Should You Take Aspirin Every Day? Here ’s What the Science Says

Aspirin is best known as an over-the-counter painkiller. But acetylsalicylic acid, as it’s called chemically, has many other health benefits, as well as side effects, in the body that have only become clear in recent years. Here’s what the latest science says about the health benefits and side effects of aspirin, as well as which conditions it may treat and those it doesn’t appear to improve. (If you are taking aspirin for any reason other than for periodic pain relief, it’s best to consult with your doctor to confirm whether the benefits outweigh the risks in your particular case.) How aspirin affects heart health Aspirin’s second-best known effect is its ability to protect the heart. In people with heart disease who have already had a heart attack, it has been shown to lower the risk of having another. Studies consistently show that people who have had heart attacks or strokes and who take a low-dose aspirin (also known as baby aspirin, which at 81 mg is about a quarter of the dose of regular-strength aspirin) a day can significantly reduce their risk of having another event. Its protective benefits come from aspirin’s ability to lower inflammation, a condition that can attract clot-building factors within blood vessel walls. These can rupture, plugging up tiny vessels in the heart and blocking blood flow. Doctors now believe that taking a daily low-dose aspirin is also a cheap and easy way for people who do not yet have heart disease &m...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthytime Source Type: news

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Cognitive behavioral therapy, offered in-office or online, may reduce pain and opioid use in addition to improving sleep and mood, new research suggests.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Internal Medicine Headlines - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news
James Salaz (left), of Montrose, Colorado, was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer in 2012 by Dr Choon-Kee Lee (right). After five years, Salaz learned he actually had blood vessel inflammation.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 14 November 2018Source: The American Journal of SurgeryAuthor(s): Erica Burkheimer, Leah Starks, Mariam Khan, Leon Oostendorp, Marianne K. Melnik, Mathew H. Chung, G. Paul WrightAbstractIntroductionObesity has been associated with negative oncologic outcomes in breast cancer.MethodsRetrospective review of patients with operable breast cancer at a single institution from 2009–2012. Patients with carcinoma in situ or metastatic disease were excluded. Variables included utilization of MRI, surgical treatment, perioperative, and long-term oncologic outcomes. Primary outcome was rate of ...
Source: The American Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
ConclusionsSeveral factors are associated with a non-complete mesorectal excision. Non-complete mesorectal grade is associated with decreased survival.
Source: The American Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
ConclusionsSimple bile duct ligation is associated with a similar incidence of bacterial translocation as double ligation, but without cirrhosis or portal hypertension.
Source: The American Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe primary ingredients in cannabis, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), have been made available in numerous forms and formulations to treat multiple medical conditions, and recreational access to marijuana is increasing. Of particular importance to the surgeon may be their effects on prolonging intestinal motility, decreasing inflammation, increasing hunger, mitigating pain, and reducing nausea and vomiting. Perioperative use of medicinal or recreational marijuana will become increasingly prevalent, and the surgeon should be aware of the positive and negative effects of these cannabinoids.
Source: The American Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 14 November 2018Source: European Journal of RadiologyAuthor(s): Alireza Aminsharifi, Rajan T. Gupta, Efrat Tsivian, Sitharthan Sekar, Christina Sze, Thomas J. PolascikAbstractPurposeTo introduce and assess the efficacy of a reduced core targeted (RCT) biopsy template (image-targeted + laterally directed sextant biopsy) to detect clinically-significant cancer in patients with elevated PSA and a previous negative biopsy or on active surveillance. The performance and added value of either targeted alone vs random sextant vs combined biopsy template was appraised.MethodsData fro...
Source: European Journal of Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
ConclusionsMore than three retriever passes may increase the rate of recanalization, but not the likelihood of favorable functional outcomes in ischemic stroke patients treated with mechanical thrombectomy. Notably, multiple retriever passes may also increase the risk of intracranial hemorrhage.Evidence-Based MedicineLevel of Evidence: Level 4, Case Series.
Source: CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeIn patients with acute occlusions of the middle cerebral artery, the collaterals play an important role in infarct growth and potentially on clinical outcome. As the primary collateral pathway, the posterior cerebral artery with the posterior communicating artery (PComA) is important. We analyzed the influence of the presence of an ipsilateral PComA on infarct growth and clinical outcome.MethodsWe included 101 patients with M1 occlusions and subsequent endovascular treatment and differentiated patients without an ipsilateral PComA from those with an ipsilateral PComA.ResultsThere was no difference in the rat...
Source: CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeThe aim of this study is to assess the feasibility of aspiration mechanical thrombectomy in patients with massive and submassive pulmonary embolism (PE) and contraindications to thrombolysis.Materials and MethodsEighteen patients presenting massive (8/18) or submassive (10/18) PE were prospectively enrolled between October 2016 and November 2017. All the patients enrolled had contraindications to thrombolysis (haemorrhagic stroken = 1, ischaemic stroke in the preceding 6 monthsn = 7, central nervous system damage or neoplasmsn = 1, recent major trauma/surgery/he...
Source: CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
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