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Profiling the genome hundreds of variations at a time
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) Using baker's yeast, a team at Harvard's Wyss Institute developed a CRISPR-Cas9-based high-throughput approach that allows researchers to precisely alter hundreds of different genes or features of a single gene at once in individual yeast cells with 80 to 100% efficiency, select cells from the population that show specific behaviors, and identify the gene alterations that either trigger or prevent them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

N.I.H. Halts Enrollment in a Study of Drinking Now Under Scrutiny
Following reports in The Times that investigators and officials had solicited funding for the trial from the alcohol industry, the N.I.H. has launched two internal investigations. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: RONI CARYN RABIN Tags: Clinical Trials Conflicts of Interest Harvard University National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism National Institutes of Health Collins, Francis S Grassley, Charles E Source Type: news

Seafood Recommended 1 to 2 Times/Week for Cardiac Benefit
THURSDAY, May 17, 2018 -- One to two servings of seafood per week is recommended for cardiovascular benefits, according to an American Heart Association science advisory published online May 17 in Circulation. Eric B. Rimm, Sc.D., from the Harvard... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 17, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Scientists analyze first ancient human DNA from Southeast Asia
(Harvard Medical School) The first whole-genome analyses of ancient human DNA from Southeast Asia reveal that there were at least three major waves of human migration into the region over the last 50,000 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

This Will Change Your Mind About Psychedelic Drugs
For years, the field of mental health has been largely barren of meaningful treatment advances. But now, scientists have new hope in the least likely of places: psychedelic drugs. Recent research suggests that certain psychedelic substances can help relieve anxiety, depression, PTSD, addiction and the fear surrounding a terminal diagnosis. “The biggest misconception people have about psychedelics is that these are drugs that make you crazy,” says Michael Pollan, author of the new book How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and ...
Source: TIME: Health - May 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mandy Oaklander Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

Top-10 List of the Most Studied Genes of All Time Includes Several Used in Clinical Laboratory Testing for Cancers, Other Diseases
Harvard School of Medicine researcher discovers only a fraction of all known human genes are ever included in research studies It seems every day that diagnostic test developers are announcing new genetic tests for everything from researching bloodlines to predicting vulnerability to specific chronic diseases. However, as most pathologists know, there are more than 20,000 […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - May 16, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Digital Pathology Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Management & Operations AKT1 ana Source Type: news

State's biggest health insurance firms blame Obamacare tax for Q1 losses
The state ’s largest insurers suffered deep losses in the first quarter of 2018, blaming the red ink on a newly-resumed tax of the Affordable Care Act. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, the state’s largest insurer with 2.8 million members, reported a $97.2 million operating loss in the first quar ter, compared to a $10.6 million operating gain in the same period last year. Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, which has the second largest membership at 1.3 million members, reported a $9.4 million… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - May 16, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

Flesh eating bacteria ‘thrive on their victim's pain’
New research from Harvard Medical School has discovered that  'flesh-eating' bacteria actually hijacks a victim's pain receptors for their own benefit. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Plant proteins used in new nanofiber dressing that accelerates healing and improves tissue regeneration
(Natural News) Harvard researchers have come up with two nanofiber wound dressings made from natural proteins found in plants and animals. Wounds treated with the new dressings heal so fast and so thoroughly that they don’t leave any scars, reported The Harvard Gazette. The two wound dressings were produced by separate research teams, one of... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Reboot your diet: Consuming more mono-unsaturated fatty acids can reduce your risk of heart disease by 26%
(Natural News) Make your diet more heart-healthy by including foods rich in monounsaturated fatty acids. A study found that eating more monounsaturated fatty acids from plants can lower the risk of heart disease by 26 percent. Led by researchers at the Harvard School T.H. Chan of Public Health in Boston, the study investigated the effect... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Global Health and Tech Thinkers Come Together at SwitchPoint
May 14, 2018From pandemic preparedness to gender equality, here are a few standout moments from the 2018 event.At  SwitchPoint, a two-day conference organized by Intrahealth International —a DAI strategic affiliate—400 global health and technology devotees came together in the North Carolina countryside to share ideas and seed partnerships for solving global health challenges, especially by using technology. The seventh annual event, held April 26–27, featured 30-plus stage speakers and 20-plus microlabs.These talks and microlabs covered a host of topics, from pandemic preparedness and the value...
Source: IntraHealth International - May 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

UCLA engineer develops 3D printer that can create complex biological tissues
A UCLA bioengineer has developed a technique that uses a specially adapted 3D printer to build therapeutic biomaterials from multiple materials. The advance could be a step toward on-demand printing of complex artificial tissues for use in transplants and other surgeries.“Tissues are wonderfully complex structures, so to engineer artificial versions of them that function properly, we have to recreate their complexity,” said Ali Khademhosseini, who led the study and is UCLA’s Levi James Knight, Jr., Professor of Engineering at theUCLA Samueli School of Engineering. “Our new approach offers ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 14, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Eat more dark chocolate to resolve irregular heartbeats
(Natural News) Chocolate lovers, rejoice: A study published in the journal Heart has found that eating moderate amounts of chocolate can reduce the risk of developing atrial fibrillation (AFib), a life-threatening form of irregular heartbeat. Scientists at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, together with the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Aalborg University, and the Danish Cancer... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Harvard and MIT launch gene editing company
Group aiming to commercialise Crispr tool secures $87m initial venture capital funding (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - May 14, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Beam Therapeutics launched to develop Harvard base editing technology
(Harvard University) Harvard University has granted a worldwide license to Beam Therapeutics, Inc., to develop and commercialize a suite of revolutionary DNA base editing technologies for the treatment of human disease. Beam announced today that it has raised up to $87 million in Series A financing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Antibodies against one hemorrhagic fever virus found to disarm a related virus
(Harvard Medical School) Research conducted in vitro shows two human antibodies made in response to vaccination against one hemorrhagic fever virus can disarm a related virus, for which there is currently no vaccine.The proof-of-principle finding identifies a common molecular chink in the two viruses' armor that renders both vulnerable to the same antibodies.The results set the stage for a single vaccine and other antibody-based treatments that work against multiple viral 'cousins' despite key differences in their genetic makeup. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 14, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The startup that wants you to 'live to 130 in the body of a 22-year-old'
A Harvard startup has begun preliminary experiments on beagles and claims it can make animals 'younger' by adding new DNA instructions to their bodies. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Partners HealthCare CFO says plans for future are regional
Acquisition conversations with Care New England and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care are just the beginning of the growth plans Partners HealthCare is exploring, which includes a more regional view. Peter Markell, chief financial officer for Partners, said the organization is evaluating different opportunities in the context of a larger New England strategy. “We’re looking at other places in New England where we think we can find people who want to work with us, (where) we think we’re a ligned in… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - May 11, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

Partners HealthCare CFO says plans for future are regional
Acquisition conversations with Care New England and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care are just the beginning of the growth plans Partners HealthCare is exploring, which includes a more regional view. Peter Markell, chief financial officer for Partners, said the organization is evaluating different opportunities in the context of a larger New England strategy. “We’re looking at other places in New England where we think we can find people who want to work with us, (where) we think we’re a ligned in… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 11, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

A Do No Harm Framework for ICT4D: Inspiration from SwitchPoint 2018
May 11, 2018The issue of data ethics isn't new to international development —but it all feels a little more urgent now. SwitchPoint 2018 was an inspiring, passionate, and delightful indulgence: Spending two days in lush Saxapahaw, North Carolina, thinking about big ideas and learning from leading experts in small group sessions in between performance art and live music shows felt like such a departure from Conference As Usual.I felt space opening up in my brain to start really processing what the speakers were saying —the real act and action of listening versus the usual ruse of secretly responding to...
Source: IntraHealth International - May 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

UCI-Harvard research may help combat the deadly gastrointestinal infection C. diff
(University of California - Irvine) Clostridium difficile   infection is the most common cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in developed countries. Researchers have discovered how the C. diff toxin B recognizes the human Frizzled protein, the receptor it uses to invade intestinal cells and lead to deadly gastrointestinal infections. The findings, published in Science, could pave the way for new C. diff antitoxins and also show potential for the development of novel anti-cancer drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tiny spiders, big color
(Harvard University) There's plenty that's striking about Phoroncidia rubroargentea, a species of spider native to Madagascar, starting with their size -- at just three millimeters, they're barely larger than a few grains of salt. But the reason they caught Sarah Kariko's eye had to do with their color. Unlike many other species, which gradually see their color leach away when preserved in ethanol, the tiny spiders dazzled with brilliant, shimmering red and silver, even after decades in ethanol. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is Meta-Analysis a Sign of Something Big on the Horizon for GID?
All signs are pointing to something big on the horizon for GI Dynamics and its embattled obesity and type 2 diabetes treatment technology. The most recent guidepost from the Lexington, MA-based company came Thursday, when it announced results were being published from a meta-analysis of the EndoBarrier. Results show the device was able to impact weight loss and insulin resistance improvement. The research is titled “Effects of the Duodenal-Jejunal Bypass Liner on Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Obesity: A Meta-analysis with Secondary Analysis on Weight Loss and Hormonal Changes,” an...
Source: MDDI - May 10, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Implants Source Type: news

GI Dynamics touts insulin resistance improvement, weight loss in EndoBarrier meta-analysis
This study presents the most comprehensive EndoBarrier meta-analysis we have seen and this type of data is indicative of EndoBarrier’s highly impactful clinical utility,” prez & CEO Scott Schorer said in a press release. Earlier this week, GI Dynamics announced it inked a binding commitment for a $1.8 million financing deal with Crystal Amber Fund Limited. The post GI Dynamics touts insulin resistance improvement, weight loss in EndoBarrier meta-analysis appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - May 10, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Weight loss GI Dynamics Source Type: news

How the germ behind flesh-eating disease hijacks neurons to avoid immune destruction
(Harvard Medical School) A study conducted in mice reveals that neurons play key role in the development of flesh-eating disease.The findings show that a bacterium that causes flesh-eating disease hijacks the normal crosstalk between nervous and immune systems to avoid immune destruction, thus ensuring its own survival.Two approaches prevent infections, halt disease progression in mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Progress in posttraumatic stress disorder --Increased understanding points to new approaches for PTSD prevention and treatment
(Wolters Kluwer Health) Recent advances in scientific understanding of how posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) develops and persists may lead to more effective treatment and even prevention of this debilitating disorder, according to the May/June special issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry, published by Wolters Kluwer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Type 2 Diabetes Ups Risk of Renal Cancer in Women, but Not Men
TUESDAY, May 8, 2018 -- Type 2 diabetes is independently associated with a greater risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in women, but not in men, according to a study published online April 20 in Diabetes Care. Rebecca E. Graff, Sc.D., from Harvard... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 8, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Seven simple ways to cope with loneliness
We live in lonely times. The elderly are lonely. The teens are lonely. People are lonely in cities and in rural areas, so much so that it's now considered a public-health issue (one with real, physical health effects). In a cover story for the Harvard Business Review last year, former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy declared that "the world is suffering from an epidemic of loneliness." (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - May 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Patients and families who experience delirium report more distress than those who do not
(Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research) Researchers from Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Brown University, and Yale School of Nursing have reported that patients who develop delirium (an acute decline of cognitive functioning) during or after a hospital stay report more distress than those who do not. The same goes for family members of patients who have experienced delirium -- they also report more distress than family members of patients who have not experienced delirium. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genomic databases weakened by lack of non-European populations
Precision medicine will largely be built on vast troves of genomic information, but diverse populations are still underrepresented in public genomic databases, according to a new study by researchers from Partners Healthcare/Harvard Medical School and the National Institutes of Health. They found significantly fewer studies of African, Latin American and Asian ancestral populations compared to European populations in two public databases. Findings were published online May 7 inHealth Affairs. (Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights)
Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights - May 8, 2018 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: news

Study: Open-Label Placebos Relieve Fatigue in Cancer Patients
It is common for cancer patients to experience fatigue during and after cancer treatment. Fatigue usually lessens as patients recover, but some patients experience long-term fatigue that gets in the way of the things they want to do. Mesothelioma survivors are among the many cancer patients who cope with fatigue once treatment ends. New research conducted by scientists at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and Harvard Medical School shows cancer-related fatigue can be relieved by a placebo pill. This relief even occurs when patients are aware they are taking a placebo, known as open-label placebo. A placebo is anythin...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - May 7, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

Antipsychotic medications may result in increased risk of gestational diabetes
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Public Health and Massachusetts General Hospital addressed the link between antipsychotic treatment during pregnancy and gestational diabetes in a new research paper published online today by the American Journal of Psychiatry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Built for speed: DNA nanomachines take a (rapid) step forward
(Arizona State University) In a new study, researchers from ASU, University of Michigan, the Wyss Institute, the Dana Farber Cancer Institute and the Department of Biological Chemistry at Harvard describe an innovative DNA walker, capable of rapidly traversing a prepared track. Rather than slow, tentative steps across a surface, the DNA acrobat cartwheels head over heels, covering ground 10- to 100-fold faster than previous devices. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Former Yale roommates win $75K grand prize at Harvard to combat disease
Alumni Andrew Rothaus ’11 B.A. and Dr. Abraar Karan ’11 B.A. are taking on Zika by developing a safe, effective mosquito repellent with their startup hour72+. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - May 4, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Partners is exploring a merger with insurer Harvard Pilgrim
Partners HealthCare is exploring a potential merger with Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, officials from Partners said on Friday. The deal would combine the largest health care system in Massachusetts with one of the largest insurers in Massachusetts, adding to an ever-interconnected system that officials say has to increasingly care for patients on a budget. “As a health care environment changes and insurers and provide rs increasingly share financial risk, traditional relationships are shifting,”… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - May 4, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

Bill Gates Commits $12 Million To Help Find A Universal Flu Vaccine
BOSTON (CBS Local) – After a devastating flu season around the world, Bill Gates is joining the search for a universal vaccine for the potentially deadly virus. The Details: Bill Gates is offering $12 million in grants to help create a universal flu vaccine Gates made the announcement on April 27 while warning about the risk of a global pandemic The CDC says the 2017-18 flu season has killed 160 children, the most in the U.S. since 2013  In a conference at the Seaport Hotel & World Trade Center in Boston on April 27, Gates stressed the need for new treatments and a better global response to futur...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Bill Gates Chris Melore Flu Flu Vaccine Local TV Medicine talkers Source Type: news

'Digital snapshots' reveal the protein landscape of mitochondrial quality control
(Harvard Medical School) Harvard Medical School scientists developed a new technique to analyze, with unprecedented quantitative precision, how cells initiate the removal of defective mitochondria by the cell's autophagy, or 'self-eating,' system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 3, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Stephen Hawking ’s Last Paper Was Just Published. Here’s What He Says About the Cosmos
(NEW YORK) — Weeks after his death, physicist Stephen Hawking has delivered his last thoughts about the nature of the cosmos, and he says it may be simpler than often believed. Well, simpler if you understand theoretical physics, anyway. It remains incomprehensible for the rest of us. A paper that outlines his view, written with Thomas Hertog of the University of Leuven in Belgium before Hawking’s death in March, has been published by the Journal of High Energy Physics. Hertog had announced the new theory last year at a conference celebrating Hawking’s 75th birthday. The University of Cambridge, where Haw...
Source: TIME: Science - May 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Malcom Ritter / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime Physics Stephen Hawking Source Type: news

Samuel Epstein Leaves Legacy of Cancer Prevention
Dr. Samuel Epstein spent his life advocating cancer prevention and fighting against industries that put workers and consumers at risk. For more than 50 years, Epstein raised awareness of preventable causes of cancer. Among his targets was asbestos, a naturally occurring mineral linked to mesothelioma, lung cancer and other deadly conditions. He’s credited for saying the asbestos industry “successfully suppressed and manipulated information on the carcinogenicity and other hazards of asbestos.” In his 1998 book “The Politics of Cancer Revisited,” Epstein discussed the elaborate cover-up that Jo...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - May 2, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

These five habits can add a decade to your life, study says
Researchers have identified five simple habits that can add more than 10 years to your life, but acknowledge that even when people know the positive effects, they struggle with adopting them.   According to a study conducted by Harvard University and published in the journal Circulation, the habits that lead to a longer, healthier life are exactly what you would expect: following a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight, exercising regularly, drinking alcohol in moderation and not smoking.  What… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - May 2, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Anne Stych Source Type: news

These five habits can add a decade to your life
Researchers have identified five simple habits that can add more than 10 years to your life, but acknowledge that even when people know the positive effects, they struggle with adopting them.   According to a study conducted by Harvard University and published in the journal Circulation, the habits that lead to a longer, healthier life are exactly what you would expect: following a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight, exercising regularly, drinking alcohol in moderation and not smoking.  What… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 2, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Anne Stych Source Type: news

Work Requirements and Medicaid: What Will Happen to Beneficiaries with Mental Illnesses or Substance Use Disorders?
A Q&A with Richard G. Frank of Harvard Medical School Frank about the challenges of determining whether someone is able to work and what happens when people with mental illnesses are denied critical benefits. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - May 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why genetic IQ differences between 'races' are unlikely
The idea that intelligence can differ between populations has made headlines again, but the rules of evolution make it implausibleThe idea that there may be genetic differences in intelligence between one population and another has resurfaced recently, notably in the form of aNew York Times op-ed by the Harvard geneticist David Reich. In the article, Reich emphasises the arbitrary nature of traditional racial groupings, but still argues that long periods of ancestry on separate continents have left their genetic marks on modern populations. These are most evident for physical traits like skin and hair colour, where genetic...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kevin Mitchell Tags: Science Evolution Neuroscience Genetics Source Type: news

Scientists Announce Plan to Create Virus-Proof Cells
The scientific group Genome Project-write (GP-write) announced on Tuesday that they plan to launch a “grand-scale community-wide project” to develop cells that are resistant to viruses, as well as cells that are potentially resistant to radiation, freezing, aging and cancer. It’s the first step, it says, toward producing “ultra-safe cells” at will. “Ultra-safe cells could have a major impact on human health,” said George Church, a geneticist at Harvard Medical School and one of four members of the GP-write Leadership Group, in a statement. GP-write is kicking off a working meeting ...
Source: TIME: Health - May 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized Genetics healthytime Source Type: news

Scientists Announce Plan to Create Virus-Proof Cells
The scientific group Genome Project-write (GP-write) announced on Tuesday that they plan to launch a “grand-scale community-wide project” to develop cells that are resistant to viruses, as well as cells that are potentially resistant to radiation, freezing, aging and cancer. It’s the first step, it says, toward producing “ultra-safe cells” at will. “Ultra-safe cells could have a major impact on human health,” said George Church, a geneticist at Harvard Medical School and one of four members of the GP-write Leadership Group, in a statement. GP-write is kicking off a working meeting ...
Source: TIME: Science - May 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized Genetics healthytime Source Type: news

George Church, CRISPR Pioneer, Embraces Alternative Tech In Project To Recode A Human Genome
George Church, a Harvard scientist who pioneered the use of the enzyme CRISPR to edit the genes of human cells, will use an alternative, older technology in an effort to recode an entire human genome in hundreds of thousands of locations in order to make it immune to viruses. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - May 1, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Matthew Herper, Forbes Staff Tags: NASDAQ:CLLS Source Type: news

Foods to eat and skip to increase chances for pregnancy
A new review by Harvard University sheds new light on nutrition and fertility. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - May 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

Harvard's Wyss Institute partners with Cellectis to recode the human genome
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) Today the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and Cellectis (Euronext Growth: ALCLS - Nasdaq: CLLS), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing immunotherapies based on gene-edited allogeneic CAR T-cells (UCART), announced that they will collaborate to further advance the Wyss Institute's efforts to recode the entire genome of cell lines derived from humans and other species, and to develop new tools and methods facilitating this goal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain's window for language learning open until adulthood
(Boston College) It has long been known that children learn language more easily than adults, but determining exactly when that ability declines has been something of a mystery. Researchers from Boston College, MIT and Harvard report in the journal Cognition that prime language learning years extend approximately a decade longer than previously thought -- until 17.4 years of age. The new findings hold implications for neuroscience, linguistics, developmental psychology and public policy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Traffic-related pollution linked to risk of asthma in children
(Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) New research led by scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health suggest that long-term exposure to traffic-related pollution significantly increases the risk of pediatric asthma, especially in early childhood. Their findings were published today in a Letter to the Editor in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news