Study: Chemicals in some vegetables prevent cancer in mice
Chemicals in some vegetables, including kale, cabbage and broccoli, helped prevent colon cancer in mice, according to a study. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - August 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A teacher battling cancer ran out of sick days. Colleagues gave theirs.
The chemotherapy dripped through a catheter in his chest. Cancer patient Robert Goodman had burned through his paid sick days while undergoing surgery and chemotherapy for colon cancer. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - August 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Diets 'devoid of vegetable matter' may cause colon cancer
Feeding mice a diet rich in a compound that results from the digestion of cabbage and other brassicas protected their gut from inflammation and cancer. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Colorectal Cancer Source Type: news

Chemicals found in vegetables prevent colon cancer in mice
(The Francis Crick Institute) Chemicals produced by vegetables such as kale, cabbage and broccoli could help to maintain a healthy gut and prevent colon cancer, a new study from the Francis Crick Institute shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists discover how to target mutations that in 50% of cancers  
Scientists at the University of California, San Francisco have developed a drug that can turn 'off' the out of control growth that occurs in about half of all cancers, including lung, skin and colon tumors. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lack of Exercise Can Boost Cancer Risk
MONDAY, Aug. 13, 2018 -- Few Americans know that inactivity can increase the risk of colon, breast and other types of cancer, a new study finds. An analysis of survey responses from 351 people revealed that while many knew a sedentary lifestyle... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Lymph Node Removal Ups Survival in Right-Sided Colon Cancer Lymph Node Removal Ups Survival in Right-Sided Colon Cancer
Removing 22 or more lymph node improved the survival rate by about 20% in patients with right-sided colon cancer.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Public unaware of cancer risk from too little exercise, study reports
(Taylor& Francis Group) It has long been accepted that regular exercise can assist in helping to prevent or reduce the risk of a multitude of health problems. However, a new study on US audiences published in the Journal of Health Communication, reports that the public respondents to a survey were largely unaware that an insufficient level of exercise can contribute to an increased risk of certain types of cancer, such as colon and breast. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Common skin cancer can signal increased risk of other cancers, Stanford researchers say
(Stanford Medicine) People who develop abnormally frequent cases of a skin cancer known as basal cell carcinoma appear to be at significantly increased risk for the development of other cancers, including blood, breast, colon and prostate cancers, according to a preliminary study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

To Boost Colon Cancer Screening, Use the Mail
(Source: Cancercompass News: Colorectal Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Colorectal Cancer - August 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Are The Health Benefits Of Turmeric Too Good To Be True?
(CNN) — Alzheimer’s disease. Diabetes. Arthritis. Unwanted hair growth. Baldness. Infertility. Erectile dysfunction. Hangovers. Glaucoma. Cancer. If you have an ailment, there’s a good chance that someone, somewhere, is studying whether turmeric can treat it. There are more than 15,000 manuscripts published about curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, and about 50 manuscripts added to this collection each week, according to the National Institutes of Health. “It’s really taken on sort of panacea-like properties in terms of the things it’s being studied for and the things it has bee...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local TV turmeric Source Type: news

FIT Outreach Increased Colon Cancer Screening
(MedPage Today) -- Modest success in mailing fecal immunochemical tests directly to homes (Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology)
Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology - August 6, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: news

Diet soft drinks tied to lower odds of colon cancer recurrence
Colon cancer patients who drink one or more servings of artificially-sweetened beverages a day have roughly half the risk of their cancer recurring compared to those who drink few or none of these beverages, a U.S. study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Key piece identified for slowing a colorectal cancer subtype
(IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute)) Inhibiting the Jagged 1 protein in mice prevents the proliferation and growth of colon and rectal tumours. What is more, this approach to the disease permits the removal of existing tumours. The discovery leads the way to the development of a therapy for treating this type of pathology in humans, the second leading cause of cancer-related death in Western countries (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 2, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Drinking Too Much Alcohol (And Too Little) Is Linked to Dementia
To drink or not to drink when it comes to your health really depends on a few important factors, including how much you imbibe and what health issues you’re concerned about. Alcohol in moderation can lower the risk of heart disease for some people, as well as reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes and gallstones. But excessive drinking — more than about a drink a day for women and two drinks a day for men — is also linked to several types of cancer, including breast, colon, pharynx, larynx and esophageal. Too much alcohol can also take a toll on the liver. Some studies have also suggested that moderate drink...
Source: TIME: Health - August 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Alcohol Brain Dementia Source Type: news

To Boost Colon Cancer Screening, Use the Mail
Title: To Boost Colon Cancer Screening, Use the MailCategory: Health NewsCreated: 7/31/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 8/1/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - August 1, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

To Boost Colon Cancer Screening, Use the Mail
TUESDAY, July 31, 2018 -- Colon cancer is treatable if caught early. And sending screening tests in the mail might boost timely detection, a new study suggests. University of North Carolina (UNC) researchers found that Medicaid patients were more... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 31, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

To Boost Colon Cancer Screening, Use the Mail
(Source: Cancercompass News: Colorectal Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Colorectal Cancer - July 31, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Nitrate in drinking water increases the risk of colorectal cancer, according to study
(Natural News) Researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark have linked increased levels of nitrate found in drinking water to the risk of developing colon and rectal cancer. The results of the study, published in the International Journal of Cancer, also revealed that the risk factors for developing the conditions occur at concentrations far below the current drinking... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

ACS: Start Colon Cancer Screening at Embryogenesis
Discussions should start no later than the blastocyst stage (Source: MedPage Today Primary Care)
Source: MedPage Today Primary Care - July 26, 2018 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Too Few Americans Getting Screened for Cancer: CDC
THURSDAY, July 26, 2018 -- Routine checks for breast, prostate, cervical and colon cancer save lives, but screening rates for all but colon cancer have stalled in recent years, U.S. health officials report. According to the new U.S. Centers for... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 26, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Cutting-Edge Primary Care Data From DDW 2018 Cutting-Edge Primary Care Data From DDW 2018
Dr David Johnson shares new results impacting colon cancer screening, diabetes, anti-TNF agents, and other key areas.Medscape Gastroenterology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - July 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology Commentary Source Type: news

Diet Soft Drinks and Improved Colon Cancer Outcome? Diet Soft Drinks and Improved Colon Cancer Outcome?
Drinking artificially sweetened beverages was associated with significantly improved survival in patients with stage III colon cancer, but the effect may be due to displacing sugar-sweetened drinks.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - July 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

NIH expands program that conducts large-scale clinical trials in real-world settings
Ongoing studies focus on many different diseases, including colon cancer, chronic pain and kidney failure. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - July 23, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Nitrate in drinking water increases risk of colorectal cancer, according to study
(Natural News) Researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark have linked increased levels of nitrate found in drinking water to the risk of developing colon and rectal cancer. The results of the study, published in the International Journal of Cancer, also revealed that the risk factors for developing the conditions occur at concentrations far below the current drinking... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bowel cancer symptoms: Stomach cramps could be a sign of the cancer
BOWEL cancer symptoms occur when cells start to divide uncontrollably in the large intestine. Signs and symptoms can be observed in the toilet bowl, or through how someone is feeling. Watch out for these warning signs of colon cancer. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - July 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could Diet Soda Help Curb Colon Cancer's Return?
Title: Could Diet Soda Help Curb Colon Cancer's Return?Category: Health NewsCreated: 7/20/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 7/23/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - July 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

'Invisible' stool blood tied to increased risk of premature death
(Reuters Health) - A screening test for colon cancer that looks for "invisible" blood in stool may also predict a heightened risk of premature death from other causes, a recent study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - July 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Could Diet Soda Help Curb Colon Cancer's Return?
People in a recent study who drank one or more 12-ounce servings of artificially sweetened soft drinks a day had a 46 percent lower risk of cancer recurrence or death over the study period than those who didn't drink such beverages. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - July 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could Diet Soda Help Curb Colon Cancer ’ s Return?
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - July 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Family Medicine, Oncology, Research, Nutrition, News, Source Type: news

Could Diet Soda Help Curb Colon Cancer's Return?
FRIDAY, July 20, 2018 -- A new study suggests that colon cancer patients who regularly drink diet sodas have a much lower risk of their tumor coming back, or of dying from the cancer. In a study funded by the U.S. National Cancer Institute,... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 20, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Could Diet Soda Help Curb Colon Cancer's Return?
(Source: Cancercompass News: Colorectal Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Colorectal Cancer - July 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Low- or no-calorie soft drinks linked to improved outcomes in colon cancer
In a new Yale study, drinking at least one 12-ounce serving of diet cola per day resulted in a 46% improvement in the risk of colon cancer recurrence or death. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - July 19, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Low/no calorie soft drinks linked to improved outcomes in advanced colon cancer patients
(Yale University) Drinking artificially-sweetened beverages is associated with a significantly lower risk of colon cancer recurrence and cancer death, a team of investigators led by a Yale Cancer Center scientist has found. The study was published today in the journal The Public Library of Science One or PLOS ONE. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Fecal Occult Blood Flags Risks Beyond Colon Cancer
(MedPage Today) -- Positive FOBT tied to increased mortality from non-cancer causes (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - July 17, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

New target protein for colon cancer identified
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have identified a new potential target protein (c-Cbl) they believe can help further the understanding of colon cancer and ultimately survival of patients with the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Hidden Blood in Feces May Signal Deadly Conditions
MONDAY, July 16, 2018 -- Even if it's not visible to the naked eye, blood in the stool can be serious -- a sign of a potentially fatal disease other than colon cancer, new research suggests. This could include circulatory, respiratory, digestive,... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Weight loss surgery may decrease hormone-related cancer risk, study says
Weight loss surgery may decrease a person's risk of developing hormone-related cancers, increase the chance of colon cancer, according to study in England. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - July 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Contrast ultrasound identifies early cervical cancer
Contrast-enhanced ultrasound appears to be an effective alternative to MRI...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: AIUM: Double dose of US contrast helps find gastric lesions Can CEUS differentiate between IBD and colon cancer? Artificial intelligence may help bridge experience gap for liver CEUS Contrast ultrasound clears up picture for renal lesions Contrast US helps assess breast cancer treatment response (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 13, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Improving cancer treatment with 3D modeling of drug resistance
(University of Akron) Researchers will model response of colon cancer cells to anticancer drugs using 3D cultures. By exploring specific mechanisms of a cancer cell's feedback signaling that renders tumors non-responsive, they can design treatment strategies that effectively block tumor growth with significantly reduced toxicity to normal cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 13, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

OncoBreak: Boosting Anticancer Immunity; IBD to Colon Cancer; Lagging Proton Trials
(MedPage Today) -- News, features, and commentary about cancer-related issues (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - July 12, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Yet Another Cancer Screening Recommendation. This Time: Colon Yet Another Cancer Screening Recommendation. This Time: Colon
The American Cancer Society now suggests beginning screening for colorectal cancer at age 45. Is that a good idea?Georgetown University Family Medicine (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - July 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care Commentary Source Type: news

A study points to new therapeutic targets for tumors associated with chronic inflammation
(Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)) Scientists headed by ICREA researcher Angel R. Nebreda at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) report a new mechanism that contributes to the development of inflammation-associated colon cancer and points to new therapeutic targets. The study has been published in the journal EMBO Molecular Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A blood test for leukemia? Genetic changes in the blood can be spotted five years before
The findings by British and Canadian scientists could be a game-changer for the hard-to-treat cancer, allowing doctors to monitor patients' risks in the same way that polyps can be red flags for colon cancers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers Apply Computing Power to Track the Spread of Cancer
Princeton researchers have developed a new computational method that increases the ability to track the spread of cancer cells from one part of the body to another. This migration of cells can lead to metastatic disease, which causes about 90 percent of cancer deaths from solid tumors - masses of cells that grow in organs such as the breast, prostate or colon. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - July 4, 2018 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Triclosan, a common antimicrobial found in toothpastes and soaps, promotes the development of colon cancer
(Natural News) Where do you draw the line when it comes to avoiding germs? Maybe you’re the type who politely declines shaking hands in business meetings, or you might skip a great-looking passed appetizer at a party because you didn’t get a chance to wash your hands. Perhaps you’ve even mastered leaving public restrooms without... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How obesity drives colon cancer in mice
A team including Yale researchers found that a high level of insulin was the link between obesity and colon cancer in mice. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - July 3, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Researchers apply computing power to track the spread of cancer
(Princeton University, Engineering School) Princeton researchers have developed a new computational method that increases the ability to track the spread of cancer cells from one part of the body to another. This migration of cells can lead to metastatic disease, which causes about 90 percent of cancer deaths from solid tumors -- masses of cells that grow in organs such as the breast, prostate or colon. Understanding the drivers of metastasis could lead to new treatments aimed at blocking the process of cancer spreading through the body. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 29, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news