Older People Are Contributing to Climate Change, and Suffering From It
Growing numbers of seniors are using more energy. They also are most likely to suffer in extreme weather, which has become more common as the planet warms. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paula Span Tags: Weather Global Warming Elderly Baby Boomers Polls and Public Opinion Energy Efficiency Volunteers and Community Service Air Conditioning Deaths (Fatalities) Harvard Medical School Pew Research Center Brown, Lisa (1972- ) New York C Source Type: news

Study analyzes mortality risks among pro athletes
(Harvard Medical School) A first-of-its-kind comparison between elite pro athletes suggests higher overall mortality among NFL players compared with MLB players. NFL players also appear to have higher risk of dying from cardiovascular and neurodegenerative causes compared with MLB peers.The differences warrant further study of sport-specific mechanisms of disease development. Clinicians treating current and former NFL players should be vigilant about the presence of cardiovascular and neurologic symptoms and promptly treat risk factors such as sleep apnea, obesity, hypertension. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cleveland Hopkins Airport Launches Stop the Bleed
Every year, more than 9 million people travel through Cleveland Hopkins International Airport (CLE) in Cleveland, Ohio. With the possibility of severe hemorrhage from a multitude of sources, including escalators, machinery, active shooter events or other terrorism events, the Stop the Bleed program felt like a perfect fit for an airport. The CLE Fire Department started research of the Stop the Bleed program several months ago, and wanted to make sure the program was a perfect fit for both CLE and nearby Burke Lakefront Airport (BKL)—a public airport on the shore of Lake Erie, in the northeast part of downtown Clevela...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 23, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Trauma Exclusive Articles Source Type: news

Pediatricians Should Encourage Fish Consumption for Children
THURSDAY, May 23, 2019 -- Fish and shellfish consumption should be encouraged for children, according to a technical report published online May 20 in Pediatrics. Aaron S. Bernstein, M.D., M.P.H., from Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 23, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Vadim Gladyshev to present at the 6th Aging Research for Drug Discovery Forum in Basel
(InSilico Medicine, Inc.) Vadim Gladyshev, Ph.D., Professor of Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, to present at the 6th Aging Research for Drug Discovery Forum in Basel, Switzerland. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Health Tip: Effects of Too Much Protein
-- In recent years, high-protein diets have surged in popularity. Though protein is essential for life, too much protein can be a problem, says Harvard Medical School. Getting too much protein is associated with: High cholesterol. Increased cancer... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 22, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Early antiretroviral treatment may preserve key immune responses to HIV
(Massachusetts General Hospital) Investigators from the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard have found that instituting combination antiretroviral treatment at the earliest stages of HIV infection may allow the generation of functional CD8 'killer' T cells and preservation of the CD4 helper T cells that are the virus's primary target. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 22, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Life in Rural America: Part II
Rural adults are satisfied with their quality of life and feel safe in their communities, but many struggle to stay ahead of mounting medical and housing expenses and to access the health care they need. (Source: RWJF News Digest - Quality of Care)
Source: RWJF News Digest - Quality of Care - May 21, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Tags: Public and Community Health National Rural Source Type: news

Biotech Startups And The Hard Truth Of Innovation
Gary Pisano ’s recent Harvard Business Review piece, The Hard Truth About Innovative Cultures, beautifully frames up how innovative corporate environments are frequently misunderstood. The author shares some color commentary from the perspective of a biotech founder and investor. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - May 20, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Booth, Contributor Source Type: news

SABER tech gives DNA and RNA visualization a boost
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) A collaborative research team from Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and Harvard Medical School (HMS) has now developed 'Signal Amplification by Exchange Reaction' (SABER), a highly programmable and practical method that significantly enhances the sensitivity as well as customization and multiplexing capabilities of FISH analysis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Staying in shape: How rod-shaped bacteria grow long, not wide
(Marine Biological Laboratory) A team from Harvard University, Marine Biological Laboratory, and collaborators show how the rod-shaped bacteria Bacillus subtilis maintains its precise diameter while growing end to end. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

'Imagine...' -- our attitudes can change solely by the power of imagination
(Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences) Roland Benoit and Philipp Paulus together with Daniel Schacter from Harvard University have examined the question, how neutral places suddenly become valuable to us, in a study published in the journal Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Healthy habits could avoid 27% of cancer cases in Brazil
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) A study by Brazilian researchers in partnership with Harvard estimates the impact of five risk factors on the incidence of cancer- physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, overweight, smoking and alcohol consumption. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 14, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Being wise is good for your health -- review looks at emerging science of wisdom
(Wolters Kluwer Health) Can science measure what it means to be wise? A growing body of evidence suggests that wisdom is a complex concept that contributes to mental health and happiness, according to a review in the May/June issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Help Inform Science Policy This Summer
Registration is now open for the 2019 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) is an opportunity for scientists from across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research and education. Now in its eleventh year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state ele...
Source: Public Policy Reports - May 13, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Scientists can create a perfect map of your gut on a microchip
Harvard University scientists have created a microchip that mimics the gut and its bacteria to help them study how certain drugs will interact with the complex flora inside the intestines. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How viable is your liver after you die?
(World Scientific) In a paper to be published in a forthcoming issue of TECHNOLOGY, a group of researchers from Harvard Medical School have done a study on the viability of donated livers and its correlation with donor demographics. The results of this study could reduce the number of livers that are discarded and facilitate development of novel therapeutics and bioengineering for clinical research applications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Catch a virus by its tail
(Harvard Medical School) At a glance: Research uncovers key mechanism that allows some of the deadliest human RNA viruses to orchestrate the precise copying of the individual pieces of their viral genome and replicate. The findings identify new targets to inhibit viral replication and may inform the development of a novel class of antiviral drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Green energy nudges come with a hidden cost
(Carnegie Mellon University) Many US households receive energy bills comparing their use to that of similar neighbors to remind them to use less energy. Such policies aim to 'nudge' people toward making better choices, both for their future selves and for others. Nudges like these have become popular among policymakers, because they are virtually costless to implement. However, a new study from researchers at Carnegie Mellon, Fordham and Harvard universities finds these nudges have an unexplored cost: they can decrease support for policies with far greater impact. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Human gut microbiome physiology can now be studied in vitro using Organ Chip technology
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) A research team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering has developed an approach to co-culture a complex human gut microbiome in direct contact with intestinal tissue for at least five days using 'organ-on-a-chip' (Organ Chip) microfluidic culture technology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 13, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

HEALTH NOTES: Bad news bearers ARE less popular than those announcing good fortune
Harvard University experts tested it in an experiment where volunteers had the opportunity to win $2, depending on whether an odd or even number was picked from a hat. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health Tip: Benefits of Fitness Boxing
-- Fitness boxing is a popular way for adults to stay fit. Unlike regular boxing, fitness boxing does not involve sparring, so there is no risk of head trauma, says Harvard Medical School. Instead, participants throw punches at the air or at a... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 10, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Campaign raises awareness of "epidemic" killing moms
"An American mom today is 50 percent more likely to die in childbirth than her own mother was," a Harvard Medical School obstetrician said (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - May 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Elizabeth Warren, Unveiling Opioid Plan, Says Sackler Name Should Come Off Harvard Buildings
Ms. Warren, a Democratic presidential candidate, also said she would donate the funds she received from the Sacklers, who are behind OxyContin. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: ASTEAD W. HERNDON Tags: Opioids and Opiates Purdue Pharma Sackler Family Warren, Elizabeth Sackler, Beverly Harvard University Presidential Election of 2020 OxyContin (Drug) Source Type: news

AI finds radiologists vary in follow-up recommendations
An artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm helped Harvard researchers conclude...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Automated algorithms track adherence to follow-up advice AI reveals cause of transient ischemic attack symptoms AI could help radiologists track follow-up advice Natural language processing yields rad-path correlation Can AI learn how to understand radiologist reports? (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - May 9, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

TB Alliance and partners form multidisciplinary center for translational TB drug research
(Burness) The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) has awarded TB Alliance a Center of Excellence in Translational Research (CETR) grant (U19AI142735) for tuberculosis (TB) drug development. New translational research to develop novel anti-TB medicines is being carried out with partners at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Harvard University, Johns Hopkins University, and Research Triangle Institute. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The stale air in your office may make you dumber, research suggests
High levels of carbon dioxide in offices may starve the brains of employees and make them worse at mental tasks, Harvard University and University of California, Berkeley, studies found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Elizabeth Warren, Unveiling Opioid Plan, Says She Will Give Sackler Family ’ s Donations to Charity
Ms. Warren, a Democratic presidential candidate, also called on Harvard University to remove the pharmaceutical family ’ s name from its campus buildings. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: ASTEAD W. HERNDON Tags: Opioids and Opiates Purdue Pharma Sackler Family Warren, Elizabeth Sackler, Beverly Harvard University Presidential Election of 2020 OxyContin (Drug) Source Type: news

The Importance of Healthy Living in the Treatment of Complex-PTSD
Treatment for complex post-traumatic stress disorder (C-PTSD) happens on many levels. In order to heal emotionally and mentally, we need to support the physical body as well. Research has found extensive comorbidity for C-PTSD and major depressive disorder (MDD) (95% lifetime, 50% current), as well as anxiety disorders.1 In addition to the higher prevalence of depression and anxiety, depressed patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) tend to experience more severe symptoms.2 Addressing Anxiety and Depression as Part of Treatment for C-PTSD We now know that our physical bodies are interconnected with the function...
Source: Psych Central - May 8, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Fabiana Franco, Ph.D. Tags: Abuse PTSD Source Type: news

After $59M round, CRISPR startup launches with plans to tackle heart disease
A new gene editing company, founded by two Harvard scientists and one of the men behind Editas Medicine, has launched with nearly $59 million to develop a single treatment for the leading cause of death worldwide. Verve Therapeutics emerged from stealth mode this week after a Series A financing round led by GV, formerly Google Ventures. The 10-person startup has also signed collaboration deals with fellow gene editing startup Beam Therapeutics and Verily, a life science business operating under… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 7, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

A quarter of transgender and non-binary high school students have been sexually assaulted
A new study from the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health has found that transgender boys were 26 % more likely to experience sexual assault when bathroom restrictions were in place. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Novel Imaging May Make Peritoneal Mesothelioma Surgery More Effective
Dr. James Cusack at Massachusetts General Hospital has begun using a novel imaging system for patients with peritoneal mesothelioma that could better identify tumor cells during surgery, reducing the chance of recurrence. Cusack, an associate professor of surgery at the Harvard University Medical School, is also studying the molecular imaging technology with select cases of appendiceal, ovarian and gastrointestinal cancers. The single-center clinical trial, which started April 3, aims to determine safety and efficacy of the procedure for peritoneum metastases, according to Cusack. The Lumicell System already has been studi...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - May 6, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

Results of Harvard Study into Medicare Costs Offers Opportunities for Clinical Laboratories
Harvard’s study of high-cost Medicare patients offers insights into how medical laboratories can help improve early diagnosis, optimize therapies, and monitor chronic disease Clinical laboratories and anatomic pathology groups supporting Medicare patients understand that a small portion of high-cost patients make up the majority of Medicare spending. Between extended treatment, comorbidities, and the complex nature […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - May 6, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Compliance, Legal, and Malpractice Laboratory Pathology Managed Care Contracts & Payer Reimbursement Management & Operations Source Type: news

Microbial Toxins Found in Electronic Cigarette Products
FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 -- Electronic cigarette (EC) products may be contaminated with microbial toxins, according to a study published online April 24 in Environmental Health Perspectives. Mi-Sun Lee, from Harvard University in Boston, and colleagues... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 3, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

2 HMS faculty elected to National Academy of Sciences
(Harvard Medical School) Researchers' work shows how curiosity, creativity drive science and illustrates how a passion for discovery enriches knowledge. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ragon Institute study identifies viral peptides critical to natural HIV control
(Massachusetts General Hospital) Investigators at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard have used a novel approach to identify specific amino acids in the protein structure of HIV that appear critical to the ability of the virus to function and replicate. They also have found that the immune systems of individuals naturally able to control HIV infection target these amino acids with pathogen-killing CD8 T cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 2, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Storage beyond the cloud
(Harvard University) As the data boom continues to boom, more and more information gets filed in less and less space. Even the cloud will eventually run out of space, can't thwart all hackers, and gobbles up energy. Now, a new way to store information could stably house data for millions of years, lives outside the hackable internet, and, once written, uses no energy. All you need is a chemist, some cheap molecules, and your precious information. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Doctors-to-be describe their scientific studies on Student Research Day
This year ’s Student Research Day will include a poster session featuring 106 posters and a Farr Lecture by Harvard Medical School Dean Dr. George Q. Daley. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 30, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Alumnus gives MIT $4.5 million to establish the Broderick Fund for Phytocannabinoid Research
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Charles R. Broderick, an alumnus of MIT and Harvard University, has made gifts to both alma maters to support fundamental research into the effects of cannabis on the brain and behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Unraveling cannabinoids
(Harvard Medical School) Harvard Medical School, MIT received a $9 million gift to study the neurobiology, physiologic effects of cannabinoids. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Meet with Your Lawmakers to Inform Science Policy This Summer
Registration is now open for the 2019 Biological Sciences Congressional District Visits event. This national initiative, organized by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) is an opportunity for scientists from across the country to meet with their federal or state elected officials to showcase the people, facilities, and equipment that are required to support and conduct scientific research and education. Now in its eleventh year, the event enables scientists, graduate students, representatives of research facilities, and people affiliated with scientific collections to meet with their federal or state ele...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 29, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Readmission penalties for safety net hospitals drop under new rules
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) Readmission penalties against hospitals providing care to socioeconomically disadvantaged patients have dropped 14 percentage points under new rules adopted in 2019 that more equitably account for low-income populations being served, according to a new analysis led by UT Southwestern Medical Center and Harvard researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Workplace wellness programs return few benefits, study suggests
The idea that workplace wellness programs serve to improve employees' health and reduce overall spending on medical benefits may not be accurate, according to a new study by researchers from Harvard University. But others say cost savings are not the only value of the programs. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - April 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Business Source Type: news

It ’s Not Your Imagination: That Toddler is Judging You
There are few things as irresistible as the face of a toddler: the tiny nose, the ingenuous eyes, the utter scrumptiousness of the cheeks. Well, guess what. They don’t think nearly as highly of your face. Kids may not say it, but by the time they’re as young as three, they give you a good hard look the moment they meet you—and they judge a lot by what they see. It may be no surprise that young humans—like all humans—look to the face first for clues about the kindness, approachability and even competence of new people. But according to a new study conducted by a group of researchers from Harvar...
Source: TIME: Health - April 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

It ’s Not Your Imagination: That Toddler is Judging You
There are few things as irresistible as the face of a toddler: the tiny nose, the ingenuous eyes, the utter scrumptiousness of the cheeks. Well, guess what. They don’t think nearly as highly of your face. Kids may not say it, but by the time they’re as young as three, they give you a good hard look the moment they meet you—and they judge a lot by what they see. It may be no surprise that young humans—like all humans—look to the face first for clues about the kindness, approachability and even competence of new people. But according to a new study conducted by a group of researchers from Harvar...
Source: TIME: Science - April 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

Harvard Study: Harmful Toxins Found In Popular E-Cigarettes
BOSTON (CBS) – A Harvard University study of e-cigarettes found that many contain bacterial and fungal toxins. Researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health looked at 75 popular electronic cigarette products, including cartridges and e-liquids, sold in the United States. In 27% they found endotoxin, and 81% percent had glucan. Harvard Chan researchers found that popular e-cigarette products sold in the U.S. were contaminated with bacterial and fungal toxins. https://t.co/2QUmhm2vM9 — HarvardPublicHealth (@HarvardChanSPH) April 24, 2019 Those toxins have been linked to health problems that incl...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Source Type: news

Microbial contaminants found in popular e-cigarettes
(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) Popular electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) products sold in the US were contaminated with bacterial and fungal toxins, according to new research from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Leading Doctors Discussed Creating Ethical Medical Miracles at the TIME 100 Summit
Speaking at the first Time 100 Summit in New York City on Tuesday, prominent geneticist George Church admitted that for about 10 years, he knew biological weapons could be specifically targeted to individual people. But he kept it to himself. Church, a professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School, participated in a panel discussing how to introduce breakthroughs in medicine, which can become life-saving miracles, in ethical and responsible ways. He discussed his decision not to share his knowledge widely as an example of a line he consciously decided not to cross for ethical reasons. “I kept that a secret and didn...
Source: TIME: Health - April 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized 2019 TIME 100 t100summit Source Type: news

Kids As Young As 5 Make Superficial Judgments Based On Appearance
BOSTON (CBS) — Harvard researchers found that children as young as five make superficial judgments about others based on their facial features, much like adults do. Adults often make snap judgments about other people based simply on how their mouth is set or the shape of their brow. This can influence who we vote for, who we hire, and who may get a harsher punishment. Now researchers have found that by the age of five, children do the same. They had 350 children ages 3 to 13 look at computer-generated faces designed to look trustworthy or not, dominant or submissive, competent or incompetent. The kids almost always m...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

AI predicts lung cancer survival from CT scan data
Harvard researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: AI malware deceives radiologists with fake tumors on CT AI reliably characterizes pulmonary nodules on CT AI spots lung nodules on CT, with low false-positive rate New AI algorithm identifies small lung tumors on CT scans NIH issues huge database of CT scans for AI testing (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 22, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news