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Divided Democratic Party Debates Its Future as 2020 Looms
Like virtually all Democrats, Tim Ryan is no fan of Donald Trump. But as he speeds through his northeastern Ohio district in a silver Chevy Suburban, the eight-term Congressman sounds almost as frustrated with his own party. Popping fistfuls of almonds in the backseat, Ryan gripes about its fixation on divisive issues and its “demonization” of business owners. Ryan, 44, was briefly considered for the role of Hillary Clinton’s running mate last year. Now he sounds ready to brawl with his political kin. “We’re going to have a fight,” Ryan says. “There’s no question about it.&rd...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Philip Elliott / Youngstown, Ohio Tags: Uncategorized democratic party Source Type: news

Drinking low-fat or skim milk raises the risk of Parkinson's disease, according to researchers
(Natural News) The more low-fat dairy a person consumes in a day, the greater their risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, claim researchers from Harvard University. To be precise: Those who consumed at least three servings of low-fat dairy a day had a 34 percent higher chance of acquiring the disease than those who consumed less... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ancient human DNA in sub-Saharan Africa lifts veil on prehistory
(Harvard Medical School) The first large-scale study of ancient human DNA from sub-Saharan Africa opens a long-awaited window into the identity of prehistoric populations in the region and how they moved around and replaced one another over the past 8,000 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 21, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

President Trump, North Korea and a Brief History of Nuclear Threats
During his first presidential speech at the United Nations on Tuesday, President Trump cited the “strength and patience” of his nation before telling the audience that “if [the U.S.] is forced to defend itself or its allies, we will have no choice but to totally destroy North Korea.” This is not, as it happens, the first time a nuclear power has openly threatened another state with destruction — but the previous episode does not bode well for President Trump, or for the world. In 1956 only the United States, the USSR and Great Britain had nuclear weapons. It turns out that Russia was quite a w...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: David Kaiser Tags: Uncategorized Nuclear Opinion United Nations USSR Source Type: news

Study links PTSD with increased lupus risk
A new study by Harvard University T. H. Chan School of Public Health found that women with post-traumatic stress disorder are at increased risk for lupus. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

PTSD increases your risk of lupus
Women who have PTSD are almost three times as likely to develop lupus, according to a new Harvard study. Mental healthcare could help reduce risk for autoimmune diseases. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Discovery helps improve accuracy of CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing
(University of California - Berkeley) Detailed study of how domains within the Cas9 protein move when the molecule binds to DNA has allowed UC Berkeley, Harvard and Massachusettes General Hospital scientists to locate the protein that monitors the fidelity of binding between the Cas9 single-guide RNA and its DNA target. The researchers then tweaked this domain to boost specificity, creating the highest fidelity Cas9 protein to date. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

State Health Leadership and the Opioid Epidemic: Where Are We Now and Where Are We Going?
Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 09/08/2017 This one-hour virtual town hall, presented by ASTHO in association with The Forum at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, addresses the opioid epidemic in the speakers'states. Presenters offer their perspectives and shared innovative approaches to preventing opioid misuse and abuse, ranging from education and prevention through treatment and recovery. They discuss what else is needed to reduce opioid misuse and prevent addiction nationwide. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - September 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Scientists explore biology's boundaries at Allen Discovery Center at Tufts first symposium
(Tufts University) Eight researchers in the vanguard of biological science gathered at the inaugural symposium of the new Allen Discovery Center at Tufts University today to explore new frontiers within the dark matter of biology. The day-long symposium, which attracted guest speakers from leading research institutions such as Tufts, Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Jackson Labs, was expected to draw about 300 attendees. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

An interconnection between the nervous and immune system
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) Working with colleagues from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE ), Harvard Medical School and Ohio State University, researchers from Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin have shown that the increased incidence of infections seen in spinal cord injury patients is directly linked to a disruption of the normal central nervous system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Foot pain? New study says look at hip and knee for complete diagnosis
(Hospital for Special Surgery) A study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery and Harvard Medical School suggests new guidelines may be in order for evaluating and treating lower extremity pain. Investigators set out to determine if there was a relation between foot pain and lower extremity joint pain, and they found a significant association between foot pain and knee or hip pain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dar Williams: How to Make Your Town Somewhere Everyone Wants to Live
It doesn’t start with love. If you want to live in a great town, but you’re not quite there yet, you don’t just start to build that town with love, peace, civility, or morality. You start with a hill. You say to yourself, That hill, off the side of the high school, would be perfect for sledding. I know someone who could mow it with his riding mower. You call that guy and ask. He says, “Sure.” On an early Saturday morning in late September when the streets are empty, he drives over on the main roads and mows the hill. You hand him a coffee and tell him your idea. He says, pointing, “Afte...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dar Williams Tags: Uncategorized Books Community Source Type: news

Where 2017 ’s Hurricanes Fit in the Long History of American Climate Confusion
This post is in partnership with the History News Network, the website that puts the news into historical perspective. The article below was originally published at HNN. Last month, Hurricane Harvey dumped more rain on the Texas coast in a week than most states see all year. As I write, Florida is engulfed in a hurricane expected to cause tens of billions more in damage. We know rising sea levels mean higher storm surges. We know hotter air means potentially larger hurricanes with more rain and winds. What’s harder to say is whether we should blame these particular storms—or any other weather event—on glo...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sam White / History News Network Tags: Uncategorized Environment natural disaster Source Type: news

Liberia: Harvard Doctor to Save Million Lives in Liberia
[New Democrat] A two-year-old child in rural Liberia has a fever. It could be malaria, and the only way to get treatment is for her mother to carry her on her back, cross a riverbed by canoe and walk through a forest for at least two days to get to the nearest healthcare clinic. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 18, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

‘We Should Forgive Everybody at Some Point.’ Chelsea Manning Speaks Out in Rare Public Appearance
(NANTUCKET, Mass.) — Chelsea Manning said Sunday she is not an “American traitor” as her critics have claimed, and that she did what she thought was right. Manning made the remarks at a conference in Nantucket that was one of her first public appearances since being released from a military prison in May. The Associated Press was the only media outlet in attendance. “I believe I did the best I could in my circumstances to make an ethical decision,” she told the crowd when asked by the moderator if she was a traitor. The 29-year-old transgender woman was known as Bradley Manning when she was co...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer McDermott / AP Tags: Uncategorized Chelsea Manning intelligence National Security onetime Surveillance Source Type: news

Why Bernie Sanders ’ Health Care Bill is a Risk
As progressive Democrats introduced single-payer healthcare legislation this week, many in the party are shaking their heads at what proponents are calling a “litmus test” for 2020 candidates. The dead-on-arrival bill has more than a dozen Democratic supporters in the Senate—and its support among the general public is far from enthusiastic—but the measure represents the lasting influence of Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren on the party, shifting it leftward at a time of great opportunity. With Republicans deeply divided over President Trump, Democrats may create a new rift among their supporters ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Zeke J Miller Tags: Uncategorized Morning Must Reads Source Type: news

Harvard Withdrew Chelsea Manning ’s ‘Visiting Fellow’ Invitation. Here’s What to Know
A Harvard graduate school dean on Friday withdrew a designation extended to Chelsea Manning, saying the offer was a “mistake,” after a backlash from several people, including the head of the CIA. Manning, an Army soldier who was convicted of espionage after leaking classified government documents, was released from prison in May after then-President Barack Obama commuted her sentence in January. Manning was set to serve as a “visiting fellow” at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government this fall before the school revoked the “perceived honor.” The reversal came less than a da...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melissa Chan Tags: Uncategorized Chelsea Manning onetime Source Type: news

Study: Hospitals, nursing homes increasingly have common investors
A Harvard study found that half of all post-acute care centers have common investors with hospitals across the country, up from just 25 percent in 2005. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 15, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

Schools Seek to Help Immigrants Amid Mixed Signals on DACA
(BERKELEY, Calif.) — Mixed signals from Washington over a possible agreement to preserve protections for young immigrants are increasing anxiety and confusion on college campuses, where the stakes are high. Amid the uncertainty, colleges and universities are stepping up efforts to protect students enrolled in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, telling them to be hopeful but plan for the worst. Harvard University has opened a round-the-clock emergency hotline for immigrants in the program. The University of Illinois at Chicago has posted advice on what to do if federal agents show up on campus. UC Ber...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jocelyn Gecker and Sophia Tareen / AP Tags: Uncategorized DACA Immigration onetime Source Type: news

Harvard Says Chelsea Manning Can Still Visit, But Not as a Fellow
The Harvard Kennedy School rescinded its designation of Chelsea Manning as a visiting fellow late Thursday, calling the initial decision “a mistake.” “We invited Chelsea Manning to spend a day at the Kennedy School,” said dean Douglas Elmendorf in a statement, explaining that Manning was invited to talk to interested students, and then give remarks at a forum where attendees could “ask hard questions and challenge what she has said and done.” “We did not intend to honor her in any way or to endorse any of her words or deeds,” Elmendorf continued. Manning served more than six ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kevin Lui Tags: Uncategorized Chelsea Manning colleges Education Harvard intelligence onetime Source Type: news

CIA Director Mike Pompeo Cancels Harvard Appearance Over Chelsea Manning Hire
CIA Director Mike Pompeo cancelled a scheduled appearance at Harvard University on Thursday over the university’s Kennedy School of Government hiring of Chelsea Manning as a visiting fellow. “While I have served my country as a soldier in the United States Army and will continue to defend Ms. Manning’s right to offer a defense of why she chose this path, I believe it is shameful for Harvard to place its stamp of approval upon her treasonous actions,” Pompeo said in a letter to Harvard on Thursday, according to NBC News. The Kennedy School announced Manning’s fellowship on Wednesday, along with...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized Chelsea Manning Harvard onetime Source Type: news

How women who don't get enough vitamin D face MS risk
Researchers at Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health in Boston studied blood samples from 3,200 women, who are two to three times more likely to be diagnosed with MS than men. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Anti-Infectives Rx Takes Place on September 19 to Bring Together...
Join Rita Colwell (National Science Foundation), Shalabh Gupta (Globavir BioSciences), Oreola Donini (Soligenix), Roelof Rongen (Matinas), Jeff Wager (EnBiotix), and others at Harvard Medical School...(PRWeb September 14, 2017)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/09/prweb14698504.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - September 14, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

NIH awards $15M for 3D human tissue models
[Image from Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University]The National Institutes of Health has announced 13 2-year awards, totaling $15 million a year, for hospitals and universities to develop 3D human tissue models. The funding will go toward the first phase of a 5-year program. Even though pre-clinical studies using cell and animal research models are promising, more than 60% of investigational drugs fail in human trials because of ineffectiveness. The NIH hopes to change that with the funding by developing 3D microphysiological system platforms that replicate human disease. The platforms, kn...
Source: Mass Device - September 13, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Business/Financial News Research & Development National Institutes of Health (NIH) Source Type: news

Women lacking vitamin D raise risk of MS by 43%
A study by  Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health says measuring vitamin D levels could denote one's risk - which shows a healthy amount of the 'sunshine vitamin' is key to preventing MS. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: $40 keychain could accurately detect food allergens
Researchers at Harvard Medical School have built a point-of-use food allergen detector that fits onto a keychain and can conducts tests in under ten minutes. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - September 13, 2017 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Wyss Institute launches human Organ Chip project to model influenza virus infection
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering has received funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to leverage its human Organ-on-a-Chip (Organ Chip) microfluidic cell culture technology to develop clinically relevant in vitro models of influenza infection of human lung, and to identify new anti-viral therapeutics that act by modulating the host response to infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 13, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Hormone therapy does not increase risk of cancer
Harvard Medical School did a follow-up on a 90s study that claimed hormone therapy caused risk of heart disease, cancers and premature death. It showed the risks were not caused by the drug. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Here Are All the Books Hillary Clinton Name-Drops in Her New Memoir
Hillary Clinton doesn’t just want you to read her campaign memoir. It turns out she thinks you should read a few more books. In “What Happened,” the former Secretary of State reflects on her failed presidential campaign, reflecting on her concerns about the direction President Trump is taking the country and how she handled her loss. Clinton peppers the book with references to books that she thinks help explain Trump’s rise and how America should respond to it as well as poems, novels and essays that inspired her and helped her cope with her loss. Here’s a look at the books she namechecks: Cl...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ryan Teague Beckwith Tags: Uncategorized 2016 Election Books hillary clinton Source Type: news

The Latest College Rankings Have Some Familiar Schools on Top
Princeton University, Williams College and the University of California, Berkeley, are still the United States’ best university, best liberal arts college and best public university, respectively, according to the latest edition of U.S. News & World Report‘s closely watched college rankings. The 2018 rankings released Tuesday had Princeton in first place, Harvard in second, and Yale and the University of Chicago tied for third among national universities. In the ranking of liberal arts colleges, Williams College in Williamstown, Mass., was first, followed by Amherst College in Amherst, Mass. Bowdoin College...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kate Samuelson Tags: Uncategorized College Education onetime Source Type: news

​Emory University School of Medicine names new dean
Emory University named Dr. Vikas Sukhatme dean of its School of Medicine. Sukatme succeeds Dr. David Stephens, current interim dean, who will remain in his roles as vice president for research in Emory’s Woodruff Health Sciences Center and chair of the Department of Medicine in Emory University School of Medicine. Currently Sukhatme, a physician-scientist, is chief a cademic officer and Harvard Faculty Dean for Academic Programs at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston and the Victor… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - September 12, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Ellie Hensley Source Type: news

Hormone therapy does notincrease risk of cancer
Harvard Medical School did a follow-up on a 90s study that claimed hormone therapy caused risk of heart disease, cancers and premature death. It showed the risks were not caused by the drug. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Your Dreams Actually Mean, According to Science
If dreams were movies, they wouldn’t make a dime. They’re often banal, frequently fleeting and they’re screened for an audience of just one. As for the storyline? You’re in a supermarket, only it’s also Yankee Stadium, shopping with your second-grade teacher until she turns into Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Then you both shoot a bear in the cereal aisle. Somebody call rewrite. But dreams are vastly more complex than that, and if you’ve got a theory that explains them, have at it. The ancient Egyptians thought of dreams as simply a different form of seeing, with trained dreamers serving as seers ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized behavior dreams Freud health Jung mind psychology sleep the brain Source Type: news

How to create a culture of wellness at your business
There are many reasons why business owners should want a culture of health for their employees. Healthier people are happier and more productive, and when they ’re less likely to get sick, it costs less to insure them. Healthy employees, in fact, incur 41 percent fewer costs than less healthy ones, according to data published in the Harvard Business Review. Fostering a healthy work environment is not only the right thing to do, it can also save you mone y. It’s easier said than done, though.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 11, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Content provided by Tufts Health Plan Source Type: news

How to create a culture of wellness at your business
There are many reasons why business owners should want a culture of health for their employees. Healthier people are happier and more productive, and when they ’re less likely to get sick, it costs less to insure them. Healthy employees, in fact, incur 41 percent fewer costs than less healthy ones, according to data published in the Harvard Business Review. Fostering a healthy work environment is not only the right thing to do, it can also save you mone y. It’s easier said than done, though.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - September 11, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Content provided by Tufts Health Plan Source Type: news

Avoid eating just before your bedtime, study recommends
Conclusions Previous research suggests we may be better off consuming more of our calories earlier on in the day, when we have a full, active day ahead of us to use up the energy. It's also been observed that people who consume large calorific meals late in the evening can have a higher body weight. In a sense, the results of this study seem plausible and don't really say anything different from what's already been observed. But as this is a cross-sectional study, it can't really prove very much. The study involved a small, select sample of US university students. Their results can't be applied to everyone, as they have di...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news

Gecko Biomedical wins CE Mark for Setalum vascular sealant
Gecko Biomedical said today it won CE Mark approval in the European Union for its Setalum Sealant designed for use during vascular surgery. The Paris-based company said Setalum is a biocompatible, bioresorbable sealant designed as an add-on to sutures, and is usable in wet and dynamic environments and activated using a light activation pen. The CE Mark approval marks the 1st regulatory win for Gecko Biomedical’s Setalum, the company said. “We are delighted to receive the CE Mark for our 1st product, Setalum sealant, as this will allow us to bring new and innovative solutions to the market to improve patient car...
Source: Mass Device - September 11, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Regulatory/Compliance Surgical Vascular Gecko Biomedical Source Type: news

These mutations could be key to understanding how some harmful conditions develop
(University of California - San Diego) A team of researchers led by a bioinformatician at the University of California San Diego has developed a method to help determine whether certain hard-to-study mutations in the human genome, called short tandem repeats or microsatellites, are likely to be involved in harmful conditions. The team, which also includes scientists from the New York Genome Center, Harvard University, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, details their findings in the Sept. 11 issue of Nature Genetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 11, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

To improve health monitoring, simply trip the 'nanoswitch'
(Boston Children's Hospital) A team of researchers from Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and Harvard's Wyss Institute have adapted their DNA nanoswitch technology -- previously demonstrated to aid drug discovery and the measure of biochemical interactions -- into a new platform that they call the nanoswitch-linked immunosorbent assay (NLISA) for fast, sensitive and specific protein detection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 11, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Outcome Health works with Harvard and more digital health deals
Harvard Health Publications, which harnesses the expertise of more than 11,000 Harvard Medical School faculty clinicians to create patient health engagement materials, is collaborating with Outcome Health. The latter seeks to improve patient outcomes by providing health intelligence and information at the moment of care using technology. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - September 7, 2017 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Whole wheat cuts your risk of colorectal cancer by 17%
The Harvard study, a collaboration with the World Cancer Research Fund, is the first to link whole grains with lower cancer risk. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A touch of EroS
(Harvard Medical School) Researchers interested in the evolution of multicellular life were looking for bacteria that stimulate Salpingoeca rosetta, single-cell saltwater dwellers that are the closest living relatives of animals, to form the rosette-shaped colonies that give them their name. But one bacterium had quite a different stimulating effect: It motivated S. rosetta to have sex. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 6, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for September 5, 2017
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. How medical device risk management is connected with design controls Medical device design controls play an important role when it comes to risk management, but the relationship isn’t always immediately clear. Intended us...
Source: Mass Device - September 5, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Novartis CEO departs, leaving corner office to Harvard doc
Novartis‘ (NYSE:NVS) chief executive Joseph Jimenez is slated to leave his post next February, the drugmaker reported over the weekend. The CEO’s surprise departure leaves the corner office to Dr. Vasant Narasimhan, who currently serves as the company’s CMO and global head of drug development. The move comes just days after Novartis won FDA approval for its breakthrough CAR-T leukemia therapy – the first of its kind to be cleared in the U.S. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Novartis CEO departs, leaving corner office to Harvard doc appeared first on M...
Source: Mass Device - September 5, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Business/Financial News Pharmaceuticals Wall Street Beat GlaxoSmithKline plc Novartis Roche Source Type: news

Ability to recognize faces shaped through repeat exposure
Harvard Medical School researchers have found that a macaque's ability to recognize faces is down to a region in the brain that is shaped through repeated exposure to faces in the first 200 days of life. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Having a purpose in life can keep you strong in old age
Adults who see a purpose in their life are less likely to lose their grip strength or walking speed, Harvard University scientists found. Both physical factors occur naturally with aging. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Face value
(Harvard Medical School) Scientists have long deemed the ability to recognize faces innate for people and other primates -- something our brains just know how to do immediately from birth. However, the findings of a new Harvard Medical School study published Sept. 4 in the journal Nature Neuroscience cast doubt on this longstanding view. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

OncBioMune to investigate new prostate cancer drug in Phase II trial
OncBioMune Pharmaceuticals has reported an ongoing review of its Phase II clinical trial protocol by the regulatory committee at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre / Harvard Medical School in the US for evaluation of ProscaVax to treat early stage … (Source: Drug Development Technology)
Source: Drug Development Technology - September 3, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Why parents really need to talk to their children about the news
These are strange, anxiety-provoking times. That’s true no matter where one lives or where one sits on the political spectrum; for all of us, it’s upsetting and confusing. If it feels that way for adults, just imagine what it’s like for children who catch snatches of information and conversations they don’t really understand. That’s why it’s really, really important that parents talk to their children about what is going on in our country and our world. It’s important for two reasons: First of all, children hear and see more than we think they do — and can be easily become up...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 1, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Claire McCarthy Tags: In the News Parenting Dr. Claire McCarthy Source Type: news

Bacteria act as aphrodisiac for the closest relatives of animals
(University of California - Berkeley) Choanoflagellates are a ubiquitous but enigmatic one-celled ocean organism that may give clues to the origin of multicellularity in animals. New research has turned up a surprising kink in the organism's sex life: swarming and mating are triggered by a marine bacterium common in their environment. UC Berkeley and Harvard researchers traced this response to a protein secreted by the bacteria. The choanos seem to be eavesdropping on bacteria to determine their life history. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news