Aspirin Use Cuts CRC Risk in Those Initiating Use Before Age 70
THURSDAY, Jan. 21, 2021 -- Regular use of aspirin is associated with a reduced risk for colorectal cancer (CRC) among those with initiation of aspirin before age 70 years, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in JAMA Oncology. Chuan... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 21, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New, simplified genetic test effectively screens for hereditary cancers
(Elsevier) Researchers have developed a new integrated genetic/epigenetic DNA-sequencing protocol known as MultiMMR that can identify the presence and cause of mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency in a single test from a small sample of DNA in colon, endometrial, and other cancers. This alternative to complex, multi-step testing workflows can also determine causes of MMR deficiency often missed by current clinical tests. Their results are presented in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, published by Elsevier. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Strange colon discovery explains racial disparities in colorectal cancer
(University of Virginia Health System) The colons of African-Americans and people of European descent age differently, new research reveals, helping explain racial disparities in colorectal cancer - the cancer that killed beloved 'Black Panther' star Chadwick Boseman at only 43. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Does aspirin lower colorectal cancer risk in older adults? It depends on when they start
(Massachusetts General Hospital) A new study has found that there is no protection against colorectal cancer if people begin taking aspirin regularly after age 70. However, there appears to be such protection if aspirin is started before age 70 and continued. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 21, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Simple, cheap test can help save lives from colorectal cancer
(University of Exeter) New research has demonstrated that a simple, cheap test can help identify who is at risk of developing colorectal cancer, aiding early diagnosis and potentially saving lives. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 18, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Breast, Cervical, CRC Screening Below Healthy People 2020 Targets
FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2021 -- Receipt of screening tests for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers was below national Heathy People 2020 targets in 2018, according to research published in the Jan. 14 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 15, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Cancer Screening Test Receipt - United States, 2018
This report describes progress toward national cancer screening targets in 2018. (Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - January 14, 2021 Category: American Health Tags: Cancer Cancer Screening Cancer Screening Guidelines Colorectal Cancer MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Source Type: news

Patients in Canada missing recommended cancer screenings
A significant number of people in Canada are missing timely screening tests...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Cancer delays: Counting COVID-19's hidden costs USPSTF proposes lowering colon screening age to 45 Women who smoke are less likely to get cancer screening Are older Americans screened too much for cancer? ASTRO: Cervical cancer deaths rise as women's centers close (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 13, 2021 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

New research in JNCCN highlights dangerous disparities for life-saving cancer screening
(National Comprehensive Cancer Network) New research in the January 2021 issue ofJNCCN--Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network finds more than a third of eligible people miss timely screening tests for colorectal cancer and at least a quarter appear to miss timely screening tests for breast and cervical cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 13, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Colorectal Cancer Risk From Obesity Varies by Sex
Authors say more nuanced approach needed to understand link between body weight and risk for colorectal cancer (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - January 11, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Family Medicine, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Internal Medicine, Oncology, Pathology, Journal, Source Type: news

A Colonoscopy Alternative Comes Home
An at-home test for colon cancer is as reliable as the traditional screening, health experts say, and more agreeable. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paula Span Tags: your-feed-science Tests (Medical) Colon Colon and Colorectal Cancer Elderly your-feed-health Source Type: news

Colorectal Cancer Risk From Obesity Varies by Sex
MONDAY, Jan. 11, 2021 -- Higher body mass index (BMI) is associated with a significantly increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC) among men, whereas higher waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) is a strong risk factor among women, according to a study... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 11, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

For Many Cancer Patients, Diagnosis Brings Psychological'Silver Lining '
MONDAY, Jan. 11, 2021 -- Could a cancer diagnosis sometimes produce positive life changes? In a new study, many people with colon cancer, even in advanced stages, believed their diagnosis had brought some beneficial effects to their lives. In... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 11, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Uncovering basic mechanisms of intestinal stem cell self-renewal and differentiation
(Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health) The gut plays a central role in the regulation of the body's metabolism and its dysfunction is associated with a variety of diseases, such as obesity, diabetes, colitis and colorectal cancer that affect millions of people worldwide. Targeting endocrine dysfunction by stimulating the formation of specific enteroendocrine cells from intestinal stem cells could be a promising regenerative approach for diabetes therapy. For this, a detailed understanding of the intestinal stem cell lineage and the signals regulating the recruitment of intestin...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Differences in Right vs Left Colon in Black vs White Individuals Differences in Right vs Left Colon in Black vs White Individuals
Differences between right and left colon biopsy specimens may explain the difference in colorectal cancer location in Black vs White Americans.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - January 8, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Gut microbe may promote breast cancers
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) A microbe found in the colon and commonly associated with the development of colitis and colon cancer also may play a role in the development of some breast cancers, according to new research from investigators with the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and its Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 6, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

CRC Risk in Young Adults: Not as High as Previously Reported CRC Risk in Young Adults: Not as High as Previously Reported
Previous studies of colorectal cancer (CRC) included carcinoid tumors as well as colorectal adenocarcinoma, which has inflated estimates of risk, say experts.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape FamilyMedicine Headlines)
Source: Medscape FamilyMedicine Headlines - December 31, 2020 Category: Primary Care Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Alto Reed, Longtime Saxophonist for Bob Seger's Silver Bullet Band, Dies at 72
Alto Reed, the longtime saxophonist for Bob Seger & the Silver Bullet Band, died on Wednesday (Dec. 30) after a long battle with colon cancer. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Triple Treatment Combo Beneficial in BRAF - Mutant CRC
Irinotecan, cetuximab, and vemurafenib improve progression - free survival in BRAFV600E - mutated colorectal cancer (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - December 28, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Gastroenterology, Oncology, Pathology, Pharmacy, Journal, Source Type: news

Cancer Treatment Delays Are Deadly: 5- and 10-Year Data Cancer Treatment Delays Are Deadly: 5- and 10-Year Data
Longer time from diagnosis to definitive treatment after prostate, breast, lung, and colon cancer diagnosis was tied to higher mortality.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Gastroenterology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Gastroenterology Headlines - December 28, 2020 Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Triple Treatment Combo Beneficial in BRAF-Mutant CRC
MONDAY, Dec. 28, 2020 -- Irinotecan and cetuximab combined with vemurafenib improve progression-free survival in BRAFV600E-mutated colorectal cancer (CRC), according to a study published online Dec. 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Scott... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - December 28, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Latest News - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Operations - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

COVID-19 relief bill delays USPSTF mammo recommendation
A bill passed by the U.S. Congress to provide COVID-19 relief also includes...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: USPSTF proposes lowering colon screening age to 45 USPSTF advises against carotid artery stenosis screening House subcommittee delays USPSTF mammo recommendation ACR: New USPSTF lung cancer guidelines will save lives Do women over 75 need screening mammography? (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - December 24, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Triple chemotherapy combination improves metastatic colorectal cancer outcomes
(SWOG) Researchers from SWOG Cancer Research Network, a cancer clinical trials group funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, have shown that a triple drug combination -- of irinotecan, cetuximab, and vemurafenib -- is a more powerful tumor fighter and keeps people with metastatic colon cancer disease free for a significantly longer period of time compared with patients treated with irinotecan and cetuximab. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 23, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Obesity's Influence on Colon Cancer Risk May Vary by Gender: Study
TUESDAY, Dec. 22, 2020 -- Obesity affects colon cancer risk differently in women and men, new research reveals. British researchers analyzed data from more than 58,000 people with colon cancer and nearly 68,000 without. The takeaway: A higher body... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 22, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Obesity's Influence on Colon Cancer Risk
Title: Obesity's Influence on Colon Cancer RiskCategory: Health NewsCreated: 12/22/2020 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 12/22/2020 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - December 22, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Early-Onset CRC Incidence Examined by Histologic Subtype
MONDAY, Dec. 21, 2020 -- Among individuals with early-onset colorectal cancer (EOCRC), adenocarcinoma rates are increasing in specific subgroups, but carcinoid tumors are increasing more steeply in all age groups, according to a study published... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - December 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

The Achilles' heel of cancer stem cells
(Max Delbr ü ck Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association) Colon cancer stem cells have one weak spot: the enzyme Mll1. An MDC team led by Walter Birchmeier has now shown in Nature Communications that blocking this protein prevents the development of new tumors in the body. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 21, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How to Stop Young Black Men From Dying of Colorectal Cancer How to Stop Young Black Men From Dying of Colorectal Cancer
Healthcare professionals must earn the trust of the African American community before they can hope to reduce colorectal cancer rates.Medscape Gastroenterology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - December 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology Expert Interview Source Type: news

Cancer risk from obesity differs for men and women
A new study, led by researchers at the University of Bristol and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), has revealed that where fat is on our body may lead to different health outcomes for men and women. The research, co-funded by World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF), Cancer Research UK and Diabetes UK, found that having more body fat around your waist is more dangerous for women than it is for men when it comes to risk of developing colorectal cancer (also known as bowel cancer). (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - December 17, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, International, Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Population Health Sciences, Institutes, Institutes, Bristol Population Health Science Institute; Press Release Source Type: news

$10M grant from Exact Sciences to support Stand Up to Cancer colorectal cancer initiative
(Stand Up To Cancer) Today Stand Up To Cancer ® (SU2C) unveiled a collaborative initiative aimed at improving colorectal cancer screening, early detection and prevention across the United States. The transformative $10 million grant from Exact Sciences, a provider of cancer screening and diagnostic tests, will fund a colorectal cancer 'Dream Team' of researchers, as well as a comprehensive public awareness campaign to increase screenings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 17, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cancer risk from obesity differs for men and women
(University of Bristol) A new study, co-funded by World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF), Cancer Research UK and Diabetes UK, reveals that where fat is on our body may lead to different health outcomes for men and women. The research revealed that having more body fat around your waist is more dangerous for women than it is for men when it comes to risk of developing colorectal cancer (also known as bowel cancer). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 16, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

SU2C research leads to FDA approval of new first-line treatment for colorectal cancer
(Stand Up To Cancer) The FDA recently approved the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab as a first-line treatment for patients with certain types of advanced colorectal cancer. This is the 9th FDA approval supported by Stand Up To Cancer ® (SU2C) research. Patients newly diagnosed with advanced or metastatic microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) or mismatch repair deficient (dMMR) colorectal cancer previously would have been prescribed pembrolizumab only after exhausting standard chemotherapy treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 16, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New combination therapy could help fight difficult-to-treat cancers with common mutations
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) UCLA scientists describe a new combination therapy that suppresses the MAPK pathway by holding cancer-driving proteins in a death grip. This combination of two small molecules has the potential to treat not only BRAF mutated melanoma but also additional aggressive subtypes of cancers, including melanoma, lung, pancreatic and colon cancers that harbor common mutations in cancer genes called RAS or NF1. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CDC awards Huntsman Cancer Institute $3 million to increase colorectal cancer screening
(Huntsman Cancer Institute) Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah has been awarded a five-year, $3 million grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to improve Utah's colorectal cancer screening rates. This funding will provide colorectal cancer screening and follow-up services to people between 50 and 75 years of age through partnership with health systems across Utah. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 14, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

AI body analysis finds lung cancer survival risk factors
An artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm was able to quickly analyze body...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: AI abdominal fat analysis assesses cardiovascular risk AI can opportunistically screen for metabolic syndrome AI unlocks screening potential of body CT exams CT predicts cardiac events in colon cancer patients Muscle mass, adiposity on CT predict breast cancer survival (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - December 11, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Proof-of-concept study shows dogs can detect COVID-19 in human sweat
" Working " dogs trained to perform search and rescue tasks, detect explosives or diseases such as colon cancer correctly identified people infected with COVID-19 up to 100% of the time, French researchers said Thursday. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - December 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Henry Ford Hospital performs first procedure in U.S. using CG-100 for colorectal cancer
(Henry Ford Health System) Henry Ford Health System is the first in the country to perform a procedure using the CG-100 ™ intraluminal device, which is temporarily inserted into the gastrointestinal tract and designed to reduce diverting stoma rates, and the need for an ostomy bag, in patients undergoing gastrointestinal resection procedures due to colorectal cancer treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 9, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Natalie Desselle-Reid, "Madea's Big Happy Family" actress, dead at 53 from colon cancer
"She was a bright light in this world. A queen. An extraordinary mother and wife," her family wrote on Instagram. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Early Signs of Colon Cancer
Title: Early Signs of Colon CancerCategory: Diseases and ConditionsCreated: 12/8/2020 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 12/8/2020 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - December 8, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Hot Spots ID'd for Higher CRC Mortality in Younger Women
MONDAY, Dec. 7, 2020 -- Specific geographic areas in the United States are associated with higher rates of mortality from early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC) in women, according to a study published in the December issue of Clinical and... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - December 7, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Colon cancer screening: Weighing the options
(Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed)
Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed - December 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pembrolizumab Slows MSI-H-dMMR Metastatic CRC
THURSDAY, Dec. 3, 2020 -- For the first-line treatment of microsatellite-instability-high (MSI-H) or mismatch-repair-deficient (dMMR) metastatic colorectal cancer, pembrolizumab is superior to chemotherapy for prolonging progression-free survival,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - December 3, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Study: Immunotherapy Vaccine for Mesothelioma Still Promising
The ONCOS-102 immunotherapy vaccine continues its move toward future, first-line standard of care treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma, based upon the latest study follow-up data. When combined with standard chemotherapy, the genetically modified adenovirus has produced a median overall survival of at least 18.2 months, according to results released in late November from the ongoing clinical trial. Median overall survival was more than four months better than the control group receiving chemotherapy alone in the randomized trial. ONCOS-102 is manufactured by Targovax, a small Scandinavian biotech company focused on...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 3, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Fran Mannino Source Type: news

AI abdominal fat analysis assesses cardiovascular risk
Body composition metrics automatically calculated from abdominal CT exams by...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: AI can opportunistically screen for metabolic syndrome AI unlocks screening potential of body CT exams CT predicts cardiac events in colon cancer patients ISMRM: Deep learning moves toward clinical practice Muscle mass, adiposity on CT predict breast cancer survival (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - December 2, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news