — the same amount provided in 2015. That program, which is aimed at helping military veterans, has allocated almost $12 million for mesothelioma research since 2008. The World Trade Center Health Program is within the $8.1 billion reauthorization of the James Zadroga 9/11 H...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 16, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

Congress Set to Pass Zadroga Act for 9/11 Mesothelioma Victims
The 9/11 World Trade Center Health Program, which aides those diagnosed with an asbestos-related disease, will receive a 75-year extension as part of a $1.1 trillion spending bill expected to be approved by Congress. The program is within the $8.1 billion reauthorization of the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act designed to help those injured by the historic terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. The reauthorization comes as a relief to thousands of residents and first responders sickened by the toxic air and smoldering debris that lingered for months in New York City after the terrorist attack. "It is pe...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 16, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

SMART Approach Is Advancing Mesothelioma Survival Rates
Accelerated high-dose radiation just before extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) surgery — a reversal of the traditional order at most U.S. specialty centers — continues to produce impressive results for pleural mesothelioma patients in Toronto. Specialists at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and Toronto General Hospital estimated the median overall survival and disease-free survival at 51 and 47 months, respectively, for patients with the most common subtype of the disease. Surgeon Marc de Perrot presented the findings of an ongoing study earlier this year at the American Association for Thoracic Surgery in S...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 14, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Hefty Asbestos Removal Costs Delay Demolitions
Discussions about its fate are mixed, from restoration and rebuilding to razing the 3.5-million-square-foot structure. The automotive plant is laden with asbestos, and regardless of the final decision, asbestos removal will be the first step, and it will come with a price tag in the tens of thousands. Activity on the project moves slowly as owner Fernando Palazuelo expects to begin removing debris from the 40-acre site as the first phase in a 10- to 15-year plan to revive the complex, a Detroit News report shows. In the meantime, the decaying expanse of brick and mortar continues to invite unwelcome guests and add to th...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 9, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

Nestor Villamizar Grows Mesothelioma Program in Miami
Thoracic surgeon Nestor Villamizar saw the glaring need for a comprehensive mesothelioma program in bustling South Florida, even when he was 1,500 miles away in Boston. He is filling that void today. Villamizar joined the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center in 2014, hoping to slow the stream of mesothelioma patients who are leaving Florida to seek treatment at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. He has been a much-welcomed addition to the state. The early results are impressive. "When I was working at the Brigham, we kept seeing more and more mesothelioma patients coming for surgery from Florida, and it alw...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 3, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Lung Cancer Community Can Learn from Breast Cancer Progress
Thoracic surgeon Dr. Jacques Fontaine at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa believes there is a well-marked path to improving the stubbornly high mortality rate for lung cancer. The breast cancer community already has blazed the trail. "Some of the things that really changed the face of breast cancer 20 years ago, are now taking hold with lung cancer," Fontaine told Asbestos.com. "Hopefully, we're going to start seeing more progress." November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month, a time to focus on what needs to be done, what should be done better, and what breast cancer has taught everyone. While progr...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 24, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Toyota Warns Australians of Fake Brake Pads with Asbestos
Toyota, the world’s largest automaker, recently announced dealers and independent mechanics in Australia may have unknowingly installed thousands of counterfeit brake pads containing deadly asbestos in more than 500,000 vehicles. The vehicles that may contain the fake brakes pads include HiAce models (2005-2015), HiLux models (2004-2015) and commuter buses, according to News Corp Australia, which broke the story. “We are cracking down on counterfeit parts that put customer safety at risk. It is very concerning to us that not only do these parts contain asbestos, but they are able to be sold in Australia,&rdqu...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 19, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Lorraine Kember Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

Early CT Screening Is Critical to Reducing Lung Cancer Deaths
Thoracic surgeon and robotics innovator Dr. Farid Gharagozloo believes regular early screenings and better follow-up care will significantly reduce the annual number of Americans dying of lung cancer by almost two-thirds. Gharagozloo, director of cardiothoracic surgery at Florida Hospital Celebration Health, says the medical establishment in the U.S. and patients themselves share the blame for the unreasonably high number of lung cancer deaths today. Patients need to be more assertive. Doctors need to be more aggressive. Together, they can make a big difference. "We can turn this thing around — change the who...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 10, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

How America Let Asbestos Kill Its Veterans
Discussions among doctors about the dangers of asbestos started in the early 1920s, and while the medical and scientific research communities released confirmations about its deadly side effects, the U.S. military didn’t heed their warnings and continued to build its vessels. 1922 Medical professionals held discussions linking asbestos to various health problems. 1924 Dr. W...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 9, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Veterans & Military Source Type: news

New Lung Cancer Drugs Raise Hope for Mesothelioma Patients
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently granted approval for immunotherapy drugs Keytruda and Opdivo to fight non-small cell lung cancer, raising the hopes of patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. Drugmakers Merck & Co. and Bristol-Myers Squibb manufacture Keytruda (pembrolizumab) and Opdivo (nivolumab), respectively. Both drugs target PD-1 and PD-L1, specific proteins that block a body's immune system from attacking the cancer cells. Those same proteins were identified in a subset of mesothelioma patients with the shortest survival times. The University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center r...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 5, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Role of Genetic Testing & Peritoneal Mesothelioma Survival
Genetic testing may soon become a determining factor in treatment for peritoneal mesothelioma. The recent findings of a retrospective study found a major drop in overall survival and progression-free survival among patients with alterations in the CDKN2A and NF2 genes. The prognostic significance of the two genetic clues could change the way doctors determine a patient's eligibility for major aggressive surgery. Modern Pathology published the study last month. Officials at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) and Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta supplied the research. The study involved 86...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 2, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Henderson May Annex Eldorado Valley Land Containing Asbestos
Officials in Henderson, Nevada, forge ahead with plans to possibly annex and develop parts of the Eldorado Valley despite geologists’ concerns about the presence of naturally occurring asbestos in the ground. While official annexation remains delayed, city officials continue studying the proposal and negotiating with developers, Henderson Public Works assistant director Robert Herr told TV8 News. The city council in June voted to consider the proposal after developers and landowners pitched the idea of building homes and businesses on a four-square-mile site mostly south of current city limits. This comes despite ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 19, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

Celebration Health Adds Robotic Surgery Mesothelioma Specialist
The "I'm going to Disney World" proclamation popularized by Super Bowl champions and Most Valuable Player award winners might soon be associated with another small but select group — mesothelioma survivors. Dr. Farid Gharagozloo, one of the nation’s most innovative thoracic surgeons, recently joined Florida Hospital Celebration Health, located in the Walt Disney World-planned community of Celebration. He believes his success with robotic surgery can change the way malignant pleural mesothelioma is treated today. "The patients coming here should get a Disneyesque experience. Not a fantasy one, b...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 15, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Boston VA Pioneers Heated Chemo for Pleural Mesothelioma
Thoracic surgeon Dr. Abraham Lebenthal in Boston recently performed the first intraoperative heated chemotherapy procedure in the VA health care system for a patient with malignant pleural mesothelioma. The procedure should improve care and long-term survival for veterans who rely on the VA for their health care needs. It will help in the fight against this rare and aggressive cancer. Lebenthal is hoping more veterans with mesothelioma take advantage of what he can offer now at the Boston VA, which utilizes a long-term, collaborative relationship with nearby Brigham and Women's Hospital and the International Mesothelioma...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 12, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Crews Demolish Asbestos Homes, Neighbors Not Warned
Kimberly Koehler dropped everything when a neighbor called her to report a plume of dust after a construction crew demolished a house in their Portland, Oregon, subdivision. Koehler, an Eastmoreland Neighborhood Association board member, immediately went to the site and confronted one of the workers. She demanded proof the house was asbestos-free. When he failed to produce any documentation, she immediately contacted the state agency that oversees worker safety. Within two hours, investigators isolated the site and began sampling for asbestos contamination that later tested positive. The demo crew consisted of ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 8, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

Age Should Not Limit Aggressive Mesothelioma Surgery
Age should not be a deterrent to aggressive, potentially curative surgery for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Renowned thoracic surgeon Dr. Wickii Vigneswaran in Chicago believes too many patients with mesothelioma today are being misguided into bypassing major surgery because of their age. Vigneswaran, a surgeon for more than 25 years, wants to dispel the lingering myth that many patients are too old to benefit from a therapeutic option that could improve their quality of life and extend survival. "There has always been this tendency to say 'He's a little too old for surgery.' But the decision [to have surgery] today...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 7, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Researchers Stop Once-Promising Mesothelioma Clinical Trial
Researchers halted the once-promising clinical trial involving defactinib (VS-6063) and the targeting of malignant pleural mesothelioma stem cells because of the drug's poor performance. The phase II trial, which began in 2014 with high hopes at 11 different centers across the U.S., stopped enrollment this week following a Data Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) review of an interim analysis. That analysis showed VS-6063 was well-tolerated with few side effects, but the level of efficacy was too low, according to Robert Forrester, president and CEO of Verastem, the biopharmaceutical company in Boston producing the drug. Forres...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 1, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Statistical Model Improves Prognosis Accuracy
Doctors may soon be giving pleural mesothelioma surgical patients a much clearer, more precise look at their future, replacing the often muddled, best-guess prognosis they have been providing. Researchers in Italy are developing a promising statistical model that will offer patients a more definitive understanding of their likely survival times. The model also could be used to improve the personalization of treatments. "Our model could be easily applied," thoracic surgeon Dr. Giovanni Leuzzi of the National Cancer Institute in Rome told Asbestos.com. "We have factors that may be combined into a scoring syste...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 30, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Trimodality Treatment Extends Survival
Trimodality treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma will improve survival time significantly, according to a recent retrospective study from the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle. The approach includes surgery, chemotherapy and radiation, and it provides a clear contrast to a less aggressive treatment plan that many patients still pursue. Patients using the trimodality therapy in the study had a median survival of 14.6 months after diagnosis. Patients treated with less than the three options had a median survival of only 8.6 months. "The study validates some of the work we've been doing here,"...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 29, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

High Hopes for New Mesothelioma Center in Maryland
Thoracic surgeon Dr. Joseph Friedberg spent almost a decade building a well-respected mesothelioma program at the Abramson Cancer Center in Philadelphia. He is building an even better one now in Baltimore. The University of Maryland recently named Friedberg director of its new Mesothelioma and Thoracic Oncology Treatment and Research Center, expecting to create a flagship that is second to none. "We intend to make this the most comprehensive program in the country for mesothelioma," Friedberg told Asbestos.com. "It might be presumptuous to just say 'we're the best,' although I hope that's the case. I like to...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 22, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Asbestos Violations Exposed at Texas VA Hospital
Federal investigators supported a San Antonio whistleblower that exposed the unsafe handling of toxic asbestos at the Audie L. Murphy Memorial Veterans Hospital in south Texas. The worker, who has served as a maintenance mechanic and janitor at the South Texas VA Health Care System hospital since 1974, told federal authorities that hospital management for years failed to protect its workers from airborne asbestos, which can lead to deadly cancers such as mesothelioma. A U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs medical inspector conducted an investigation in 2014. This month, the U.S. Office of Special Counsel sent President Ba...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 21, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

Mesothelioma 5K Inspires Family to Raise Cancer Funding
Chuck Jarvis Jr. will never forget how giving his father was, how wonderfully he lived his life and just how horribly he died. It's all part of him now. Jarvis, 37, is a police officer and doting father of two toddlers in Los Angeles, but he also is known as an unabashed supporter of the Pacific Meso Center (PMC), renowned surgeon Dr. Robert Cameron and his staff. Jarvis will be participating for the fourth consecutive year in PMC's 5K Walk/Hike for Meso on Sept. 27, raising research money to help uncover better treatment options for the pleural mesothelioma that killed his father. "My dad was the best man I've ever k...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 18, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Jon Stewart Lobbies Congress for 9/11 First Responders
Comedian Jon Stewart turned serious this week when he joined a group of almost 200 police, fire and rescue workers in Washington D.C., lobbying Congress to renew the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act that will expire soon. The Health and Compensation Act provides benefits to first responders and residents sickened by the toxic air and smoldering debris following the historic terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York City 14 years ago. Of particular long-term concern is a belief by medical professionals that the incidence of cancers, such as malignant pleural mesothelioma caused by inhalation of as...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 17, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Celebrities Source Type: news

Moffitt Will Break New Ground with Mesothelioma Trial
The Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa later this month will launch the first pleural mesothelioma clinical trial in the U.S. that will deliver repeated, high-dose chemotherapy directly to the site of tumors. The trial is designed as a second-line therapy for patients with inoperable or recurrent mesothelioma that no longer responds to standard chemotherapy or radiation. Although the treatment does not aim to cure the cancer, researchers expect it to extend survival and improve quality of life. During the procedure, doctors will identify the specific blood vessels that feed the tumors, and then they will overload them with che...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 17, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Asbestos Diseases Still Looming After 9/11 Attacks
Thoracic surgeon Dr. Raja Flores believes an alarming number of asbestos-related diseases, such as mesothelioma, will start emerging soon in New York City, stemming from rescue and cleanup efforts after the historic 9/11 terrorist attack at the World Trade Center 14 years ago. He compared it to Libby, Montana, where hundreds of miners, family members and nearby residents have died or been sickened by the asbestos dust pouring from vermiculite mines decades ago. "I hope I'm wrong, but I don't think so," Flores, chief of thoracic surgery at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York, told Asbestos.com. "We've se...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 10, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

Students Return to Class After Asbestos Cleared from Schools
Hundreds of Orange County school kids can set their alarm clocks a little later this year. Beginning Sept. 9, the first day back to school, most will ride the bus to their own local school rather than making a long trek to another district according to a report published in The Los Angeles Times. Last October, Ocean View School District officials shut down three elementary schools, displacing 1,600 Huntington Beach students after concerns of asbestos exposure at the schools. Transporting children by bus to eight other schools in separate districts that year cost the Ocean View School Board $50,000 a week. One School Remai...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 9, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

Asbestos Ban in Sweden Leads to Drop in Mesothelioma
The strict ban on asbestos more than 30 years ago in Sweden has produced a tangible decline in mesothelioma throughout the country. It has also helped fuel the growing debate about establishing a similar asbestos ban in the U.S. and Canada. "There is no good argument to use asbestos, anymore," senior professor Bengt Jarvholm, of the department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine at Umea University in Sweden, told Asbestos.com. "Especially [using it] in an industrialized country." No Argument for Not Banning Asbestos in US Jarvholm has spent much of his career studying the impact of asbestos exposure ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 31, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

Mrs. Florida Int'l Contestant Launches Mesothelioma Campaign
Vida Hargrett has a forum now — and she plans to use it. Hargrett, 30, has qualified for the 2016 Mrs. Florida International Pageant, hoping to utilize that platform to raise awareness for mesothelioma and the growing move to ban asbestos. Her goals are lofty. "I'm not afraid to speak up — and speak out," Hargrett said from her home in South Florida. "And this is a cause worth fighting for. I'll take this battle around the world if I can." Hargrett is the daughter-in-law of peritoneal mesothelioma survivor Patricia Hargrett, who has battled the asbestos-related cancer since October 2012. Her...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 27, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Celebrities Source Type: news

Toys 'R' Us, Other Retailers Remove Asbestos Crayons
Toys "R" Us, Party City, Amazon.com and Dollar Tree answered lawmakers' urgent call to pull toxic asbestos crayons and crime lab toys from their inventory. The major retailers acted after learning certain children’s products tested positive for asbestos, a carcinogen that causes several deadly diseases such as asbestosis and mesothelioma, which can take 20-50 years to develop after first exposure. “We commend these four companies for their good corporate citizenship and commitment to protecting children and families from contaminated products,” Sen. Ed Markey, D-Mass., wrote in a press release. ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 19, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Patients Under Age 40 Display Unique Traits
Researchers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have uncovered some distinct differences in mesothelioma among a unique subset of patients under the age of 40, providing insight that could lead to a better understanding of this complex disease. Malignant mesothelioma is typically diagnosed in older patients who were exposed to asbestos decades ago in an occupational setting, but researchers recently isolated a smaller, much younger group and found some startling trends. These people survived much longer, were more likely to be female, and more likely to have peritoneal mesothelioma. The findings were in stark cont...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 17, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

New Bill Seeks to Create First Mesothelioma Registry in US
People diagnosed with mesothelioma often feel there is little public information about the asbestos-related cancer. Several existing state cancer registries focus on more common cancers, including lung, breast, prostate and colorectal. While there are more than 221,000 new lung cancer cases annually in the U.S., mesothelioma is rare — about 3,000 new cases each year. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program, a national cancer registry, tracks incidence rates by state, but it does not track new cases of mesothelioma at a national level. While it publishes fact sheets with information about new ca...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 12, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

ADAO: Bill to Overhaul Chemical Regulation Lacks Bite
U.S. legislators may soon update the nation's antiquated Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) with a proposed bill aimed at strengthening existing laws that protect us from hazardous chemicals in our homes, schools and workplaces. But officials with the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) say the bill, known as the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act (S.697), lacks teeth. ADAO President Linda Reinstein says the proposed reform, expected to be heard when the U.S. Senate reconvenes in September, could be a rollback that handicaps the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency because it fails to ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 7, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

'Sugarbaker Walker' Is Key Mesothelioma Recovery Device
A custom-made thoracic walker designed by mesothelioma specialist Dr. David Sugarbaker almost 15 years ago continues to evolve, putting surgical patients back on their feet quicker to accelerate the postoperative recovery process. Some call it the "Sugarbaker Walker" — a virtual mobile recovery tool. "It's a very significant piece of equipment today," said Dr. Abraham Lebenthal, thoracic surgeon and mesothelioma specialist at the VA Boston Healthcare System and Brigham and Women's Hospital. "It can kick start the recovery process. Patients just do better with early ambulation." Dr. A...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 5, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Asbestos Puts Shipbreaking Workers at Risk for Many Cancers
This study was one of the few that involved only "shipbreaking," which is the dismantling of old ships for salvage or scrap. It also examined cancers beyond mesothelioma, a cancer caused almost exclusively by inhalation or ingestion of asbestos. The study, published in the on-line medical journal PLOS One, was linked to the Taiwan Cancer Registry and involved 4,227 workers from the 1985 Kaohsiung Shipbreaking Workers Union who belonged to the Labor Insurance Program. They were followed until 2008. There were 940 deaths and 436 cancer cases reported. Their numbers were compared to a control group of 22,135 who wor...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 4, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Shocking Allegations of Asbestos Dumping at Kilgore College
The timing couldn't be worse for Kilgore College in Texas. School officials recently laid off several maintenance workers and forced others into early retirement. Their last day is Aug. 31. The cuts happened four months after they submitted signed affidavits to two state agencies describing how the school was illegally dumping asbestos and other hazardous waste on campus for decades, the Longview News-Journal reports. However, Kilgore College President Bill Holda denied the layoffs are related to the workers' allegations. Holda said layoff discussions began as early as 2010, years before workers sent the accusations to the...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 31, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Asbestos Exposure & Bans Source Type: news

Seattle Cancer Center Using SMART Mesothelioma Treatment
A Toronto-based groundbreaking approach to treating mesothelioma has crossed the Canadian border and is now part of an innovative Seattle cancer treatment center. Officials at the Swedish Cancer Institute in Seattle recently adopted the Surgery for Mesothelioma After Radiation Therapy (SMART) approach that originated at the Princess Margaret Cancer Center in Toronto. The therapy is a significant shift from the traditional lower-dose, radiation-after-surgery method to a more high-intensity approach that has more than doubled the three-year survival rate for pleural mesothelioma patients. Officials at the Swedish Cancer...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 27, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Centers Among Best Cancer Hospitals in US
U.S. News and World Report on Tuesday ranked the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, which has earned acclaim for its work with mesothelioma, as the top cancer care hospital in the nation. The Houston hospital scored high marks in the areas of reputation with specialists, patient survival rates, patient volume, nursing intensity, advance technologies and patient services, according to the publication's 2015-16 cancer center rankings. These rankings are designed to help patients and families identify facilities that excel in treating rare diseases and difficult cases. Several of the high-ranking hos...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 22, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

New Report: Asbestos Industry Ignored OSHA Guidelines
Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) guidelines for acceptable asbestos levels in the workplace air were regularly ignored in a variety of industries throughout the first decade of the 21st century, according to a recent study. An independent team of occupational toxicologists reviewed two OHSA databases from 1984 to 2011, and results showed airborne asbestos consistently exceeded permissible levels on myriad job sites across the country. The findings may help explain why the National Cancer Institute projected an estimated 55,000 new cases of mesothelioma in males in the next 40 years, desp...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 20, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

Lawmakers Urge Retailers to Pull Crayons, Toys with Asbestos
Two U.S. senators are pointing fingers at four retail giants — Party City, Dollar Tree, Toys "R" Us and Amazon.com — for continuing to stock and sell children’s toys, including crayons, that allegedly contain deadly asbestos. Sens. Ed Markey, D-Mass., and Dick Durbin, D-Ill., sent letters to the chief executive officers at the four retailers last week after the Environmental Working Group Action Fund (EWG) released a report showing traces of asbestos in crayons and crime-scene kits. "In light of the consumer safety concerns raised by this report, we write to encourage you to volun...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 14, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Beth Swantek Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

New Study Shows Aspirin May Prevent Mesothelioma
Simple aspirin could be the key to preventing or delaying the growth of malignant mesothelioma for those who spent years working in high-risk occupations, a new report shows. Researchers at the University of Hawaii Cancer Center concluded the popular over-the-counter medication can inhibit the growth of mesothelioma tumor cells by blocking the inflammatory effects of a particular molecule that plays a critical role in the progression of the disease. Although the study used lab mice, its relevance already has reached the clinical stage. "The findings were very convincing. The aspirin worked really well...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 13, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news