Could the U.S. Mail Deliver Better Colon Cancer Screening Rates?
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - March 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Gastroenterology, Oncology, Preventive Medicine, News, Source Type: news

Does Bariatric Surgery Lower the Risk for Incident Cancer? Does Bariatric Surgery Lower the Risk for Incident Cancer?
Dr Lowenfels comments on a study that suggests weight loss surgery may lower the risk for obesity-associated cancers (endometrial, colon, pancreatic, and postmenopausal breast).Medscape General Surgery (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: General Surgery Viewpoint Source Type: news

Could the U.S. Mail Deliver Better Colon Cancer Screening Rates?
FRIDAY, March 22, 2019 -- No one likes to get a colonoscopy, but new research suggests that mailing at-home colon cancer tests to folks who are overdue for their checks might prompt them to get screened. " We believe that mailing kits directly to... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 22, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Financial incentives didn't improve response rates to mailed colorectal cancer screening tests
(JAMA Network) Financial incentives didn't increase completion rates of colorectal cancer screening tests mailed to patients. In a randomized clinical trial of almost 900 patients, none of the incentives (an unconditional $10, a promised $10 upon completion of the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) kit to test for blood in a stool sample or chance at a lottery with a 1-in-10 chance of winning $100) was statistically better than no financial incentive to entice patients to complete the FIT. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mailing colorectal cancer screening kit found effective, regardless of financial incentive
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Roughly a quarter of patients overdue for colorectal cancer screening mailed completed kits back within two months, even if they weren't given any kind of financial incentive. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Could the U.S. Mail Deliver Better Colon Cancer Screening Rates?
(Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer - March 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Could the U.S. Mail Deliver Better Colon Cancer Screening Rates?
(Source: Cancercompass News: Colorectal Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Colorectal Cancer - March 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

High-fructose corn syrup promotes colon tumor growth in mice
(Weill Cornell Medicine) Consuming the equivalent of one can of soda per day caused mice predisposed to colon cancer to develop larger tumors, according to a study by Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian investigators. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 21, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study points to new strategy for boosting immunotherapy effectiveness in advanced colorectal cancer
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center revealed the common oncogene KRAS as a possible explanation for why many patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) do not respond to immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 21, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

High-fructose corn syrup enhances intestinal tumor growth in mice
Excessive consumption of beverages sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is associated with obesity and with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Whether HFCS contributes directly to tumorigenesis is unclear. We investigated the effects of daily oral administration of HFCS in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutant mice, which are predisposed to develop intestinal tumors. The HFCS-treated mice showed a substantial increase in tumor size and tumor grade in the absence of obesity and metabolic syndrome. HFCS increased the concentrations of fructose and glucose in the intestinal lumen and serum, respectively, and ...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Goncalves, M. D., Lu, C., Tutnauer, J., Hartman, T. E., Hwang, S.-K., Murphy, C. J., Pauli, C., Morris, R., Taylor, S., Bosch, K., Yang, S., Wang, Y., Van Riper, J., Lekaye, H. C., Roper, J., Kim, Y., Chen, Q., Gross, S. S., Rhee, K. Y., Cantley, L. C., Y Tags: Medicine, Diseases reports Source Type: news

Giving cancer patients a voice
Far too often, cancer patients and their doctors aren ’t aware of all the side effects that accompany new cancer therapies. Some of these new medications might cause fatigue, muscle aches, general pain and discomfort. A lack of information can lead to patients being unprepared to manage their symptoms or even cause some to delay or stop treatment all together. Historically, many clinical trials did not have a method to analyze or widely report the patient’s experience while undergoing a therapy.  Researchers at UCLA and across the country are trying to change that. To help people in making better-informed ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 20, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Screening for Colorectal Cancer in Cystic Fibrosis Screening for Colorectal Cancer in Cystic Fibrosis
Dr David Johnson on recent recommendations that notably shift the age range for who should be screened and how often.Medscape Gastroenterology (Source: Medscape Gastroenterology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Gastroenterology Headlines - March 20, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Gastroenterology Commentary Source Type: news

Mutation Status May Drive Sequential vs Combo Treatment in CRC Mutation Status May Drive Sequential vs Combo Treatment in CRC
David Kerr reviews a new study on sequential versus combination chemotherapy for advanced colorectal cancer, asking whether this study will change readers'practice.Medscape Oncology (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - March 20, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology Commentary Source Type: news

Why are CT colonography use rates trending downward?
Patient awareness and use of CT colonoscopy have continued to dwindle since...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Can CTC improve staging for high-risk colon cancer? Calcium scores on CT colonography predict cardiac events Study confirms low rate of incidental findings on CTC CT colonography finds more cancer in seniors Does colonoscopy top CTC for cancer screening? (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 20, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Precision oncology insights revealed for colorectal cancer
(UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center) Findings published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology could help define strategies to more effectively treat colorectal cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 19, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Statin Use Tied to Lower Colorectal-Cancer Risk After Negative Colonoscopy Statin Use Tied to Lower Colorectal-Cancer Risk After Negative Colonoscopy
Statin use is associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer between six and 36 months after an initial negative colonoscopy, according to a retrospective study.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - March 18, 2019 Category: Surgery Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

The story of GARP: a potential target for cancer immunotherapy
(Medical University of South Carolina) In an article published in the March issue of Cancer Research, researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina reveal how the cell surface receptor GARP plays a role in T regulatory cell function and migration to the gut. Because the presence of T regulatory cells in the gut is generally associated with negative outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer, GARP could have potential as a therapeutic target for patients with this type of cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 18, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

' Encouraging Activity' for Dual Anti-HER2 Tx in HER2+, KRAS Wild-Type MCRC (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- MyPathway data support use in heavily pretreated HER2-amplified metastatic colorectal cancer (Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology)
Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology - March 17, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: news

ASCO: Guidelines Released for Early Detection, Treatment of CRC
FRIDAY, March 15, 2019 -- Expert guidance has been provided on the early detection of colorectal cancer and on treatment and posttreatment follow-up; the two guidelines were recently published online in the Journal of Global Oncology. Gilberto... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - March 15, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Does Age at Diagnosis Impact Clinical and Molecular Features of Colorectal Cancer?
Research published in Cancer evaluated whether colorectal cancers diagnosed in early adulthood differ from those diagnosed at older ages. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - March 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Bryant Furlow Source Type: news

Go nuts with the cancer-protective properties of walnuts
(Natural News) Walnuts are one of the most popular nuts consumed because of their health benefits. These are packed with bioactive compounds such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), polyphenols, and dietary fiber. In addition, they can help cut your risk of developing colon cancer – making it a great addition to your diet. While walnuts... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Distinct Clinical Subgroups In Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer Distinct Clinical Subgroups In Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer
Patients 18 to 29 years of age and those with IBD are genetically unique and require special consideration, say researchers.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - March 13, 2019 Category: Pathology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Early-life exposure to microbiota restricts colon cancer later in life, study finds
(Georgia State University) Exposure to microbiota, or microorganisms such as bacteria, in the early stages of life plays a crucial role in establishing optimal conditions in the intestine that inhibit the development of colon cancer in adulthood, according to a study led by Georgia State University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 13, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mom discovers two weeks after giving birth that she has colorectal cancer
Lauren Riccotone, 37, from Middletown, Pennsylvania, was diagnosed with stage 3B colorectal cancer in January 2016, just a few weeks after she gave birth to her first child. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Reducing your risk of colon cancer recurrence
DEAR MAYO CLINIC:?Are there things that I can do to help prevent a recurrence of colon cancer? ANSWER:?The rate of colorectal cancer survival five years after initial diagnosis has been on the rise. But with survival comes a new risk -- that of recurrence. Colorectal cancer recurrence within five years after treatment ends is in [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - March 12, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

23andMe Has a New Type 2 Diabetes Risk Report. Here ’s What to Know
Consumer genetics company 23andMe is broadening its health portfolio with a new report on consumers’ genetic risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. More than 30 million Americans have diagnosed or undiagnosed diabetes, according to the most recent federal data. The vast majority of these people — up to 95% — have Type 2 diabetes, meaning their bodies do not use insulin properly. Both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are related to family history and genetics, but Type 2 is also strongly associated with obesity, as well as lifestyle factors such as diet and exercise. The new 23andMe report estimates a customer&rsq...
Source: TIME: Health - March 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

Distinct Etiology Found for Colorectal Cancer With Early Onset
MONDAY, March 11, 2019 -- Onset of colorectal cancer (CRC) in adults younger than 50 years is distinct from onset in patients aged 50 years or older, according to a study published online March 11 in Cancer. Alexandra N. Willauer, from the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - March 11, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Personal Health: Colon Cancer Screening Can Save Your Life
With colorectal cancer being found in an increasing number of younger adults, the pressure is on to screen millions more. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JANE E. BRODY Tags: Colon and Colorectal Cancer Tests (Medical) Health Insurance and Managed Care Colonoscopy Bowels Digestive Tract Source Type: news

Colorectal cancer in patients with early onset is distinct from that in older patients
(Wiley) New research indicates that colorectal cancer diagnosed at an early age has clinical and genetic features that are different from those seen in traditional colorectal cancer diagnosed later in life. Published early online in CANCER, the study also revealed certain unique features in especially young patients and those with predisposing conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 11, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Peanut Allergy Patch; FIT for Colon Cancer: It's PodMed Double T! (with audio)
(MedPage Today) -- This week's topics also include testing for breast cancer mutations and daily aspirin's bleeding risks (Source: MedPage Today Allergy)
Source: MedPage Today Allergy - March 10, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: news

Genomic Assessment of ctDNA in Colorectal Cancers Genomic Assessment of ctDNA in Colorectal Cancers
Research finds that circulating tumor DNA profiles in patients with colorectal cancer are heterogeneous and most have potentially actionable alterations.JCO Precision Oncology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Journal Article Source Type: news

Living With Cancer: Inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer -- understanding the connection
Inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer You may be worried about the connection between inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer. It's important to understand that inflammatory bowel disease, which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, doesn't necessarily lead to colon cancer. However, if you have Crohn's disease that affects the lower part of your large [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - March 8, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Risk of Postop Cognitive Dysfunction After Colorectal Surgery Risk of Postop Cognitive Dysfunction After Colorectal Surgery
This study aimed to identify risk factors for early postoperative cognitive dysfunction in elderly patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery.BMC Anesthesiology (Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - March 7, 2019 Category: Surgery Tags: Anesthesiology Journal Article Source Type: news

CRC in Young Adults: Misdiagnosed, so Advanced When Found CRC in Young Adults: Misdiagnosed, so Advanced When Found
Colorectal cancer (CRC) in young adults is often suspected to be something else, so when it is eventually found, it is already advanced, suggest survey results. But an expert disagrees.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - March 6, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

CRC in Young Adults: Misdiagnosed, Advanced When Found CRC in Young Adults: Misdiagnosed, Advanced When Found
Colorectal cancer (CRC) in young adults is often suspected to be something else, so when it is eventually found, it is already advanced, suggest survey results. But an expert disagrees.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - March 6, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Exercise and weight loss efforts significantly reduce risk of tumors
(Natural News) People who are obese and those who do not exercise are at an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer — one of the most common cancers worldwide. A recent study published in the American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism found that exercise is an essential factor in reducing the risk of developing this... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Exercise Might Slow Colon Cancer ’ s Advance
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - March 5, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncology, Sports Medicine, News, Source Type: news

New center addresses alarming increase in colorectal cancer rates among young adults
The Young-Onset Colorectal Cancer Center is among the first centers in the country dedicated to treating colon and rectal cancer patients under age 50 (Source: BWH News)
Source: BWH News - March 5, 2019 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

Exercise Might Slow Colon Cancer's Advance
TUESDAY, March 5, 2019 -- Exercise has countless benefits, even in small doses. And new research suggests the payoffs might extend to colon cancer patients. Short sessions of intense exercise may slow the growth of colon cancer, Australian... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 5, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Exercise Might Slow Colon Cancer's Advance
Title: Exercise Might Slow Colon Cancer's AdvanceCategory: Health NewsCreated: 3/5/2019 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 3/5/2019 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - March 5, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Exercise Might Slow Colon Cancer's Advance
(Source: Cancercompass News: Colorectal Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Colorectal Cancer - March 5, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Exercise Might Slow Colon Cancer's Advance
(Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer - March 5, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Tuesday Tips: Protect yourself from colorectal cancer
Early screening for colorectal cancer is crucial.?Get the facts about this common form of cancer. Watch:?How to protect yourself from colorectal cancer. Journalists: Broadcast-quality video (TRT 1:31) is in the downloads?at the end of the post. Please 'Courtesy: Mayo Clinic News Network.'? (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - March 5, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Medical News Today: How do oral bacteria make colorectal cancer more aggressive?
The common oral bacterium F. nucleatum hastens the aggressiveness of colorectal cancer by promoting the growth of cells that are already cancerous. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Colorectal Cancer Source Type: news

March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month
(Source: Karmanos Cancer Institute)
Source: Karmanos Cancer Institute - March 4, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Tooth decay may make colon cancer more aggressive
The findings by Columbia University add to the growing swell of research that show oral health may be linked to much, much more than just the look and smell of our teeth. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Good, the Bad, and the Indeterminate in CRC Screening The Good, the Bad, and the Indeterminate in CRC Screening
Colonoscopy vs sigmoidoscopy vs stool tests: Real evidence lacking, but opinions prevail in the battle to keep mortality rates from colorectal cancer (CRC) as low as possible.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - March 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

WVU researchers pursue blood test for colorectal cancer
(West Virginia University) Researchers at the West Virginia University Cancer Institute are evaluating a first-of-its-kind blood test for detecting colorectal cancer. Their findings may help propel the test toward inclusion in the US Preventive Services Task Force's recommendations for colorectal cancer screening. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 4, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How a common oral bacteria makes colon cancer more deadly
(Columbia University Irving Medical Center) Researchers have determined how a type of bacteria commonly found in the mouth accelerates the growth of colon cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 4, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Colitis and Crohn Disease: A True/False Test
True or False: Smoking causes IBD flares; peak IBD onset occurs in 3rd decade; UC affecting the rectum increases risk of colon cancer; plus 3 more. (Source: ConsultantLive)
Source: ConsultantLive - March 4, 2019 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Ted W. James, MD Tags: Gastrointestinal Disorders Source Type: news