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Healthy diets lower blood pressure more than medication
Researchers from Harvard Medical School found cutting out salt and eating more fruit and vegetables reduces blood pressure levels by 21 mm Hg, with most medications lowering it by 10-15 mm Hg. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Using mouthwash daily could raise your risk of diabetes
Mouthwash may kill off helpful microbes in the mouth which protect against these conditions, found the Harvard School of Public Health which suggests swilling once not twice a day may be best. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How badly do you want something? Babies can tell
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Babies as young as 10 months can assess how much someone values a particular goal by observing how hard they are willing to work to achieve it, according to a new study from MIT and Harvard. This ability requires integrating information about both the costs of obtaining a goal and the benefit gained by the person seeking it, suggesting that babies acquire very early an intuition about how people make decisions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Light Pollution Is Getting Worse Every Year. That ’s Bad For Your Health
Nothing has captured the march of wealth and progress like any society’s ability to light up the night—first with campfires and torches, then with gas lamps, finally with incandescent lights. Franklin Roosevelt’s 1936 Rural Electrification Act was an effort both to bring modernity to the 90% of American farms that lacked electricity and to help jolt the American economy, which was still deep in the Depression. The modern nighttime image of the Korean peninsula as seen from space, with darkness north of the 38th parallel and brilliant light in the vibrant south, powerfully captures the connection between c...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Environment health illumination Light NASA nature NOAA onetime Science Sprawl Source Type: news

Stroke Rehab Technology Aims To Speed Healing
Watching someone who has suffered a stroke try to perform everyday actions such as walking down the sidewalk or even bringing a cup to their lips can serve as a sobering reminder of how fragile full and robust health is, and also serves as an inspiration for those dedicated to improving the lives of those patients. Steven Plymale, recently named CEO of Toronto-based MyndTec, said his reaction to watching videos of patients using the company's MyndMove functional electrical stimulation (FES) rehabilitation system was one of the reasons he joined MyndTec. "They are very compelling," Plymale said of the demonstratio...
Source: MDDI - November 22, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Greg Goth Tags: Electronics Source Type: news

Social networks and survival: Social ties could help with cancer management
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital led by Ying Bao, MD, ScD, an epidemiologist in BWH's Channing Division of Network Medicine and Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School, have found that women with stronger social networks had better survival after colorectal cancer diagnosis and conclude that social network strengthening could be a tool for management of colorectal cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 21, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Poll: Most LGBTQ Americans report violence, threats, or sexual harassment
This report is part of a series titled 'Discrimination in America.' The series is based on a survey conducted for National Public Radio, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. While many surveys have explored Americans' beliefs about discrimination, this survey asks people about their own personal experiences with discrimination. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Outcome Health offers buyouts to employees
Troubled Chicago startup Outcome Health has started offering voluntary buyouts to employees.    The buyout offers occurred after partners suspended their relationships with the company, including Harvard Health Publishing and the American Medical Association, according to The Wall Street Journal. The company laid off 76 individuals in September. Outcome held a companywide meeting on Fri day where it informed employees about “voluntary separation packages,” per the report. Some employees were… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - November 20, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Gina Hall Source Type: news

Breastmilk: The gift that keeps on giving... Babies who were exclusively breastfed have less than half the risk of eczema as teenagers than those that were not
(Natural News) Adding to the wealth of evidence that prove the benefits of beast milk, a new study finds that breastfeeding could lower the risk of eczema in children by half, as reported by the Science Daily. A team of researchers from King’s College London, Harvard University, University of Bristol, and McGill University assessed whether prolonged... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

School Lunches: What can we do?
From the desk of Kim Gubbins, CPNPWe are three months into the new school year and do school lunches have you stressed, bored and lacking? Are your kids already complaining about the same old same old and wishing they could just eat hot lunch pizza everyday? So, let ’s get inspired and figure out fresh new lunch ideas.I know schools are working harder at feeding our children a healthier lunch, but let me honest, most school cafeterias are serving pizza, burgers and fried chicken patties on a daily basis. And with 17%-20% of children in the United States being obese, I feel that packing lunch is a significantly health...
Source: Pediatric Health Associates - November 17, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Food Allergies Healthy Habits Source Type: news

Clarivate Analytics names the world ’s most impactful scientific researchers with the release of the 2017 Highly Cited Researchers List
Clarivate Analytics, the global leader in providing trusted insights and analytics to enable researchers to accelerate discovery, today released its publication of its annual Highly Cited Researchers list.  The citation analysis identifies the most frequently cited researchers as determined by the extent to which their papers have supported, influenced, inspired and challenged other researchers around the globe. It identifies authors who have consistently won peer approval from international researchers in the form of high citation counts. For more than two decades the Web of Science has served as the basis for regula...
Source: News from STM - November 15, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news

America's Love Affair With Sugary Sodas Is Fading
Overall, the number of adults who said they drank a sugary beverage on a daily basis dropped by 12 percentage points between 2003 and 2014, Harvard researchers said, and by 19 percentage points among kids. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - November 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The empathy gap: why don ’t you meet people who think differently to you? | Douglas Alexander
It ’s not just MPs who are out of touch – I’ve seen how many people live, work and socialise in ways that mean we rarely encounter people unlike ourselves• Douglas Alexander is a senior fellow at Harvard Kennedy School and a former Labour ministerPeople often ask me, “Do you miss being an MP?” My answer is always a bit of acurate ’s egg. I certainly miss being in government – where you can make change happen. But I don’t miss Westminster – even before the latest depressing revelations – it often felt to me like Hogwarts gone wrong.But what I miss most of all ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Douglas Alexander Tags: Communities Society Politics UK news Psychology Local politics Source Type: news

Sugary beverage consumption in US declining but remains high among certain groups
(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) Consumption of sodas and other sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) fell for both children and adults between 2003 and 2014, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. But despite this positive trend, the researchers found, consumption remains high among adolescents and young adults, and is particularly high among black, Mexican American, and non-Mexican Hispanic populations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Legal implications of neuroscience research - Harvard Review of Psychiatry presents update
(Wolters Kluwer Health) New research on the biological basis of psychiatric disorders has important implications for legal proceedings as well as mental health treatment, according to a special issue on 'Psychiatry, Neuroscience, and the Law,' presented in the Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tax Reform Could Impact Higher Education
Congress is considering major tax overhauls that would, among other things, impose an excise tax on the investment earnings of endowments at wealthy colleges and universities. Nearly seventy private institutions of higher education would be subject to the new tax, which only affects schools whose endowments exceed $250,000 per student. Public universities would be exempt. Only 30 of the top 300 research institutions in the U.S. fall within the list. Among them are Harvard University, Stanford University, MIT, Yale University, and Columbia University. The House and Senate have drafted their own versions of the tax reform ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - November 14, 2017 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Eating nuts twice a week cuts your risk of heart disease
A study by Harvard University of more 200,000 people - many of whom were followed for more than three decades - found all types of nuts helped prevent the world's biggest killer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

SPM Conference
Discussions noted and collected will serve as the basis of a number of internal advocacy efforts. Let’s keep the conversation going on Connect! Our inaugural meeting was certified as Patients Included, a designation given to an event that meets all 5 of the Patients Included charter: Missed the event and couldn’t catch the live-stream? Loved the meeting so much you wish you could experience it all over again? We’ve got you covered! Here are speakers’ presentations from the inaugural Society for Participatory Medicine conference. Looking forward to our second annual meeting in 2018! Stay tuned for d...
Source: Society for Participatory Medicine - November 13, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Nanette Mattox Tags: Newsletter Source Type: news

Breastfeeding cuts risk of eczema by 54%, reveals study
The researchers, from King's College London, the University of Bristol and Harvard University, tracked 13,000 babies born in 1996 and 1997 until they were 16 to make the findings. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Breastfed babies are less likely to have eczema as teenagers, study shows
Babies whose mothers had received support to breastfeed exclusively for a sustained period from birth have a 54 per cent lower risk of eczema at the age of 16, a new study led by researchers from King's College London, Harvard University, University of Bristol and McGill University shows. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - November 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International, Health, Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, Faculty of Health Sciences, Population Health Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

NIH awards $2.34m to GBSI for reverse experimental design training to improve research reproducibilitY
(Global Biological Standards Institute) The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded the Global Biological Standards Institute (GBSI) $2.34 million over five years for a groundbreaking experimental design training project to improve reproducibility in preclinical research. The project, entitled " Producing Reproducible Experiments by Promoting Reverse Experimental Design " (PREPaRED),* is a collaborative educational partnership between GBSI and faculty at Harvard Medical School, Vanderbilt University, Purdue University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Federal policy to reduce re-hospitalizations is linked to increased mortality rates
Federal policymakers five years ago introduced the Hospital Readmission Reduction Program to spur hospitals to reduce Medicare readmission rates by penalizing them if they didn ’t. A new analysis led by researchers at UCLA and Harvard University, however, finds that the program may be so focused on keeping some patients out of the hospital that related death rates are increasing.In a study of 115,245 fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries at 416 hospitals, implementation of the reduction program was indeed linked to a decrease in readmissions at 30 days after discharge and at one year after discharge among people hos...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 12, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Federal policy to reduce re-hospitalizations is linked to increased mortality rates
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) Federal policymakers five years ago introduced the Hospital Readmission Reduction Program to spur hospitals to reduce Medicare readmission rates by penalizing them if they didn't. A new analysis led by researchers at UCLA and Harvard University, however, finds that the program may be so focused on keeping some patients out of the hospital that related death rates are increasing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Reena ’s story: A bright future with short bowel syndrome
She’s just 16, but Reena Zuckerman knows exactly what she wants to be doing in another 10 years. “My dream is to play on the press team in the annual Women’s Congressional Softball Game,” says the aspiring political journalist. Since 2009, the event has pitted members of Congress against the press corps, raising nearly a million dollars for charity. “When I’m not doing schoolwork or watching TV, I’m listening to political podcasts and NPR,” Reena confesses. It’s an impressive goal, but one that’s no doubt attainable for this driven teen, who’s been pushing h...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 10, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation Dr. Tom Jaksic G-tube short bowel syndrome (SBS). volvulus Source Type: news

Why you should only use antibiotics if truly necessary
Let’s be honest: most parents feel better when their sick child is prescribed an antibiotic. There’s just something so reassuring about having a prescription. It’s hard to feel like all you can do is wait and give your child TLC; it feels better to do something. Even when the doctor says that your child has a virus, and explains that antibiotics treat bacteria, not viruses, it’s common for parents to think: but what if there is even a little chance that there is a bacterial infection along with — or instead of — the virus? It can’t hurt to be safe, right? But that’s the thing...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 9, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Claire McCarthy Tags: Ask the Expert Health & Wellness antibiotics Claire McCarthy MD Source Type: news

Rwanda:Harvard School to Train Rwandan Oncologists
[New Times] Harvard Medical School, the graduate medical school of the prestigious Harvard University in the United States, has agreed to train over 20 clinical oncologists from Rwanda over the next few years. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 9, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Parasites suck it up
(Harvard Medical School) Depletion of a fatty molecule in human blood propels malaria parasites to stop replicating and causing illness in people and instead to jump ship to mosquitoes to continue the transmission cycle, according to a new study by an international research team. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 9, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Driving national discussions
(Harvard University) In the first large scale randomized media experiment ever conducted, researchers found that if just three outlets write about a particular major national policy topic -- such as jobs, the environment, or immigration -- discussion of that topic across social media rose by more than 62 percent, and the balance of opinion in the national conversation could be swayed several percentage points based on that coverage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UCLA helps many to live long and prosper
In Westwood, more than 100 faculty experts from 25 departments have embarked on anall-encompassing push to cut the health and economic impacts of depression in half by the year 2050. The mammoth undertaking will rely on platforms developed by the new Institute for Precision Health, which will harness the power of big data and genomics to move toward individually tailored treatments and health-promotion strategies.On the same 419 acres of land, researchers across the spectrum, from the laboratory bench to the patient bedside, are ushering in a potentially game-changing approach to turning the body ’s immune defenses a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 9, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

High-fiber diet can beat bowel cancer
Fiber boosts survival rates of those diagnosed – even if diet was poor before, found a Harvard Medical School study. The risk of colon cancer falls 33% for every 5g of whole grain cereal fiber added to diet. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Harvard University hosted an anal sex workshop
The talk hosted by adult shop Good Vibrations on Tuesday was one of many workshops held for the university's annual Sex Week. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Harvard life sciences incubator says startups raised $30M in first year after launch
In an interview, Harvard Innovation Labs managing director Jodi Goldstein said the 15,000 square-foot space is also nearing full occupancy. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - November 8, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Max Stendahl Source Type: news

Fasting can extend your life and keep you from aging
Intermittent fasting can keep your body younger, extend your lifespan and improve your overall health, a new Harvard University study suggests. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

One brisk walk a week increases older women's lifespan
Harvard University researchers analyzed more than 17,000 women over 70. They found light activity like housework did little for longevity, but a regular brisk walk did wonders. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New techniques give blood biopsies greater promise
(Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard) Researchers develop an efficient method for capturing and quantifying tumor DNA from blood prior to sequencing, thereby making blood biopsies cost-effective and scalable. The study demonstrates that nearly 90 percent of the genetic features of a tumor can be detected in blood using standard whole-exome sequencing. Researchers discovered that this approach could be effectively applied in 33 to 49 percent of patients with advanced cancer, a number that is likely to increase as sequencing becomes cheaper. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 6, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

IOS Press acquires StemBook
(IOS Press) IOS Press, an international publisher providing content for scientific, technical and medical communities, is proud to announce that it has acquired StemBook, an online open access review of stem cell biology that was launched by the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) in collaboration with the MIND Informatics group at Massachusetts General Hospital in 2008. IOS Press will update, develop, expand and relaunch the site in spring 2018 in collaboration with HSCI. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Autonomously growing synthetic DNA strands
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) A Wyss Institute team has developed a method that allows pre-designed sequences of DNA to autonomously grow and concatenate along specific assembly routes, hence providing the basis for a new generation of programmable molecular devices. Putting their new concept of so-called 'Primer Exchange Reaction' (PER) cascades to the test, they successfully engineered a first set of devices with diverse functions, such as self-building DNA-origami and DNA nanostructures that sense, amplify, record or logically evaluate environmental signals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 6, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

This conventional businessman is set for second innings
An alumnus of Harvard University, Prakash Mody took over the reins of Unichem, started by his father Amrut Lal Mody in 1944, when the company just had one manufacturing unit. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - November 3, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Opioid Emergency
Harvard University, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. 11/02/2017 This 17-minute podcast discusses how the country arrived at the declaration of the opioid epidemic as a public health emergency. Speakers detail the scale of the opioid crisis, and how the declaration fell short of a national emergency under the Stafford Act, which would have opened the door to even greater funding to address the opioid crisis. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - November 3, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Manual for Citizen Scientists Starting or Participating in Data Collection and Environmental Monitoring Projects
Harvard University. 09/2017 This 201-page document outlines practical suggestions for how to support individuals researching and responding to public health and environmental concerns. It also contains an overview of relevant laws and regulations, as well as technical suggestions regarding data collection, analysis, and compliance with relevant scientific and quality standards. It discusses how it is often important after a natural disaster to make a record of impacts that might be hard to measure months or years later. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - November 3, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Fiber-Rich Diet Boosts Survival From Colon Cancer
Among people treated for non-metastatic colon cancer, every 5 grams of fiber added to their diet reduced their odds of dying by nearly 25 percent, said lead researcher Dr. Andrew Chan. He is an associate professor in the department of medicine at Harvard Medical School. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - November 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Recommended Dose: Episode 3 with Lisa Bero
Lisa Bero, a former Co-Chair of the Cochrane Governing Board, says public will increasingly demand less wining and dining, more independence  from health professionals  Global authority on research integrity and industry bias in science Professor Lisa Bero has called for greater recognition of industry influence in science, followinglast week ’s revelations that Australiannurses, dietitians, and pharmacists are receiving millions of dollars in payments from pharmaceutical companies.‘All around the world this is a problem because physicians and other health professionals to some extent have this e...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - November 2, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Liposuction May Ease Swelling in Cancer Patients
Harvard researchers used the surgical technique to remove fat from just underneath the skin in three people with the condition. Two of the patients had lymphedema as a side effect of cancer treatment. The other one had a naturally developing form of lymphedema. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - November 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Liposuction May Ease Limb Swelling in Cancer Patients
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 1, 2017 -- Liposuction may help people with lymphedema -- a painful, disfiguring swelling of the arms, hands, legs or feet. Harvard researchers used the surgical technique to remove fat from just underneath the skin in three people... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 1, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Crowdsourced data boosts breast cancer research
An organization formed to boost breast cancer research by crowdsourcing data and sharing it with other scientists has released the first of a promised series of semi-yearly reports.   The Metastatic Breast Cancer Project was created two years ago by the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, a non-profit research organization in Cambridge, Massachusetts, to publicly share non-identifying genomic information about people with breast cancer.  The goal is to accelerate research b y curating information… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 1, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Anne Stych Source Type: news

Crowdsourced data boosts breast cancer research
An organization formed to boost breast cancer research by crowdsourcing data and sharing it with other scientists has released the first of a promised series of semi-yearly reports.   The Metastatic Breast Cancer Project was created two years ago by the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, a non-profit research organization in Cambridge, Massachusetts, to publicly share non-identifying genomic information about people with breast cancer.  The goal is to accelerate research b y curating information… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - November 1, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Anne Stych Source Type: news

Poll: One-third of Latinos say they have experienced discrimination in jobs and housing
This report is part of a series titled " Discrimination in America. " The series is based on a survey conducted for National Public Radio, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. While many surveys have explored Americans' beliefs about discrimination, this survey asks people about their own personal experiences with discrimination. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

From Bench to Bedside: $4 Million Gift Supports Translational Medicine
Dr. Jeffrey and Lisa Leiden Establish Professorship in Translational Medicine at Brigham and Women ’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School (Source: BWH News)
Source: BWH News - October 31, 2017 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

Pesticide exposure may be linked to infertility
Eating non-organic fruits and vegetables that pesticides cannot be washed off of may be linked to infertility, according to a new study from Harvard University. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sight unseen
(Harvard Medical School) Research led by scientists from Harvard Medical School reveals " hidden " variability in how tumor cells are affected by anticancer drugs, offering new insights on why patients with the same form of cancer can have different responses to a drug. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news