Men who can do over 40 push-ups are at a 96% lower risk of heart disease, study finds
Instead of long, arduous treadmill tests for heart health, doctors at Harvard University are now recommending push-ups, as doing over 10 indicates a young man's heart is relatively healthy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Push-up capacity linked with lower incidence of cardiovascular disease events among men
(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) Active, middle-aged men able to complete more than 40 push-ups had a significantly lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes -- including diagnoses of coronary artery disease and major events such as heart failure -- during 10 years of follow-up compared with those who were able to do less than 10 push-ups during the baseline exam. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cracking colibactin's code
(Harvard University) In an effort to understand how colibactin, a compound produced by certain strains of E. coli, may be connected to the development of colorectal cancer, Harvard researchers are exploring how the compound damages DNA to produce DNA adducts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Uncovering a 'smoking gun' of biological aging clocks
(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) A newly discovered ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clock can be used to accurately determine an individual's chronological and biological age, according to research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The ribosomal clock is a novel biomarker of aging based on the rDNA, a segment of the genome that has previously been mechanistically linked to aging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 14, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A Harvard Geneticist Wants To Sell A Magical Molecule To Reverse Aging. It Works. In Mice.
David Sinclair stirred up controversy before when he promoted — and got $8 million — off a “miraculous molecule.” (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 13, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

IBM Watson Health announces slew of AI-based research partnership deals
IBM Watson Health today announced a number of new partnership deals, including an expanded collaborative deal with the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and 10-year, $50 million collaborative research deals with the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Vanderbilt University Medical Center. The Cambridge, Mass.-based IBM division said that it inked an extended partnership with the Broad Institute looking to analyze and explore genomics data to better understand the intrinsic possibility individuals have for a certain disease. The newly inked initiative aims to incorporate population-based and hospital-based biob...
Source: Mass Device - February 13, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Featured Software / IT IBM Watson Health Source Type: news

Platelet 'decoys' outsmart both clots and cancer
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) What do heart disease, stroke, sepsis, and cancer have in common, aside from being deadly diseases? They're all linked to platelets, the cells in our blood that normally help our blood clot. New research from the Wyss Institute has created 'decoy' platelets that can both prevent blood clots and keep cancer from spreading. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 13, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

4 Important Steps to Take After a Cancer Diagnosis
Each year, more than 1.7 million people in the United States hear three dreaded words: You have cancer. As common as cancer is, no one expects cancer to happen to them. We understand, as patients and as caregivers, how frightening a cancer diagnosis can be: how it can upend your life, leaving you feeling like you’re barely treading water. And we know that making tough decisions when your life depends on it is not easy. From our research at Harvard Business School of how people navigate their cancer treatment (and what they wish they had known sooner), we have developed four steps that all people with cancer can take ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kathy Giusti and Lori Tauber Marcus Tags: Uncategorized Cancer Source Type: news

A bioengineered factory for T-cells
(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Harvard engineers and stem cell biologists have developed an injectable sponge-like gel that enhances the production T-cells after a bone marrow transplant. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Engineered miniature kidneys come of age
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) A research team at Harvard University has now removed a major barrier for the use of kidney organoids as a tool to model kidney diseases, test drug toxicities and eventually for the creation of organ replacements, the lack of a pervasive blood vessel system (vasculature). The team solved this problem with a powerful new approach that exposes stem cell-derived kidney organoids to fluidic shear stress and thus enables them to vascularize and mature further than they could before. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dr. John Gunderson, 76, Dies; Defined Borderline Personality Disorder
“ He was the first person to look systematically at the data and figure out what the heck this diagnosis really meant, ” a colleague said. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: BENEDICT CAREY Tags: Gunderson, Dr. John Deaths (Obituaries) Psychiatry and Psychiatrists Borderline Personality Disorder Mental Health and Disorders Harvard University Source Type: news

How bees stay cool on hot summer days
(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Harvard researchers have developed a framework that explains how bees use environmental signals to collectively cluster and continuously ventilate the hive. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Vaccinating against chickenpox often causes shingles, even in children
(Natural News) Like all diseases, chickenpox takes a lot of joy out of childhood. When he gets it, he can’t learn more at school, enjoy the sunshine, or even explore the great outdoors. However, if you think that getting a shot for chickenpox solves the problem, think again. According to researchers from Harvard Medical School, healthy... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A High-Tech Pill to End Drug Injections
Engineers have developed a tiny robotic capsule that injects insulin once it lands in the stomach. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GINA KOLATA Tags: Insulin Turtles and Tortoises Digestive Tract Biotechnology and Bioengineering Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Brigham and Women's Hospital Harvard University Massachusetts Institute of Technology Novo Nordisk A/S Science (Journal) your-feed-s Source Type: news

Microbial manufacturing
(Harvard University) Led by Emily Balskus, Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, a team of researchers has untangled how bacteria found in soil are able to manufacture streptozotocin, showing for the first time that the compound is produced through an enzymatic pathway and revealing the novel chemistry that drives the process. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Men who have smoked marijuana are MORE fertile than those who don't, shocking Harvard study finds
A new Harvard University study unexpectedly found that men who have ever smoked weed have higher sperm counts and testosterone levels, but the male hormone may drive fertility and 'risk-taking.' (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A New Study Says Pot Smokers May Have Higher Sperm Counts. But There ’s a Catch
Men who have smoked marijuana may be more fertile than those who have never touched it, suggests a new study published in the journal Human Reproduction. The results are a surprise — but researchers warn there’s more to the story. While research about marijuana and fertility is limited, some past papers have suggested that it might harm semen quality. Cigarette smoking is also known to be a risk factor for both female and male infertility. Given those links, the authors of the new study expected to find that men who have smoked pot would have worse measures of fertility, says co-author Dr. Jorge Chavarro, an as...
Source: TIME: Health - February 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized fertility healthytime Source Type: news

Novel enzyme discovered in intestinal bacteria
(University of Konstanz) At the University of Konstanz, in cooperation with Harvard University, a key enzyme for formation of harmful hydrogen sulphide in the human gut by Bilophila bacteria has been discovered. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lifestyle determines risk for cardiovascular disease: Inflammation flagged as key
(Natural News) A study by researchers from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have determined that “a set of genetic mutations in blood cells that arises during aging” can possibly be a major new risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The researchers said that since the mutations are more common in older people (more than... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New disease surveillance tool helps detect any human virus
(Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard) A new computational method called 'CATCH' designs molecular 'baits' for any virus known to infect humans and all their known strains, including those that are present in low abundance in clinical samples, such as Zika. The approach can help small sequencing centers around the globe conduct disease surveillance, which is crucial for controlling outbreaks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 4, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Two e-cigarette flavors destroy lung function, Harvard study warns  
Popcorn and caramel - two widely used e-liquids - contain chemicals that wear down the lungs' first line of defense, raising the risks of COPD and asthma, the study found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Two e-cigarette flavors destroy lung function, Harvard study warns 
Popcorn and caramel - two widely used e-liquids - contain chemicals that wear down the lungs' first line of defense, raising the risks of COPD and asthma, the study found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Common e-cigarette chemical flavorings may impair lung function
(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) Two chemicals widely used to flavor electronic cigarettes may be impairing the function of cilia in the human airway, according to a new study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Evolution, illustrated
(Harvard University) Led by Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and Molecular and Cellular Biology Hopi Hoekstra, a team of international researchers conducted a years-long study that not only confirmed the intuition that light-colored mice survive better in light-colored habitats, and vice versa for dark-colored mice, but also allowed researchers to pinpoint a mutation related to survival, specifically that affects pigmentation, and understand exactly how the mutation produced a novel coat color. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 31, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Harvard Museum of Natural History presents a new Climate Change exhibit exploring the global impact of the warming climate on the planet
(Harvard University) The Harvard Museum of Natural History announces the new Climate Change exhibit that draws on the latest scientific information about our warming climate, the global and local consequences, and how to both reduce the fossil fuel emissions that cause it and prepare for its effects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

We need to fine-tune our 'maps' of the visual cortex, study shows
(KU Leuven) Monkey brain scans have revealed new information about the part of the brain that processes visual information. The findings were recently presented in PNAS by neurophysiologists Qi Zhu (KU Leuven) and Wim Vanduffel (KU Leuven/ Harvard Medical School). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 30, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Bad brakes
(Harvard Medical School) A study in human and mouse heart cells identifies a faulty molecular brake in the most common form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young people and athletes and the most common genetic disease of the heart The faulty brake, found about a quarter of all genetic mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, interferes with the heart muscle's ability to contract and relax,.Treatment with a chemical compound successfully restores normal contractility and relaxation in human heart cells (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How Employers Can Help Caregivers For A Win-Win
A Harvard report finds that employers helping caregiving workers can boost their bottom line. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - January 27, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Next Avenue, Contributor Source Type: news

These Patients Had Sickle-Cell Disease. Experimental Therapies Might Have Cured Them.
Success against sickle-cell would be “ the first genetic cure of a common genetic disease ” and could free tens of thousands of Americans from agonizing pain. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GINA KOLATA Tags: Genetics and Heredity Hemoglobin Crispr (DNA) Blood Pain Sickle Cell Anemia National Institutes of Health Harvard University bluebird bio Inc. Africa Source Type: news

These Patients Had Sickle-Cell Disease. Experimental Therapies May Have Cured Them.
Success against sickle-cell would mark “ the first genetic cure of a common genetic disease ” and could free tens of thousands of Americans from agonizing pain. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GINA KOLATA Tags: Genetics and Heredity Hemoglobin Crispr (DNA) Blood Pain Sickle Cell Anemia National Institutes of Health Harvard University bluebird bio Inc. Africa Source Type: news

2003 to 2015 Saw Increase in Outpatient Benzodiazepine Use
FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 -- Outpatient benzodiazepine use increased from 2003 to 2015, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in JAMA Network Open. Sumit D. Agarwal, M.D., and Bruce E. Landon, M.D., from Harvard Medical School in Boston,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 25, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

The hitchhiker's guide to defeating glioblastoma
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) A team of investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School has begun looking at microRNAs in an entirely new way. Their approach has shown promising results in preclinical models, increasing survival in a murine model of glioblastoma by five-fold when combined with chemotherapy. The team's results are published in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Harvard researchers report positive trial results with artificial pancreas smartphone app
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) The results of a new clinical trial have shown the safety and efficacy of the interoperable Artificial Pancreas System smartphone app (iAPS), which can interface wirelessly with leading continuous glucose monitors (CGM), insulin pump devices, and decision-making algorithms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Doctors Make Mistakes. A New Documentary Explores What Happens When They Do —and How to Fix It
People accept it as fact: that to err is human. Every misstep is an opportunity to learn and improve. But when the mistakes are made by doctors, lives can be compromised, or even lost. Among malpractice claims, about 30% are due to diagnostic errors, according to a report by Coverys, a malpractice services provider. In the U.S. in 2017, surgeons either operated on the wrong patient, the wrong site or performed the wrong procedure 95 times, according to the Joint Commission, which accredits and certifies many healthcare systems in the country. To Err is Human, a new documentary from 3759 Films and Tall Tale Productions that...
Source: TIME: Health - January 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Health Care Source Type: news

Insufficient evidence' that antidepressants affect fertility or infertility-treatment outcomes
(Wolters Kluwer Health) Based on limited research, there's no strong evidence that selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) -- the most widely used class of antidepressants -- have an adverse impact on fertility, according to a paper in the Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cancer drug development award given to Geoffrey Shapiro
(European Society for Medical Oncology) The TAT 2019 Honorary Award for cancer drug development has been given to Dr Geoffrey Shapiro, Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Institute Physician at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, for his leadership in developmental therapeutics, particularly in solid tumours. The award will be presented during the International Congress on Targeted Anticancer Therapies (TAT) 2019, to be held in Paris, France, 25-27 February. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ScienceTake: How Ants Sniff Out the Right Path
They may seem like automatons, but ants are surprisingly sophisticated in their navigational strategies. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JAMES GORMAN Tags: Ants Senses and Sensation Harvard University Journal of Experimental Biology Source Type: news

The New Old Age: Hospitals Stopped Readmitting So Many Medicare Patients. Did That Cost Lives?
A new government program was supposed to prevent certain Medicare recipients from cycling in and out of hospitals. Now experts worry some older patients are being denied necessary care. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: PAULA SPAN Tags: Hospitals Elderly Medicare Fines (Penalties) Heart Pneumonia Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (2010) Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Harvard University Health Affairs (Journal) Journal of the American Medical Assn Medi Source Type: news

The New Old Age: Hospitals Stopped Readmitting Medicare Patients So Often. Was That a Good Thing?
A new government program was supposed to prevent certain Medicare recipients from cycling in and out of hospitals. Now some experts worry it may be costing lives. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: PAULA SPAN Tags: Hospitals Elderly Medicare Fines (Penalties) Heart Pneumonia Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (2010) Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Harvard University Health Affairs (Journal) Journal of the American Medical Assn Medi Source Type: news

The New Old Age: Older Patients Are Not Returning as Often to Hospitals. Is That a Good Thing?
A new government program was supposed to prevent certain Medicare recipients from cycling in and out of hospitals. Now some experts worry it may be costing lives. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: PAULA SPAN Tags: Hospitals Elderly Medicare Fines (Penalties) Heart Pneumonia Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (2010) Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Harvard University Health Affairs (Journal) Journal of the American Medical Assn Medi Source Type: news

Sexist? Bigoted? Aren ’t we all? | Oliver Burkeman
Before we point the finger at others, maybe it ’s time to take a closer look at our own behaviourYou ’ll recall, I assume, the ancient riddle about the father and son rushed to casualty after a car crash, where the surgeon, taking one look at the boy, declares, “I can’t operate on him, he’s my son!” As a way of making a point about sexism, this doesn’t really work any more: the twist or “solution” to the riddle (how is this possible?) is meant to be that the surgeon is his mother – but as many a smart aleck has noted, why not his other father?Still, there are echo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Oliver Burkeman Tags: Health & wellbeing Life and style Psychology Source Type: news

‘ Planetary Health Diet ’ : Scientists Say Cutting Red Meat, Sugar Can Save Lives And The Planet
(CNN) — An international team of scientists has developed a diet it says can improve health while ensuring sustainable food production to reduce further damage to the planet. The “planetary health diet” is based on cutting red meat and sugar consumption in half and upping intake of fruits, vegetables and nuts. And it can prevent up to 11.6 million premature deaths without harming the planet, says the report published Wednesday in the medical journal The Lancet. The authors warn that a global change in diet and food production is needed as 3 billion people across the world are malnourished — which in...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Source Type: news

Asteroids Are Slamming Into Earth Twice as Much as Before, Scientists Say
(WASHINGTON) — Giant rocks from space are falling from the sky more than they used to, but don’t worry. For the past 290 million years, large asteroids have been crashing into Earth more than twice as often as they did in the previous 700 million years, according to a new study in Thursday’s journal Science. But no need to cast a wary glance up. Asteroids still only smack Earth on average every million or few million years, even with the increased crash rate. NASA’s list of potential big space rock crashes shows no pending major threats. The biggest known risk is a 4,200-ft. (1.3-km) wide asteroid w...
Source: TIME: Science - January 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Seth Borenstein / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight space Source Type: news

6 High-Protein Foods That Are Healthier Than Beef
Americans are obsessed with protein. It’s touted as the cornerstone of any healthy diet, since it helps people feel full and builds muscle. But most Americans eat too much protein every day, according to federal estimates—and they’re going especially overboard with animal proteins, namely red meat. It’s becoming clear how big a problem excessive red-meat consumption can be for health. Research has found associations between diets heavy in red and processed meats and many chronic diseases, including Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Red meat comes with high amounts of saturated fat, and proc...
Source: TIME: Health - January 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Celebrities Are Fighting Over the ‘Keto’ Diet. Here’s What Science Says About How Healthy It Is
A celebrity feud has ignited debate over the popular — but somewhat controversial — ketogenic diet. It all started last week, when trainer Jillian Michaels told Women’s Health that the high-fat, low-carb keto diet is “a bad plan, for a million reasons.” “I don’t understand. Like, why would anybody think this is a good idea?” Michaels asked. It quickly became clear that many people, famous and otherwise, think the trendy plan is a good idea. Celebrities including Al Roker and Andy Cohen criticized Michaels’ take, causing her to double down on her position and offer to de...
Source: TIME: Health - January 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Medical News Today: ALS: A new therapy may be in sight
New research, led by Harvard scientists, identifies a novel potential therapeutic target for treating amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Muscular Dystrophy / ALS Source Type: news

Risk for Uninsurance in AMI Patients Reduced With Medicaid Expansion
THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 -- Medicaid expansion was associated with a reduced risk for uninsurance among acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in JAMA Cardiology. Rishi K. Wadhera, M.D., from Harvard... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 17, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Less Beef and More Beans. Report Recommends a New Diet for Planetary Health
(NEW YORK) — A hamburger a week, but no more — that’s about as much red meat people should eat to do what’s best for their health and the planet, according to a report seeking to overhaul the world’s diet. Eggs should be limited to fewer than about four a week, the report says. Dairy foods should be about a serving a day, or less. The report from a panel of nutrition, agriculture and environmental experts recommends a plant-based diet, based on previously published studies that have linked red meat to increased risk of health problems. It also comes amid recent studies of how eating habits aff...
Source: TIME: Health - January 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Candice Choi / AP Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition onetime overnight Source Type: news