Eating carbs in moderation lowers your risk of early death
The study of 15,400 people, led by Harvard School of Public Health, found eating too many or too few carbs is damaging to health. But if they make up 50 percent of your diet, you may well live longer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Weight Gain After Quitting Smoking May Up T2DM Risk
THURSDAY, Aug. 16, 2018 -- Smoking cessation accompanied by weight gain is linked to increased risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the Aug. 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Yang Hu, from the Harvard T.H. Chan... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 16, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Weight gain after quitting smoking increases a person ’s type 2 diabetes risk by more than 20% 
A study from Harvard University has found that those who gained weight after quitting smoking had a 22 percent higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes in comparison with current smokers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is Oatmeal Healthy? Here ’s What the Experts Say
Oatmeal is a near-universally beloved breakfast. While it has historically been enjoyed across Europe, Russia and the U.S., oatmeal is rapidly gaining popularity in developing countries because of its affordability and its perceived health properties. But is oatmeal really good for you? To answer that question, it’s first important to differentiate among all the different types of oatmeal. There’s steel-cut and rolled, quick-cooking and instant. But all of these terms refer to different methods of preparing hulled oats for cooking. “You can’t eat an unprocessed oat straight from the field,” sa...
Source: TIME: Health - August 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

This Habit Will Make You Better At Your Job
Imagine you’re faced with a tricky task at work. What’s your first reaction? If you’re socially minded, perhaps you’d fire off an email or Slack message to a co-worker, hoping to pick their brain. Or if you prefer solitude, maybe you’d shut yourself in a conference room to puzzle through the problem on your own. Either of these strategies could yield good results — but a new study, published Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, says the best strategy may be a blend of the two. “With our smartphones and all of these technologies now, we’re constantly able...
Source: TIME: Health - August 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime Source Type: news

Weight gain after smoking cessation linked to increased short-term diabetes risk
(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) People who gain weight after they quit smoking may face a temporary increase in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, with the risk directly proportional to the weight gain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Icon of free speech Noam Chomsky says it was wrong of Big Tech to ban Infowars
(Natural News) He supported avowed socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders’ 2016 presidential bid, the Occupy movement, and is a noted Left-wing professor emeritus from Harvard University and MIT. He once called POTUS Donald Trump an “ignorant, thin-skinned megalomaniac” who is a “greater evil” than Hillary Clinton. He hated the Reagan administration, the wars in Vietnam and... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Harvard Scientist Thinks He Has a Gene Test for Heart Attack Risk. He Wants to Give It Away Free.
" I think in a few years I think everybody will know this number similar to the way we know our cholesterol right now, " muses Sekar Kathiresan, director of the Center for Genomic Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital and a professor at Harvard Medical School. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - August 13, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Matthew Herper, Forbes Staff Source Type: news

New genetic test could detect your risk of five deadly diseases DECADES before symptoms arise
Harvard Medical School scientists say their new test, giving a 'polygenic risk score', would be the earliest predictor ever. It could be given at birth to spot risk of cancer, heart disease and diabetes. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Clues to Your Health Are Hidden at 6.6 Million Spots in Your DNA
With a sophisticated new algorithm, scientists have found a way to forecast an individual ’ s risks for five deadly diseases. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GINA KOLATA Tags: Genetics and Heredity Tests (Medical) Heart Breast Cancer DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid) Broad Institute Harvard University Kathiresan, Sekar Source Type: news

Male Underwear Choice Affects Sperm Counts
MONDAY, Aug. 13, 2018 -- Men who wear boxers have higher sperm counts then men who wear tighter underwear, according to a study published Aug. 8 in Human Reproduction. Lidia M ínguez-Alarcón, Ph.D., M.P.H., from Harvard University in Boston, and... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 13, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Researchers predict risk for common deadly diseases from millions of genetic variants
(Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard) A research team reports a new kind of genome analysis that could identify large fractions of the population who have a much higher risk of developing serious common diseases, including coronary artery disease, breast cancer, or type 2 diabetes. These tests, which use information from millions of places in the genome to ascertain risk for five diseases, can flag greater likelihood of developing the potentially fatal conditions well before any symptoms appear. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Collaborate, but only intermittently, says new study
(Harvard Business School) Technologies and organizations should be redesigned to intermittently isolate people from each other's work for best collective performance in solving complex problems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Carl Zimmer: ‘We shouldn’t look to our genes for a quick way to make life better’
The science writer and Harvard professor on intelligence, the promise and dangers of gene editing, and how we get heredity wrongCarl Zimmer is a rarity among professional science writers in being influential among the scientists on whose work he writes and comments – to the extent that he has beenappointed as professor adjunct in thedepartment ofmolecularbiophysics andbiochemistry at Yale University. Zimmer has just published his13th book,She Has Her Mother ’s Laugh,a survey of “the power, perversions and potential of heredity”.What is the book ’s main message about our att...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Philip Ball Tags: Genetics Biology Science Books Science and nature books Culture Source Type: news

Global funding for adolescent health misses the target
(Harvard Medical School) Adolescents make up more than a quarter of the population in developing countries, but only 1.6 percent of global development assistance for health from 2003-2016 went to adolescent health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why Is Harvard Training Its Med Students at the Zoo?
(MedPage Today) -- Future MDs learn'One Health'approach to medicine (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - August 9, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

'Tighty whities' really do damage a man's fertility
Men who most often wear boxer shorts have the highest counts of better sperm and jockeys and tighty whities are the worst underwear for fertility, according to new research from Harvard University. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Wearing Boxers May Be Better for Your Sperm Count, Study Says
Boxers or briefs? Researchers from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health have new findings that may help settle the debate. Men who wear boxers tend to have higher sperm counts and better quality sperm than men who wear tighter underwear, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Human Reproduction. That finding may warrant a wardrobe change among men actively looking to father a child, says study co-author Jorge Chavarro, an associate professor of nutrition, epidemiology and medicine at Harvard. “It will definitely not harm anyone, and it will probably help the men who are likely to benefit fro...
Source: TIME: Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Innovation Health onetime Source Type: news

Stale cockpit air may be affecting your pilot's performance
When ventilation in an airplane is insufficient, carbon dioxide levels rise and the higher the levels of the gas, the worse pilots perform flight maneuvers, Harvard University research reveals. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gender Gap for First Authors of Perspectives in Peds Journals
WEDNESDAY, Aug. 8, 2018 -- Women are underrepresented among physician first authors of perspective-type articles in prominent pediatric journals, according to a study published online July 20 in JAMA Network Open. Julie K. Silver, M.D., from Harvard... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 8, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

NTU and Harvard scientists discover fat-blocking effect of nanofibers
(Nanyang Technological University) Tiny balls of nano-sized cellulose fibers added to food reduced fat absorption by up to half in laboratory and animal experiments, report scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Harvard University, United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Immigrants use little health care, subsidize care of non-immigrants: Harvard/Tufts study
(Physicians for a National Health Program) A study in the International Journal of Health Services finds that immigrants use far less health care than non-immigrants, and may actually subsidize the care of US citizens. Immigrants' utilization was only one-half to two-thirds as high as that of the US-born population. Researchers concluded that immigrants effectively subsidize private and public insurance programs (such as Medicare) because they pay more into the system than is paid out for their care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

My host is my castle
(Harvard University, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology) Bat flies have been studied in a variety of contexts, including host associations and specificity, how bat ecology and roosting biology affects parasitism, and how fly morphology functions to allow coexistence of species on bat individuals and populations. Laboulbeniales associated with bat flies have been recently rediscovered. Studies since 2015 have revealed many new hosts, host associations, and undescribed taxa. These trends hint at the true diversity of these unique fungi. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Brown University to be main affiliate for Care New England under Partners deal
Brown University is cementing its place as the school of record for the Care New England health system if Partners succeeds in its bid to acquire the Rhode Island hospital chain. In doing so, it's effectively keeping Partners' affiliated college, Harvard University, at arms length and out of the Ocean State. Partners HealthCare, Care New England, and Brown announced on Tuesday that the three had signed a memorandum of understanding to establish Brown’s Warren Alpert school as the primary academic… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - August 7, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

Soft multi-functional robots get really small...and spider-shaped
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) Scientists have created -- of all things -- a soft robotic spider. Don't worry, it doesn't bite: the spider is a demonstration of a new   manufacturing process that can produce   soft robots on the millimeter scale with micrometer-scale features for microsurgery and other procedures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

If you're a woman having a heart attack, insist on a female physician
(Harvard Business School) Of more than 500,000 heart attack patients admitted to hospital emergency departments in Florida between 1991 and 2010, females treated by male doctors were less likely to survive. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Women survive heart attacks better with women doctors: Study
(Washington University in St. Louis) A review of nearly 582,000 heart attack cases over 19 years showed female patients had a significantly higher survival rate when a woman treated them in the ER, according to research by faculty members at Minnesota, Washington University in St. Louis and Harvard. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Harvard Research Fellow Estimates Puerto Rico's Death Toll Following Hurricane Maria
NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Satchit Balsari, a research fellow at Harvard Medical School and the T.H. Chan School of Public Health about his estimate of Puerto Rico's death toll following Hurricane Maria and recommendations for preparedness. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Low plasma levels of omega-3 fatty acids associated with preterm birth
(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) Pregnant women who had low plasma levels of long chain n-3 fatty acids in their first and second trimesters were at a significantly higher risk of early preterm birth when compared with women who had higher levels of these fatty acids, according to new research from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in collaboration with Statens Serum Institut in Copenhagen (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New lung cell type discovered
(Harvard Medical School) In separate studies published online in Nature on Aug. 1, two independent research teams report the discovery of a new, rare type of cell in the human airway. These cells appear to be the primary source of activity of the CFTR gene, mutations to which cause cystic fibrosis, a multiorgan disease that affects more than 70,000 people worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Innovative Global Data-Sharing Platform Vivli Launches
Leading institutions, including Cochrane, sign on to international platform which aims to accelerate medical researchThe nonprofit organizationVivli launched a novel data-sharing and analytics platform to help researchers move faster toward new treatments and cures. This innovative platform makes it easy for researchers worldwide to discover, share and analyze data from clinical trials, regardless of who sponsored the research or where the research took place.The Vivli platform launches at a crucial time in the evolution of science. Increasingly, researchers are being required to make their data openly available. New guide...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - July 30, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Alcohol In Breast Milk May Lead To Lower Cognition In Kids, Study Finds
(CBS Local/CNN)– Children’s exposure to alcohol through breast milk may cause a comparable drop in their cognitive abilities, according to a study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics. “This is the first study in which associations between alcohol exposure through breast milk and cognition in children are examined,” the researchers from Macquarie University in Australia wrote in the report. Previously Undisclosed TSA Program Tracks Unsuspecting Passengers The authors obtained data from a longitudinal study, a continuous study of data over a period of time, of 5,107 Australian infants who were...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - July 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News breastfeeding CNN Local TV Source Type: news

Nano-optic endoscope sees deep into tissue at high resolution
(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Experts in endoscopic imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and pioneers of flat metalens technology at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), have teamed up to develop a new class of endoscopic imaging catheters -- termed nano-optic endoscopes -- that overcome the limitations of current systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New ways to assess drug benefits can help cut health care costs
(American Statistical Association) Newly approved drugs are compared to either a placebo or to one standard of care, with little information about their effectiveness to the other available treatment options. The statistical performance of a commonly used method to address this challenge has yet to be extensively studied or reported. David Cheng of Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health and researchers from Analysis Group have identified conditions under which this method is valid. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Use Mosaic Chromosomal Alterations to ID New Approaches to Preventing CLL?
In analyzing over 8,300 mosaic chromosomal alterations in UK Biobank participants, Harvard researchers uncovered specific alterations that may predict for CLL. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - July 27, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: John Schieszer Source Type: news

Highest opioid prescribing rates in U.S. among congressional districts in Southeast, Appalachia, and rural West
Congressional districts with the highest opioid prescribing rates are predominantly concentrated in the southeastern U.S., with other hotspots in Appalachia and the rural west, according to a new study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - July 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

This engineered heart ventricle helps with studying arrhythmia and cardiomyopathy
[Luke MacQueen and Michael Rosnach/Harvard University]While engineered heart tissues can replicate muscle contraction and electrical activity in a dish, many aspects of heart disease can only adequately be captured in 3D. In a report published online yesterday by Nature Biomedical Engineering, researchers describe a scale model of a heart ventricle, built to replicate the chamber’s architecture, physiology and contractions. Cardiac researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital think it could help them find treatments for congenital heart diseases. Building a 3D engineered heart ventricle Collaborators from the Harv...
Source: Mass Device - July 26, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Blog Vector Blog Source Type: news

Third Retraction for Harvard Cancer Biologist
The move follows two major corrections to a 2011 Nature paper, in which researchers demonstrated that a natural compound selectively kills cancer cells. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - July 25, 2018 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Stanford, Harvard geneticists launch biotech to fight deadly bacteria
Professors at Harvard University and Stanford University have joined forces to launch a biotech startup that is developing a fluid-testing tool and disease database — an ambitious project that could one day cut laboratory testing time down to an hour and help stop deadly outbreaks.  "We're working toward a one-stop solution for infection," Harvard geneticist Dr. David Andrew Sinclair said of Arc Bio, which emerged from stealth Tuesday. "Eventually, we'll be the place that researchers and hospitals… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 24, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Allison DeAngelis Source Type: news

Stanford, Harvard geneticists launch biotech to fight deadly bacteria
Professors at Harvard University and Stanford University have joined forces to launch a biotech startup that is developing a fluid-testing tool and disease database — an ambitious project that could one day cut laboratory testing time down to an hour and help stop deadly outbreaks.  "We're working toward a one-stop solution for infection," Harvard geneticist Dr. David Andrew Sinclair said of Arc Bio, which emerged from stealth Tuesday. "Eventually, we'll be the place that researchers and hospitals… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 24, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Allison DeAngelis Source Type: news

UCLA biologist works to create a new field, merging the sciences and architecture
How do spaces affect us, and animals? UCLA biologist Noa Pinter-Wollman had the idea that we can learn from the way animals use space, and, with several colleagues from the U.S., England and France, she is launching an effort to create a new field of study. Her goals are ambitious.Does she hope her research will lead to better homes, better offices and better communities?“Of course,” said Pinter-Wollman, an expert on ants, spiders and how environments influence collective behavior. “Who doesn’t? I want to know how collective behaviors emerge; what causes them, and how they can be improved.”It ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 24, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Stanford, Harvard geneticists launch biotech to fight deadly bacteria
Professors at Harvard University and Stanford University have joined forces to launch a biotech startup that is developing a fluid-testing tool and disease database — an ambitious project that could one day cut laboratory testing time down to an hour and help stop deadly outbreaks.  "We're working toward a one-stop solution for infection," Harvard geneticist Dr. David Andrew Sinclair said of Arc Bio, which emerged from stealth Tuesday. "Eventually, we'll be the place that researchers and hospitals… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - July 24, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Allison DeAngelis Source Type: news

Stanford, Harvard geneticists launch biotech to fight deadly bacteria
Professors at Harvard University and Stanford University have joined forces to launch a biotech startup that is developing a fluid-testing tool and disease database — an ambitious project that could one day cut laboratory testing time down to an hour and help stop deadly outbreaks.  "We're working toward a one-stop solution for infection," Harvard geneticist Dr. David Andrew Sinclair said of Arc Bio, which emerged from stealth Tuesday. "Eventually, we'll be the place that researchers and hospitals… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 24, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Allison DeAngelis Source Type: news

Harvard, Stanford geneticists launch biotech to fight deadly bacteria
Professors at Harvard University and Stanford University have joined forces to launch a biotech startup that is developing a fluid-testing tool and disease database — an ambitious project that could one day cut laboratory testing time down to an hour and help stop deadly outbreaks.  "We're working towards a one-stop solution for infection," Harvard geneticist Dr. David Andrew Sinclair said of Arc Bio, which officially launched Tuesday. "Eventually, we'll be the place that researchers and hospitals… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 24, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Allison DeAngelis Source Type: news

Meet with Your Lawmakers to Inform Science Policy this Summer
Registration is now open for the 2018 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) is an opportunity for scientists from across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research and education. Now in its tenth year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state elect...
Source: Public Policy Reports - July 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Health Tip: Avoid Sugary Drinks
-- The average American gets more than 200 calories a day from sugary drinks, Harvard University's T.H. Chan School of Public Health says. That's more than four times the average amount in 1965. The thirst for sugary drinks is contributing to the... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

A 3D model of a human heart ventricle
(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Harvard University researchers have bioengineered a three-dimensional model of a human left heart ventricle that could be used to study diseases, test drugs and develop patient-specific treatments for heart conditions such as arrhythmia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A 3-D model of a human heart ventricle
(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Harvard University researchers have bioengineered a three-dimensional model of a human left heart ventricle that could be used to study diseases, test drugs and develop patient-specific treatments for heart conditions such as arrhythmia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Doctors think they have discovered the cause of MS  
Scientists at the University of Glasgow and Harvard University in the US suggest exposure to two common infections – threadworms followed by the Epstein-Barr virus – may be the trigger. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Systemic Changes May Reduce Gender Disparities in Medical Training Systemic Changes May Reduce Gender Disparities in Medical Training
Gender disparities in medical careers - in position, pay and publishing - start early, but even small systemic changes in training programs could begin to narrow these gaps, says a group of Harvard Medical School doctors.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - July 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Med Students News Source Type: news