The Power of Positivity
Health care is a difficult business. The demands are greater on staff, particularly in long-term care and assisted living. The residents are medically complex, as are their care needs. Documentation has become cumbersome, even with an electronic health record. In the centers where I practice, recent changes in ownership and administration have contributed to the angst and frustration of the staff. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - January 1, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Nina M. Flanagan Tags: Nurse ’s Notes Source Type: news

Addiction Medicine in PALTC: Speaker to Share Guidance on Care, Respect, Dignity, Recovery
Increasingly, post-acute and long-term care facilities are seeing patients with opioid addiction and other substance use disorders. Some of these patients are older adults — more like traditional PALTC patients — but some are younger, representing a variety of clinical needs and comorbidities. Yet all share a need for focused care to start them on the road to recovery. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - January 1, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Joanne Kaldy Source Type: news

Extinguishing the Fire of Burnout With Targeted, Innovative Solutions
According to the National Academy of Medicine, more than half of U.S. physicians experience substantial symptoms of burnout. “Burnout is an increasingly recognized phenomenon in the health care workplace, and current research suggests high rates of burnout pervading various medical professions and specialties,” said Lakshman Swamy, MD, MBA. Dr. Swamy will present the Closing Keynote on “Beyond Burnout: Practical Sol utions to Improve the Work” at AMDA — The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine’s annual conference in March. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - January 1, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Joanne Kaldy Source Type: news

The Long Journey of Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Research
Post-acute and long-term care research has come a long way; and it ’s getting more attention as the aging population grows. Increasingly, payors, policy makers, providers, and even consumers want to know about innovative care management and the best, most cost-effective ways to treat various illnesses. Some presenters at the Keynote Address on “The Year in Revi ew” at AMDA — The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine’s upcoming annual conference shared some of their thoughts about the direction of PALTC research, the challenges researchers face, and the opportunities for practition...
Source: Caring for the Ages - January 1, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Joanne Kaldy Source Type: news

Ensuring a Legacy
My satisfying work as a volunteer with the Foundation for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care (PALTC) Medicine (Our Foundation) gives me a chance to do things at this stage of my career —admittedly a later stage—that I don’t get to do in my many other activities in geriatrics and long-term care. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - January 1, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Kenneth L. Rapp Source Type: news

Journal Highlights From the February Issue of JAMDA
Residents in post-acute and long-term care facilities experience twice the rate of admission to intensive care units due to sepsis, a longer hospital stay, and more than twice the mortality than non-nursing home residents, but these outcomes may be preventable. In an article in JAMDA, Robin L. P. Jump, MD, PhD, of the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, and colleagues propose that nursing home staff can serve as “first responders” and activate an emergency system. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - January 1, 2019 Category: Health Management Tags: Journal Highlights Source Type: news

Black Patients With Mental Health Conditions More Likely Than Whites to End Up in Nursing Homes
Older patients with mental health conditions were more likely to be admitted to nursing homes upon hospital discharge than older patients without mental health diagnoses, and black patients with mental health conditions had higher odds of nursing home admission than their white counterparts, an analysis of National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) data has shown. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - January 1, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Christine Kilgore Source Type: news

When Antibiotics Aren ’t the Answer
Kenneth Brubaker, MD, CMD, a Pennsylvania-based medical director, talks about why positive urine tests don ’t necessarily mean someone has a urinary tract infection and needs antibiotics. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - January 1, 2019 Category: Health Management Tags: Caring Source Type: news

Medical Directors: Why Do You Abdicate Your Advocacy With Nursing Homes?
Nursing home medical directors are in short supply, and there is great demand for their services. The age-old law of supply and demand places physicians in a position of strength when they are negotiating medical director relationships with the nursing homes where they will dedicate a significant portion of their career. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - January 1, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Steven Fuller Tags: Guest Editorial Source Type: news

News From the Society
Your professional family is waiting for you in Atlanta —as are innovative ideas, best practices, and answers to the questions that keep you awake at night. There’s still time to register for the Society’s 2019 annual conference, March 7-10. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - January 1, 2019 Category: Health Management Source Type: news

Shark Tank Finalists Swim With the Big Fish
You have to be a little crazy to be an innovator, according to Jim Stefansic, PhD, MBA, president and CEO of Raiven Healthcare. “You have to believe from day one that you will succeed. Then you have to stay the course,” he said. And he should know: Dr. Stefansic’s company is a finalist in AMDA — The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine’s 2019 Shark Tank competition. The other finalists are WoundWiseIQ , Canopy Tools, and Abely Solutions. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - January 1, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Joanne Kaldy Source Type: news

Clean Out the Medicine Cabinet!
According to the Centers for Medicare& Medicaid Services (CMS), medication reconciliation is defined as the process of identifying the most accurate list of all medications that a patient is taking, including name, dosage, frequency, and route, by comparing the medical record to an external list of medications obtained from a patient, hospital, or other provider. Medication reconciliation is an important part of any transition to or from home or any health care facility to prevent medication mishaps. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - January 1, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Jeanne Manzi Tags: Public Service Announcement Source Type: news

Let ’s Talk: Communication in the Nursing Home
Dear Dr. Jeff: (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - January 1, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Jeffrey Nichols Tags: Dear Dr. Jeff Source Type: news

Must-Keep New Year ’s Resolutions
As another year has come and gone, we have taken the time to reflect on issues, changes, and resources that have changed the post-acute and long-term care (PALTC) space this year, including the Patient-Driven Payment Model (PDPM), Skilled Nursing Facility Value-Based Purchasing (SNF VBP), and changes to the Physician Fee Schedule. We pondered what else will impact our field in the coming year, including Phase 3 of the revised Requirements of Participation originally released in 2016 and further changes involving Alternative Payment Models (APMs) and the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - January 1, 2019 Category: Health Management Source Type: news

A Paradigm Shift in Post-Acute Care
Well, it ’s definitely 2019 — a number much higher than I ever expected to see — and this year promises to bring some significant changes to the world of skilled nursing facilities, especially in the post-acute (or skilled, Medicare Part A) arena. This fall, both Phase 3, the final phase of the revised Requirements of Participation (RoPs) for SNFs released in 2016, and the new paradigm for calculating a facility’s per diem payment (PDPM, the Patient-Driven Payment Method) go into effect. Elsewhere in this issue, we share insights from leaders of AMDA — The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term ...
Source: Caring for the Ages - January 1, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Karl Steinberg Tags: On My Mind Source Type: news

Perspectives
The select quotes below represent both common and unique perspectives of our respondents. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - January 1, 2019 Category: Health Management Source Type: news

Don ’t Miss These Events
Website: https://paltc.org/core-curriculum-medical-direction-post-acute-and-long-term-care (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - January 1, 2019 Category: Health Management Source Type: news

New Handbook Offers Path to Pet –Patient Partnerships
Society ’s attitudes towards pets are changing. We’ve gone from keeping pets outside to putting them in our beds. We are more pet-friendly than ever, but our institutions haven’t caught up,” said Steve Feldman, executive director of the Human Animal Bond Research Institute. HABRI has partnered with the National Council on Aging’s National Institute of Senior Centers to develop a new pet-friendly handbook, Older Adults and Animal Programing (http://bit.ly/2FQLj0C). The guide highlights the scientific research behind human–animal interactions with older adults, offers sample pet-related po...
Source: Caring for the Ages - December 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Joanne Kaldy Source Type: news

Top New Drug Approvals of 2018
Improving treatments is always one of the key goals for practitioners who work with the older adult population, but the list of new medications released into the market each year can be overwhelming to delve through, especially for the specialty areas. Of all the new medications from 2018, these five drugs that entered the market have the potential to impact prescribing practices and change the way the older adult population is managed. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - December 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Katherine Fary Source Type: news

Enjoying Companionship, as Long as It Lasts
I ’m dedicating this column to my frail geriatric canine, Tessa. I’ve taken dogs on nursing home rounds with me now for almost 25 years, and it never gets old. The joy they bring to my residents is palpable and undeniable, and it brightens up my day, too. Yes, it slows me down some because there a re lots of informal visits and the unplanned detours between patients when someone shouts, “Oh, a dog!” from their room. Luckily, I am usually not in a rush, and I figure I am collecting some sort of karmic currency for sharing the pooches with others who really appreciate them. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - December 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Karl Steinberg Tags: on my mind Source Type: news

Vaccines Should Not Be a Sticking Point
Dear Dr. Jeff: (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - December 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Jeffrey Nichols Tags: Dear Dr. Jeff Source Type: news

Expert Perspective
Editor ’s note: The new content on this page, Expert Perspective, underscores the lasting relevance of the issue discussed in this previously published column. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - December 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Kenneth W. Goodman Source Type: news

No DNR Tattoo for Me, Thanks
Many of Caring ’s readers will recall the November, 2017 letter to the New England Journal of Medicine (2017;377:2192–2193) that recounted the case of an unidentified 70-year-old man who presented, unconscious and very ill, to an emergency department and was found to have a large “DO NOT RESUSCITATE” tatto o on his chest. Beneath that tattoo was a second tattoo, a representation of his signature. The patient received moderately aggressive life-sustaining treatment in an intensive care unit to address acidosis and hypotension, and the treating ICU team elected not to honor the tattoo initially. (Sour...
Source: Caring for the Ages - December 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Karl Steinberg Tags: on my mind Source Type: news

Risk Management for a Resident Who Won ’t Follow Medical Advice
Mrs. H and her husband are residents at a skilled nursing facility. They are elderly and have extensive gait instability, but are cognitively intact. Mr. H is rehabilitating after a compression fracture of the thoracic spine. They are both receiving physical therapy and occupational therapy. After rehab, Mr. H is discharged home to the community to live with his adult children, but his wife must remain in the SNF. Every day after his discharge, Mr. H visits his wife and wants to walk with her in the hallways like they used to do when they both resided at the SNF together. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - December 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: William C. Wilson Tags: LEGAL ISSUES Source Type: news

The Buzz: Facilities Are Going Alarm-Free
It ’s 2 a.m. and the buzzing of a bed alarm signals that Mrs. Jones is getting up to go to the bathroom. Now alerted, staff can assist her and keep her safe. That is the ideal that makes bed and chair alarms part of many facilities’ fallprevention programs. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - December 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Joanne Kaldy Source Type: news

Music Intervention Improves Apathy in Residents With Dementia
In addition to improving communication ability, a 12-week music intervention relieved apathy among older residents with dementia in a nursing facility in the People ’s Republic of China. By comparison, the control group demonstrated similar or worsened effects in the same symptoms of apathy, including “decreased goal-oriented motor behavior, decreased goal-oriented cognition, and decreased affective reaction.” (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - December 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Brian Ellis Source Type: news

Students, Seniors Buddy Up to Build Bridges
Cathleen Dacey often participates in morning yoga and stretching programs at the assisted living facility where she lives. She is the youngest participant, but not just by a few years — Ms. Dacey is in her 20s. She is attending the law school at Quinnipiac University and is part of the student-in-residence program at Masonic Care at Ashlar Village in Connecticut. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - December 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Joanne Kaldy Source Type: news

Physician Burnout, Depression, and Suicide
The work we do — geriatrics and long-term care — always ranks high in job satisfaction when polls are taken. And yet ask any doctor you know, and he or she will tell you about one or two or four or more medical friends and colleagues who offed themselves along the way. I, myself, can think of six. They were go ne from the lives of all who knew and loved them in an instant. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - December 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Jerald Winakur Tags: Meditations on Geriatric Medicine Source Type: news

Get the Best of PALTC Medicine: 2019 Society Membership Is Now Open
Whether you are interested in education and continuing medical education credits, webinars and other online programming, the latest research, podcasts featuring national experts, or you just want to connect with like-minded colleagues, Society membership is your answer. Renew or join today for benefits that include: (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - December 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Source Type: news

Q & A with an Expert: The Rise of Hospital Medicine and Its Impact on Health Care Delivery
In an exclusive interview with Caring for the Ages, Jasen Gundersen, MD, MBA, president of TeamHealth ’s Hospitalist and Post-Acute Care service lines, spoke with Ian Cordes, a member of Caring’s Editorial Advisory Board, about the increasing role of hospitalists in the United States. Dr. Gundersen explained how this development has changed the practice of medicine in the acute and post-acute se ttings, as well as discussed the evolution of TeamHealth, the influence of electronic medical record (EMR) systems on the day-to-day, and more. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - December 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Ian Cordes Tags: BOARD ROOM Source Type: news

Caring Communication: Connecting with Practitioners, Staff for Quality Outcomes, Happy Patients
Several years ago, Caring for the Ages introduced this column to help encourage the best possible communication between practitioners and patients/families in post-acute and long-term care on a wide range of topics. We gathered a prestigious group of patient advocates, practitioners, and family members to craft a column that would meet this goal. The result was Caring for Consumers. This month ’s column, authored by long-time contributing writer Joanne Kaldy, whose mother was an assisted living facility and nursing home resident, focuses on how to keep the communication channels open and working. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - December 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Tags: Caring Source Type: news

Journal Highlights From the December Issue of JAMDA
Staff training can lead to improved oral hygiene and denture care among nursing home residents, a study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - December 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Source Type: news

Destination, Atlanta: Annual Conference Offers the Best of PALTC Medicine
Registration is now open for AMDA  — The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine 2019 Annual Conference, set for March 7-10 in Atlanta, GA. Many practitioners, such as Firas Saidi, MD, CMD, have already signed up. As Dr. Saidi, the conference’s first registrant, said, “I’ve been attending the annual conference fo r over 10 years. It’s the only place I can get relevant, up-to-date information in the post-acute and long-term care space. There’s always something interesting happening, always something out of the box and innovative. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - December 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Source Type: news

Don ’t Miss These Events
Website: https://paltc.org/core (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - December 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Source Type: news

Giving to “Our Foundation”
All of us practicing post-acute and long-term care medicine are confronted with a lot of information and data. But it is up to us, using everything we know, see, and feel, to make decisions about patient care. Our job is to think both broadly and specifically about what is needed for the optimal well-being of the person whose care is entrusted to us. At the end, salient facts and impressions are key to the decisions we make. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - December 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: J. Kenneth Brubaker Source Type: news

Special Editor ’s Announcement: Giving Thanks for Change
It ’s November, and Thanksgiving is right around the corner. America has a wonderful tradition of setting aside a specific holiday — and if you’re lucky a nice 4-day weekend — to celebrate gratitude for all the things we have in our lives to be thankful for. Thanksgiving is a time to take stock , to reconnect with family and friends, to stop and smell the roses (or the turkey or the wood fire), to reminisce about old times and those we have lost, and to appreciate how fortunate and blessed we are. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - November 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Karl Steinberg Tags: on my mind Source Type: news

Dementia Interventions: From Past to Present
In this issue of Caring for the Ages, several articles about dementia prevention and care for individuals with dementia are being republished. In looking back at these articles, I ’m reminded of how few answers we have in terms of the best approach to care. Moreover, I anticipate that there really is no best answer but rather a smorgasbord of approaches and ways to prevent, screen for, and treat dementia. What works, or is best for one individual may simply not work or be b est for another. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - November 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Barbara Resnick Source Type: news

Calling All State Chapters
When I call, state chapter leaders wonder if they really want to answer their phones. “Yes, it’s Mary Evans calling, asking that you please do your utmost to join me in not only evangelizing about the Foundation for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine’s Futures Program, but also that you raise money and send a check.” (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - November 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Mary Evans Source Type: news

I Don ’t Belong Here — I Want to Go Home
Dear Dr. Jeff: (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - November 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Jeffrey Nichols Tags: Dear Dr. Jeff Source Type: news

Let ’s Work Together to Make This Flu Season a Better One for PA/LTC Residents
Flu season is officially here, and once again I find myself surprised by the tenacity of the old (and new) myths about the flu shot. (For instance, one that recently moved into the “myth” column is that people with egg allergies shouldn’t get the flu shot.) However, unless we’re prepared to have a repeat of last year’s flu season, which was particularly brutal for the frail older adults living in nursing homes and other post-acute and long-term care settings, we need to take steps now to get ready. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - November 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Christopher E. Laxton Tags: LEGAL ISSUES Source Type: news

Pharmacists IMPACT Patient Care – an overview of the IMPACT Act
On September 18, 2014, Congress passed the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014 (the IMPACT Act), and the bill was signed into law by President Obama on October 6, 2014. This law requires the submission of standardized data by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs), skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), home health agencies (HHAs), and inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs), and it establishes a quality reporting program (QRP) for SNFs. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - November 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Jeanne Manzi PharmD Tags: LTC Pharmacy Source Type: news

Preparing for Disasters, Assisted Living Communities Balance Protection and Engagement
Safety and independence — many older Americans and their families choose assisted living (AL) communities, or care communities, because they offer this combination of features. However, when disaster strikes, whether it is a hurricane, fire, or active shooter situation, care communities must ensure a balance between prot ection and engagement. “Preparedness should be part of the organizational culture, and everyone — including the residents — needs to be involved,” said Stan Szpytek, the president of Fire and Life Safety, an emergency preparedness consultant to AL communities and other organiz...
Source: Caring for the Ages - November 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Joanne Kaldy Source Type: news

The Changing Ethics of Health Care
Health care delivery is changing, and the ethics of health care are changing along with it. Much has been written about how and why health care delivery is changing, driven largely by concerns about escalating health care costs. But far less attention is given to the changing ethics of health care — what the causes are, and what, if anything, can and should be done about it. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - November 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Jonathan M. Evans Tags: MEDICAL ETHICS Source Type: news

Adult Daughters: Our Nation ’s Front Lines of Caregiving in the Era of Alzheimer’s
In honor of A Day Without a Woman, my friends at Daughters Unite quoted one of my frequent go-to sayings: “If adult daughters went on strike tomorrow, our health care system would collapse.” It’s time I explained why I say this so often. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - November 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: MaryAnne Sterling Tags: Caregiver ’s Perspective Source Type: news

Roam If You Want to: Unlocking Doors for Patients With Dementia
The author of Dementia Beyond Drugs: Changing the Culture of Care and Dementia Beyond Disease: Enhancing Well-Being, G. Allen Power, MD, posted a photo on social media of a door in a dementia unit decorated to resemble the corner of a lovely room with a bookcase and flowers in a vase. At first glance, it is visually appealing. But the truth is, said Dr. Power, it is still a door. Instead of disguising or locking doors to keep people from leaving, “We need to figure out why they want to leave, and we need to think about the needs we’re not meeting,” he said. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - November 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Joanne Kaldy Source Type: news

AMDA Podcast Is Your Program
The AMDA On-The-Go podcast, hosted by Wayne Saltsman, MD, PhD, CMD, is fast becoming a popular way for practitioners to get the latest news and research, hear from experts and innovators, and revel in the excellence and energy that is PA/LTC medicine. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - November 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Source Type: news

Prepare for a Successful Informal Dispute Resolution
Editor ’s note: Although this article was written in 2016, the information and advice provided in it remain relevant to the current IDR processes. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - November 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: By Janet K. Feldkamp Tags: LEGAL ISSUES Source Type: news

Nurse Practitioners Build Future Careers on New Foundation
The Foundation for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (formerly the AMDA Foundation) Futures program has always been an amalgam of participants in various career stages from all across the country. A few years ago, the program began adding nurse practitioners to the mix. These NPs not only learned about PA/LTC medicine — much of it from the medical director’s point of view — they also shared their perspectives with their physician colleagues. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - November 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Joanne Kaldy Source Type: news

Is Diet the Best Prevention Strategy for Dementia?
A number of studies have reported that diet interventions can be an effective strategy for preventing or delaying the onset of dementia in older adults. While the Mediterranean (MedDiet) and the DASH (Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension) diets have demonstrated cardiovascular benefits in older adults, another reported outcome is a lower risk of Alzheimer ’s disease and cognitive decline. The MedDiet is a cultural-based diet pattern that has been shown to prevent cardiovascular disease, whereas the DASH diet originally was developed to reduce and control blood pressure. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - November 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Phyllis Famularo Source Type: news

Dr. Smith Goes to Washington: Society Members Unite Legislators With Issues Aimed at Improving Care
On a Thursday in late September, the crowds on Capitol Hill were larger and more energized than usual. The Brett Kavanaugh hearings were being held, the area was crowded with spectators and protestors alike, and people in Washington, DC, were glued to their TVs. In the midst of all this, leaders of AMDA — The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine arrived on the Hill to meet with legislators and address issues aimed at improving the quality of care for post-acute and long-term care residents. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - November 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Joanne Kaldy Source Type: news