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Grey ’s Anatomy May Be Giving You the Wrong Ideas About Medicine, Study Says
New research has diagnosed a problem with television medical dramas. A study published Monday in the journal Trauma Surgery & Acute Care says that medical dramas — Grey’s Anatomy, specifically — “may cultivate false expectations among patients and their families” when it comes to the realities of medical care, treatment and recovery. That conclusion isn’t altogether unexpected, given that Grey’s Anatomy is notorious for its dramatic cases. Over the show’s 14-and-counting seasons, patients have accidentally swallowed bombs, been skewered by trees and poles, become encased ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Research Source Type: news

The flu vaccine depends on a person's immune history
The flu shot's effectiveness depends more on your personal immune history than on how much it mutated in production, Harvard University and University of Chicago research suggests. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Past encounters with the flu shape vaccine response
(University of Chicago Medical Center) Researchers from the University of Chicago, Harvard University and others show that poor immune responses, not egg adaptions, may explain the low effectiveness of the vaccine that year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 20, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Diabetes could be triggered by virus, scientists warn
Harvard University scientists found that four viruses contain insulin-like proteins. The new research suggests that these may trigger type 1 and type 2 diabetes by tricking the body. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Peppa Pig does not cause autism, experts insist
Social media posts have claimed a Harvard study blamed Peppa Pig for autism. Experts have now refuted the claims, saying no such study exists. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A share in the future of DNA sequencing
Professor George Church on why he wants us to earn money by sharing our genomic data, his plans to resurrect the woolly mammoth and how narcolepsy helps him generate ideas• How can I make money from my DNA?A new genetic testing company calledNebula Genomics wants to help people profit from their own genomes. The Observer talks to Harvard University DNA sequencing pioneer George Church about his latest venture, what ’s cooking in his lab and how falling asleep on the job can sometimes be a godsend.What is the value of getting your genome sequenced? Why do it?One very compelling argument that I think justifies alm...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zo ë Corbyn Tags: Genetics Science Biology Medical research Stem cells Source Type: news

George Church: "Genome sequencing is like the internet back in the late 1980s."
The pioneering geneticist on why he wants us to earn money by sharing our genomic data, his plans to resurrect the woolly mammoth and how narcolepsy helps him generate ideas• How can I make money from my DNA?A new genetic testing company calledNebula Genomics wants to help people profit from their own genomes. The Observer talks to Harvard University DNA sequencing pioneer George Church about his latest venture, what ’s cooking in his lab and how falling asleep on the job can sometimes be a godsend.What is the value of getting your genome sequenced? Why do it?One very compelling argument that I think justifies a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zo ë Corbyn Tags: Genetics Science Biology Medical research Stem cells Source Type: news

'Liquid biopsy' can help predict outcomes in metastatic triple-negative breast cancer
(Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center) A clinically relevant 'liquid biopsy' test can be used to profile cancer genomes from blood and predict survival outcomes for patients with metastatic triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), according to new research published by a multi-institutional team of researchers with The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center -- Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James), the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

BBJ's Power Breakfast on health care focuses on industry consolidation, disruption
Consolidation and disruption were the terms of the day at the Boston Business Journal's Power Breakfast on health care, held Thursday morning in Longwood Medical Area. The event, attended by more than 200 businesspeople at Harvard Medical School's Martin Conference Center, featured Rosemarie Day, president, Day Health Strategies, who helped launch the original Massachusetts Health Connector; Tom Hubbard, vice president of policy research at think tank Network fo r Excellence in Health Innovation… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - February 15, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Business Journal Staff Source Type: news

Why Pig Organs Could Be the Future of Transplants
Making human tissue in a lab has always been more sci-fi than sci-fact, but powerful genetic technologies may change that soon. For the most part, the only way to replace diseased or failing hearts, lungs, kidneys and livers is with donor organs. Even then, many people struggle to find a good biological match with a donor, and 8,000 die each year in the U.S. while waiting for an organ. In one promising solution to the shortage, researchers have been putting a new DNA editing tool called CRISPR through rigorous tests in organ regeneration. Last August, a group of scientists led by George Church, professor of genetics at Har...
Source: TIME: Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Longevity organ transplants Source Type: news

You Asked: Do Religious People Live Longer?
If a long life is what you’re after, going to church may be the answer to your prayers. A number of studies have shown associations between attending religious services and living a long time. One of the most comprehensive, published in JAMA Internal Medicine in 2016, found that women who went to any kind of religious service more than once a week had a 33% lower chance than their secular peers of dying during the 16-year study-follow-up period. Another study, published last year in PLOS One, found that regular service attendance was linked to reductions in the body’s stress responses and even in mortality&ndas...
Source: TIME: Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Longevity Source Type: news

Is an Anti-Aging Pill on the Horizon?
Anti-aging products from skin creams to chemical peels are part of a $250 billion industry, but scientists have yet to discover a longevity elixir that stands up to medical scrutiny. A group of researchers believe they’re getting closer, however, thanks to a compound called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, or NAD+ for short. “NAD+ is the closest we’ve gotten to a fountain of youth,” says David Sinclair, co-director of the Paul F. Glenn Center for the Biology of Aging at Harvard Medical School. “It’s one of the most important molecules for life to exist, and without it, you’re dea...
Source: TIME: Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized anti-aging healthytime Longevity Source Type: news

Researchers advance CRISPR-based diagnostic tool, develop miniature paper test
(Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard) The team that first unveiled the rapid, inexpensive, highly sensitive CRISPR-based diagnostic tool called SHERLOCK has greatly enhanced the tool's power to work with a miniature paper test, similar to a pregnancy test, allowing rapid and simple detection in any setting. Additional features greatly expand both the breadth and sensitivity of the diagnostic information, including the ability to detect multiple targets at once and quantify the amount of target in a sample. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Harvard study shows rise in babies dying in their sleep
Pediatricians at Harvard Medical School warn the stagnant figures are a sign that efforts to promote 'safer' sleeping positions have been futile. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

5 Ways Love Is Good for Your Health
If you’re in a relationship, Valentine’s Day may be one of the healthiest days of the year — despite the champagne and chocolate. That’s because love come with some solid health benefits, according to a growing body of scientific research. Dr. Helen Riess, director of the Empathy and Relational Science Program at Massachusetts General Hospital and author of the forthcoming book The Empathy Effect, told TIME how falling head over heels can help your health, both mentally and physically. Love makes you happy. When you first fall in love, dopamine, the feel-good brain chemical associated with reward, i...
Source: TIME: Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime Source Type: news

'Dramatic' rise in babies dying in their sleep
Pediatricians at Harvard Medical School warn the stagnant figures are a sign that efforts to promote 'safer' sleeping positions have been futile. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A gut reaction...on a chip
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) researchers from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, Instituto Superior T é cnico (IST, Portugal), Boston Children's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School (HMS) have published a study using an organ-on-a-chip (Organ Chip) model of the human gut that reveals the intestinal blood vessel cells may play an important part in radiation-induced intestinal injury, and it confirms that a potential radioprotective drug, dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG), suppresses the intestine's responses to radiation injury. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Chemicals found in food packaging linked to weight gain
A study led by Harvard ’s School of Public Health looked at the affect of chemicals called perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) on weight regulation after weight loss. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Chemicals in packaging, carpets and non-stick pans 'may contribute to obesity'
Studies have also linked compounds called perfluoroalkyl substances to cancer, high cholesterol and immune problemsChemicals used to make non-stick pots and pans, stain-resistant carpets, and food packaging may contribute to high levels of obesity by disrupting the body ’s ability to burn calories, scientists say.Researchers at Harvard University examined the effects of compounds calledperfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), which have already raised concerns among some health experts after animal experiments and other studies linked them to cancer, high cholesterol and immune problems.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Source Type: news

Chemicals In Food Wrappers Are Linked to Weight Gain
Chemicals known as perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)—used frequently in fast-food wrappers and other products for their oil- and water-repellant properties—have been linked to hormone disruption, immune dysfunction, high cholesterol and even cancer. Now, a new study suggests that exposure to the chemicals could make it harder to keep weight off after dieting. The study, published in PLOS Medicine, found that levels of PFAS in the blood were linked to greater weight gain in a group of people who had recently shed pounds, especially among the women. Another finding may hint at why: People with higher blood levels ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Environmental Chemicals Found in Non-Stick Pans Are Linked to Weight Gain
Chemicals known as perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)—used frequently in fast-food wrappers and other products for their oil- and water-repellant properties—have been linked to hormone disruption, immune dysfunction, high cholesterol and even cancer. Now, a new study suggests that exposure to the chemicals could make it harder to keep weight off after dieting. The study, published in PLOS Medicine, found that levels of PFAS in the blood were linked to greater weight gain in a group of people who had recently shed pounds, especially among the women. Another finding may hint at why: People with higher blood levels ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Vaccines Can Stem Poverty, Not Just Disease, Study Suggests
TUESDAY, Feb. 13, 2018 -- Vaccines can provide major health and economic benefits for people in low- and middle-income countries, according to a new study by Harvard researchers. It estimated that increased spending to ensure wider distribution of... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

PFASs, chemicals commonly found in environment, may interfere with body weight regulation
(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) Boston, MA - A class of chemicals used in many industrial and consumer products was linked with greater weight gain after dieting, particularly among women, according to a study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The chemicals -- perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) -- have been linked with cancer, hormone disruption, immune dysfunction, high cholesterol, and obesity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 13, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

True to type: From human biopsy to complex gut physiology on a chip
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) Published in Scientific Reports, Donald Ingber's team at the Wyss Institute leverages the organoid approach to isolate intestinal stem cells from human biopsies, but goes on to break up the organoids and culture the patient-specific cells within our Organ Chips where they spontaneously form intestinal villi oriented towards the channel lumen, and the epithelium in close apposition to human intestinal microvascular endothelium (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 13, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists identify immune cascade that fuels complications, tissue damage in chlamydia infections
(Harvard Medical School) Research in mice pinpoints immune mechanism behind tissue damage and complications of chlamydia infection, the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States.Separate immune mechanisms drive bacterial clearance versus immune-mediated tissue damage and subsequent disease.Therapies are needed to avert irreversible reproductive organ damage that can arise as a result of silent infections that go untreated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 13, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Book Review: Still Alice
Still Alice is a novel, not a work of nonfiction. Yet it probably offers one of the most accurate and gripping accounts of the experience of early-onset Alzheimer’s disease ever written. At first, Lisa Genova, a Harvard PhD in neuroscience, self-published her book. Her story resonated, and Still Alice took off, selling so many copies that it was bought by the prestigious publisher, Simon & Schuster. Over time, Genova would go on to win multiple awards for her work, and Still Alice would be made into a major motion picture. The Alice Howland we meet at the outset of the book is an esteemed professor of cognitive p...
Source: Psych Central - February 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Bella DePaulo Tags: Aging Alzheimer's Book Reviews Disorders Alzheimer's disease books on alzheimers early-onset Alzheimer's still alice Source Type: news

‘Reason is non-negotiable’: Steven Pinker on the Enlightenment
In an extract from his new book Enlightenment Now, the Harvard psychologist extols the relevance of 18th-century thinking• Read an interview with Steven Pinker on Enlightenment Now hereWhat is enlightenment? In a 1784 essay with that question as its title, Immanuel Kant answered that it consists of “humankind’s emergence from its self-incurred immaturity”, its “lazy and cowardly” submission to the “dogmas and formulas” of religious or political authority. Enlightenment’s motto, he proclaimed, is: “Dare to understand!” and its foundational demand is freedom of...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Steven Pinker Tags: Science and nature Steven Pinker Books Psychology Environment Culture Source Type: news

Steven Pinker: ‘The way to deal with pollution is not to rail against consumption’
The feather-ruffling Harvard psychologist ’s new book, a defence of Enlightenment values, may be his most controversial yet• Read an extract from Enlightenment Now hereSay the word “enlightenment” and it tends to conjure images of a certain kind of new-age spiritual “self-improvement”: meditation, candles, chakra lines. Add the definite article and a capital letter and the Enlightenment becomes something quite different: dead white men in wigs.For many people, particularly in the west, reaching a state of mindful nirvana probably seems more relevant to their wellbeing than the writings of...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Anthony Tags: Steven Pinker Science and nature Books Psychology Environment Poverty Inequality Culture Source Type: news

Mass. colleges got millions from family behind OxyContin maker
The gifts to Harvard and other schools mostly occurred before the drug hit the market, but are facing fresh scrutiny as the opioid crisis rages on. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 8, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Max Stendahl Source Type: news

Mass. colleges got millions from family behind OxyContin maker
The gifts to Harvard and other schools mostly occurred before the drug hit the market, but are facing fresh scrutiny as the opioid crisis rages on. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - February 8, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Max Stendahl Source Type: news

The trauma trap: what's causing inequalities in emergency care?
As US studies reveal worrying disparities in trauma treatment based on patient ethnicity, one surgeon urges more research into inequalities in UK emergency careTen years ago, when Dr Adil Haider, a trauma surgeon at Harvard Medical School, began investigating disparities in emergency centre outcomes based on information recorded in theUS National Trauma Data Bank, he discovered a striking trend.In the US, trauma is thenumber one cause of death for people under 47, and Haider had identified huge differences in patient survival rates based entirely on race. Compared to white patients with injuries of similar severity, black ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Cox Tags: Inequality Health Society US healthcare NHS US news Life and style World news Race issues UK news Doctors Medical research Science Source Type: news

Nature, meet nurture
(Harvard Medical School) Is it nature or nurture that ultimately shapes an organism? A new study reveals a dramatic landscape of gene expression changes across all cell types in the mouse visual cortex after a sensory experience, many linked to neural connectivity and the brain's ability to rewire itself to learn and adapt. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New glucagon delivery system reduces episodes of post-bariatric surgery hypoglycemia
(Joslin Diabetes Center) The number of bariatric surgeries is increasing, as is the incidence of post-bariatric hypoglycemia (PBH). Physicians do not have adequate tools to treat this condition. A smart glucagon device developed by Joslin Diabetes Center and the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences has been shown to reduce episodes of PBH. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Global Monitoring of Disease Outbreak Preparedness: Preventing the Next Pandemic; A Shared Framework
Harvard University. 02/05/2018 This 125-page report from the Harvard Global Health Institute provides an evidence-based monitoring framework for an independent global monitoring system, structured along four key domains, reflecting a multi-sectoral, whole-of-society approach to disease outbreak preparedness. Its four domains are strengthening public health core capacity as a foundation; improving science, technology, and access; reinforcing risk analysis and incentives for action; and strengthening global mechanisms. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

You Asked: Can Hanging Upside Down Relieve Back Pain?
If you’ve ever seen a TV commercial for inversion tables—those tilting contraptions that allow you to hang upside down by your ankles—and you suffer from back pain, you’ve probably been tempted to buy one. The ads claim that by dangling upside-down, bat-like, you’ll create separation between the vertebrae of your spine and neck. That separation supposedly reduces pressure on the nerves running between and around these vertebrae. You’ll relax tense muscles, and increase the flow of “nutrients” to the disks of your spine—all of which should help relieve back pain and prom...
Source: TIME: Health - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Back Pain benefits of hanging upside down Exercise/Fitness healthytime inversion table inversion table therapy is hanging upside down good for you remedies for back pain what does an inversion table do yoga yoga headsta Source Type: news

Manchester University Press to Migrate All Books and Journals to PubFactory in Spring 2018
Sheridan PubFactory and Manchester University Press are developing an online hosting platform that will bring together all of Manchester’s books and journals, vastly improving the accessibility and support for institutions and the user experience for readers. Simon Ross, CEO of Manchester University Press said: “PubFactory services and technology will allow Manchester University Press to directly control and manage the growth of our publishing program. They understand the needs of both our books and journals and can fully support a smaller publisher that by necessity needs thoughtful, creative solutions that ar...
Source: News from STM - February 6, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Editorial Source Type: news

Does watching Fast and Furious turn drivers into speed merchants?
A survey has observed a spike in the average speeds of those who had just seen one of the franchise ’s films. But it might be best to cover the brakes before leaping to any hasty conclusionsThe next time you get a speeding ticket, it might be worth arguing that the movies are to blame. A research paper by Dr Anupam Jena of Harvard medical schoolhas suggested films in theFast and Furious franchise may be responsible for drivers hitting the accelerator too hard.Jena unearthed details from 200,000 US speeding tickets that had been posted online, and studied those issued in the week following the release of films in the ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: James Ball Tags: Psychology Fast and Furious Science Culture Film Source Type: news

UC San Diego-Harvard group reports shift in awareness from Chopra well-being program
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study by Paul J. Mills, Ph.D., and colleagues has shown that an intensive six-day Ayurveda-based mind-body program led to a significant and sustained increase in self-awareness, with related mental and physical health benefits. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

IntechOpen Joins Presentations at Harvard and MIT on Open Access Books Addressing the Need for Fast Publishing with Peer Review
IntechOpen, the first native scientific publisher of Open Access books, stated its CEO/co-founder and scientist, Alex Lazinica, joined a presentation on Open Access books at Harvard and MIT, conducted by Mirena Bagur, MBA, a former course director at the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, with a goal of familiarizing researchers of benefits of distributing peer-reviewed, scientific articles and providing access to scientific discovery to their colleagues worldwide. Titled “How Publishing in Open Access Books Impacts Your Research Career,” the presentations were held to familiarize researche...
Source: News from STM - February 5, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news

For world's poorest, vaccines prevent deaths, medical impoverishment
(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) Vaccines have enormous impact not just on health, but on keeping people out of poverty, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. They estimated that increased investments in 10 vaccines administered in low- and middle-income countries over a 15-year period could avert up to 36 million deaths and 24 million cases of medical impoverishment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Pro Football Players May Die Earlier Than Their Peers, Study Says
The professional football industry has been rocked by plenty of bad press in recent years, from domestic violence charges to studies linking the sport to chronic brain injury. Now, just ahead of this weekend’s Super Bowl, a new study casts another shadow over the game: Career players in the National Football League (NFL) have slightly higher rates of early death than their peers who didn’t play professionally, according to a report published in JAMA. The difference in mortality rate between NFL players and non-NFL players was not statistically significant, meaning that the total number of deaths in the study wa...
Source: TIME: Health - February 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized chronic traumatic encephalopathy concussions cte football players football cte study football injuries football safety healthytime is football dangerous is football safe onetime Research why is football dangerous Source Type: news

Zeroing in on dopamine
(Harvard Medical School) Harvard Medical School scientists have identified the molecular machinery responsible for secretion of the neurotransmitter dopamine, opening the door for strategies to precision target dopamine release to treat disorders such as Parkinson's and addiction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Conversation on the Opioid Epidemic with Vice Admiral Jerome M. Adams
Harvard University, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. 01/24/2018 This 32-minute video is a conversation with the 20th Surgeon General of the United States about the role of the Surgeon General in general, and specifically, in the national opioid crisis. He discusses the opioid crisis as one of his priorities, the need to increase the availability of naxolone, and the need to educate the public about the severity of the epidemic and how the public can respond. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Change to state workers' health insurance plans was 'seriously mishandled,' Mass. AG says
A major change to Massachusetts public employees' health insurance plans was "seriously mishandled" and should be reconsidered, state Attorney General Maura Healey said Tuesday, adding that she's heard from "terrified" state workers. The Group Insurance Commission (GIC) manages insurance for over 400,000 state employees and retirees. The GIC went through a process to decide which plans to allow in for coverage, and is seeking to remove Tufts, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care and Fallon. The move will… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 24, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Gintautas Dumcius Source Type: news

Medicaid expansion linked with better, more timely surgical care
(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) The Affordable Care Act's Medicaid expansion was linked to better access to surgery and higher quality surgical care, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study will be published online Jan. 24, 2018 in JAMA Surgery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Twin Cities lab animal monitoring company to be sold for $70M
Data Sciences International, which makes equipment for monitoring lab animals, has reached a deal to be sold to a Massachusetts company for about $70 million. The buyer is Harvard Bioscience, a Holliston, Mass.-based company that makes life sciences equipment. The company announced the deal Monday. St. Paul-based Data Sciences International has about 180 employees and generated roughly $44 million in revenue last year. By comparison, Harvard Bioscience reported $105 million in revenue in 2016,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - January 23, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Max Stendahl Source Type: news

Harvard Bioscience snaps up lab equipment firm for $70M
Harvard Bioscience, a Holliston company that makes life sciences equipment, has agreed to acquire a Minnesota-based firm that makes implantable devices for monitoring blood glucose levels in lab animals. Under the deal, which was announced on Monday and is expected to close by early next month, Harvard Bioscience (Nasdaq: HBIO) said it would pay $70 million to buy Data Sciences International. The privately held, 180-employee company makes so-called “telemetry” systems that allow researchers… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 23, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Max Stendahl Source Type: news

Our Complacency About the Flu Is Killing Us
Everyone’s talking—and rightly so—about this year’s flu season, which is on its way to becoming the worst in 15 years. The news is full of stories about hospitals resorting to tents to accommodate the influx of patients and parents dealing with school closings in nearly every state. We count and mourn the dead. As a family doctor, my heart is with those patients and their families. As a global health professional with four decades of experience in combating epidemics, my mind is on the one critical thing we aren’t talking about at all as we suffer in this flu season: complacency. Put plainly, ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jonathan D. Quick, MD, MPH Tags: Uncategorized deaths from flu 2018 flu epidemic flu epidemic 2018 flu peak flu season 2018 flu shot effectiveness healthytime how many people have died from the flu new flu symptoms public health why are people dying of the flu Source Type: news

Hospital Groups Have an Idea That Could Make Generic Drugs Cheaper
(TRENTON, N.J.) — Several major not-for-profit hospital groups are trying their own solution to drug shortages and high prices: creating a company to make cheaper generic drugs. The plan, announced Thursday, follows years of shortages of generic injected medicines that are the workhorses of hospitals, along with some huge price increases for once-cheap generic drugs. Those problems drive up costs for hospitals, require staff time to find scarce drugs or devise alternatives, and sometimes mean patients don’t get the best choice. The not-for-profit drug company initially will be backed by four hospital groups &md...
Source: TIME: Health - January 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Linda A. Johnson / AP Tags: Uncategorized APH healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news

Major Mass. insurers dropped from state employee health system
A decision about health coverage for state employees and retirees is shaking the Massachusetts health insurance industry. Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, Tufts Health Plan and Fallon Health, which are the second-, third- and fourth-largest insurers in the state, have been dropped by the state Group Insurance Commission (GIC), which manages coverage for 442,000 members. About half of those members have a Harvard Pilgrim, Tufts or Fallon plan, and will need to chose new insurance coverage for July 1.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - January 19, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Martha Bebinger Source Type: news