ACA reduced out-of-pocket health costs for families with kids, but they still need help
FINDINGSThe percentage of low- and middle-income families with children that had burdensome out-of-pockethealth care costs fell following the 2014 implementation of thehealthinsurancemarketplaces and Medicaidexpansion provisions of the Affordable Care Act,known widelyas Obamacare, according to a new study by Lauren Wisk, an assistant professor at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, and colleagues.Before the ACA, the study shows,35.6% of the lowest-income families experienced burdensome costs, but this fell to 23.7% post-ACA. For low-income families,the proportion fell from 24.6% to 17.3%, and for middle-income fam...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 28, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Interplanetary hoppers: Microbes from Earth may have reached Venus by hitchhiking on asteroids
(Natural News) If Venusian life does exist, it may have originated from Earth: An interplanetary hopper hitched a ride with an asteroid that grazed Earth’s upper atmosphere and landed on Venus. Researchers from Harvard University — astronomy professor Avi Loeb and student Amir Siraj — proposed the idea after a group of scientists recently detected signatures of phosphine. Microorganisms... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heart Failure Highlights From ESC 2020 Heart Failure Highlights From ESC 2020
Dr Akshay Desai, of Harvard Medical School, reviews key studies on heart failure, presented at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2020, which was held as a virtual conference.Medscape (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - September 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: None ReCAP Source Type: news

Novel dual CAR T cell immunotherapy holds promise for targeting the HIV reservoir
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A recent study published in the journal Nature Medicine, led by researchers James Riley, PhD, a professor of Microbiology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and Todd Allen, PhD, a professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Group Leader at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard, describes a new Dual CAR T cell immunotherapy that can help fight HIV infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CRISPR-based malaria testing on-the-fly
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) A multi-disciplinary research collaboration which was led by Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), created a field-applicable, ultrasensitive diagnostic assay that specifically detects DNA sequences from all Plasmodium species in symptomatic and asymptomatic malaria. The new malaria diagnostic method combines an optimized 10-minute rapid sample preparation protocol with the CRISPR-based SHERLOCK system to enable highly specific and sensitive Plasmodium detection in another 60 minut...
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 21, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Marine sponges inspire the next generation of skyscrapers and bridges
(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) are using the glassy skeletons of marine sponges as inspiration for the next generation of stronger and taller buildings, longer bridges, and lighter spacecraft. The researchers showed that the diagonally-reinforced square lattice-like skeletal structure of Euplectella aspergillum, a deep-water marine sponge, has a higher strength-to-weight ratio than the traditional lattice designs that have used for centuries in the construction of buildings and bridges. (Sour...
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 21, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New Survey Shows Covid-19 Coronavirus Pandemic Worsening Financial Inequalities In America
An NPR, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Harvard poll showed the percentages of households facing serious financial problems during the pandemic. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - September 18, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Y. Lee, Senior Contributor Tags: Healthcare /healthcare Innovation /innovation Money /money Personal Finance /personal-finance Coronavirus business pharma Source Type: news

Increasing the effectiveness of cancer treatments: Anti-PD-L1 immunotherapy
(Tokyo Medical and Dental University) Researh teams of Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) and Harvard Medical School (HMS) have uncovered how to increase the efficacy of anti-PD-L1 immunotherapy. Using a combination of molecular, biochemical, and bioinformatics approaches, they discovered that the nuclear localization of PD-L1 is controlled by acetylation at a single, specific, Lys site. In the nucleus, PD-L1 controls the expression of immune related genes. Therefore, targeting PD-L1 nuclear localization could enhance the efficacy of PD-1/PD-L1 blockade based immunotherapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 18, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

There ’s Only Weak Evidence For Vitamin-D As a COVID-19 Preventative—But Scientists Are Trying to Learn More
To protect himself from COVID-19, Dr. Anthony Fauci has long said he’s skipping hugs and handshakes, wearing a mask, and staying off of planes. Last week, he acknowledged adding another step to protect his health: taking supplements of vitamin-D. “If you are deficient in Vitamin-D, that does have an impact on your susceptibility to infection,” Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said in an interview posted on Instagram last week. “So I would not mind recommending—and I do it myself—taking vitamin-D supplements.” However, while spurious claims t...
Source: TIME: Health - September 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Donald Trump Is Losing On An Issue Voters Care A Lot About. Here ’s How He’s Trying to Change That
With nearly 200,000 Americans dead from COVID-19 and millions more who lost their health insurance when they lost their jobs this year, President Donald Trump tried this week—as he has done throughout his presidency—to change the conversation. On Sunday, the President issued a new executive order aimed at lowering prescription drug prices, an issue dear to many voters, and boasted on Twitter that “prices are coming down FAST.” The reality is more complicated. Trump’s new executive order, which revokes and replaces a different executive order on drug prices that he signed in July, directs the...
Source: TIME: Health - September 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized 2020 Election COVID-19 Explainer News Source Type: news

Rapid test for Covid-19 shows improved sensitivity
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) A CRISPR-based diagnostic for the SARS-Cov-2 virus can produce results in less than an hour with similar accuracy as the standard PCR test now used. Development of the Covid-19 test was led by researchers at MIT and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 17, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The Vikings Were More Complicated Than You Might Think
One of the biggest surveys ever of ancient DNA offers new evidence of who the Vikings were and where they went raiding and trading. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: James Gorman Tags: Vikings Genetics and Heredity Research Race and Ethnicity Archaeology and Anthropology Nature (Journal) Willerslev, Eske your-feed-science Uppsala University University of Copenhagen Harvard University Reich, David E (1974- ) Denma Source Type: news

Predicting therapeutic response in depressed teen girls
(Elsevier) The risk of developing major depressive disorder (MDD) surges during adolescence-particularly for girls. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be an effective treatment, but only about half of girls diagnosed with depression show significant improvement. Researchers at Harvard Medical School and McLean Hospital have now identified a non-invasive test of brain function that could help predict who will respond to CBT. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

With digital phenotyping, smartphones may play a role in assessing severe mental illness
(Wolters Kluwer Health) Digital phenotyping approaches that collect and analyze Smartphone-user data on locations, activities, and even feelings - combined with machine learning to recognize patterns and make predictions from the data - have emerged as promising tools for monitoring patients with psychosis spectrum illnesses, according to a report in the September/October issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Boston University researchers to develop new breast tumor models
(Boston University School of Medicine) Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers Gerald Denis, PhD, Andrew Emili, PhD, and Stefano Monti, PhD, together with Beth Israel Deaconess/Harvard Medical School researcher Senthil Muthuswamy, PhD, have been awarded a five-year, $2.5 million National Cancer Institute UO1 grant to develop and analyze breast tumor organoids (models). Specifically, the award will support their project: Multiscale analysis of metabolic inflammation as a driver of breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 14, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Neural cartography
(Harvard Medical School) A new x-ray microscopy technique could help accelerate efforts to map neural circuits and ultimately the brain itself. Combined with artificial intelligence-driven image analysis, researchers used XNH to reconstruct dense neural circuits in 3D, comprehensively cataloging neurons and even tracing individual neurons from muscles to the central nervous system in fruit flies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19 is Still Devastating Nursing Homes. The Trump Administration Isn ’t Doing Much To Stop It
At least 75,000 Americans in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities have already died from COVID-19—and the devastation is far from over. After a decrease earlier this summer, the death toll is now rising once again, and as the country heads into the fall and then flu season, millions of Americans who require institutional long-term care remain at the greatest risk. But, so far, the Trump Administration has talked a big talk—and mostly failed to deliver. The White House trumpeted its efforts to send personal protective equipment (PPE) and testing materials to long-term care facilities, but the suppli...
Source: TIME: Health - September 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Barbieri, Fichorova and Nour Awarded Grant to Support Women ’s Reproductive Health Research and Mentorship
Three members of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology were awarded a five-year grant through the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development ’s Gynecologic Health and Disease Branch to establish a Harvard-wide Women’s Reproductive (Source: BWH News)
Source: BWH News - September 11, 2020 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

The Great Vaccine Race: Inside the Unprecedented Scramble to Immunize the World Against COVID-19
The cleverest of enemies thrive on surprise attacks. Viruses—and coronaviruses in particular—know this well. Remaining hidden in animal hosts for decades, they mutate steadily, sometimes serendipitously morphing into more effective and efficient infectious agents. When a strain with just the right combination of genetic codes that spell trouble for people makes the leap from animal to human, the ambush begins. Such was the case with SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus behind COVID-19, and the attack was mostly silent and insidious at first. Many people infected with SARS-CoV-2 remained oblivious as they served as the v...
Source: TIME: Health - September 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Magazine Source Type: news

Nosocomial COVID-19 Rare During Height of Pandemic
THURSDAY, Sept. 10, 2020 -- During the height of the pandemic, the incidence of nosocomial COVID-19 was rare, according to a study published online Sept. 9 in JAMA Network Open. Chanu Rhee, M.D., M.P.H., from Harvard Medical School in Boston, and... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - September 10, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

GTEx Consortium releases fresh insights into how DNA differences govern gene expression
(Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard) Scientists from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project, a National Institutes of Health-funded consortium, have completed a wide-ranging set of studies documenting how small changes in DNA sequence can impact gene expression across more than four dozen tissues in the human body. These studies, released in a set of 15 papers published in Science and other journals, constitute the most comprehensive catalog to date of genetic variations that affect gene expression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 10, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Drugs bill warning over US/UK trade deal
(SAGE) The NHS would spend billions of pounds more on drugs if it had to pay US prices following a US/UK trade deal. According to a new study by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Harvard Medical School, and the University of Oxford, NHS England would have spent over £ 5 billion more on 50 brand-name prescription drugs widely used in primary care if it had paid US prices in 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Poll: Half of Households in the Four Largest U.S. Cities Report Serious Financial Problems Including Depleted Savings, and Trouble Paying Bills or Affording Medical Carein the Four Largest U.S. Cities Report Serious Financial Problems
A poll by NPR, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and RWJF reveals serious financial problems reported across a wide range of areas during the coronavirus outbreak. (Source: RWJF - News Releases)
Source: RWJF - News Releases - September 9, 2020 Category: Health Management Authors: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Tags: Health Disparities Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Public and Community Health Source Type: news

The Impact of Coronavirus on Households Across America
This NPR, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and RWJF polling series examines the most serious health and financial problems facing households across America prior to the expiration of federal coronavirus support programs. (Source: RWJF - Obesity and Childhood Obesity)
Source: RWJF - Obesity and Childhood Obesity - September 9, 2020 Category: Eating Disorders & Weight Management Authors: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Tags: Health Disparities Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Public and Community Health Source Type: news

Audio » Dr. Robert Savoy: fMRI Master Educator
Dr. Peter Bandettini interviews Dr. Robert Savoy from Harvard Medical School about his experiences training thousands worldwide in the use of Functional Brain Imaging. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - September 9, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

Trump seeks to end “critical race theory” brainwashing in federal agencies
(Natural News) The Trump administration is putting an end to the “critical race theory” training that is used in federal agencies. Calling the practice “anti-American propaganda,” Trump tweeted: “This is a sickness that cannot be allowed to continue.” Critical race theory is defined by Harvard University legal scholars as drawing “upon a variety of critical... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Daily Coronavirus Testing at Home? Many Experts Are Skeptical
The buzzy idea is impractical, critics said. And there isn ’t yet real-world data to show it will work. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine J. Wu Tags: Tests (Medical) Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Shortages Laboratories and Scientific Equipment Harvard University Health and Human Services Department United States Source Type: news

Rwandan And Harvard Med Students Help Shatter The Coronavirus Language Barrier
Olivier Uwishema, a Rwandan now studying medicine in Turkey, used money he saved from his monthly scholarship stipend to create a non-profit, an organisation which is now helping to translate and distribute vital Covid-19 information around the world. #globalsouthscience (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - September 6, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Andrew Wight, Contributor Tags: Science /science Innovation /innovation Healthcare /healthcare Leadership /leadership Education /education Coronavirus Source Type: news

Looking at the lunar surface: Harvard scientist believes the moon holds clues about extraterrestrial life
(Natural News) The surface of the moon may hold clues about the existence of extraterrestrial life. According to one scientist, the moon may be acting as a “fishing net” and “mailbox” for evidence of alien life. “The idea is to consider the moon’s surface as a fishing net for interstellar objects collected over time and potentially... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Open Windows, Doors Could Help Stop Coronavirus Spread In Schools, Harvard Experts Say
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Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Education Health schools Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Coronavirus Harvard Massachusetts Schools Source Type: news

Wool-like material can remember and change shape
(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) SEAS researchers have developed a biocompatible material that can be 3D printed into any shape and pre-programmed with reversible shape memory. The material is made using keratin, a fibrous protein found in hair, nails and shells, extracted from leftover Agora wool used in textile manufacturing. It could be used in anything from self-fitting bras to actuating textiles for medical therapeutics and could help reduce waste in the fashion industry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 3, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Harvard promotes claim that '2+2=5'
(Natural News) On Sunday, the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health promoted research on Twitter by one doctoral student that claims that two plus two can equal five. The research was quickly mocked by Twitter users, many of whom questioned the value of a Harvard education. (Article by Tom Ciccotta republished from Breitbart.com) In... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Differing diets of bonobo groups may offer insights into how culture is created
(Harvard University) Besides humans, many other social animals are believed to exhibit forms of culture in various ways, too. According to a new study led by Harvard primatologists Liran Samuni and Martin Surbeck, bonobos, one of our closest living relatives, could be the latest addition to the list. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Evidence of hibernation-like state in Antarctic animal
(Harvard University, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology) Among the many winter survival strategies in the animal world, hibernation is one of the most common. According to new research, this type of adaptation has a long history. In a paper published in the journal Communications Biology, scientists at Harvard University and the University of Washington report evidence of a hibernation-like state in an animal that lived in Antarctica during the Early Triassic, some 250 million years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 27, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A Woman May Have Been Cured of H.I.V. Without Medical Treatment
In dozens of other patients who suppress the virus without drugs, it seems to have been cornered in parts of the genome where it cannot reproduce, scientists reported. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Apoorva Mandavilli Tags: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Genetics and Heredity Immune System Bone Marrow Transplants your-feed-science Nature (Journal) Harvard University Source Type: news

Researchers discover gene controlling nectar spur development
(Harvard University, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology) A team of researchers from California State University in Sacramento, University of California in Santa Barbara, and Harvard University have identified the key gene controlling the development of nectar spur in Aquilegia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 26, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Abbvie signs $30 million research deal with Harvard Medical School
AbbVie Inc. said it's signed a $30 million collaborative research deal with Harvard Medical School to study and develop viral therapies against infections, including those caused by Covid-19. The North Chicago-based pharmaceutical giant (NYSE: ABBV) said the research alliance, which it will fund at $30 million over three years, will launch a multi-pronged effort by the medical school to focus on viral infections that lead to hemorrhagic fever and coronavirus. "A key element of having a strong research… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - August 26, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ben Miller Source Type: news

From the archives: nudge theory and the psychology of persuasion – podcast
While the Science Weekly team take a summer break, we ’re bringing you an episode from the archives – one that seems particularly pertinent as the pandemic continues and governments take a more prominent role in our day-to-day lives. Back in 2017,Ian Sample investigated how we ’re constantly “nudged” to change how we act. Exploring the psychology, history and ethics of nudge theory, Ian spoke to the Harvard Law School professor Cass Sunstein and Dr David Halpern, one of the field’s founders, who is currently advising the UK government on nudging during the coronav irus outbreakContinue r...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Ian Sample and produced by Max Sanderson with Madeleine Finlay Tags: Psychology Science Source Type: news

Cutting surgical robots down to size
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) Teleoperated surgical robots are becoming commonplace in operating rooms, but many are massive (sometimes taking up an entire room) and difficult to manipulate. A new collaboration between Harvard's Wyss Institute and Sony Corporation has created the mini-RCM, a surgical robot the size of a tennis ball that weighs as much as a penny, and performed significantly better   than manually operated tools in delicate mock-surgical procedures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Myomo receives first Australian insurance authorization for MyoPro arm & hand orthosis device
The device was originally developed at MIT with Harvard Medical School. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - August 24, 2020 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Harvard's Wyss Institute launches Torus Biosystems
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University announced today that Cambridge, MA-based Torus BiosystemsTM, Inc., will develop and commercialize DNA nanotechnology developed at the Wyss Institute by Peng Yin and David Zhang. The technology has the potential to disrupt current infectious disease diagnostics by delivering quantitative DNA and RNA results at the patient point-of-care in under 30 minutes. The announcement follows a worldwide licensing agreement between Harvard's Office of Technology Development (OTD) and Torus Bio...
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 21, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Dr. Otis Brawley In Conversation With Douglas Brooks: ‘We Don’t Need to Reform Health Care—We Need to Transform Health Care’
Douglas Brooks served as the head of the White House Office of National AIDS Policy during the Obama Administration as the first openly gay, HIV-positive African American to hold the job. He focused on addressing the health needs of those at higher risk of HIV infection, and is now executive director of community engagement at the biopharmaceutical company Gilead Sciences. Dr. Otis Brawley was chief medical and scientific officer of the American Cancer Society before becoming a professor of oncology at Johns Hopkins, where he oversees a research effort exploring disparities in cancer rates and outcomes. Over a Zoom call, t...
Source: TIME: Health - August 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Douglas Brooks and Otis Brawley Tags: Uncategorized feature Magazine Source Type: news

Genetic background influences disease risk from single-gene variants
(Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard) Life can change dramatically when someone learns they are genetically predisposed to a disease. But these kinds of predictions are complicated: not everyone carrying such high-risk single-gene variants develops the condition. Researchers have now identified how a person's genetic background, in addition to any high-risk variants they carry, influences the risk of disease for three different conditions. The findings, published in Nature Communications, suggest ways to more accurately interpret patients' genetic risk of disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 20, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Latif Nasser, Harvard Ph.D., on the Rewards of Being Dumb
They include getting your own Netflix show. Nasser, a science journalist known for his work on “Radiolab,” talked about going on-camera for “Connected” and the importance of staying curious. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Remy Tumin Tags: Television Documentary Films and Programs Nasser, Latif Radiolab (Radio Program) Netflix Inc Science and Technology Connected (TV Program) Source Type: news

Portrait of a virus
(Harvard Medical School) Researchers create a centralized electronic medical records tool to gather, monitor, analyze clinical trends in COVID-19 across multiple countries. Proof-of-concept platform overcomes key hurdles of decentralized EMR systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 19, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Call for Urgent Action by 275 World Leaders on Global Education Emergency In Face of Covid19
Credit: UNICEF Mali / DickoBy External SourceNEW YORK, Aug 18 2020 (IPS) We write to call for urgent action to address the global education emergency triggered by COVID-19. With over 1 billion children still out of school because of the lockdown, there is now a real and present danger that the public health crisis will create a COVID generation who lose out on schooling and whose opportunities are permanently damaged. While the more fortunate have had access to alternatives, the world’s poorest children have been locked out of learning, denied internet access, and with the loss of free school meals – once a lif...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Economy & Trade Education Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Education Cannot Wait (ECW) Source Type: news

Boston ’ s Museum Of Science Unveils Virtual Q & A Exhibit On Coronavirus
BOSTON (AP/CBS) – Boston’s Museum of Science and a top Harvard University health expert have teamed up to make it easier for anyone anywhere in the world to get answers to their burning questions about the coronavirus pandemic. The interactive exhibit, featuring Dr. Ashish Jha and using artificial intelligence technology, was unveiled at the museum and online Monday. “Ask a Virtual Expert: COVID Conversations with Dr. Jha” allows the curious both on-site and remotely to ask a digital image of Jha a multitude of questions about COVID-19. The answers are based on Jha’s responses to more than 550...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Events Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Boston Museum Of Science Coronavirus Harvard University Source Type: news

Digital technologies and telepsychiatry, NIHR
The following table is divided into four: Table A is short and concise, and is designed for quick reference, with practical advice summarised briefly as a checklist for busy clinicians. Tables B, C and D have full detail and cover the different implications and possibilities for using telepsychiatry in general, in children and adolescents and in older adults. In Tables B, C and D, questions are arranged in groups covering topics listed under headings. Readers can, of course, focus only on areas of interest, but we would suggest that you read the answers to all questions within a group as the answers complement and overlap ...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - August 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Saliva-Based Coronavirus Test Could Be A Fast And Cheap ‘ Game Changer ’
(CNN) — After months of frustration over testing shortages and delays, a new saliva test could give Americans a fast and inexpensive option to learn if they have Covid-19. Researchers from the Yale School of Public Health created the SalivaDirect test, which received emergency use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration on Saturday. “The SalivaDirect test for rapid detection of SARS-CoV-2 [the novel coronavirus] is yet another testing innovation game changer that will reduce the demand for scarce testing resources,” said Adm. Brett Giroir, the US official in charge of Covid-19 testing efforts....
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health CNN Coronavirus Yale University Source Type: news

How viral infections associated with cancer become persistent?
(Instituto de Medicina Molecular) A new study led by Pedro Simas, group leader at Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM; Portugal) and Kenneth M. Kaye, Professor at Harvard Medical School (HMS; USA), discovered a region of viral protein LANA that is key for viral latency and persistent infection inside human cells. These findings published today in the prestigious journal PNAS, can potentially be used to develop therapy for KSHV tumors since blocking the function of this LANA region is expected to abolish virus persistence, which would eliminate the cancer cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 17, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news