We Used to Have a Lyme Disease Vaccine. Are We Ready to Bring One Back?
At my animal hospital in upstate New York, an epicenter of the U.S. tick epidemic, my dog Fawn lets out a whimper as the veterinarian injects her with her annual Lyme disease shot. I roll my eyes. She doesn’t know how good she has it. The injection means that if a tick bites her (and in rural New York, a tick always does), the creepy crawly will feast on dog blood that’s been supercharged with a Lyme bacteria-killing substance, and Lyme disease won’t be transmitted to Fawn. I wish I could be shot up with that superpower. Currently, there is no human vaccine for Lyme disease—even though more than two...
Source: TIME: Health - June 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mandy Oaklander Tags: Uncategorized Disease feature Source Type: news

COVID-19 Exposed the Faults in America ’s Elder Care System. This Is Our Best Shot to Fix Them
For the American public, one of the first signs of the COVID-19 pandemic to come was a tragedy at a nursing home near Seattle. On Feb. 29, 2020, officials from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Washington State announced the U.S. had its first outbreak of the novel coronavirus. Three people in the area had tested positive the day before; two of them were associated with Life Care Center of Kirkland, and officials expected more to follow soon. When asked what steps the nursing home could take to control the spread, Dr. Jeff Duchin, health officer for Seattle and King County, said he was working w...
Source: TIME: Health - June 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized Aging COVID-19 feature franchise Magazine TIME for Health Source Type: news

Domesticated foxes display increased size in brain regions
(Harvard University) By analyzing MRI scans of the foxes, Hecht and her colleagues showed that both the foxes bred to be tame and those bred for aggression have larger brains and more grey matter than the brain of the control group (the foxes not bred for any particular behavior). These findings run in contrast to studies on other animals that have shown domesticated species have smaller brains with less grey matter, than their wild forebears. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Microbes in ocean play important role in moderating Earth's temperature
(Harvard University, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology) A new study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences uncovers where much of the carbonate consumption in the deep sea is happening - a process that prevents its escape into Earth's atmosphere. Researchers from Harvard and Boston University collected and examined methane-eating microbes from seven geologically diverse seafloor seeps and found that the carbonate rocks from all sites host methane-oxidizing microbial communities with the highest rates of methane consumption. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Controversy Over the FDA ’s Approval of The First Alzheimer’s Treatment Keeps Growing
“The whole thing is befuddling, and a series of inexplicable surprises,” says Dr. Caleb Alexander, professor of epidemiology and medicine at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Alexander is a member of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s advisory committee that provided recommendations to the agency on whether or not to approve the Alzheimer’s drug aducanumab. On June 7, the FDA did approve the drug (under the brand name Aduhelm), in a highly controversial decision that continues to divide the Alzheimer’s community. Patients and advocacy groups, including the Alzheimer&rsq...
Source: TIME: Health - June 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Study finds links between Whites having Black neighbors and party affiliation
(Harvard University) White men who had a Black neighbor when they were growing up are more likely to be Democrats and less likely to be Republican, an influence that can last several decades later. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Forget me not: Novel target shows promise in treating Alzheimer's and related dementias
(Medical University of South Carolina) Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina and Harvard Medical School have identified a previously unknown early driver of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). In Science Translational Medicine, they report high levels of cis P-tau, a pathogenic protein, in human AD and VaD brains as well as preclinical disease models. Treatment with an antibody to the toxic protein prevented disease progression and reversed disease symptoms and restored cognitive function in older mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Broad Institute co-founder launches startup focused on cell death
From the lab of Stuart Schreiber, a Harvard University professor and co-founder of the Broad Institute, a new startup is launching with a unique focus: cell death. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - June 9, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: Rowan Walrath Source Type: news

Ludwig cancer research study shows how novel drug screen can individualize cancer therapy
(Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research) A study conducted by researchers at the Ludwig Center at Harvard has demonstrated how a drug screening method known as dynamic BH3 profiling can be used to quickly identify potentially effective combinations of existing drugs for personalized cancer therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

5 Ways to Keep Your Brain Sharp As You Age
Important parts of the brain tend to atrophy as we get older—yet brain scans of some 70-year-olds resemble those of 20 to 30-year-olds. Emerging research points to habits that may keep the mind sharp during the aging process. “Despite the stereotypes, cognitive decline is not inevitable as you age, and adopting healthy lifestyle habits can significantly reduce your risks for dementia later on in life,” says Sarah Lenz Lock, AARP’s senior vice president and executive director of the Global Council on Brain Health. Start socializing “Social isolation increases dementia risk by 50%” in old...
Source: TIME: Health - June 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matt Fuchs Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Harvard physicist: Earth should sign an interstellar treaty with alien civilizations to prevent cosmic catastrophe
(Natural News) Harvard University astrophysicist Abraham Loeb recommends establishing an interstellar treaty with advanced alien civilizations that may be residing in the Milky Way and the neighboring galaxy, Andromeda. He says that this treaty would prevent a cosmic catastrophe that can wipe out the Earth. Loeb, who was the longest-serving chair of Harvard’s Department of Astronomy, made the suggestion in an article published May... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Up close and personal – The Dr. Kevin Williams story
From a young age, Dr. Kevin Williams looked to his father as a role model. Back in 1952, his father became the third African American physician in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, despite barriers and discrimination faced by Black professionals in the medical field.   “It was a different time,” says Kevin. “When my father first opened his practice, none of the hospitals would give him admitting privileges.”  At his office, Kevin ’s father saw patients on a first come, first served basis. Patients in the area were so eager to see him that they started lining up at 4 o’clock eac...
Source: EyeForPharma - June 7, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jill Donahue Source Type: news

Up close and personal – The Dr. Kevin Williams story
From a young age, Dr. Kevin Williams looked to his father as a role model. Back in 1952, his father became the third African American physician in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, despite barriers and discrimination faced by Black professionals in the medical field.   “It was a different time,” says Kevin. “When my father first opened his practice, none of the hospitals would give him admitting privileges.”  At his office, Kevin ’s father saw patients on a first come, first served basis. Patients in the area were so eager to see him that they started lining up at 4 o’clock eac...
Source: EyeForPharma - June 7, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jill Donahue Source Type: news

New method accurately reflects hotspots in epidemic
(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) A new method to monitor epidemics like COVID-19 gives an accurate real-time estimate of the growth rate of an epidemic by carefully evaluating the relationship between the amount of viruses in infected people's bodies, called the viral load, and how fast the number of cases is increasing or decreasing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 3, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Genetic base editing treats sickle cell disease in mice
(Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard) Sickle cell disease leads to chronic pain, organ failure, and early death in patients worldwide. A team led by Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital has demonstrated a gene editing approach that efficiently corrects the mutation underlying SCD in patient blood stem cells and in mice. This treatment rescued disease symptoms in animal models, enabling long-lasting production of healthy blood cells, and could inspire a therapeutic strategy for SCD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 3, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

50 years of progress in women's health
(University of California - San Diego) Cynthia A. Stuenkel, MD, clinical professor of medicine at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, and JoAnn E. Manson, MD, DrPH, professor of epidemiology at Harvard T.H. Chan School Of Public Health, review 50 years of progress in women's health in a perspective article publishing theNew England Journal of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 29, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

‘Stranger than anything dreamed up by sci-fi’: will we ever understand black holes?
In the new documentary Black Holes: The Edge of All We Know, the work of Stephen Hawking and others in trying to figure out a mystery for the age is put under the spotlightSo, what would it feel like to fall into a black hole?“Well, at the moment you crossed the horizon, you wouldn’t feel anything – there would be nothing dramatic,”Peter Galison, co-founder of the Black Hole Initiative at Harvard University, says over the phone.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 26, 2021 Category: Science Authors: David Smith in Washington Tags: Documentary films Black holes Culture Science Space Source Type: news

Vestibular physical therapy treatment of individuals exposed to directed energy - Hoppes CW, Lambert KH, Klatt BN, Harvard OD, Whitney SL.
INTRODUCTION: Following suspected sonic attacks on U.S. Embassies, a subset of individuals presented with a unique cluster of symptoms believed to have resulted from exposure to directed energy. Directed energy has been described as exposure to a unique so... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 26, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Asthma medication use and exacerbations
(Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute) How does the switch to a high-deductible health plan affect children with asthma? A new study suggests that enrollment in a high-deductible health plan (HDHP) may not be associated with changes in asthma medication use or asthma exacerbations when medications are exempt from the deductible. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How army ants' iconic mass raids evolved
(Harvard University, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology) Researchers led by Harvard University and The Rockefeller University combine phylogenetic reconstructions and computational behavioral analysis to show that army ant mass raiding evolved from group raiding through the scaling effects of increasing colony size. The transition evolved tens of millions of years ago and is perfectly correlated with a massive increase in colony size. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

AI helps predict treatment outcomes for patients with diseased dental implants
 ANN ARBOR —Peri-implantitis, a condition where tissue and bone around dental implants becomes infected, besets roughly one-quarter of dental implant patients, and currently there's no reliable way to assess how patients will respond to treatment of this condition. To that end, a team led by the University of Michigan School of Dentistry developed a machine learning algorithm, a form of artificial intelligence, to assess an individual patient's risk of regenerative outcomes after surgical treatments of peri-implantitis.   The algorithm is called FARDEEP, which stands for Fast and Robust Decon...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - May 24, 2021 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Gateway Health CEO Cain Hayes on his tenure in Pittsburgh, his new opportunity and what makes a leader successful
Hayes was named CEO of Harvard Pilgrim and Tufts Health Plan. He ’ll leave Gateway and Pittsburgh on June 11 and take over his new job in the Boston area in early July. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 21, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Paul J. Gough Source Type: news

Gateway Health CEO Cain Hayes on his tenure in Pittsburgh, his new opportunity and what makes a leader successful
Hayes was named CEO of Harvard Pilgrim and Tufts Health Plan. He ’ll leave Gateway and Pittsburgh on June 11 and take over his new job in the Boston area in early July. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 21, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Paul J. Gough Source Type: news

Jerome Kagan, Who Tied Temperament to Biology, Dies at 92
A Harvard psychologist, he originally attributed personality traits to nurturing only. Then he concluded, We ’re largely born this way. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sam Roberts Tags: Psychology and Psychologists Deaths (Obituaries) Harvard University Kagan, Jerome Children and Childhood Parenting Biology and Biochemistry Source Type: news

Best predictor of arrest rates? The 'birth lottery of history'
(Harvard University) An unprecedented longitudinal study, published in the American Journal of Sociology, shows that when it comes to arrests it can come down to when someone comes of age rather than where or who they are, a theory the researchers refer to as the " birth lottery of history. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Black Economic Council, Dorchester health care center heads lauded by Urban League
The heads of the Black Economic Council of Massachusetts and the departing leader of the Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center were honored Thursday at the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts ’ annual breakfast. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 20, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Grant Welker Source Type: news

New CEO named for Tufts, Harvard Pilgrim
The combined Tufts Health Plan and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care organization has named Cain Hayes as the organization ’s new CEO. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 20, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

Overjet's Dental Assist Receives FDA Clearance to Bring AI to the Dental Practice
In a Dental Industry First, Overjet's Dental Assist Receives FDA Clearance to Bring AI to the Dental PracticeNEWS PROVIDED BYOverjet May 20, 2021, 09:00 ETBOSTON, May 20, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- Overjet, the global leader in dental artificial intelligence, today announced that it received FDA 510(k) clearance for its Overjet Dental AssistTM product. This Software as a Medical Device product applies artificial intelligence in real-time to aid dentists and hygienists. The clearance by the FDA will enable Overjet to market and sell the AI product directly to dental practices. The software supports dental...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - May 20, 2021 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

CEO of Dorchester health center says he'll become president of Carney Hospital
Stan McLaren, the president and CEO of the Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center in Dorchester, said Thursday at the Urban League of Mass. annual breakfast that he'll be the next leader of Carney Hospital. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - May 20, 2021 Category: American Health Authors: Grant Welker Source Type: news

Study: Fire retardant used in furniture and insulation linked to antisocial behavior
(Natural News) A study published in the journal Environmental Health shows that commonly used fire retardants may increase children’s risk of antisocial behavior. Researchers from Oregon State University and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that children with higher levels of exposure to certain types of flame retardants are more likely to... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CRC Risk Up in First-Degree Relatives of Patients With Polyps
WEDNESDAY, May 19, 2021 -- First-degree relatives of patients with precursor lesions for colorectal cancer (CRC) have an increased risk of CRC, according to a study published online May 4 in The BMJ. Mingyang Song, M.D., from the Harvard T. H. Chan... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 19, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

This Scientist Is Auctioning Off His DNA and Says Yours is Valuable Too This Scientist Is Auctioning Off His DNA and Says Yours is Valuable Too
George Church's genetic information is for sale and the Harvard geneticist, who was one of the first people to ever have his genome sequenced, says personal information can be profitable.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - May 18, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Pathology & Lab Medicine News Source Type: news

Anthony Fauci, 100 Days Into the Biden Administration, Is Finally Getting to Do His Job
When Dr. Anthony Fauci arrived at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. for his first White House press briefing under the new Biden Administration, he could see things would be different. It was the day after the Inauguration, and President Joe Biden was eager to get the country’s COVID-19 response back on track. Five minutes before he addressed the public, Fauci spoke with the new President. “He said, ‘I want you to just go and tell the science, explain to people that if we make mistakes, we’re going to fix the mistakes and we’re not going to dwell on the mistakes. Let science be communicated to the public...
Source: TIME: Health - May 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Gut check
(Harvard Medical School) Researchers identify links between genetic makeup of bacteria in human gut and several human diseases. Clusters of bacterial genes present in conditions including cardiovascular illness, inflammatory bowel disease, liver cirrhosis, and cancer. Work brings scientist closer to developing tests that could predict disease risk or identify disease presence based on a sampling of the genetic makeup of a person's microbiome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 18, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Preventive interventions can improve mental health outcomes in children, teens and young adults
(Wolters Kluwer Health) Offering interventions to young people in the general community can prevent the emergence of certain mental health disorders, according to the first comprehensive systematic review to address this question. The results appear in the May/June issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry, which is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 18, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Future of Virus Tracking Can Be Found on This College Campus
Colorado Mesa University and the Broad Institute of M.I.T. and Harvard have spent the last year exploring new approaches to managing outbreaks. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Anthes Tags: Coronavirus Reopenings Contact Tracing (Public Health) Tests (Medical) Colleges and Universities Mobile Applications Epidemics Quarantines Water Pollution Dormitories Computers and the Internet your-feed-health your-feed-science Sa Source Type: news

ExxonMobil Wants You to Take Responsibility for Climate Change, Study Says
ExxonMobil is one of the world’s largest publicly traded oil and gas companies—and it wants you to take responsibility for climate change. A new analysis from researchers at Harvard University released Thursday found that the company’s public-facing messaging on climate change since the mid-2000s consistently emphasizes “consumers,” “energy demand” and individual “needs” as the cause of climate change, as well as the avenue for potentially addressing it. Outwardly focusing on consumers’ personal responsibility is one part of the company’s nuanced messaging ...
Source: TIME: Science - May 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

The Public's Perspective on the United States Public Health System
This survey examines trust in key groups in health and health care, ratings of the job performance of public health agencies, trust in information from public health departments, and public views on the biggest health problems facing the nation. (Source: RWJF - Obesity and Childhood Obesity)
Source: RWJF - Obesity and Childhood Obesity - May 13, 2021 Category: Eating Disorders & Weight Management Authors: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Tags: Health Disparities Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Public and Community Health Source Type: news

Poll: Public Supports Substantial Increase in Spending on U.S. Public Health Programs, but has Serious Concerns About How the System Functions Now
According to a RWJF/Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health poll, in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic, a majority of the public favors increasing federal spending on improving the nation’s public health programs. (Source: RWJF - News Releases)
Source: RWJF - News Releases - May 13, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Tags: Public and Community Health Source Type: news

NSF recognizes a mathematician and a social scientist with the Alan T. Waterman Award
A mathematician who uses number theory to provide new perspectives on some of the oldest and most difficult problems in mathematics, and a social scientist whose innovative contributions show the impact of increased opportunity and representation on our nation’s most important decisions -- Melanie Matchett Wood, a Harvard University mathematician, and Nicholas Carnes, a Duke University social scientist and scholar of public policy, have earned the National Science Foundation's Alan T. ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=302673&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News i...
Source: NSF News - May 12, 2021 Category: Science Source Type: news

NIH Vaccine Designer Takes Coronavirus Research to Harvard NIH Vaccine Designer Takes Coronavirus Research to Harvard
Corbett, 35, helped lead the NIH's development of the COVID-19 vaccine made by Moderna.Associated Press (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - May 11, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

NIH vaccine designer takes coronavirus research to Harvard
The U.S. government scientist who helped design one of the first COVID-19 vaccines and then tackled skepticism of the shots in communities of color is getting a new research home (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - May 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Turns out developing a taste for carbs wasn't a bad thing
(Harvard University) A new study looking at the evolutionary history of the human oral microbiome shows that Neanderthals and ancient humans adapted to eating starch-rich foods as far back as 100,000 years ago, which is much earlier than previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 10, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sugar-Sweetened Drinks May Up Early-Onset CRC Risk in Women
FRIDAY, May 7, 2021 -- Among women, sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake is associated with an increased risk for early-onset colorectal cancer (EO-CRC), according to a study published online May 6 in Gut. Jinhee Hur, Ph.D., from the Harvard T. H.... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 7, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

A Massive Chinese Rocket Will Fall Uncontrollably Back to Earth Soon. It (Probably) Won ’t Land On You
If you’re not at least a little worried about the core stage of China’s Long March 5B rocket now flying—tumbling, really—through low Earth orbit, you’re not paying enough attention. The giant chunk of space junk measures 30 m (98 ft) long and 5 m (16.5 ft) wide and weighs 21 metric tons. It’s traveling on an elliptical path around the Earth measuring roughly 370 km (230 mi) high by 170 km (105 mi) low, and that orbit is decaying fast. At the current rate, the rocket stage should reenter the atmosphere sometime on May 8—unless it’s May 7 or maybe May 9—and potentially sc...
Source: TIME: Science - May 5, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

New, almost non-destructive archaeogenetic sampling method developed
(E ö tv ö s Lor á nd University (ELTE), Faculty of Science) An Austrian-American research team (University of Vienna, Department Evolutionary Anthropology and Harvard Medical School, Department of Genetics), in collaboration of Hungarian experts from E ö tv ö s Lor á nd University, has developed a new method that allows the almost non-destructive extraction of genetic material from archaeological human remains. The method allows anthropologists, archaeologists and archaeogeneticists to avoid the risk of serious damage to artefacts of significant scientific and heritage value, which can the...
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 5, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Intestinal polyps in close relatives can increase risk of colorectal cancer
(Karolinska Institutet) Cancer of the colon and rectum is one of the deadliest forms of cancer, and has in recent years affected growing numbers of young people. In the largest registry study to date, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Harvard University in the USA demonstrate a possible connection between colorectal polyps in close relatives and the risk of developing colorectal cancer. The study, which is published in The British Medical Journal, is of potential consequence for different countries' screening procedures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 4, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Harvard University licenses its nasal swab collection technology to Rhinostics
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and Harvard Medical School (HMS) and the Massachusetts-based startup Rhinostics announced today that the University's sample collection swab and high-throughput automation technologies have been licensed to Rhinostics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 4, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A trait of the rare few whose bodies naturally control HIV: " trained " immune cells
(Massachusetts General Hospital) Scientists at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard discover that " elite controllers " have myeloid dendritic cells that display characteristics of trained innate immune cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 4, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Vertex-partnered gene therapy startup raises $110M
Affinia Therapeutics, the gene therapy startup founded in 2019 based on research out of Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Harvard Medical School, has raised $110 million as it looks to file its first new drug application within the next year. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 3, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Rowan Walrath Source Type: news