Recent survey provides updated national estimate of doctors' financial ties to industry
(The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy& Clinical Practice) Since 2013, gifts and payments to doctors by pharmaceutical and medical device companies have been publicly reported. Some medical centers, employers, and states have banned or restricted detailing visits, physician payments or gifts. In order to better understand the effects of these changes, a team of researchers from Harvard Medical School, The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, and the American Board of Internal Medicine conducted a national survey of internal medicine doctors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers Study History, Importance Of Handshake
BOSTON (CBS) – For centuries, humans have been shaking hands as a form of greeting. Many years ago, historians believe a handshake was a way for people to show that they were unarmed and therefore did not pose a threat. But researchers at Harvard Business School wanted to find out whether shaking hands serves an important purpose in modern society. They studied people engaging in car buying negotiations and found that when people shook hands beforehand, they tended to have a more cooperative spirit, were found to be more honest and warm during the talks, and in the end, both parties benefited. If there was no handsha...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - October 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Watch Listen Dr. Mallika Marshall Handshake Source Type: news

These Are the Best High-Fiber Foods, According to Experts
Your body doesn’t like things to be too easy. Challenging it from time to time—with exercise, with the elements, and even with short periods of going without food—is often associated with better health outcomes. The same is true of your gut and the foods it digests. Foods that break down and slip through too quickly (namely, refined starches and sugars) tend to promote overeating, out-of-control blood sugar surges, and other disease-linked side effects. Meanwhile, foods that put up a bit of a fight against digestion are often the best ones for you. That’s certainly true in the case of fiber, which i...
Source: TIME: Health - October 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Researchers Want Cancer Patients To Share Their Medical Information In Search of Cures
April Doyle, a single mom from Visalia, Cal., only lets herself look three months into her future. Since she was first diagnosed with breast cancer in 2014, she’s tried a new treatment every three months to keep the cancer from spreading from her breast tissue to other parts of her body. But it returned: this time in her bone. She is almost out of options for her hard-to-treat cancer, but she finds comfort in online support groups where other women with metastatic breast cancer share their experiences. “Eventually we know we will exhaust all of our options until they keep coming up with more treatments,” ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime Source Type: news

Deep Learning Algorithm Can ID Mammographic Breast Density
THURSDAY, Oct. 18, 2018 -- A deep learning (DL) algorithm can successfully assess mammographic breast density, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in Radiology. Constance D. Lehman, M.D., Ph.D., from Harvard Medical School in Boston, and... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - October 18, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Harvard Calls for Retraction of Dozens of Studies by Noted Cardiac Researcher
Some 31 studies by Dr. Piero Anversa contain fabricated or falsified data, officials concluded. Dr. Anversa popularized the idea of stem cell treatment for damaged hearts. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GINA KOLATA Tags: Anversa, Piero Falsification of Data Harvard Medical School Brigham and Women's Hospital Research Heart Stem Cells Clinical Trials Academic and Scientific Journals Source Type: news

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Americans who become seriously ill don’t just struggle with their disease. Often, they feel confused and helpless (62%), face the risk of financial ruin (53%), and experience serious problems with their care (61%). Those are among the key findings of a new survey released today by the Commonwealth Fund, the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and the New York Times.         (Source: The Commonwealth Fund: Newsroom)
Source: The Commonwealth Fund: Newsroom - October 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

10 Ways to Keep Your Heart Healthy
No one ever had fun visiting the cardiologist. ­Regardless of how good the doc might be, it’s always a little scary thinking about the health of something as fundamental as the heart. But there are ways to take greater control—to ensure that your own heart health is the best it can be—even if you have a family history of cardiovascular disease. Although 50% of cardiovascular-disease risk is genetic, the other 50% can be modified by how you live your life, according to Dr. Eugenia Gianos, director of Women’s Heart Health at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “This means you can greatly ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Lombardi and Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Baby Boomer Health heart health Source Type: news

Eliminating emissions in India and China could add years to people's lives
(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) In a recent study, researchers from Harvard University wanted to know how replacing coal-fired powerplants in China and India with clean, renewable energy could benefit human health and save lives in the future. The researchers found that eliminating harmful emissions from powerplants could save an estimated annual 15 million years of life in China and 11 million years of life in India. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Harvard: Heart Researcher's Papers Contain Fraudulent Data
TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 -- Dozens of scientific papers from the laboratory of well-known heart researcher Piero Anversa contain fraudulent data, according to a Harvard Medical School internal investigation. Anversa and other members of his laboratory... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - October 16, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Harvard Calls for Retraction of Dozens of Studies by Noted Cardiologist
Some 31 studies by Dr. Piero Anversa contain fabricated or falsified data, officials concluded. Dr. Anversa popularized the idea of stem cell treatment for damaged hearts. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GINA KOLATA Tags: Anversa, Piero Falsification of Data Harvard Medical School Brigham and Women's Hospital Research Heart Stem Cells Clinical Trials Academic and Scientific Journals Source Type: news

Calls to Retract 31 Papers by Disgraced Cardiac Stem Cell Doc Calls to Retract 31 Papers by Disgraced Cardiac Stem Cell Doc
Citing a need for rigorous research practices, Harvard University and Brigham& Women's Hospital are calling for the retraction of 31 papers by a former researcher and professor.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Life in Rural America
The purpose of the Life in Rural America report was to understand the current views and experiences of rural Americans on economic and health issues. (Source: RWJF - Obesity and Childhood Obesity)
Source: RWJF - Obesity and Childhood Obesity - October 16, 2018 Category: Eating Disorders & Weight Management Authors: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Tags: National Source Type: news

Residents of Rural U.S. Largely Optimistic about the Future and Like Where They Live, NPR/RWJF/Harvard Poll Shows
A poll by NPR, RWJF and Harvard shows that rural residents like their jobs and say they are doing better than their parents but worry about drug abuse and their local economies. (Source: RWJF - News Releases)
Source: RWJF - News Releases - October 16, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Tags: Public and Community Health Source Type: news

Health Highlights: Oct. 16, 2018
Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: Heart Researcher's Papers Contain Fraudulent Data: Harvard Dozens of scientific papers from the laboratory of well-known heart researcher Piero... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - October 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

NPR Poll: Rural Americans Are Worried About Addiction And Jobs, But Remain Optimistic
Details the findings of a new poll onLife in Rural America from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Questions included the biggest problems facing rural people and their families, their optimism about the future, economic and health concerns, the opioid epidemic, and more. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - October 16, 2018 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Hypertension medications ARE safe during pregnancy, study reveals
A new study from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School has found that less than one percent of babies born to women who take beta-blockers have congenital malformations. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dozens of Retractions Requested for Heart Stem Cell Studies
Harvard and Brigham and Women's Hospital disavow the work by former faculty member Piero Anversa. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - October 15, 2018 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Impulsivity, painful and provocative events, and suicide intent: testing the interpersonal theory of suicide - Jordan JT, Samuelson KW, Tiet QQ.
OBJECTIVE: The Interpersonal Theory of Suicide (IPTS; Joiner, 2005. Why People Die by Suicide. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press) hypothesizes that repeated exposure to painful and provocative events (PPE) increases capability for suicide (CS), there... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

DNA tests prove Elizabeth Warren has LESS "Native American" ancestry than the average white American
(Natural News) Democrat race hoaxer Elizabeth Warren wormed her way through Harvard by falsely claiming to be Native American. In 1997, the Fordham Law Review made her the poster child of successful “women of color” even though she’s white. Warren is widely expected to make a run for the presidency in 2020, so the entire... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study shows children are still being prescribed opioid pain relievers despite federal warnings against the practice
(Natural News) A new study shows that at least one in 20 children are still receiving codeine for pain management following tonsil and adenoid removal procedures, three years after the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had restricted its use on kids. The team, composed of members from the University of Chicago Medicine, the University of Michigan, and Harvard... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fatal police shootings 40% more likely in states with higher gun ownership
The U.S. Constitution’s second amendment gives us the “right to bear arms,” but what if having a gun for protection is actually putting you more at risk of harm? A new study finds that a person’s chances of being involved in a fatal police shooting is higher in states with the highest rates of gun ownership, compared to those with the lowest. The study, from researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Northeastern University found that people were 3.6 times more likely to be involved in fatal police shootings if they lived in the 10 states with the most guns — Alaska, Ge...
Source: ABC News: Health - October 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Book Review: Calm Clarity:  How to Use Science to Rewire Your Brain
While there are many goals we may pursue in life — a better career, a better relationship, a greater sense of meaning, and deeper connection with those around us — they all start with first gaining a sense of clarity over what is getting in our way, what is helping move us toward our goals, and how we can begin to take ownership of our brains in a way that allows us to live the kind of lives we want. For Due Quach, a survivor of PTSD and a successful management consultant, understanding how to improve her brain function wasn’t just necessary, but advantageous. She writes, “It took many years for me ...
Source: Psych Central - October 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Disorders General Habits Happiness Memory and Perception Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Personal Stories Psychology Self-Help Trauma Calm Clarity Due Quach Higher Self Inner Sage PTSD Source Type: news

Millions of Americans Could Be Identified Using Consumer Genetic Databases —Even If They’ve Never Taken a DNA Test
Up to 60% of Americans of European descent could be identified using only a DNA sample, some basic personal information and consumer genetic databases—even if they’ve never done a genetic test themselves, according to a new study published in Science. Some 7 million Americans have taken a direct-to-consumer DNA test, many of which promise insights about ancestry, wellness and likelihood of developing certain chronic diseases in exchange for a sample of spit. The proliferation of these tests has also given rise to crowdsourced online databases that allow people to anonymously upload their results for further ana...
Source: TIME: Health - October 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Genetics healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Experts debate telemedicine merits and myths
At next week's Connected Health Conference, doctors from Harvard and UPMC will tackle the question of whether telemedicine's costs outweigh its benefits. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - October 12, 2018 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

High Circulating Prolactin Level Inversely Linked to T2DM Risk
FRIDAY, Oct. 12, 2018 -- Among U.S. women, a normally high circulating prolactin concentration is associated with a reduced risk for type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in Diabetologia. Jun Li, Ph.D., from the Harvard T.H.... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - October 12, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

D ’Ambrosio Named Distinguished CHEST Educator by ACCP
Carolyn D'Ambrosio, MD, MS, FCCP, director of the Harvard-Brigham and Women's Hospital Pulmonary and Critical Care Fellowship Program in the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, was honored as a Distinguished CHEST Educator by the Americ (Source: BWH News)
Source: BWH News - October 12, 2018 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

Low-Dose Aspirin May Reduce Ovarian Cancer Risk
THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 -- Low-dose aspirin use is associated with a reduced risk for ovarian cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in JAMA Oncology. Mollie E. Barnard, Sc.D., from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - October 11, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Stephen Hawking's final scientific paper released
Black Hole Entropy and Soft Hair was completed in the days before the physicist ’s death in March•Black holes and soft hair: why Stephen Hawking ’s final work is importantStephen Hawking ’s final scientific paper has been released by physicists who worked with the late cosmologist on his career-long effort to understand what happens to information when objects fall into black holes.The work, which tackles what theoretical physicists call “the information paradox”, was completed in the days beforeHawking ’s death in March. It has now been written up by his colleagues at Cambridge and...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Stephen Hawking Black holes Science Physics Source Type: news

'Chemical-free' nail varnishes contain toxins linked to infertility and even cancer
Researchers from Harvard found that '3-Free' polishes that claim to be free of the 'toxic trio' - DnBP, toluene and formaldehyde - often still contain toxins linked to brain toxicity and even foetal abnormalities. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Even ‘Non-Toxic’ Nail Polish May Contain Harmful Chemicals, Study Says
Cosmetics are subject to very few regulations in the U.S. While they fall under Food and Drug Administration (FDA) purview, current laws do not require beauty products and their ingredients to be FDA-approved before hitting shelves. Even laws that pertain to cosmetic labeling are somewhat loose; many buzzwords that show up on product packaging mean, effectively, nothing. That’s also the case for many nail polishes. And even brands that tout safe formulations may be substituting some toxic chemicals for equally dangerous alternatives, suggests a new study published Wednesday in the journal Environmental Science & ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime toxins Source Type: news

'Chemical-free' nail varnishes contain toxins linked to infertility and even cancer
Researchers from Harvard found that '3-Free' polishes that claim to be free of the 'toxic trio' - DnBP, toluene and formaldehyde - often still contain toxins linked to brain toxicity and even foetal abnormalities. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mental health disorders will cost £12 TRILLION a year worldwide by 2030
According to a report put together by Harvard scientists, conditions such as depression and anxiety are rising in every country on the planet. They add sustainable development needs good mental health. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Chemical in plastic 'raises the risk of premature birth sixfold', scientists claim
Researchers led by the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health in Boston, analysed the urine of 364 women at a fertility clinic before they became pregnant. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why We Keep Ignoring Even the Most Dire Climate Change Warnings
You’d think the end of the world would be enough to get us scared. Humans have always been an exceedingly risk-averse species—which is how we came to survive as a species at all. If there are lions on one part of the savannah, we go to another. If crocodiles keep coming out of the river, we fish somewhere else. So when it comes to the loss of the entire planet, well, we ought to take action. And yet we don’t; we never do. That odd contradiction is on display again, in the wake of an announcement by the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change that a catastrophe is nigh—that th...
Source: TIME: Science - October 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized climate change Environment onetime Source Type: news

Hand Sanitizer Reduced Toddlers ’ Sick Days More Than Soap, Study Found
By Naomi Thomas, CNN (CNN) — Young children inevitably have a lot of runny noses and sore throats, but how they clean their hands could cut back on how often they miss day care, according to a study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics. Researchers in Spain found that children who cleaned their hands with sanitizer instead of soap and water reduced their missed days of school, respiratory infections and antibiotic prescriptions. Researchers studied 911 children up to age 3 who attended 24 day care centers in Almería, Spain. They split the children, their families and their day care centers into three gro...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - October 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Hand Sanitizer Source Type: news

Sleep: how much do we really need?
The optimum amount of sleep is supposed to be eight hours a night. Why is shuteye so important – and what happens if we don’t get enough?“The only known function of sleep is to cure sleepiness,” the Harvard sleep scientist Dr J Allan Hobson once joked. This isn’t quite true, but the questions of why we spend about a third of our lives asleep and what goes on in our head during this time are far from being solved.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin, Science correspondent Tags: Science Sleep Life and style Health & wellbeing Source Type: news

Just quarter of an aspirin a day could slash a woman's ovarian cancer risk by 25%
A study of 205,000 women, led by Harvard University, found those who regularly took a quarter-dose painkiller were far less likely to be diagnosed with the cancer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Low-dose aspirin may lower ovarian cancer risk
(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) Women who reported recent, regular use of low-dose aspirin (100 milligrams or less) had a 23 percent lower risk of developing ovarian cancer when compared with women who did not regularly take aspirin, according to new research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study also found that long-term heavy use of non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 4, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Trump ’s Attack Against Christine Blasey Ford Mischaracterizes How Memory Works, Experts Say
President Donald Trump on Tuesday attacked Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her when they were teenagers, for not remembering certain details about the alleged incident. “How did you get home? ‘I don’t remember,'” Trump said, imitating Ford. “How did you get there? ‘I don’t remember.'” Blasey Ford accused Kavanaugh of groping her and pinning her down on a bed during a gathering in Maryland in the 1980s, a charge Kavanaugh has denied. During her testimony in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee last week...
Source: TIME: Science - October 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Samantha Cooney Tags: Uncategorized memory onetime Source Type: news

Processed Meats Linked To Breast Cancer, Study Says
(CNN) — Eating processed meats like bacon, sausages and ham could increase the risk of breast cancer, a study has said. Regularly consuming the foods was linked with a 9% higher risk of breast cancer, according to an analysis of previous studies looking at over 1.2 million women. The findings follow previous research from the World Health Organization, which categorized processed meat as a carcinogen after finding that its consumption can cause various types of cancer. Processed meats are those that have been preserved by smoking, curing or salting. “This systematic review and meta-analysis study reports signif...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - October 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Breast Cancer Local TV Source Type: news

Study identifies genetic 'trauma footprint' that could be screened for in criminal investigations
Sperm from the survivors of child abuse show different epigenetic 'tags' than those of non-victims that could help confirm past crimes,Harvard and University of British Columbia research finds. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The New Health Care: Uber, Lyft and the Urgency of Saving Money on Ambulances
‘ Don ’ t reflexively call an ambulance, ’ a Harvard researcher says. In many cases, a cheaper way makes sense. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: AUSTIN FRAKT Tags: Ambulances Health Insurance and Managed Care Uber Technologies Inc Lyft Inc Prices (Fares, Fees and Rates) Car Services and Livery Cabs Source Type: news

The Effects Of Sexual Assault On The Brain
NPR's Rachel Martin talks with Jim Hopper, a teaching associate at Harvard Medical School, about sexual assault and its effects on the brain. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - September 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Kids pick up marijuana at younger age if their mothers use the drug, study finds
On average, children whose mothers used marijuana tried it themselves an average of two years earlier than peers whose mothers didn't use the drug, Harvard scientists found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The secret to happiness? Be like Winnie the Pooh! Harvard professor claims
Harvard professor Sanjiv Chopra claims AA Milne's lovable bear is the 'master of zen' and we could all learn a lesson or two from the honey-loving creature's optimistic perspective on life. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

IBM ’s Watson Not Living Up to Hype, Wall Street Journal and Other Media Report; ‘Dr. Watson’ Has Yet to Show It Can Improve Patient Outcomes or Accurately Diagnose Cancer
Wall Street Journal reports IBM losing Watson-for-Oncology partners and clients, but scientists remain confident artificial intelligence will revolutionize diagnosis and treatment of disease What happens when a healthcare revolution is overhyped? Results fall short of expectations. That’s the diagnosis from the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) and other media outlets five years after IBM marketed its […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - September 21, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Instruments & Equipment Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing anatomic pathology clinical laboratory Dark Daily dark intelligence group Dark Report David Howard PhD Emory University harvard m Source Type: news

Summer 2020 Olympics in Tokyo may be hit by deadly dengue fever
Researchers from Harvard have raised concerns following the unexpected dengue outbreak in Japan's capital city in 2014. This shows Tokyo has the climate and mosquitoes for the virus. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news