Could Red Wine Enhance Effectiveness of Chemotherapy for Mesothelioma?
Researchers in South Korea have uncovered an unusual synergy between a chemical found in red wine and a drug used to treat childhood leukemia that has translated into a potential future treatment options for malignant mesothelioma. The combination of resveratrol, which comes from the skin of red grapes, and the drug clofarabine, has shown an ability to make mesothelioma cells much more vulnerable to chemotherapy. Researchers found the resveratrol/clofarabine combination prevented tumor cell proliferation and triggered programmed cell death. It also left healthy cells untouched. "I think that our results showed therape...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - June 30, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Immunotherapy Clinical Trial Showing Promise in Stopping Mesothelioma Recurrence
Even after the best multimodal treatment approach – a combination of two or more therapies (chemotherapy, surgery and radiation) – the probability of mesothelioma cancer recurrence remains high because of the diffuse nature of the disease. Researchers are moving closer to fixing that dilemma. Doctors currently are testing a Wilms’ tumor 1 (WT1) peptide vaccine for its ability to halt mesothelioma recurrence in a Phase II clinical trial conducted at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. MD Anderson still is accepting new participants for this randomized study that began in 2013. The expected completion...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - June 25, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Study: Higher Survival Rates for Women Could Lead to New Treatment Options
This study included cases from Georgia, Connecticut, Michigan, Hawaii, Iowa, New Mexico, California, Washington, Utah, Alaska, Kentucky, Louisiana and New Jersey. Researchers worked at Mount Sinai Medical Center and the North Shore/Long Island Jewish Health System-Hofstra School of Medicine. Study Confirms Earlier Findings The low incidence of women with the disease is mostly related to occupational exposure to asbestos, the primary cause of mesothelioma. It is normally associated with blue-collar professions, which traditionally have a smaller percentage of women. Although the use of asbestos dropped dramatically in Amer...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - June 19, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Vietnam Vet Credits Strong Will, Alternative Medicine to Mesothelioma Survival
Doctors told United States Army soldier Billy K. almost 50 years ago that he never would walk again, his left leg irreparably damaged by a spray of bullets when his patrol was ambushed in the jungle during the Vietnam War. Doctors told him last year he had six months to live, an unfortunate victim of malignant pleural mesothelioma, an aggressive and incurable cancer around his lungs. He didn't listen either time. Billy was back home last week cutting grass with a push mower, making plans to go camping with his wife and best friends. A proud military veteran and mesothelioma survivor doing surprisingly well today, Billy, 7...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - June 18, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Stories from Survivors Source Type: news

Ochsner Cancer Institute Considers Expanding Treatment Program into Latin America
Thoracic surgeon Rodney Landreneau, M.D., joined the Ochsner Cancer Institute in New Orleans as director in 2013 with an ambitious goal, creating a Mesothelioma Specialty Program that could service the entire Gulf South Region. His vision already has been expanded. Now he wants an international program. Landreneau hopes to extend his reach and begin attracting patients from South and Central America, where specialized mesothelioma care has been slow to develop, while the incidence of the disease has grown considerably. "As far as I know, there are no institutions there focusing on mesothelioma," Landreneau tol...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - June 13, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Study: Majority of Peritoneal Mesothelioma Patients Avoid Surgery, Despite Benefits to Survival
Peritoneal mesothelioma patients are neglecting surgery as a therapeutic option - for a variety of reasons - and needlessly losing out on years of survival time, a recently published study from the Medical College of Wisconsin shows. Even though the benefits are clear, surgery is not being performed on 62 percent of peritoneal patients, according to the study using 1973 to 2010 data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database. The Annals of Surgical Oncology published the study in its May journal. "It's unfortunate, but you can see the missed opportunity here," said Kiran Turaga, M.D., ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - June 11, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

New Leadership at Brigham and Women's Bolsters Mesothelioma Care
The departure of renowned mesothelioma specialist David Sugarbaker, M.D. from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston earlier this year didn't lessen the hospital's commitment. It made that long-standing promise to patients even stronger. Raphael Bueno, M.D., is making sure of that. Bueno, who has replaced Sugarbaker as the chief of the thoracic surgery division, reiterated his pledge recently that Brigham and Women's would remain the country's most prestigious destination for patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. "It's even better now," Bueno told Asbestos.com. "Patients understand that it’s...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - June 5, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Doctors Helping Veterans with Mesothelioma Access the VA Health Care System
The West Los Angeles VA Medical Center can provide some of the finest care in the world for patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. The problem is that not enough veterans - or even the doctors throughout the sprawling Veterans Administration health care system - know it's available. "One of the biggest challenges we face is trying to get the word out, to make people aware of what we have here," said Graciela Hoal, RN, NP, who works closely with doctors and patients at the West Los Angeles VA. "The care we offer can make a big difference for a patient with mesothelioma." In an effort to spread ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - June 4, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Study: Decades After Exposure to Asbestos Does Not Diminish Its Toxicity
The risk of developing mesothelioma cancer after exposure never leaves or subsides, regardless of how long you live, a new study shows. The broad-based study that examined eight diverse patient groups from Italy and Australia, including both occupational and secondhand exposure, concluded the toxicity of asbestos within the body never expires. There is no decrease or decline in risk, said lead author Alison Reid, Ph.D., Associate Professor at the School of Public Health, Curtin University in Western Australia. She and six others penned the study titled, "Mesothelioma Risk After 40 Years Since First Exposure to Asbes...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - May 30, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Anti-Alcoholism Drug from 1950s Shows Promise in Treating Mesothelioma
An FDA-approved drug used since the 1950s to treat alcoholism has shown considerable promise in suppressing the spread of mesothelioma and enhancing the effectiveness of chemotherapy, according to a recently published study. Scientists and clinicians conducted the study, published April 2014 in PLOS ONE, to examine the effects of copper-enhanced disulfiram (DSF-Cu) on malignant pleural mesothelioma cells in vitro and on animal models. Arun K. Rishi, Ph.D., of the Karmanos Cancer Institute at Wayne State University, said the findings could clear a path to more effective treatment options for the cancer caused almost exclu...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - May 28, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Survivor Credits Good Life, God and Graviola Tea to Survival
Rich D. opened the door and gazed with amazement at his posh suite on the 26th floor of the luxurious Bellagio Hotel in Las Vegas – private sauna, flat-screen TVs throughout, super-king bed, a picturesque view of both the faraway mountains and the famed strip below – and he just smiled. He dropped his bags and took the elevator down to the casino, where he kept turning up aces. "I may have mesothelioma, but mesothelioma doesn't have me," he said recently, recalling that day from earlier this year. "When I die, I want to look back and say 'Boy, what a ride I had.' I'll go out kicking, that's for ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - May 23, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Stories from Survivors Source Type: news

Ed Lauter Asbestos Lawsuit Casts a Wide Net
The list of companies accused of exposing actor Ed Lauter to asbestos, the toxic mineral blamed for causing the pleural mesothelioma that eventually killed him, could continue to grow, according to documents obtained by Asbestos.com. Defendants named in the lawsuit filed April in the Los Angeles County Superior Court include some well-known broadcasting, automotive, manufacturing and conglomerate giants: CBS Corporation CertainTeed Corporation Ford Motor Company Foster Wheeler AG General Electric Company Georgia-Pacific LLC Honeywell International, Inc. Ingersoll-Rand PLC Jo...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - May 21, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Celebrities Source Type: news

Cameron Leads International Mesothelioma Symposium on Lung-Sparing Therapies
Renowned thoracic surgeon Robert Cameron, M.D., has spent much of the last two decades convincing the medical community that leaving both lungs intact is the best way to treat patients with pleural mesothelioma. Slowly, but surely, he has prevailed. Cameron, chief of thoracic surgery at the West Los Angeles VA Medical Center and director of the UCLA Mesothelioma Program, has converted many with his efforts, turning the pleurectomy/decortication (P/D) surgery he has pioneered into the standard of surgical care. Cameron will be at his persuasive best on June 7 as the featured speaker at the 4th International Symposium on ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - May 14, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Surgical Candidates Compare Mortality and Morbidity Rates
Pleural mesothelioma patients considering surgery should be aware of the latest comparison study, detailing the mortality and morbidity rates of aggressive extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) and pleurectomy/decortication (P/D). Despite advances in all therapies that make up the standard of care for mesothelioma, the EPP surgery still carries stubbornly high mortality and morbidity rates when compared to the less aggressive — but often equally effective — P/D surgery. The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery in April published the findings of a three-year, multicenter study of surgical morbidity and mo...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - May 13, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Survivor Kasie Coleman Has Bright Business Future
BATON ROUGE, La. — Kasie Coleman is like a buzz saw without a stop switch now, whirling from one task to the next, leaving dust in her wake and anyone trying to follow, two steps behind. She doesn't slow anymore for negative thoughts, chemotherapy side effects or behind-schedule doctor appointments. Too busy for that. Coleman has children to raise, a husband to love, parents to help, a God to worship, a blog to write and a burgeoning bakery business to build. She's charging through a life that hardly acknowledges the peritoneal mesothelioma cancer now in remission, but still quietly brewing within her belly. The 3...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - May 9, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Stories from Survivors Source Type: news

Virtual Consultation System at Ochsner Could Help Mesothelioma Patients Everywhere
The Ochsner Cancer Institute in New Orleans is exploring the viability of a novel, virtual consultation system that will allow its mesothelioma specialists to make recommendations to physicians who need assistance in caring for, and advising, their patients. Specialists at Ochsner would be able to view patient images and records from facilities across the nation right from their center in Louisiana. The records would be transmitted over a secure website that would meet compliance with the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). The virtual consultation system, which likely will begin with an ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - May 5, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Proud Immigrant and Mesothelioma Survivor Teaches Family About Attitude
Will L. spends a lot of time now worrying about his father's health. He often wonders how different things might be if his father had never left Ecuador 45 years ago to create a better life for his family. He also wonders how something so good turned out so bad. How did the American dream become an American nightmare? Malignant pleural mesothelioma changed his perspective on a lot of things. "If my father had stayed in Ecuador, raised a family there, this never would have happened to him, and that saddens me and my brothers," Will said from his home in New Jersey. "But he won't let us talk like that aroun...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - April 23, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Stories from Survivors Source Type: news

Dr. Stevens Wants Beaumont to Be Midwest Leader in Mesothelioma Treatment
Craig Stevens, M.D., has heard too many stories about patients with mesothelioma leaving Michigan to seek treatment elsewhere, searching for the best, specialized care they could find. He wants to stop that exodus by making the Beaumont Cancer Institute in suburban Detroit the best regional center for mesothelioma treatment. Stevens is the recently-appointed chairman of the Radiation Oncology Department at Beaumont. He is a pioneer in the use of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and a specialist in the treatment of pleural mesothelioma, a rare and aggressive cancer. He wants to build and integrate a new speci...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - April 21, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Cerfolio Leads the Charge for Robotics in Thoracic Surgery
Just a few years ago, renowned thoracic surgeon Robert Cerfolio, M.D., was one of the biggest robotic surgery skeptics, discounting the notion that a computer-controlled system could perform a precise operation in the chest better than he could as absurd. He is now its biggest proponent — taking a 180-degree turn. Cerfolio, the chief of thoracic surgery for the University of Alabama at Birmingham Health Care System, has performed more robotic thoracic operations using the da Vinci Surgical System in the past four years than anyone in the world. Robotic surgery involves tiny instruments attached to a robot remotely...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - April 15, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Fox Chase Committing Its Best to Mesothelioma Treatment
The Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia doesn't handle as many pleural mesothelioma cases as some of the other specialty centers, but the care it provides them and outcomes it produces are second to none. Mesothelioma cancer is a high priority. "I don't think you can get better care anywhere else," said Walter Scott, M.D., chief of thoracic surgical oncology at Fox Chase. "We've got the experts with experience. And we've got that great support team around them." Scott spoke at the conclusion of the sixth annual Advances in Thoracic Oncology Conference last week. The program, which included presen...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - April 3, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Japan Study Find Standard Chemotherapy Still Best Hope for Mesothelioma
The long-standing chemotherapy combination of cisplatin and pemetrexed will remain the front-line treatment regimen for mesothelioma patients in the foreseeable future, despite recent efforts to develop newer and more effective drugs. Nothing better has emerged. Researchers at the Shizuoka Cancer Center and Juntendo University in Japan recently concluded that the cisplatin/pemetrexed (Alimta) combination remains the best choice. "It should continue to be the standard, front-line chemotherapeutic regimen for inoperable MPM (malignant pleural mesothelioma)," wrote the authors of the March study, published in Res...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 28, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Japan Study Finds Standard Chemotherapy Still Best Hope for Mesothelioma
The long-standing chemotherapy combination of cisplatin and pemetrexed will remain the front-line treatment regimen for mesothelioma patients in the foreseeable future, despite recent efforts to develop newer and more effective drugs. Nothing better has emerged. Researchers at the Shizuoka Cancer Center and Juntendo University in Japan recently concluded that the cisplatin/pemetrexed (Alimta) combination remains the best choice. "It should continue to be the standard, front-line chemotherapeutic regimen for inoperable MPM (malignant pleural mesothelioma)," wrote the authors of the March study, published in Res...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 28, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Study: Palliative Chemotherapy Not Meeting Patient Expectations
This study is the first step in proving evidence that specifically demonstrates what negative outcomes may result." Palliative Chemotherapy Shortens Hospice Care During a six-year period, investigators analyzed data from 386 terminally ill patients who were part of Coping with Cancer, a federally funded study. The American Society of Clinical Oncology recently identified palliative care chemotherapy as one of the practices that, if stopped, could improve patient care and reduce costs. This study found the use of palliative chemotherapy was associated with late hospice referrals and higher rates of cardiopulmonary r...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 20, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

EPP Surgery Still Plays Important Role in Mesothelioma Treatment
The much-debated and extremely aggressive extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) surgery still should play a prominent role in the management of mesothelioma, according to a recent U.K. study. The study reopened the simmering controversy over the value of the EPP by contradicting the conclusions of previous research that prompted some specialists to stop doing the surgery and others to dramatically reduce the number of procedures. The EPP involves the removal of an entire lung, the lining surrounding the lung and heart, along with major parts of the diaphragm — all in a curative attempt to remove as much cancer as possib...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 13, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Pleural Mesothelioma Survivor Plans to Dance in the Rain
Rosalie C. carries an iPad with a message that she sees each time it awakens, helping inspire her through the good times and the bad: "Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass. It's about learning to dance in the rain." She isn't sure what her future holds — it's in God's hands — but she can tell you confidently now her immediate plans: Dance in the rain every day. Rosalie and her husband Larry will leave Florida soon, returning to their farm outside Ft. Wayne, Ind., to start planting spring crops, fully expecting to return again to the Sunshine State after the late-fall harvest. Her diagnosi...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 11, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Stories from Survivors Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Symposium Opens Wednesday
Mesothelioma specialists, patients, caregivers and advocates from around the country are gathering in Alexandria, Va., this week to exchange ideas, ask questions and raise awareness at the 11th annual International Symposium on Malignant Mesothelioma. Patients and caregivers have an opportunity to hear from mesothelioma medical specialists on a variety of topics, including post-surgery recovery, immunotherapy, radiation oncology, novel chemotherapy treatments, pulmonary health, cancer stem cells, chemo brain, the state of research and comprehensive cancer program development. There also will be sessions on raising awaren...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 4, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Specialist David Sugarbaker Leaving Boston
Mesothelioma pioneer David Sugarbaker, M.D., is taking his surgical and administrative expertise to Texas, where he hopes to create a bigger and even better platform to help patients with asbestos cancer. Sugarbaker told his staff last week at Brigham & Women's Hospital in Boston that he has become director of the upcoming Texas Lung Institute at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Although Baylor has not officially announced the hiring yet, Sugarbaker has begun implementing his plan to create a Mesothelioma Specialty Center that will be second to none, including his world-renowned practice in Boston. "T...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 28, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Protein Discovery Could Help Guide Mesothelioma Treatment
Scientists from Austria, Hungary and Croatia have identified an important biomarker in blood plasma as both an accurate predictor of malignant pleural mesothelioma survival and as a potential new guide for treatment. Researchers believe that fibrinogen, a clotting protein in plasma, can serve as a useful tool for doctors advising patients on the value of aggressive surgery. They found that higher levels of fibrinogen meant shorter survival periods and, conversely, that lower levels of fibrinogen translated into a longer survival rate. The multi-center study, which was published in the British Journal of Cancer, involved ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 26, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

NH Bill Aims to Help Firefighters
Last fall, tort reform advocates busily peddled the FACT Act to lawmakers on Capitol Hill. Meanwhile, a New Hampshire lawmaker took note of the relatively quiet release of a study about cancer among firefighters. The joint study by the National Fire Administration and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) revealed the devastating impact of job-related asbestos exposure on firefighters. It’s also being used to bolster support for a law to fund workers’ compensation for New Hampshire firefighters who have developed mesothelioma and other cancers. Study Suggests 'Occupational Disease...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 25, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Karen Marshall Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

NH Bill Aims to Help Firefighters with Mesothelioma
Last fall, tort reform advocates busily peddled the FACT Act to lawmakers on Capitol Hill. Meanwhile, a New Hampshire lawmaker took note of the relatively quiet release of a study about cancer among firefighters. The joint study by the National Fire Administration and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) revealed the devastating impact of job-related asbestos exposure on firefighters. It’s also being used to bolster support for a law to fund workers’ compensation for New Hampshire firefighters who have developed mesothelioma and other cancers. Study Suggests 'Occupational Disease...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 25, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Karen Marshall Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

New Studies Show Promise for Battling Mesothelioma on Molecular Level
The search for better treatment of mesothelioma cancer continues moving more aggressively toward immunotherapy at the molecular level, where new drugs show promise in early testing. The latest results are about RITA, a drug that affects the important p53 protein. Scientists at the Sbarro Health Research Organization (SHRO) in Philadelphia recently uncovered drugs designed to reactivate the p53 protein, which normally serves as a tumor suppressor in humans but gets turned off by most cancers. Reactivating the protein enables a body's own immune system to cause apoptosis, a programmed cell death within the tumor, without a...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 14, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Cleveland Clinic Studies Radiation-induced Mesothelioma
James Stevenson, M.D., renowned oncologist at the Cleveland Clinic, didn't need to see the recent study to know the face of malignant pleural mesothelioma was changing. He sees it in his waiting room all the time. While occupational exposure to asbestos, which is still the No. 1 cause of the rare disease, continues dropping significantly, the rate of mesothelioma remains steady. And the patients don't look the same anymore. Other causes, it seems, are emerging, and they may be rising. "The general thinking is that these non-asbestos related cases will increase as we move forward," said Stevenson, a mesothelio...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 12, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Rise Expected in Radiation-Induced Mesothelioma
James Stevenson, M.D., renowned oncologist at the Cleveland Clinic, didn't need to see the recent study to know the face of malignant pleural mesothelioma was changing. He sees it in his waiting room all the time. While occupational exposure to asbestos, which is still the No. 1 cause of the rare disease, continues dropping significantly, the rate of mesothelioma remains steady. And the patients don't look the same anymore. Other causes, it seems, are emerging, and they may be rising. "The general thinking is that these non-asbestos related cases will increase as we move forward," said Stevenson, a mesothelio...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 12, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Asbestos.com Survey Shows Need for Increased Awareness, Treatment Options
A majority of people had heard of asbestos, but were unaware of the seriousness of exposure to the deadly substance until they or a loved were diagnosed with an asbestos-related disease like mesothelioma, a recent Asbestos.com survey shows. The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com in December 2013 conducted a survey that asked our online newsletter readers a series of personal questions related to mesothelioma, including type of treatment they or their loved ones received, recommendations they offered to others dealing with the incurable cancer, effectiveness of their local VA hospital and primary location of asbestos exp...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 4, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Nadia Persaud Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

SMART Procedure Doubles Survival Rate for Mesothelioma Patients
Treating pleural mesothelioma with high-dose radiation just before aggressive surgery, a reversal of the traditional procedure, can double the three-year survival rate, according to recently published clinical research at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Toronto. The cancer center is the first in the world to study a significant number of patients using the Surgery for Mesothelioma After Radiation Therapy (SMART) and the approach is now the standard of care in Toronto. "I'm biased, and don't want to toot our own horn too loudly, but very few places have come close to the results we've seen here,"...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 27, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Classification Change Affected Documentation of Mortality Rates
Studies conducted by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimate that in the United States, at least 43,073 people have been killed by asbestos since 1979. However, they also state that this figure could account for as little as 20 percent of asbestos-related deaths. The CDC's assessment of mesothelioma mortality rates suggests that the number of nationwide asbestos-related deaths between 1979 and 2001 could be as high as 230,000 people. The significant difference between this figure and their original estimation is primarily attributed to the way the government classifies malignant mesothelioma deaths. Prior to 1998, m...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 23, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Michelle Whitmer Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Asbestos.com Survey Shows Need for Increased Awareness, Treatment Options
A majority of people had heard of asbestos, but were unaware of the seriousness of exposure to the deadly substance until they or a loved were diagnosed with an asbestos-related disease like mesothelioma, a recent Asbestos.com survey shows. The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com in December 2013 conducted a survey that asked our online newsletter readers a series of personal questions related to mesothelioma, including type of treatment they or their loved ones received, recommendations they offered to others dealing with the incurable cancer, effectiveness of their local VA hospital and primary location of asbe...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 21, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Nadia Persaud Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Using Betadine Antiseptic to Kill Mesothelioma Tumor Cells
Researchers in Italy are exploring the possibility of using a popular and traditional antiseptic as an alternative to chemotherapy for pleural irrigation after surgery with the hope of better preventing mesothelioma cancer recurrence. Early laboratory work done at the Second University of Naples has shown that Betadine brand iodine-based antiseptic, which has been used by doctors as a presurgery hand cleaner for decades, can suppress and destroy mesothelioma tumor cells. A study with surgical patients will begin soon to further determine the clinical benefits for mesothelioma treatment. "It's my dream t...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 20, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Stem Cell Research at PMC Holds Great Potential
The Pacific Heart, Lung & Blood Institute in California is moving forward with potentially groundbreaking stem cell mesothelioma research that could dramatically change the treatment of this disease. While mesenchymal stem cells already are utilized in therapies for several autoimmune diseases, the novel research will explore using them for the first time as a vehicle to deliver molecular and gene therapies directly to mesothelioma sites. The goal is to develop a reliable therapy to provide consistent, long-term survival for pleural mesothelioma patients, which currently doesn't exist. The majority of meso...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 16, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Pineapple Extract Enhances Chemo Effectiveness on Mesothelioma Cells
A future cancer treatment may have emerged with the recent discovery that bromelain, a pineapple extract, can improve the effectiveness of cisplatin chemotherapy on peritoneal mesothelioma tumor cells. Bromelain is an enzyme found in the stem and the juice of a pineapple. It has been part of the natural, alternative medicine culture for many years, dating back centuries in Central and South America. The pineapple enzyme may be close to moving into the realm of more conventional medicine in a very significant way, thanks to recent, groundbreaking research at the University of New South Wales in Australia. &...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 10, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Yale Refuses to Revoke Stephan Schmidheiny's Honorary Degree
Prestigious Yale University, a world leader in higher education, has come under fire after rejecting a call to support victims of asbestos exposure, and bypassing the opportunity to use its influence in raising awareness to the cause. Yale University has refused to revoke the honorary degree it presented to Switzerland billionaire Stephan Schmidheiny . He was convicted in 2012 of creating the asbestos environmental disaster that caused at least 2,000 deaths in Italy and countless more around the world. The Ivy League school in 1996 awarded Schmidheiny, who was sentenced to 16 years in prison, the hono...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 8, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

Novel Engineering of Immune Cells Holds Promise for Mesothelioma Patients
Patients with advanced malignant pleural mesothelioma and metastatic pancreatic cancer received surprisingly positive results during a small, recent Phase I clinical trial involving a novel engineering of immune cells. The trial was done at the Abramson Cancer Center in Philadelphia, and the results were published in Cancer Immunology Research. It accentuated the growing belief that the next big step in combating mesothelioma will come from immunotherapy, which uses a patient's own immune system to fight deadly diseases. "These results, albeit preliminary, are very promising," said Carl H. June, M....
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 3, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Top 10 Mesothelioma News Stories of 2013
There was plenty of good news within the tight-knit mesothelioma community in 2013, but some of it was mixed with disappointment. While significant advancements were made that continued hope for the future, there were reminders the fight against mesothelioma cancer remains an uphill battle. There is much work still to be done. Surgical techniques improved. Therapies got better. Diagnostics moved forward. Yet the progress on all fronts has been too slow, requiring more diligence and more commitment to raising awareness about this rare, but aggressive cancer caused by exposure to toxic asbestos. 1. Robotics C...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 30, 2013 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

New Drug Shows Promise in Killing Mesothelioma Tumor Cells
There may be help on the horizon for future pleural mesothelioma patients needing an effective, first-line systemic chemotherapy regimen that doesn't exist today. The latest laboratory breakthrough could give them a much better chance at survival. A recently completed study of panobinostat, a new experimental drug, in combination with the standard cisplatin, showed promising results in killing mesothelioma tumor cells without harming the healthy ones, along with eliminating the often troubling side effects. The study, published in Genetics and Molecular Research, was conducted in Ankara, Turkey, at Gazi Un...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 19, 2013 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Petition Aims to Build First Federally Funded Mesothelioma Program
As the youngest person to become chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Elmo Zumwalt played a major role in U.S. military history -- a war hero whose service spanned World War II, Korea and Vietnam. It's only appropriate that the Mesothelioma Center for Excellence at the VA West Los Angeles Medical Center is adopting his name. Zumwalt died from pleural mesothelioma cancer almost 14 years ago, an ending that far too many veterans have suffered, stemming from the once-extensive use of asbestos in the armed forces. His life was dedicated to those who bravely served their country. Now his memory will be, too. If th...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 12, 2013 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Veterans & Military Source Type: news

Detecting Mesothelioma Earlier with New Blood Test, Nanotechnology
One of the biggest hurdles in combating mesothelioma cancer has been an inability to accurately diagnose the disease early enough to treat it effectively. Far too often, mesothelioma is not identified until it has metastasized, leading to a typically poor prognosis. Help may be coming in the future. Researchers in Zurich, Switzerland recently published a study involving new technology that may help detect mesothelioma much earlier than before with a simple, noninvasive blood test. Bernd Wollscheid, Ph.D., of the Institute of Molecular Systems Biology and lead researcher of the study, says the findings could...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 6, 2013 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

High Dose Radiation with Pleurectomy Shows Promise in Controlling Mesothelioma
High dose radiation therapy, as a follow-up to aggressive pleurectomy/decortication surgery for patients with pleural mesothelioma, has produced impressive results in a recent Italian study. Researchers in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the Centro di Riferimento Oncologico di Aviano, in northern Italy, reported a median survival rate of 33 months for the 20 consecutive patients enrolled at the cancer institute. "We think our approach is a concrete alternative option for the cure of MPM (malignant pleural mesothelioma)," lead researcher Emilio Minatel, M.D., told Asbestos.com. "We have very e...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 3, 2013 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Congresswoman Carolyn McCarthy's Lawsuit Shines Light on Asbestos Dangers
Past exposure to asbestos will dramatically increase the chances of a smoker developing lung cancer, a fact that may gain considerable attention in the coming months by the high-profile lawsuit filed by U.S. Congresswoman Carolyn McCarthy, of New York. The 17-year veteran of Congress announced in June that doctors were treating her for lung cancer. McCarthy, 69, recently filed a lawsuit against multiple asbestos manufacturers, claiming their products significantly increased her risk of getting the disease. Her case was not the typical occupational asbestos exposure that involves directly working with the dangerous mi...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 25, 2013 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Legislation, Laws & Litigation Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Research Takes a Hit with Tissue Bank Defunding
The future of the National Mesothelioma Virtual Tissue Bank is in jeopardy after its federal funding was eliminated earlier this year, sending researchers scrambling to find other options. As part of a budget-cutting move, the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and Centers for Disease Control (CDC) eliminated the annual grant of more than $1 million, delivering a serious blow to future mesothelioma research. Mesothelioma is the rare, but aggressive cancer caused by exposure to asbestos. There is no cure and there are few treatment options, but recent advancements have been made des...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 20, 2013 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Second Round of Cytoreductive Surgery/HIPEC Could Benefit Mesothelioma Patients
Mesothelioma patients could benefit significantly from a second round of cytoreductive surgery and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (HIPEC), providing a survival advantage over those who do not receive it, according to cancer researchers in Tampa. The study, published in the Annals of Surgical Oncology, shows that researchers at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa discovered that patients with peritoneal mesothelioma, who returned for a second HIPEC procedure, survived for almost three times as long as those who underwent only one procedure. "I don't think you can definitively say it's the way to go for everyo...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 14, 2013 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news