Can A Child Survive Brain Cancer
? (Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - January 20, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

HIV drugs correlate with lower brain volumes on MRI
One of the largest-ever neuroimaging studies of individuals with HIV used MRI...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: MRI brain map links early brain atrophy to HIV SPECT leads preclinical HIV research fMRI finds cognitive issues in HIV-positive patients CT screening of smokers with HIV finds few lung cancers CCTA shows that HIV patients have more noncalcified plaque (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 19, 2021 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

New approach emerges to better classify, treat brain tumors
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) A look at RNA tells us what our genes are telling our cells to do, and scientists say looking directly at the RNA of brain tumor cells appears to provide objective, efficient evidence to better classify a tumor and the most effective treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 19, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Toxoplasma Gondii Infection May Be Tied to Higher Risk of Brain Cancer Toxoplasma Gondii Infection May Be Tied to Higher Risk of Brain Cancer
Data from two prospective studies point to an association between Toxoplasma gondii infection and the risk of glioma in adults, suggesting that reducing exposure could provide an avenue to modify glioma risk, the researchers say.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - January 14, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Researchers link cellular transport pathway to aggressive brain cancer
(Rockefeller University Press) Researchers at McGill University have identified a new cellular pathway that limits the growth and spread of brain tumors by controlling the recycling of cell surface receptor proteins. The study, which will be published January 14 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), suggests that the pathway, which involves a protein called Rab35, is defective in many patients with glioblastoma and that restoring Rab35's activity could be a new therapeutic strategy for this deadly form of brain cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 14, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

PET/CT guidance offers valuable approach to lung biopsies
One optimum way to reduce inconclusive lung biopsy results and better detect...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: PET/CT with Ga-68 tracer better for cancer patients Dual-phase technique improves PET/CT brain tumor imaging PET/CT could be useful for diagnosing fever SNMMI 2020: PSMA-PET/CT changes prostate cancer management PET/CT confirms breast cancer predicted by blood markers (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 13, 2021 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Toxin in Undercooked Meat Shows Links to Rare Brain Tumors
Title: Toxin in Undercooked Meat Shows Links to Rare Brain TumorsCategory: Health NewsCreated: 1/12/2021 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 1/13/2021 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - January 13, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Recurrent GBM brain tumors with few mutations respond best to immunotherapy
(Duke University Medical Center) New insights from a team led by Duke's Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center provide potential answers about why immunotherapies have limited success against brain tumors. The team found that recurring glioblastoma tumors with very few mutations are far more vulnerable to immunotherapies than similar tumors with an abundance of mutations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Toxin in Undercooked Meat Shows Links to Rare Brain Tumors
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - January 13, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Infections, Oncology, News, Source Type: news

Janssen to Highlight Commitment to Lung Cancer Science and Innovation with Eight Data Presentations at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer ’s 2020 World Conference on Lung Cancer
January 12, 2021 (RARITAN, N.J.) – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson announced today that eight company-sponsored presentations, including two oral presentations, will be featured at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer’s (IASLC) 2020 World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) Singapore taking place virtually January 28-31, 2021. The presentations include updated data from the Phase 1 CHRYSALIS study (NCT02609776) evaluating amivantamab in patients with NSCLC and EGFR exon 20 insertion mutations and two studies that characterize the high unmet need and lack of stand...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - January 13, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Toxin in Undercooked Meat Shows Links to Rare Brain Tumors
TUESDAY, Jan. 12, 2021 -- A foodborne pathogen may be linked to a type of rare brain cancer in adults, a new study suggests. Researchers found that people who have glioma are more likely to have antibodies to toxoplasma gondii than a similar group... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 12, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Study identifies exposure to common food-borne pathogen linked to rare brain cancer
(American Cancer Society) A new study suggests a link between toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) infection and the risk of glioma, a type of brain cancer, in adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 11, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

One in five brain cancers fueled by overactive mitochondria
(Columbia University Irving Medical Center) A new study has found that up to 20% of aggressive brain cancers are fueled by overactive mitochondria and new drugs in development may be able to starve the cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 11, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Philadelphia biotech firm acquired for $78M by North Carolina company with eye on cancer treatment
The North Carolina biopharmaceutical firm is aiming to boost its pipeline of drugs designed to combat recurrent glioma – a form of brain cancer. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - January 8, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: Cameron Snipes Source Type: news

Durham biotech makes $78M deal for Philly firm to boost platform for cancer treatment
The Durham-based biopharmaceutical firm is aiming to boost its pipeline of drugs designed to combat recurrent glioma – a form of brain cancer. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - January 8, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Cameron Snipes Source Type: news

Durham biotech makes $78M deal for Philly firm to boost platform for cancer treatment
The Durham-based biopharmaceutical firm is aiming to boost its pipeline of drugs designed to combat recurrent glioma – a form of brain cancer. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 8, 2021 Category: American Health Authors: Cameron Snipes Source Type: news

Focused ultrasound shows promise for Parkinson's disease
(University of Virginia Health System) A scalpel-free alternative to brain surgery has the potential to benefit people with Parkinson's disease symptoms that are much more severe on one side of the body, new research suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 7, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New Clues to How Cancers Originate in the Brain
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 6, 2021 -- Researchers say a new study may offer hope for future patients with glioblastoma, an aggressive brain cancer. It's the brain tumor that killed Senators John McCain and Ted Kennedy. Investigators from the University of... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 6, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

New Clues Into How Cancers Originate in the Brain
Title: New Clues Into How Cancers Originate in the BrainCategory: Health NewsCreated: 1/6/2021 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 1/6/2021 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - January 6, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

uOttawa study shows that mindfulness can help ease the pain of breast cancer survivors
(University of Ottawa) A study led by University of Ottawa researchers provides empirical evidence that mindfulness has a significant impact on the brain of women suffering from neuropathic pain related to breast cancer treatment. The researchers showed that mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) helps modulate neuropathic pain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 6, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Link between dietary fiber and depression partially explained by gut-brain interactions
(The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)) Fiber is a commonly recommended part of a healthy diet. That's because it's good for your health in so many ways--from weight management to reducing the risk of diabetes, heart disease, and some types of cancer. A new study also finds that it might be linked with a reduced risk of depression, especially in premenopausal women. Study results are published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Anticoagulants reduce the number of brain metastases in mice
(German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ)) Brain metastases can only develop if cancer cells exit the capillaries and enter into the brain tissue. To facilitate this step, cancer cells influence blood clotting, as Heidelberg scientists have now been able to show in mice. The cancer cells actively promote the formation of clots, which helps them to arrest in the brain capillaries and then penetrate through the vessel wall. Drugs that inhibit thrombin were able to reduce the number of brain metastases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 5, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Brain cancer linked to tissue healing
(University of Toronto) Brain tumours might arise from an injury that could not heal properly, Canadian scientists have found. The researches detected an increase in inflammation markers typical of injury response in the cells that give rise to glioblastoma, the most common and aggressive form of brain cancer, indicating the cancer cells' potential role in tissue healing. The unexpected findings open new ideas about how brain tumours develop while suggesting that anti-inflammatory medications might benefit some glioblastoma patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 4, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Suicidality in patients with brain tumors: a brief literature review with clinical exemplar - Costanza A, Zenga F, Rud à R, Amerio A, Aguglia A, Serafini G, Amore M, Bondolfi G, Berardelli I, Nguyen KD.
In this study, we aimed to provide a brief literature review of epidemio... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

Advances in HER2+ MBC From SABCS 2020 Advances in HER2+ MBC From SABCS 2020
From SABCS 2020, Dr Harold Burstein reports on advances for patients with HER2+ metastatic breast cancer, including gains in progression-free survival in patients with brain metastases.Medscape (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - December 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: None ReCAP Source Type: news

Why Do We Dream? A New Theory on How It Protects Our Brains
When he was two years old, Ben stopped seeing out of his left eye. His mother took him to the doctor and soon discovered he had retinal cancer in both eyes. After chemotherapy and radiation failed, surgeons removed both his eyes. For Ben, vision was gone forever. But by the time he was seven years old, he had devised a technique for decoding the world around him: he clicked with his mouth and listened for the returning echoes. This method enabled Ben to determine the locations of open doorways, people, parked cars, garbage cans, and so on. He was echolocating: bouncing his sound waves off objects in the environment and cat...
Source: TIME: Science - December 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: David Eagleman and Don Vaughn Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Medtech with Duke ties raises millions to treat brain cancer using light
The company's CEO graduated from neurosurgical residency at Duke University Hospital. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 28, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Seth Thomas Gulledge Source Type: news

Medtech with Duke ties raises millions to treat brain cancer using light
The company's CEO graduated from neurosurgical residency at Duke University Hospital. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - December 28, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Seth Thomas Gulledge Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Latest News - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Operations - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

Molecular reporters expose the allies of the brain tumor
(Max Delbr ü ck Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association) Until recently, it was unclear how and why cancer cells adapt to their environment. A team led by Gaetano Gargiulo at MDC has now developed a technology that can be used to observe the molecular processes in living cells. The researchers present their results in the journal Cancer Discovery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 23, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Roche ’s faricimab meets primary endpoint and shows strong durability across two global phase III studies for diabetic macular edema, a leading cause of blindness
Basel, 21 December 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced positive topline results from two identically designed global phase III studies, YOSEMITE and RHINE, evaluating its investigational bispecific antibody, faricimab, in people living with diabetic macular edema (DME). Both studies met their primary endpoint and showed that faricimab given every eight weeks and at personalised dosing intervals of up to 16 weeks demonstrated non-inferior visual acuity gains compared to aflibercept given every eight weeks. Faricimab was generally well-tolerated, with no new safety signals identified. The studies each h...
Source: Roche Media News - December 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche ’s faricimab meets primary endpoint and shows strong durability across two global phase III studies for diabetic macular edema, a leading cause of blindness
Basel, 21 December 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced positive topline results from two identically designed global phase III studies, YOSEMITE and RHINE, evaluating its investigational bispecific antibody, faricimab, in people living with diabetic macular edema (DME). Both studies met their primary endpoint and showed that faricimab given every eight weeks and at personalised dosing intervals of up to 16 weeks demonstrated non-inferior visual acuity gains compared to aflibercept given every eight weeks. Faricimab was generally well-tolerated, with no new safety signals identified. The studies each h...
Source: Roche Investor Update - December 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q & amp;A podcast: Study finds unique form of immunosuppression caused by brain cancer
The latest direction in cancer treatment has been toward potential cancer vaccines and immunotherapies. As these therapies become standard, continued research is important to understand how the body interacts with these treatments. A recent Mayo Clinic study found a unique form of immunosuppression caused by brain cancer that could inhibit the effectiveness of cancer vaccines [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - December 19, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Clemson researcher identifies gene teams working in subregions of brain
(Clemson University) You must first understand how something works normally before you can figure out why it's broken. Clemson University researcher Yuqing " Iris " Hang has identified six mini gene co-expression networks for a normally functioning brain. That will allow researchers to test each of the gene teams to see if gene pairs are changing in brain tumors or people with intellectual disabilities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 16, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New insights into Glioblastoma invasiveness
(Luxembourg Institute of Health) Researchers from the NORLUX Neuro-Oncology Laboratory at the LIH Department of Oncology (DONC) explored the molecular mechanisms responsible for the ability of Glioblastoma (GBM) to infiltrate and spread to healthy brain tissue. They brought forward the novel role of protein ZFAND3 in promoting the transcription of several genes that stimulate the invasion of GBM cells in the surrounding parenchyma. The findings, which carry significant implications for the development of novel therapeutic strategies against GBM, were published in the international journal Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 11, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New guidelines for treating the complications of brain tumours
(Medical University of Vienna) Experts from the leading oncology societies ESMO (European Society for Medical Oncology) and EANO (European Association of Neuro-Oncology) hav now compiled international guidelines and standards for the treatment of complications of brain tumours (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 9, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers discover key driver of the spread of cancer to the brain
(Virginia Commonwealth University) Approximately 200,000 cancer patients are diagnosed with brain metastases each year, yet few treatment options exist because the mechanisms that allow cancer to spread to the brain remain unclear. However, a study recently published in the journal Cancer Cell by VCU Massey Cancer Center scientist Suyun Huang, M.D., Ph.D., offers hope for the development of future therapies by showing how a poorly understood gene known as YTHDF3 plays a significant role in the process. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 8, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How to live longer: Golden milk improves brain and heart health to boost longevity
HOW TO live longer: A delicious drink which can be made at home is said to have an array of health benefits including a reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease, certain cancers, heart disease and type 2 diabetes, making it a no-brainer for anyone wanting to live a long and healthy life. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

White blood cells may cause tumor cell death -- but that's not good news
(Penn State) White blood cells are part of many immune system responses in the human body. New research shows that a specific type of those cells may cause brain cancer tissues to die -- but that's not good news, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. They said that higher amounts of this tissue death have been associated with poor survival in patients with aggressive glioblastomas, a deadly type of brain cancer that is common in adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 7, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

UCLA receives $7.3 million grant to build state-of-the-art facility for developing gene, cell therapies
UCLA has received a $7.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to build a state-of-the-art facility in which to produce gene and cell therapies aimed at treating a host of illnesses and conditions.The new 13,000-square-foot facility, to be constructed in UCLA ’s Center for the Health Sciences, will provide a highly regulated environment with features such as systems to manage air flow and filtering, laboratory spaces and bioreactors. The new facility is expected to be ready for use in 2023.“This grant provides critical funds to build a facility that will enable the development of a new generation...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 4, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Injured Patriots Running Back Rex Burkhead Undergoes Successful Surgery
BOSTON (CBS) — Rex Burkhead is in good spirits after undergoing surgery on Tuesday. The Patriots running back provided a quick update on his Instagram account on Thursday morning, saying he’s already on the road to recovery. Burkhead is done for the season after tearing his ACL against the Houston Texans two weeks ago. He was sporting a giant brace on his right leg — and a huge smile — in his Instagram post Thursday. “Successful surgery Tuesday and on the road to recovery now!” his post read. “Rockin my @teamjackfoundation ‘Twice The Fight’ shirt for the Hoffman family!...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CBS Boston Tags: NFL Patriots Sports Syndicated Sports Uncategorized New England Patriots Rex Burkhead Sports News Source Type: news

Consumer Health: What are olfactory hallucinations?
Hallucinations are sensory perceptions of things that are not present. These perceptions may be sights, sounds, smells or sensations on the skin. Causes of hallucinations include head injury, Parkinson's disease, Lewy body dementia, a brain tumor, schizoaffective disorder, temporal lobe seizure and a medication side effect. With phantosmia, or olfactory hallucinations, a person detects smells [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - December 3, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Drug reverses age-related cognitive   decline within days
(University of California - San Francisco) Just a few doses of an experimental drug can reverse age-related declines in memory and mental flexibility in mice, according to a new study by UC San Francisco scientists. The drug, called ISRIB, has already been shown in laboratory studies to restore memory function months after   traumatic brain injury (TBI), reverse cognitive impairments in   Down Syndrome, prevent   noise-related hearing loss, fight   certain types of prostate cancer, and even   enhance cognition   in healthy animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Monthly News Roundup - November 2020
Danyelza Gains Accelerated Approval to Treat Neuroblastoma Neuroblastoma is a solid tumor of childhood that occurs in the nervous system outside of the brain. Some tumors are easily treatable, but the majority are aggressive in nature. In... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - November 30, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news