Academic stands by research querying Indonesia's claim to be coronavirus-free
Harvard professor Marc Lipsitch says world ’s fourth most populous country may have missed casesCoronavirus - latest updatesA Harvard academic has defended research suggesting a possible underreporting of coronavirus cases in Indonesia, following fierce criticism from the health minister in the world ’s fourth most populous country, which insists it has no cases.Professor Marc Lipsitch analysed air traffic out of the Chinese city at the centre of the outbreak in China and suggestedin a report last week that Indonesia might have missed cases. On Tuesday the Indonesian health minister Terawan Agus Putrantocalled ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 14, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Karen McVeigh and Emma Graham-Harrison Tags: Indonesia Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Asia Pacific Science World news Global health Source Type: news

Harvard, Yale Investigated for Undisclosed Foreign Funding
The US Department of Education is looking into allegations that the institutions failed to report hundreds of millions of dollars in gifts from other countries. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 13, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

U.S. Response To China's Talent Plan Is Described As Heavy-Handed
The arrest of a Harvard researcher late last month has led to questions about a Chinese program to recruit American talent. Prosecutors say it's a form of economic espionage. Scientists disagree. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Geoff Brumfiel Source Type: news

Samuels Honored by Williams College, Johns Hopkins and University of Cincinnati
Martin A. Samuels, MD, FAAN, MACP, FRCP, DSci (hon.), founding chair emeritus of the Department of Neurology at the Brigham and Women ’s Hospital and the Miriam Sydney Joseph Distinguished Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School, was honored (Source: BWH News)
Source: BWH News - February 13, 2020 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

Philip Leder, Who Deciphered Amino Acid Sequences, Dies
The Harvard Medical School researcher’s work on the genetic basis of protein coding and production led him to make groundbreaking discoveries in immunology, molecular biology, and cancer... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 12, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Management and Organizational Practices Survey-Hospitals (MOPS-HP)
Notice from the Census Bureau of consideration of a proposal to conduct a Management and Organizational Practices Survey — Hospitals (MOPS-HP) as a joint project with the Harvard Business School. The survey will be used to collect data on management practices from chief nursing officers (CNOs) at general, medical, and surgical hospitals in an effort to identify factors affecting clinical and financial performance. Comments on the proposal are due by March 13, 2020. (Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center - February 12, 2020 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

People with optimistic spouses are less at-risk for dementia, study finds
Although everyone has some cognitive declines with age, researchers at the University of Michigan and Harvard University found optimists' partners were protected by their spouse's good habits. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Coronavirus Researchers Are Using High-Tech Methods to Predict Where the Virus Might Go Next
As the deadly 2019-nCov coronavirus spreads, raising fears of a worldwide pandemic, researchers and startups are using artificial intelligence and other technologies to predict where the virus might appear next — and even potentially sound the alarm before other new, potentially threatening viruses become public health crises. “What we’re doing currently with Coronavirus is really trying to get an understanding of what’s happening on the ground through as many sources as we can get our hands on,” says John Brownstein, chief innovation officer at Boston Children’s Hospital and a professor...
Source: TIME: Health - February 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV coronavirus MSFTAI2019 onetime Source Type: news

Understanding recent US mumps outbreaks
(PLOS) A single strain of mumps virus has dominated the US since 2006, and is responsible for many of the large numbers of cases seen across the country in the widespread 2016-17 outbreaks. In a paper publishing February 11 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, Pardis Sabeti from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and colleagues analyze over 200 whole mumps virus genomes from patient swab samples, providing insights not obtained in standard public health surveillance efforts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 11, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Patient-partnered research finds clues about a rare cancer's genetic roots
(Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard) Working in close partnership with patients, scientists have identified new causes of a rare cancer of blood vessel walls called angiosarcoma. The research also points to possible therapeutic options for patients with this aggressive disease, who often have a poor prognosis. The study is a result of the Angiosarcoma Project, a unique partnership between patients and scientists that empowers patients to contribute their medical records, biological samples, and voices to accelerate research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 10, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cervical cancer elimination possible within two decades in the US
(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) At current levels of screening and HPV vaccination, cervical cancer incidence in the US is projected to fall below the threshold of elimination by 2038-2046. Scaling up screening coverage to 90% could expedite elimination timing by 10-13 years and avert an average of 1,400-2,088 additional cases per year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 10, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Research uncovers new path for melanoma detection and treatment
(Edith Cowan University) A new way to spot melanoma cells circulating in the blood has the potential to significantly improve the monitoring of cancer patients and guide future treatment. Edith Cowan University's Melanoma Research Group, in collaboration with Harvard Medical School and clinicians at Western Australian hospitals, has pioneered a new technique to detect circulating tumour cells (CTCs) that could provide a new avenue for cancer diagnosis and therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 9, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Do Your Devices Meet Physicians ’ Needs?
You’ve invested a lot of time ensuring your medical device meets user needs, but could those needs have changed? As healthcare evolves thanks to robotics, value-based care, the rise of ambulatory surgery centers, remote procedures, and more, the needs of surgeons and other physicians and healthcare practitioners are evolving, too. Physicians will come together at the upcoming MD&M West 2020 conference to discuss what is missing in the world of medtech in the panel discussion, Tech Talk Panel: Physician's Perspectives: Unmet Needs, Design, & New Technologies in Medtech. Participating on the panel w...
Source: MDDI - February 7, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: Design Source Type: news

In Memoriam: Richard Veech, M.D., Ph.D.
The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism sadly announces the death of Richard L. Veech, MD, DPhil, Chief of the NIAAA Laboratory of Metabolic Control. Dr. Veech joined NIH after earning his bachelor ’s and medical degrees at Harvard and his DPhil at Oxford under the tutelage of Hans Krebs. While in the process of completing his graduate work at Oxford and planning his start at NIH, he survived the crash of a commercial airliner wherein most passengers and crew were killed. (Source: NIAAA News)
Source: NIAAA News - February 6, 2020 Category: Addiction Authors: Katherine Source Type: news

In Memoriam: Dr. Richard Veech
The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism sadly announces the death of Richard L. Veech, MD, DPhil, Chief of the NIAAA Laboratory of Metabolic Control. Dr. Veech joined NIH after earning his bachelor ’s and medical degrees at Harvard and his DPhil at Oxford under the tutelage of Hans Krebs. While in the process of completing his graduate work at Oxford and planning his start at NIH, he survived the crash of a commercial airliner wherein most passengers and crew were killed. (Source: NIAAA News)
Source: NIAAA News - February 6, 2020 Category: Addiction Authors: Katherine Source Type: news

Rejuvenate Bio launches to help dogs live longer, healthier lives
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) Gene therapy isn't just for humans anymore: Rejuvenate Bio has secured a license to commercialize a Wyss-developed technology that can treat multiple age-related conditions in dogs, helping them live longer, healthier lives. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 6, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Antioxidant reverses BPD-induced fertility damage in worms
(Harvard Medical School) Treatment with a naturally occurring antioxidant, CoQ10, restores many aspects of fertility in C. elegans worms following exposure to BPAFindings offer possible path toward undoing BPA-induced reproductive harms in peopleAlthough CoQ10 is available over the counter, it is not yet clear whether the compound could improve human fertility or do so safely (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 6, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Medicaid expansions are linked to lower out-of-pocket spending for recipients
FINDINGSOut-of-pocket spending fell an average of 28% for people enrolled in Medicaid, the state and federal health insurance program for low-income people, during the first four years of the Affordable Care Act, popularly known as Obamacare. The likelihood that Medicaid recipients would experience a catastrophic medical expense fell by 4.7% during the four-year study period, the researchers found.BACKGROUNDMedicaid is a state and federal health insurance program for low-income people. Under the Affordable Care Act, state Medicaid programs were expanded in 36 states and the District of Columbia to make health insurance ava...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 5, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Even Without Symptoms, Wuhan Coronavirus May Spread, Experts Fear
A report purporting to describe asymptomatic transmission in Germany has come under fire. But many experts still believe it ’s happening. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Roni Caryn Rabin Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Respiratory Diseases Epidemics Medicine and Health Harvard University Koch, Robert, Institute National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases New England Journal of Medicine World Health Organization Bavaria Source Type: news

Research Security: Scientists Arrested as Government Increases Efforts to Protect US Security Interests
Concerns about and oversight of foreign influence on research and espionage have been rising since 2018. In an August 2018 letter to more than 10,000 research institutions, NIH urged grant applicants and awardees to properly disclose all forms of support and financial interests and launched investigations into NIH-funded investigators who failed to properly disclose foreign financial support. Following this, an April 2019 editorial in BioScience alerted readers that investigations into foreign ties of researchers will likely spread to other agencies and need to be taken seriously. Lawmakers have also made enquiries about t...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 4, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

New Coronavirus Outbreak: What Do We Know?
Source: Harvard University, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Published: 2/3/2020. This 30-minute video from a Facebook Live Q&A provides an overview of the coronavirus (2019-n-CoV) outbreak, and discusses why it is more widespread than thought. Question topics include concerns for university populations, the effectiveness of travel bans, and routes of transmission. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Harvard professor arrested for conspiring with Chinese spies to smuggle "biological material" into communist China
(Natural News) A federal court has reportedly unsealed a shocking set of indictments implicating Charles Lieber, the head of Harvard University‘s chemistry department, as well as two Chinese nationals, for smuggling “biological material” into China and later lying about it. One of the Chinese nationals was a researcher at Boston University and a former lieutenant... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Upstate pediatricians to participate in Harvard research to study effects of toxic stress on children
The study seeks to enroll up to 300 Upstate patients through June 2021. (Source: SUNY Upstate Medical)
Source: SUNY Upstate Medical - January 31, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: News Source Type: news

Prominent Harvard Chemist Arrested For Concealing Ties to China
The Department of Justice also released the names of two Chinese researchers who allegedly acted against US interests. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - January 30, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

U.S. Accuses Harvard Scientist of Concealing Chinese Funding
Prosecutors say Charles M. Lieber, the chair of Harvard ’s chemistry department, lied about contacts with China’s Thousand Talents Program, a state-run initiative that seeks to draw foreign-educated talent. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ellen Barry Tags: Harvard University China Colleges and Universities Research Crime and Criminals Source Type: news

Health Tip: Understanding a Felon Infection
- An infection on the tip of your finger can form an abscess, says Harvard Medical School. A painful bump on the fingertip abscess is known as a felon, and is usually caused by a bacterial infection. A felon can cause pain, swelling and redness.... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 28, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Increasing vitamin C intake can reduce hip fracture risk by 44 percent: Study
(Natural News) When it comes to healthy bones, people often look to calcium and vitamin D. However, experts suggest adding an unlikely vitamin to the mix: vitamin C. In a recent study published in Osteoporosis International, a team of researchers from Tufts University, Harvard Medical School and the Boston University School of Public Health revealed that taking vitamin C can potentially reduce... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Harvard Researchers Create ‘ Body-On-Chips ’ That May Allow Safer Drug Testing
BOSTON (CBS) — Imagine testing new drugs on the human body, but not on people. That’s exactly what local scientists say they have accomplished. Drug development is a long and costly process and only about 14 percent of drug tests earn approval by the Food and Drug Administration. Researchers at Harvard’s Wyss Institute spent the past decade developing “organs-on-chip” which are small plastic cartridges housing organ-specific cells. The chips allow scientists to see how drugs affect individual organs like the human heart and kidney. Now they have been able to connect multiple organs-on-chips li...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Drug Testing Source Type: news

Interactive map of mass uprisings around the world shows nonviolence works
(Harvard University) Harvard University researchers developed an open, interactive map that provides detail about mass uprising around the world. New research using the map demonstrates that nonviolent uprisings are more successful than violent ones. The new tool provides essential data for studies of conflict. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stand Up To Cancer announces gastric cancer interception research team
(Stand Up To Cancer) A new SU2C team to intercept gastric cancer, led by Andrew T. Chan, MD, MPH, (Harvard Medical School) and Sandra Ryeom, PhD, (University of Pennsylvania) with researchers from University of Chicago, City of Hope, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Samsung Medical Center (Seoul, Korea) will receive $3MM team to seek biomarkers, such DNA and cells shed from the tumor circulating in the blood system, indicating the presence of gastric cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 27, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Enhancing drug testing with human body-on-chip systems
(American Friends of Tel Aviv University) Scientists at Tel Aviv University and Harvard University have devised a functioning comprehensive multi-Organ-on-a-Chip (Organ Chip) platform that enables effective preclinical drug testing of human drug pharmacology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The five: factors that affect early greying
As researchers confirm that stress can turn you grey, we look at the other scientific factors that could salt-and-pepper your crowning gloryThis week, scientists from Harvard demonstrated that stress canaccelerate the greying of human hair. The researchers found that stress prompts the production of a hormone that affects the melanocyte cells involved in making hair pigments. The scientists hope that this discovery will add to the understanding of how the depletion of stem cells contributes to ageing in general.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 26, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Anna Cooper Tags: Ageing Genetics Biology Science Health Society Source Type: news

New Trump Rule Requires U.S. Officials To Weigh Pregnant Visa Applicants ’ Medical Needs
The Trump administration issued a new rule on Thursday instructing United States consular officials to deny pregnant women visas unless they can prove “to the satisfaction of the consular officer” either that they are not traveling to the U.S. to give birth, or that they have a legitimate medical reason to give birth in the country. The administration says the new provision is an attempt to cut down on what’s known as “birth tourism,” or when women come to the U.S. specifically to give birth so that their children gain American citizenship. But critics say the new rule may be deeply flawed. ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Madeleine Carlisle Tags: Uncategorized Donald Trump Immigration onetime Pregnancy Women's Health Source Type: news

Health Tip: Remedies for Sore Elbow
-- Elbow pain can keep you from a normal daily life, says Harvard Medical School. The school mentions these possible remedies for an aching elbow: Rest. Take a break from overusing the muscle group that may be behind elbow pain. Heat therapy.... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 23, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Study reveals missing link in mechanisms underlying fight-or-flight response
(Harvard Medical School) Scientists map the molecular cascade behind heart function during fight-or-flight state.Findings solve longstanding biological puzzle.Results yield critical insights in adrenaline physiology that may inform other fields.Newly identified pathway can set stage for better targeted therapies to regulate heart muscle function. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 23, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How stress causes grey hair: Hormone permanently damage stem cells which colour hair
Studies on mice showed the stem cells in the hair follicle which colour hair are damaged in response to a stress hormone called norepinephrine. The effects are irreversible, the team at Harvard said. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Link Between Stress And Hair Turning Prematurely Gray Revealed In Harvard Study
(CNN) — Marie Antoinette’s hair suddenly turned white before the ill-fated French queen was taken to the guillotine to have her head chopped off, according to some historical accounts. More modern reports refer to hair turning prematurely white in survivors of bomb attacks during World War II, while an Australian airline pilot saw his hair go gray in the months after landing a plane following a failure of all four engines in the early 1980s. While there’s been plenty of anecdotal evidence suggesting premature graying can be caused by extreme stress — whether this is true and how this happens isn&rsq...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health CNN Harvard University Source Type: news

Scientists Confirm That Stress Can Indeed Turn Hair Grey
When Ya-Chieh Hsu, professor of stem cell and regenerative biology at Harvard University and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, wanted to figure out exactly what makes hair turn grey, she started with an obvious, albeit anecdotal, culprit: stress. There are well-known historical examples of the connection between stress and hair greying—Marie Antoinette’s coif reportedly blanched after she was captured during the French Revolution—and studies have even linked stress in animals to greying hair. But for the first time, Hsu and her colleagues figured out the biological reason why stress saps the pigment out of...
Source: TIME: Health - January 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized grey hair Stress Source Type: news

Stress speeds up hair greying process, science confirms
Fight-or-flight response nerves pump out hormone that wipes out pigmentation cellsLord Byron put it down to sudden fears, which took their toll on men at night. For Wordsworth it was shocks of passion that swiftly turned hair white.But while hair cannot lose its colour in an instant – at least not without help from a bottle of bleach – scientists at Harvard University have shown how stress can, over time, speed up the greying process.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 22, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Ageing Science World news Anxiety Source Type: news

Low-Carb, Low-Fat Diets Not Tied to Mortality Overall
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 22, 2020 -- Overall, low-carbohydrate diet and low-fat diet scores are not associated with total mortality, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in JAMA Internal Medicine. Zhilei Shan, M.D., Ph.D., from the Harvard T.H. Chan... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 22, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Super-Cooled Injections Might Ice Away'Deep Fat '
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 22, 2020 -- The Harvard-associated lab that created the " CoolSculpting " process of reducing fat says it's on the trail of the next advance in nonsurgical slimming. CoolSculpting freezes fat cells by applying an ice-cold gel pad to... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 22, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Free "LabXchange" science education accelerator launched by Amgen Foundation and Harvard's Faculty of Arts and Sciences
The Amgen Foundation and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University (Harvard FAS) today announced the global launch of LabXchange™, a free online science education platform that provides users with access to personalized instruction, virtual lab experiences and networking opportunities across the global scientific community. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - January 22, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Amgen Business and Industry Source Type: news

Scientific evidence found for role of stress in hair whitening
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Partnering with scientists at Harvard, a group of Brazilians affiliated with the Center for Research on Inflammatory Diseases (CRID), supported by FAPESP, described the mechanisms that cause hair color loss in extreme situations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Solving a biological puzzle: How stress causes gray hair
(Harvard University) Harvard scientists have found evidence to support long-standing anecdotes that stress causes hair graying. Researchers found that in mice, the type of nerve involved in the fight-or-flight response causes permanent damage to the pigment-regenerating stem cells in the hair follicle. The findings advance knowledge of how stress impacts the body, and are a first step toward blocking its negative effects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Life's Frankenstein beginnings
(Harvard University) When the Earth was born, it was a mess. Meteors and lightning storms likely bombarded the planet's surface where nothing except lifeless chemicals could survive. How life formed in this chemical mayhem is a mystery billions of years old. Now, a new study offers evidence that the first building blocks may have matched their environment, starting out messier than previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 22, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A low-fat low-carb diet will NOT make you live longer, study suggests
Harvard University scientists found that simply cutting fat and carbs won't lower your mortality risks. In fact, small amounts just from processed foods are still linked to six to seven percent higher death risks. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists discover 49 approved drugs that may treat cancer
Researchers at Harvard, MIT and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute screened thousands of already-approved medications and were shocked to find that so many common drugs have effects on cancers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dozens of non-oncology drugs can kill cancer cells
Drugs for diabetes, inflammation, alcoholism - and even for treating arthritis in dogs - can also kill cancer cells in the lab, according to a study by scientists at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. The researchers systematically analyzed thousands of already developed drug compounds and found nearly 50 that have previously unrecognized anti-cancer activity. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - January 20, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Dozens of non-oncology drugs can kill cancer cells
(Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard) Researchers tested approximately 4,518 drug compounds on 578 human cancer cell lines and found nearly 50 that have previously unrecognized anti-cancer activity. These drugs have been used to treat conditions such as diabetes, inflammation, alcoholism, and even arthritis in dogs. The findings suggest a possible way to accelerate the development of new cancer drugs or repurpose existing drugs to treat cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 20, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Climate (not humans) shaped early forests of New England
(Harvard University) A new, multidisciplinary study by archaeologists, ecologists, and paleoclimatologists overturns long-held interpretations of the role humans played in shaping the American landscape before European colonization. The findings give new insight into the rationale and approaches for managing biodiverse landscapes in the eastern US. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 20, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news