Deep sleep takes out the trash
(Northwestern University) By examining fruit flies' brain activity and behavior, the researchers found that deep sleep has an ancient, restorative power to clear waste from the brain. This waste potentially includes toxic proteins that may lead to neurodegenerative disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 20, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People drank more, exercised less during UK's first lockdown, scientists reveal
(Natural News) Brits drank more alcohol, ate fewer fruits and vegetables and exercised less during the first month of lockdown in the U.K. last year, according to a recent study by researchers from the University of East Anglia. Published in the British Journal of Health Psychology, it revealed that women drank more often than men but men drank... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How dietary choice influences lifespan in fruit flies
(eLife) Having a choice of foods may accelerate aging and shorten the lifespan of fruit flies, according to a study published today in the open-access eLife journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 19, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

First fruits of vaccine rollout 'should be seen in weeks'
Experts agree that the impact of the jab will vary regionally and among different groupsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageAnalysts are involved in an urgent effort to gauge the impact of Britain ’s mass Covid-19 vaccine campaign and to pinpoint dates when lockdown measures can be eased.More than 3 million people – most of them elderly or vulnerable individuals or health workers – have already been given jabs. Now researchers are trying to establish when the first fruits of the mass vaccination programme may be seen as the government heads towards its target of immunising mo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 17, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Older people University of Bristol Hospitals Chris Whitty Matt Hancock Health Infectious diseases Science UK news Society Source Type: news

Better diet and glucose uptake in the brain lead to longer life in fruit flies
(Tokyo Metropolitan University) Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have discovered that fruit flies with genetic modifications to enhance glucose uptake have significantly longer lifespans. Looking at the brain cells of aging flies, they found that better glucose uptake compensates for age-related deterioration in motor functions, and led to longer life. The effect was more pronounced when coupled with dietary restrictions. This suggests healthier eating plus improved glucose uptake in the brain might lead to enhanced lifespans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 16, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dengue —an Epidemic Within a Pandemic in Peru
International Year of Volunteers: A volunteer ombudsman in Peru helps a local woman with her problem, 2001. Credit: UN PhotoBy Carmen ArroyoUNITED NATIONS, Jan 15 2021 (IPS) While the world is grappling with the third wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, Peru is still dealing with an epidemic that it has not been able to control—the mosquito-borne viral disease known as dengue. With almost 56,400 confirmed cases as of December, Peru is suffering the worst dengue epidemic since 2017, when the virus infected over 68,000 people. The illness, coupled with the novel coronavirus crisis, has left thousands of people exposed to m...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Carmen Arroyo Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Featured Food Security and Nutrition Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Labour Latin America & the Caribbean TerraViva United Nations Water & Sanitation Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition F Source Type: news

Little known dangers of an exotic poisonous fruit: lessons from two cases of konjac ingestion - Pillay R, Chemban FM, Pillay VV, Rathish B.
We report the first hum... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

Mathematics explains how giant whirlpools form in developing egg cells
(Simons Foundation) Cell-spanning whirlpools in the immature egg cells of animals such as mice, zebrafish and fruit flies quickly mix the cells' innards, but scientists didn't know how these flows form. Using mathematical modeling, researchers have found an answer. The gyres result from the collective behavior of rodlike molecular tubes called microtubules that extend inward from the cells' membranes, the researchers report. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 13, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A fly's eye view of evolution
(University of G ö ttingen) The fascinating compound eyes of insects consist of hundreds of individual eyes known as " facets " . In the course of evolution, an enormous variety of sizes and shapes has emerged, often adaptations to different environmental conditions. Scientists, led by a research group at G ö ttingen University have now shown that these differences can be caused by very different changes in the genome of fruit flies. The study was published inMolecular Biology and Evolution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 13, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How The Pandemic Set In Motion The Messenger RNA Revolution
The huge push for a vaccine based on messenger RNA (mRNA) against Covid-19 is beginning to bear fruit. As a result, we can expect many more advances, one or several Nobel prizes, and possibly, a whole revolution in the treatment of multiple infectious diseases in the future. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - January 12, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Enrique Dans, Senior Contributor Tags: Leadership Strategy /leadership-strategy Innovation /innovation Healthcare /healthcare Source Type: news

TNCs Reviving TPP Frankenstein
By Jomo Kwame SundaramKUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, Jan 12 2021 (IPS) The incoming Biden administration is under tremendous pressure to demonstrate better US economic management. Trade negotiations normally take years to conclude, if at all. Unsurprisingly, lobbyists are already urging the next US administration to quickly embrace and deliver a new version of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). Jomo Kwame Sundaram Trump legacy Repackaging and reselling a TPP avatar will not be easy. Well before Trump’s election, even the official mid-2016 International Trade Commission’s assessment doubted Peterson Institute of Int...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jomo Kwame Sundaram Tags: Economy & Trade Featured Financial Crisis Global Globalisation Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse North America TerraViva United Nations Trade & Investment Source Type: news

Study of flowers with two types of anthers solves mystery that baffled Darwin
(University of California - Santa Cruz) Most flowering plants depend on pollinators such as bees to transfer pollen from the male anthers of one flower to the female stigma of another flower, enabling fertilization and the production of fruits and seeds. Bee pollination, however, involves an inherent conflict of interest, because bees are only interested in pollen as a food source. A new study describes a pollination strategy involving flowers with two distinct sets of anthers that differ in color, size, and position. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 12, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

GridTape: An automated electron microscopy platform
(Boston Children's Hospital) Scientists have developed an automated, faster, and more rapid electron microscopy technique, called GridTape, that enables them to label and read the location of every neuron in a tissue sample. The team used GridTape to map the circuity of the spinal cord nerve of the fruit fly. The technique not only provides a comprehensive map of neuronal circuits; it can also be used to study nerve circuitry in larger animal systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 11, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Seeding the Ocean: Inside a Michelin-Starred Chef ’s Revolutionary Quest to Harvest Rice From the Sea
There are very few things that Ángel León hasn’t done with the fruits of the sea. In 2008, as a young, unknown chef, he took a loin from one fish and attached it to the loin of another, using collagen to bind the two proteins together. He called them hybrids and served them to unsuspecting diners at Aponiente, his restaurant in the southern Spanish port town of El Puerto de Santa María, just across the bay from Cádiz. He discovered that fish eyes, cooked at 55°C in a thermal circulator until the gelatin collapsed, made excellent thickening agents for umami-rich sauces. Next he found th...
Source: TIME: Science - January 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Matt Goulding Tags: Uncategorized climate change feature longform Magazine Source Type: news

South Africa: Bread and Vaccines
[New Frame] Pharmaceutical companies stand to make billions from the Covid-19 pandemic, but the vaccines they have developed are the fruits of the collective labour of all of humanity. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 8, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Developmental Biologist Kathryn Anderson Dies at 68
The Sloan Kettering researcher used mutagenic screening to probe genes and molecular pathways, including Toll and Hedgehog, essential to development in fruit flies and mice. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - January 6, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

AHA News: Ring In the New Year With a'Mocktail '
WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- At a time when many people are stress-drinking, a New Year's Eve sangria that's alcohol-free is a healthy way to say farewell to 2020. Filled with vitamins and fiber, this fresh fruit... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 30, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

New U.S. dietary guidelines emphasize fruit, vegetables, whole grains, lean meat
New dietary guidelines released Tuesday by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Department of Health and Human Services urge increased consumption of fruits and vegetables, whole grains and lean meat. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - December 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Delicious and disease-free: scientists attempting new citrus varieties
(University of California - Riverside) UC Riverside scientists are betting an ancient solution will solve citrus growers' biggest problem - Huanglongbing - by breeding new fruits with natural resistance to the deadly tree disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 23, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study explains how a chemical from Japanese cornel may help treat Alzheimer's disease
(Natural News) Cornus officinalis, also known as Japanese cornel, is a medicinal plant native to China, Japan and South Korea. Well-known in traditional medicine, the fruit of this small tree, in particular, is used for its analgesic, diuretic and anti-diabetic properties. According to studies, the active components of Japanese cornel can inhibit the activity of... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Aren ’t We Missing Food Security Experts in the Incoming President-Elect Biden-Kamala Harris Administration?
We never imagined that we would witness food insecurity being an issue in developed countries such as the US. Credit: Stephen Leahy/IPS.By Esther Ngumbi and Ifeanyi NsoforURBANA, Illinois / ABUJA, Dec 17 2020 (IPS) Food insecurity across the U.S. continues to be on the rise because of the effects of COVID-19. According to Feeding America, over 50 million Americans will experience food insecurity, including 17 million children.  We both grew up in countries referred to as “developing countries,” Ifeanyi in Nigeria and Esther in Kenya. At the time, we never imagined that we would witness food insecurity...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Esther Ngumbi and Ifeanyi Nsofor Tags: Food & Agriculture Headlines Health Source Type: news

Africa: FAO Launches the UN's International Year of Fruits and Vegetables 2021
[FAO] Rome -- A means to improve nutrition and reduce food loss and waste, says Director-General (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 16, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Fruit Flies Are Essential to Science. So Are the Workers Who Keep Them Alive.
Sustaining the world ’s biggest Drosophila collection during the pandemic has been a challenge, but the people in Indiana who supply the insects to labs around the world stay dedicated to the task. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cara Giaimo Tags: Bloomington Drosophila Stock Center Indiana University Fruit Flies Research Genetics and Heredity Laboratories and Scientific Equipment Quarantine (Life and Culture) Workplace Hazards and Violations Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) your-feed-scie Source Type: news

Scientists Just Published A New Fruit Fly ‘Neuron Atlas.’ What Is It For?
By mapping out which genes are active in specific cells over the course of development, scientists can better understand how brain cells establish connections. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - December 14, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Caroline Seydel, Contributor Tags: Healthcare /healthcare Innovation /innovation Source Type: news

A human gene placed in fruit flies reveals details about a human developmental disorder
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) Meier-Gorlin syndrome, or MGS, is a rare genetic developmental disorder that causes dwarfism, small ears, a small brain, missing patella and other skeletal abnormalities. One mutation causing MGS, first reported in 2017, is a Lysine 23 to Glutamic acid (K23E) substitution in the gene for Orc6. Researchers have now put that mutant human gene into fruit flies to probe the function of Orc6 K23E. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Has a year of living with Covid-19 rewired our brains?
The pandemic is expected to precipitate a mental health crisis, but perhaps also a chance to approach life with new clarityShow your support for rigorous, independent Guardian journalismCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageWhen the bubonic plague spread through England in the 17th century, Sir Isaac Newton fled Cambridge where he was studying for the safety of his family home in Lincolnshire. The Newtons did not live in a cramped apartment; they enjoyed a large garden with many fruit trees. In these uncertain times, out of step with ordinary life, his mind roamed free of routines and social dis...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Paula Cocozza Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Mental health Society Science Psychology World news Medical research Neuroscience Source Type: news

Reducing your intake of sugary drinks by 1 serving a day may lower diabetes risk by at least 10%
(Natural News) Researchers from the U.S. and China suggest that drinking a serving of water, coffee or tea in place of a sugary beverage may lower Type 2 diabetes risk by up to 10 percent. In a paper published in the Diabetes Journal, they further revealed that swapping sodas and 100 percent fruit juices for diet... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Kenya: Businesses Suffer as Schools Stay Shut
[Nation] Anne Lutowei has been selling fruits and vegetables for more than 10 years at Sogomo trading centre. The shopping centre is adjacent to the University of Eldoret. Like most traders, Ms Lutowei's business depended on the institution for survival, but since closure and subsequent slow reopening of learning institutions, she barely does any business. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 8, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Fruit decline threatens forest elephants
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - December 3, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Sugden, A. M. Tags: Ecology twis Source Type: news

Long-term collapse in fruit availability threatens Central African forest megafauna
Afrotropical forests host much of the world’s remaining megafauna, although these animals are confined to areas where direct human influences are low. We used a rare long-term dataset of tree reproduction and a photographic database of forest elephants to assess food availability and body condition of an emblematic megafauna species at Lopé National Park, Gabon. Our analysis reveals an 81% decline in fruiting over a 32-year period (1986–2018) and an 11% decline in body condition of fruit-dependent forest elephants from 2008 to 2018. Fruit famine in one of the last strongholds for African forest elephants...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 3, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Bush, E. R., Whytock, R. C., Bahaa-el-din, L., Bourgeois, S., Bunnefeld, N., Cardoso, A. W., Dikangadissi, J. T., Dimbonda, P., Dimoto, E., Edzang Ndong, J., Jeffery, K. J., Lehmann, D., Makaga, L., Momboua, B., Momont, L. R. W., Tutin, C. E. G., White, L Tags: Ecology reports Source Type: news

Flash-frozen benefits: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute
There's no question that fruits and vegetables are an important part of a heart-healthy diet. In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, Dr. Stephen Kopecky, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist, says that while fresh produce is always a great choice, frozen fruits and vegetables are often just as healthy. But he also says not all frozen [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - December 3, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Erectile Dysfunction: The Foods You Eat May Affect Your Risk
Men who ate a diet high in vegetables, fruits, nuts, fish and unsaturated fats, and low in meats and whole-fat dairy, had a lower risk of erectile dysfunction. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nicholas Bakalar Tags: Diet and Nutrition Impotence Source Type: news

Tomato's wild ancestor is a genomic reservoir for plant breeders
(Boyce Thompson Institute) Today's tomatoes are larger and easier to farm than their wild ancestor, but they also are less resistant to disease and environmental stresses like drought and salty soil. Researchers from Boyce Thompson Institute created a high-quality genome for the ancestor, discovering structural variants that are involved in fruit flavor, size and ripening, stress tolerance and disease resistance. Plant breeders could use the resource to develop tomatoes that taste better, are more nutritious and more resilient. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 1, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UofL researcher uses fruit for less toxic drug delivery
(University of Louisville) UofL researchers have found a less toxic way to deliver medicines by using the natural lipids in plants, particularly grapefruit and ginger. The resulting intellectual property portfolio consisting of 12 patent families, invented by Huang-Ge Zhang, Ph.D., has been licensed to Boston-based Senda BioSciences, a Flagship Pioneering company. UofL's technology is part of Senda's efforts to develop novel drug delivery platforms to solve the challenges of transfer-ring therapeutics across biological barriers and throughout the body. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 30, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Europe coronavirus: Second wave began in Spain before spreading via tourists, study suggests
A cluster of coronavirus which was first detected in fruit pickers in northern Spain spread across the continent over summer before increasingly rapidly in local communities, driving the second wave. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Type 2 diabetes warning - four fruits that could be raising your blood sugar levels
TYPE 2 diabetes management could be described as a boxing match against high blood sugar levels. To help you land a decisive blow against high blood sugar levels, certain dietary modifications are needed. It may come as a surprise to hear that cutting back on certain fruits can help to defeat high blood sugar levels. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - November 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Trump ’s long-shot bid to overturn Pa. election results not likely to bear fruit
Despite pressuring from President Donald Trump's lawyers to not accept the state's certified presidential election results declaring Joe... (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mediterranean Diet Cuts Women's Odds for Diabetes
TUESDAY, Nov. 24, 2020 -- Overweight women who eat a Mediterranean-like diet may reduce their odds of developing type 2 diabetes by 30%, compared with women who don't, a new study suggests. The Mediterranean diet is rich in olive oil, fruits,... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 24, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Can drinking cocoa make you smarter?
(University of Birmingham) Increased consumption of flavanols - a group of molecules which occur naturally in fruit and vegetables - can increase your mental agility, according to new research at the University of Birmingham. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Eating dried fruit may be linked with better diet quality and health markers
(Penn State) Penn State research found that people who ate dried fruit were generally healthier than those who did not, and on days when people ate dried fruit they consumed greater amounts of some key nutrients than on days when they skipped. However, they also found that people consumed more total calories on days when they ate dried fruit. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 24, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sestrin makes fruit flies live longer
(Max-Planck-Gesellschaft) Researchers identify positive effector behind reduced food intake. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Erase facial wrinkles: Snacking on mangoes can stave off signs of ageing
SNACKING on mangoes can help combat ageing, a study found. Older women who ate regular moderate amounts of the tropical fruit saw facial wrinkles reduce by more than a fifth in tests. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - November 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Most children are eating vegetables, but they eat less fruit as they grow older, a multiyear study shows
Between 2015 and 2018, about 75 percent of kids and adolescents ate fruit on a given day, according to the data. More than 90 percent ate vegetables. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - November 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Erin Blakemore Source Type: news

Tracking down listeria
(BfR Federal Institute for Risk Assessment) Cheese, smoked fish, meat, sausages, fruit and vegetables are among the foods via which people can become infected with listeria. While most people successfully overcome an infection, immunocompromised people and the elderly can become seriously ill or even die from listeria. Food product recalls, rising infection rates over many years and persistent outbreaks make food contaminated with listeria a growing challenge for consumer protection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 13, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Oral symptoms caused by toxic plants containing calcium oxalate - Miyamoto M, Noma M, Ishii J, Yoshihara S.
A one-year-old girl presented to our emergency room with lip swelling after biting the fruit of a wild plant. The plant was identified as Arisaema serratum through an internet search based on the photo taken by the guardian ( Figure, A). Her vital signs we... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Contact Tracing Apps Were Big Tech ’s Best Idea for Fighting COVID-19. Why Haven’t They Helped?
When the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services launched COVID Trace, one of the nation’s first COVID-19 contact-tracing smartphone apps, on Aug. 24, state health authorities “strongly recommended” all 3 million-plus Nevadans download and use the app. But two and a half months later, adoption remained well short of that ambitious goal—the app has been downloaded just under 70,000 times as of Nov. 9, representing just under 3% of the state’s adult population. A total of zero exposures were registered in the app throughout the month of September, during which the state reported more than...
Source: TIME: Health - November 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Study: Mindfulness-based program boosts preschoolers' interest in fruit, veggies
A mindfulness-based training program that includes games can guide preschoolers toward healthier food choices, a study published Friday by the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - November 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

On the hunt for wild bananas in Papua New Guinea
(International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT)) Scientists are racing to collect and conserve wild banana species. A recent expedition to the epicenter of banana diversity shows that wild species hold traits critical to helping the world's favorite fruit survive climate change, pests and diseases (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 6, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Better health - for people and the planet - grows on trees
(International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT)) Tropical fruit trees can improve health, reduce hunger, boost incomes and fight climate change. So why don't we grow and eat more? In the journal People and Nature, researchers outline the myriad nutritional, economic and environmental-health potential of increasing the production and consumption of tropical fruits. They present an overview of benefits from tree-sourced foods in terms of nutrition and discuss the barriers and risks of scaling up supply to a global level. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nervous systems of insects inspire efficient future AI systems
(University of Cologne) Study explores functions of fruit fly's nervous system in food seeking / results valuable for the development and control of artificial intelligence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 5, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news