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7 medtech stories we missed this week: Nov. 17, 2017
[Image from unsplash.com]From Skyline Medical’s joint venture to Lensar receiving FDA clearance and CE Mark, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Skyline Medical launches JV deal with Helomics Skyline Medical announced in a Nov. 15 press release that it has signed a joint venture agreement with Helomics. The agreement comes after a strategic collaboration between the companies that allows Skyline to reach more markets. The joint venture leverages the Helomics D-Chip platform to develop and market new approaches for personalized cancer diagnostics and care. 2.&...
Source: Mass Device - November 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: 510(k) Diagnostics Food & Drug Administration (FDA) mHealth (Mobile Health) Neurological Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Regenerative Medicine Regulatory/Compliance Research & Development Helomics InnerScope iReliev LensAR Inc. Source Type: news

University of Guelph professor identifies protein key to cancer cells ability to spread
(University of Guelph) U of G scientists have made a discovery that could reduce the spread of cancer by hindering a protein that binds cancer cells together and allows them to invade tissues.The groundbreaking study identified a protein, known as cadherin-22, as a potential factor in cancer metastasis, or spread, and showed that hindering it decreased the adhesion and invasion rate of breast and brain cancer cells by up to 90 percent. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 17, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study analyzes mutations in cerebrospinal fluid in lung cancer with brain metastases
(European Society for Medical Oncology) Researchers have explored the analysis of mutations in cerebrospinal fluid of lung cancer patients with brain metastases in a study presented at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress. Tumor tissue from brain metastasis is difficult to obtain and therefore less invasive methods are needed to identify and monitor the presence of known actionable mutations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 17, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Childhood Brain Cancer Astrocytoma
Childhood Brain Cancer: Astrocytoma (Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - November 16, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Brain cancer treatment previously featured on 60 Minutes now available to children
(Solving Kids' Cancer) A Phase 1 clinical trial leveraging the re-engineered polio virus is now open for enrollment to children 12 years and older at the Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center, Duke University Medical Center. After years of following the progress of this promising therapy against adult glioblastoma and working with the research team on behalf of children, Solving Kids' Cancer teamed up with The Andrew McDonough B+ Foundation to help move this forward in a trial for pediatric brain tumor patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 16, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists Have Made Their First Attempt at Gene Editing Inside a Human Patient
(OAKLAND, Calif.) — Scientists for the first time have tried editing a gene inside the body in a bold attempt to permanently change a person’s DNA to try to cure a disease. The experiment was done Monday in California on 44-year-old Brian Madeux. Through an IV, he received billions of copies of a corrective gene and a genetic tool to cut his DNA in a precise spot. “It’s kind of humbling” to be the first to test this, said Madeux, who has a metabolic disease called Hunter syndrome. “I’m willing to take that risk. Hopefully it will help me and other people.” Signs of whether i...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marilynn Marchione / AP Tags: Uncategorized gene editing Genetics health Innovation onetime overnight Research Source Type: news

SPM Conference
Discussions noted and collected will serve as the basis of a number of internal advocacy efforts. Let’s keep the conversation going on Connect! Our inaugural meeting was certified as Patients Included, a designation given to an event that meets all 5 of the Patients Included charter: Missed the event and couldn’t catch the live-stream? Loved the meeting so much you wish you could experience it all over again? We’ve got you covered! Here are speakers’ presentations from the inaugural Society for Participatory Medicine conference. Looking forward to our second annual meeting in 2018! Stay tuned for d...
Source: Society for Participatory Medicine - November 13, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Nanette Mattox Tags: Newsletter Source Type: news

SPM in Real Life: Fall ‘17
NEW MEMBERS: Fall ‘17 Brief bios/plugs for new members (extracted from the Introduce Yourself Connect Community) After returning to school to become an OR surgical tech, Mary Mack’s heart health declined, and she quickly learned to become a strong advocate for herself. Feeling that no one was into her participatory style, Mary believes a radical change in medical student education is necessary to change the culture of medicine. She is passionate about helping to make that change happen. Her other interests include playing the guitar and speaking Mandarin Chinese. Jim Skinner created the Smart Patient Academy a...
Source: Society for Participatory Medicine - November 13, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Nanette Mattox Tags: Newsletter Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Deadly brain tumors halted by blocking telomere protein
By blocking TRF1, a protein involved in the protection of telomeres, researchers were able to halt the growth of glioblastoma tumors in mice. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

The first effective therapy against glioblastoma by attacking telomeres
(Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncol ó gicas (CNIO)) Researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have shown that it is possible to block the growth of human and murine glioblastoma in mouse models by blocking the TRF1 protein; an essential component of the telomere-protective complex. The study, published in Cancer Cell, describes a new and promising way to combat this type of brain tumor by attacking its ability to regenerate and divide immortally. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 13, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Toxic proteins that cause Alzheimer's can develop in your liver and kidneys, then migrate to the brain like cancer, shocking new study finds
(Natural News) No one really knows what causes Alzheimer’s, but recent studies on the disease are promising. Researchers at the University of British Columbia in Canada have discovered that Alzheimer’s-causing proteins can be formed in the liver and the kidneys, and then transported to the brain through the blood. These toxic proteins, known as beta-amyloids,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

SECOND OPINION | Is religious belief hard-wired into the brain?
Scientists test the hypothesis that humans are born believers by following pilgrims on the famous Camino de Santiago in Spain. Also, remembering Canada's Dr. Elizabeth Stern, a scientist whose pioneering cancer research is still saving lives. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - November 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Drinking alcohol kills new brain cells in adults
A University of Texas study found alcohol is particularly damaging to the region where new brain cells are created to sustain brain function and prevent tumors. The effect was worse in women. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UCLA helps many to live long and prosper
In Westwood, more than 100 faculty experts from 25 departments have embarked on anall-encompassing push to cut the health and economic impacts of depression in half by the year 2050. The mammoth undertaking will rely on platforms developed by the new Institute for Precision Health, which will harness the power of big data and genomics to move toward individually tailored treatments and health-promotion strategies.On the same 419 acres of land, researchers across the spectrum, from the laboratory bench to the patient bedside, are ushering in a potentially game-changing approach to turning the body ’s immune defenses a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 9, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Zebra Medical Vision to host AI1 image analytics on Google Cloud
Israeli machine-learning radiology firm Zebra Medical Vision said it will be uploading its radiology algorithms to the Google (NSDQ:GOOG) Cloud as part of the AI1 automated imaging analytics tools offering it announced last month. The AI1 analytical platform includes a deep learning engine system that can detect various medical findings from image scans on its own, including the detection of liver, lung, cardiovascular and bone disease. The Israel-based company also said said it is planning to introduce new capabilities that would cover breast cancer, lung cancer, brain trauma, hypertension and oth...
Source: Mass Device - November 8, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Health Information Technology Imaging Zebra Medical Vision Source Type: news

Misregulated protein breakdown promotes leukemias and brain cancer
(German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ)) An enzyme that is responsible for the breakdown of specific amino acids in food plays a key role in the development of leukemias and brain cancer, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg have now reported in Nature. The researchers have hence discovered a surprising link between energy metabolism and the so-called epigenetic code. The authors think that blocking this enzyme is a promising possibility to combat cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 8, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Join my unique protocol to eliminate Syndrome Zero
Today I want to talk to you about how to beat the most urgent public health threat of our time — a condition I call Syndrome Zero. This condition is at the root of almost every chronic disease we face today — including obesity, heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s, arthritis, high blood pressure, metabolic syndrome, diabetes and even hip fractures. It already afflicts billions of people on the planet — and within a matter of decades, it will see nearly every man, woman and child in America suffer from at least one chronic disease. The good news is that this plague is stoppable. But here’s the pr...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - November 7, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Cathy Card Tags: Anti-Aging Alzheimer's arthritis Cancer diabetes heart disease high blood pressure hip fractures metabolic syndrome obesity Syndrome Zero Source Type: news

Public's poor knowledge of anatomy may hamper healthcare
(Lancaster University) Healthcare is being hampered because of the public's poor basic knowledge of anatomy. Middle-aged non-graduates scored better than young graduates in an anatomical quiz given to the public. The only organ which 100 percent of people answered correctly was the brain followed by the biceps muscle and the cornea. The organs which the public knew least about were the adrenal glands which less than 15 percent of people could identify. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 7, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Growing Up with a Psychotic Mother
I was ten when my mother had her first psychotic break. It was May. I was looking forward to lazy summer days at the pool, an art camp, a stack of Babysitters Club books, and daydreaming about my first crush, a boy with a splay of freckles and a mop of dark hair. Instead, I was forced to grow up too soon. This meant wearing deodorant and shaving my arm pits. It also meant seeing my mother in a state of complete psychosis, one in which she thought maybe she had killed the postman or the neighbor girl. “I didn’t. Mean. Tokillthepostman.” Her words were all wrong, strung together in a series of hiccups a...
Source: Psych Central - November 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Leslie A. Lindsay Tags: Bipolar Depression Essays Family General Personal Stories Psychology Bipolar Disorder delusions hallucinations Hospitalization involuntary hospitalization Manic Depression Manic Episode Psychosis psychotic mania Source Type: news

Mysterious cluster of a rare, deadly childhood brain tumor that has cropped up in one Mississippi town could be tied to Hurricane Katrina
(Natural News) A very rare form of a fatal childhood brain tumor has mysteriously cropped up in a small Mississippi community, afflicting at least three kids since 2009 and puzzling medical investigators who only now think they may have a link. As reported by the U.K.’s Daily Mail, Sophia Myers, 7, was the latest child diagnosed... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Science Saturday: Brain tumors hijack growth proteins
What makes some brain cancers so hard to treat? Researchers in the laboratory of Alfredo Qui?ones-Hinojosa, M.D., Chair of Neurologic Surgery on Mayo Clinic?s campus in Florida, looked at devastating brain tumors known as chordomas to understand why those tumors are capable of growing so aggressively. In a study published in Cell Reports, they found [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - November 4, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Fish with a side of plastic?
Our ancestors thrived on eating fish fresh from the ocean. After all, fish is a pure source of protein and healthy omega-3 fats. But our modern fish supply is vastly different than anything our ancestors ate. As our oceans have become more and more polluted, so has our seafood. In fact, the fish on your dinner plate today is likely loaded with plastic trash. Let me explain… Every year, billions of pounds of plastic waste pour into our oceans and rivers. I’m talking about things like grocery bags, drinking straws, water bottles and more. It’s now estimated that up to 51 trillion pieces of plastic c...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - November 3, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Health Nutrition dinner estrogen fat fish plastic testosterone thyroid function toxins weight Source Type: news

7 medtech stories we missed this week: Nov. 3, 2017
[Image from unsplash.com]From Hologic’s new product launch to CapsoVision gettting CE Mark approval, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Hologic launches new MyoSure device Hologic announced in a Nov. 1 press release that it has launched its MyoSure Manual Device in the U.S. The device is designed to help doctors resect and remove intrauterine tissue easily in an office setting if used with the MyoSure hysteroscope. 2. IntraFuse wins FDA clearance for FlexThread fibula pin IntraFuse has received FDA 510(k) clearance for its FlexThread Fibula Pin System, ...
Source: Mass Device - November 3, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: 510(k) Endoscopic / Arthroscopic Oncology Orthopedics Pain Management Regulatory/Compliance Surgical Ultrasound Women's Health brhmedical CapsoVision Helomics Hologic Inc. IntraFuse MedTech Sensus Healthcare LLC Skyline Med Source Type: news

Florida boy diagnosed with brain tumor after concussion
Logan Silva, seven, was diagnosed with medulloblastoma, a fast-growing brain tumor. After getting a concussion, the boy from Florida suffered extreme headaches which turned out to be a tumor. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Onalespib could be an effective treatment for glioblastoma, preclinical studies show
This study showed that the targeted drug onalespib reduced the expression of cell-survival proteins such as AKT and endothelial growth factor receptor in glioma cell lines and glioma stem cells from patient tumors. This, in turn, reduced the survival, proliferation, invasion and migration of the cells. In animal models of glioblastoma the agent crossed the blood-brain barrier and showed effectiveness as a single agent and greater effectiveness in combination with temozolomide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain tumour's 'addiction' to common amino acid could be its weakness
(Queen Mary University of London) Starving a childhood brain tumour of the amino acid glutamine could improve the effect of chemotherapy, according to an early study led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and funded by Children with Cancer UK and the Medical Research Council. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 1, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Doctors: When the Doctor ’ s Mother Has Cancer
I braced myself for what would come next: The beginning of every cancer story, when the seemingly innocent cough or dizziness takes a sinister turn. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: MIKKAEL A. SEKERES, M.D. Tags: Lung Cancer Tests (Medical) Brain Cancer Computerized Axial Tomography (CAT Scans) Leukemia Surgery and Surgeons Lymph Nodes and Lymphatic System Chemotherapy Radiation Source Type: news

Gene Therapy May Fight Brain Cancer's Return
Title: Gene Therapy May Fight Brain Cancer's ReturnCategory: Health NewsCreated: 10/27/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 10/30/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - October 30, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

What Causes Hypernatremia?
Discussion Hypernatremia is a serum sodium of> 150 mEq/L. Basic causes are too much sodium or too little free water. If body weight is normal or increased, there is an increase in total body sodium without an appropriate increase in total body water. Normally when the serum sodium is increased there is transient hypertonicity of the plasma which causes the thirst center to be stimulated and antidiuretic hormone (ADH) to be released. The thirst center tells the person to drink more water and ADH causes the kidney to retain free water. This normally will allow the plasma tonicity to go back to normal. Treatment is by tr...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - October 30, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Researchers use patients' DNA to inform treatment decisions
A recent study may provide new hope for patients with recurring glioblastoma, one of the most aggressive and deadliest forms of brain cancer. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Zebra Medical vision looks to offer AI-assisted imaging scans for $1
Israeli machine-learning radiology firm Zebra Medical Vision said today it plans to launch its AI1 automated imaging analytics tools to healthcare providers for approximately $1 per scan. The company said it has developed a deep learning engine platform that can detect various medical findings from image scans on its own, including the detection of liver, lung, cardiovascular and bone disease. Zebra Medical Vision said it is also planning to introduce new capabilities that would cover breast cancer, lung cancer, brain trauma, hypertension and other clinical areas. “With this new model, we hope to facilitate adop...
Source: Mass Device - October 27, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Imaging Zebra Medical Vision Source Type: news

Gene Therapy May Fight Brain Cancer's Return
A new form of gene therapy shows promise in battling recurrent brain cancer. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - October 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gene Therapy May Fight Brain Cancer ’ s Return
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - October 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncology, Research, News, Source Type: news

Cochrane is seeking an Associate Editor to work with its Review Networks
Post: Associate EditorLocation: FlexibleSpecifications:  Full time/part-time. Permanent contract, subject to 6-month probationary periodSalary: Up to £45,000 dependent on skills and experienceClosing date for applications:  30th November 2017 ContextCochrane is creating eight new Networks of Cochrane Review Groups (CRGs) responsible for the efficient and timely production of high quality systematic reviews that address the research questions that are most important to decision makers. The creation of these thematic Networksprovides an exciting opportunity for experts in the field to join Coch...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - October 27, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Gene Therapy May Fight Brain Cancer's Return
FRIDAY, Oct. 27, 2017 -- A new form of gene therapy shows promise in battling recurrent brain cancer. The phase 1 clinical trial included 56 patients with recurrent high-grade glioma brain cancer. Three years after the gene therapy treatment, more... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - October 27, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

An experimental model might shed new light on the development of brain cancer in children
(DZNE - German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases) Researchers of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) present in the journal Cancer Cell a novel laboratory model that replicates key hallmarks of pediatric high-grade glioma. Results might pave the way for a better understanding of processes, relevant for both cancer and neurodegeneration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cancer trial led by University of Minnesota Medical School's Dr. Clark Chen shows promise
(University of Minnesota Medical School) New data from a Phase I clinical trial led by Clark Chen, M.D., Ph.D., Lyle French Chair in Neurosurgery and Head of the University of Minnesota Medical School Department of Neurosurgery shows more than a quarter of patients with recurrent high-grade glioma, a form of brain cancer, were alive more than three years after treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

TGen-UCSF study uses genomics to make treatment calls for recurrent glioblastoma patients
(The Translational Genomics Research Institute) Several patients with recurring glioblastoma, a deadly brain cancer, survived for more than a year in a clinical trial believed to be the first to use comprehensive DNA and RNA sequencing of a patient's tumor to inform treatment for these patients in real-time. The study was led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), UC San Francisco (UCSF) and the Ivy Foundation Early Phase Clinical Trials Consortium. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Gene Therapy May Fight Brain Cancer's Return
(Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer - October 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Boston Start-Up Hopes To Revolutionize Online Check-Ups
BOSTON (CBS) – We’ve all done it — felt an ache or pain and jumped online to diagnosis ourselves.  Those internet answers can be scary and flat-out wrong. A Boston start-up now wants to change the way we give ourselves these online check-ups. “You’ll hear people say all the time ‘I put in cough and I got lung cancer. I put in headache and I had a brain tumor,’ ” said Andrew Le, describing the possible results someone might get when googling their own symptoms. Le is CEO of Boston-based BuoyHealth.com, a new website that wants to be your first online stop when you&rs...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - October 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

NovoCure rises on Q3 EPS, sales beat
Shares in Novocure (NSDQ:NVCR) are on the rise today after the medical device maker topped revenue and losses-per-share expectations on Wall Street with its 3rd quarter earnings results. The St. Helier, N.J.-based company posted losses of $11.5 million, or 13¢ per share, on sales of $50.1 million for the 3 months ended September 30, seeing losses on the bottom-line shrink 65.8% while sales grew 131.2% compared with the same period during the previous fiscal year. Losses per share for the quarter came in under the 17¢ consensus on Wall Street, while sales beat the $43.6 million expectations on The Street. &ld...
Source: Mass Device - October 26, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News MassDevice Earnings Roundup NovoCure Source Type: news

Brain tumors share common tricks to survive
(Cancer Research UK) Different types of brain tumors may use strikingly similar approaches to generate and use energy to survive in the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 25, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

First Patients in US Treated with Varian HyperArc High Definition Radiotherapy
Five patients treated at UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center PALO ALTO, Calif., Oct. 24, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Varian (NYSE: VAR) today announced five patients with brain cancer became the first patients in the US to be treated ... Devices, Oncology Varian Medical Systems, HyperArc, High Definition Radiotherapy, radiotherapy (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - October 24, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Wake Forest Baptist researchers to use $9.2M grant for new brain cancer treatments
Researchers will use the grant to develop treatments for glioblastoma, the same cancer Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) was recently diagnosed with. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 24, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jessica Seaman Source Type: news

Massachusetts boy dies of cancer 9 months after diagnosis
Devin Suau was a healthy six-year-old from Massachusetts when he fell off his snowboard in early February. A brain scan to check for concussion revealed an inoperable brain tumor. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight New funding available! The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region, is pleased to announce a new round of funding for health information outreach, health literacy initiatives, emergency preparedness partnerships and health sciences library projects. Applications will be due by COB on December 1. See a recent blog post from Executive Director, Kate Flewelling for details, or review our funding opportunities and start your application today! Apply Today! Health science librarians are invited to parti...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - October 20, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Living With Cancer: Treating brain tumors
Brain tumors: Diagnosis and treatment? Brain tumors can begin in your brain (primary brain tumors), or cancer can begin in other parts of your body and spread to your brain (secondary, or metastatic, brain tumors). Treatment options depend on the type, size and location of the tumor, as well as your overall health and preferences. [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - October 20, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Glioblastoma, brain tumour that took Gord Downie's life, tough to treat, doctors say
The passing of singer-songwriter Gord Downie also puts a spotlight on the need for more funding for research into the form of brain cancer that about 1,000 Canadians are diagnosed with every year. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - October 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Gord Downie used voice to 'shed a light' on aggressive brain cancer
The death of Gord Downie hits close to home for Winnipegger Jared Spier, whose partner Joanne Schiewe died from the same brain cancer that took the Tragically Hip frontman. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - October 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Manitoba Source Type: news

Gord Downie used voice to 'shed a light' on brain cancer, importance of reconciliation
The death of Gord Downie hits close to home for Winnipegger Jared Spier, whose partner, Joanne Schiewe, died from the same brain cancer that took the Tragically Hip frontman. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - October 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Manitoba Source Type: news