FDA to review Blue Earth's Axumin for brain cancer
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted molecular imaging...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Blue Earth study reports Axumin can aid glioma diagnosis Blue Earth promotes results for PET/CT agent Blue Earth expands PSMA-PET/CT imaging portfolio Blue Earth touts addition of Axumin to NCCN guidelines Blue Earth highlights Axumin clinical results at ASTRO (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - December 11, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Advanced MRI better option for brain tumor recurrence
Is PET or MRI better for detecting tumor recurrence in patients with brain...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: DWI-MRI may be best for indeterminate lung nodules How effective is PET/MRI for rectal cancer? MRI shows promise for lung cancer screening Can whole-body MRI be used in oncologic staging? (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - December 11, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Sprayable gel developed by UCLA-led team could help the body fight off cancer after surgery
Many people who are diagnosed with cancer will undergo some type of surgery to treat their disease — almost 95 percent of people with early-diagnosed breast cancer will require surgery and it’s often the first line of treatment for people with brain tumors, for example. But despite improvements in surgical techniques over the past decade, the cancer often comes back after the procedure.Now, a UCLA-led research team has developed a spray gel embedded with immune-boosting drugs that could help. In a peer-reviewed study, the substance was successful half of the time in awakening lab animals ’ immune systems ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 10, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How does cancer spread?
(McGill University Health Centre) How does cancer spread? While studying human brain tumour cells, a team of scientists at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) found some answers to this crucial, yet so far unanswered question. They looked at a gene called EGFRvIII, which is present in patients with glioblastoma -- a highly aggressive form of brain cancer that spreads quickly and that is difficult to treat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 10, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Some brain tumors may respond to immunotherapy, new study suggests
(Columbia University Irving Medical Center) A new study suggests that a slow-growing brain tumor arising in patients affected by neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) may be vulnerable to immunotherapy, which gives the immune system a boost in fighting cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Is it possible to reverse 'chemo brain?'
'Chemo brain' affects many people who have undergone cancer treatment. What happens in the brain, and how can we reverse this effect? (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists Discover A Probable Cause Of'Chemo Brain' And It May Be Treatable
Cancer survivors often report experiencing'chemo brain,'sometimes for many years after treatment ends. Now scientists at Stanford might have figured out why it happens and what to do about it. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - December 7, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Victoria Forster, Contributor Source Type: news

'Don't come back and don't bring any friends!' Cancer patient waves goodbye to his brain tumour
James Hinnigan, 39, of Wigan, Greater Manchester, underwent pioneering surgery to remove his stage two glioma while taking part in a clinical trial at Charing Cross Hospital in 2016. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Chemo brain' caused by malfunction in three types of brain cells, Stanford study finds
(Stanford Medicine) In a new study explaining the cellular mechanisms behind cognitive impairment from chemotherapy, scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have demonstrated that a widely used chemotherapy drug, methotrexate, causes a complex set of problems in three major cell types within the brain's white matter. The study, which will be published online Dec. 6 in Cell, also identifies a potential remedy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The First Baby Has Been Born After a Uterus Transplant From a Deceased Donor
The world’s first baby born by a uterus transplant from a deceased donor is healthy and nearing her first birthday, according to a new case study published Tuesday in the Lancet. Uterus transplants have become more common in recent years, resulting in 11 live births around the world. But all of the other successful deliveries so far have been made possible by living donors — often women who opt to donate their uterus to a close friend or family member without one. The birth resulting from the case detailed in the Lancet, which took place at Brazil’s Hospital das Clínicas last December, is both the first...
Source: TIME: Health - December 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized fertility healthytime Source Type: news

Synaptive recalls versions of BrightMatter Guide
3D visualization firm Synaptive Medical has recalled three versions of its...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Synaptive signs Henry Ford Health System Synaptive, Colorado State team on brain tumor research Synaptive brings BrightMatter to Okla. Synaptive brings BrightMatter to Long Island Synaptive delivers BrightMatter system to Canadian client (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - December 3, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Expediting 3D Analysis of Normal and Diseased Tissues
The current gold standard for tissue analysis, formalin fixation paraffin embedding (FFPE) followed by 2D thin sectioning, has been around for more than a century. And like any 100-year-old technology, it has key limitations.. So, ClearLight Biotechnologies is on a mission to significantly improve the field by automating nondestructive processing of tissue in 3D as a means to initially facilitate preclinical and clinical research applications. Laurie Goodman, PhD, CEO and board manager of ClearLight Biotechnologies, explained the process in an interview with MD+DI. ClearLight’s fou...
Source: MDDI - November 30, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Susan Shepard Tags: Imaging Source Type: news

Liquid Biopsy Can Assess Tx Response of Peds Brain Tumors
Study is the first to document the utility of liquid biopsy in a pediatric brain tumor population (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - November 29, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Neurology, Oncology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Journal, Source Type: news

Liquid Biopsy Can Assess Tx Response of Peds Brain Tumors
THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 -- A liquid biopsy using blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can effectively quantify changes in mutation levels among pediatric patients being treated for diffuse midline gliomas (DMGs), according to a study recently... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - November 29, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

UA team uncovers promising lead in genetic approach to treating glioblastoma
(University of Arizona Health Sciences) University of Arizona scientists hope they have made progress toward a next-generation drug that may slow tumor growth and boost radiation's effectiveness in patients with the deadly brain cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 29, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Hopkins Nursing Dean on Nurses in Policy
body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100% !important; margin:0; padding:0; width:100% !important; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } img,a img{ border:0; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ margin:0; padding:0; } p{ margin:1em 0; padding:0; } a{ word-wrap:break-word; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font,.ExternalClass td,.ExternalClass div{ line-height:100%; } table,td{...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - November 29, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

UCLA research suggests widely used breast cancer therapy doesn ’t cause cognitive decline
UCLA researchers have found that commonly used hormone therapies for women diagnosed with breast cancer do not appear to cause significant cognitive dysfunction following the treatment.Endocrine therapy has become an essential part of treatment for the many women diagnosed with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer, in which hormones, such as estrogen, promote cancer growth. The endocrine treatment helps lower the recurrence and reduce the risk of death from breast cancer by interfering with how a woman ’s own hormones can continue to support the growth of dormant cancer cells. Yet, there has been limited evidence ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 28, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Brain tumor patient, 5, astonishes doctors by walking and talking
Rebecca Roper, five, from Enid, Oklahoma, was diagnosed with a tumor known as a glioma on her brainstem in summer 2017. Doctors were unsure if she would ever walk again. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Do cancer treatments accelerate brain aging?
A new study finds connections between key markers of biological aging and signs of cognitive decline years after the completion of breast cancer treatment. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Breast Cancer Source Type: news

Albany Med researcher working on new brain tumor treatment with $3.5 million national grant
The treatment is an alternative to open surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. It would cause minimal side effects and minimal damage to surrounding healthy tissue. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - November 21, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Liz Young Source Type: news

Nico raises $13m Series B for neurosurgery devices
Nico Corp. said today that it raised nearly $13 million in a Series B round from a group of existing backers for its line of neurosurgery devices. Indianapolis-based Nico said the $12.5 million round is earmarked for new product development and commercialization, clinical and economic studies, growing its sales and clinical teams, and expanding its footprint in Europe. “Our shareholders have again confirmed their commitment and confidence in the value and outcomes of Nico technologies and our ability to both grow and create new markets in neurosurgery,” president & CEO Jim Pearson said in prepared rema...
Source: Mass Device - November 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Featured Funding Roundup Neurological Surgical Wall Street Beat Nico Corp. Source Type: news

New drug discovery could halt spread of brain cancer
(Virginia Tech) A team of researchers at Virginia Tech may have found a solution to stopping the spread of glioblastoma with a new drug and cancer treatment method. This work is part of a five-year research grant project across multiple universities, examining the role of interstitial fluid flow in spreading glioma cells through the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists Discover A Way To Get Drugs To The Brain Faster And More Efficiently
A newly discovered way to get drugs into the brain could significantly change how we treat Alzheimer ’s, Parkinson’s, ALS and brain cancer. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - November 18, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Robin Seaton Jefferson, Contributor Source Type: news

UCLA cell study reveals how head injuries lead to serious brain diseases
UCLA biologists have discovered how head injuries adversely affect individual cells and genes  that can lead to serious brain disorders. The life scientists provide the first cell “atlas” of the hippocampus — the part of the brain that helps regulate learning and memory — when it is affected by traumatic brain injury. The team also proposes gene candidates for treating brain disease s associated with traumatic brain injury, such as Alzheimer’s disease and post-traumatic stress disorder.The researchers studied more than 6,000 cells in 15 hippocampal cell types — the first study of in...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Role of Temozolomide in the Treatment of Cancers Involving the Central Nervous System
In this article, we review the role of temozolomide in the management of patients with primary brain tumors, brain metastases, leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, and other selected CNS cancers. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - November 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Karisa C. Schreck, MD, PhD, Stuart A. Grossman, MD Source Type: news

3D-printed lungs improve patient understanding of surgery
Using transparent, flexible 3D-printed models of the lung helped physicians...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: 3D head models reduce workload for brain radiotherapy 3D printing enhances training for cleft lip repair 3D printing boosts efficiency of rib fracture repair Virtual reality, 3D printing resolve obscure lung cancer 3D-printed device aids knee replacement surgery (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - November 15, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

When Melanoma spreads to the brain, patients with BRAF or MEK mutations can find novel treatment
(University of Arizona Health Sciences) Its ample sun puts residents at risk for melanoma, but Arizona is also home to experimental treatments through early-phase clinical trials at the University of Arizona Cancer Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cancer: Brain tumours often go unnoticed - five early symptoms you must be aware of
CANCER: Brain tumours can be deadly, but many people don ’t notice they have one for a long period of time, by which point it may be to late to treat it. These are five early symptoms of a brain tumour you must be aware of. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - November 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: Radiation causes cognition damage in brain cancer patients
Radiation seems to specifically injure the brain region involved in learning and forming new memories. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - November 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Electrophysiological measure of impaired information processing in drivers with hematological malignancy - Anderson DE, Bhatt VR, Schmid K, Lunning M, Holstein SA, Rizzo M.
The broad goal of this study is to measure remote effects of cancer on brain physiology and behaviors that underpin instrumental activities of daily living such as automobile driving. Studies of hematological malignancies (HM) have demonstrated impairments... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news

Mayo Foundation Journalist Residency: Application Deadline December 11
In this five-day fellowship program sponsored by the Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, journalists will receive a behind-the-scenes, in-depth look at what?s new and what?s next in several medical specialties. Topics will include aging, cancer, brain injuries and diseases, transplant medicine, vaccines and developing technologies such as regenerative medicine, telemedicine and simulation-based medical [...] (Source: Mayo Clinic Florida News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Florida News - November 14, 2018 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

Cognitive decline -- radiation -- brain tumor prevented by temporarily shutting down immune response
(University of California - San Francisco) In a new study published Nov. 13 in the journal eLife, UC San Francisco scientists report the first animal model of glioma -- the most aggressive and most common form of brain cancer in the US -- that can also be used to study the long-term effects of radiation therapy in tumor-bearing brains. Using this mouse model, the researchers showed that a drug that temporarily suppresses a key component of the brain's immune system can prevent radiation-associated cognitive decline. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

WPI and Albany Medical College developing robotic system to treat brain tumors
(Worcester Polytechnic Institute) Researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and Albany Medical College, along with corporate partners GE Global Research and Acoustic MedSystems, have received a five-year, $3.5 million award from the National Institutes of Health through the National Cancer Institutes' Academic-Industrial Partnership program, to continue development of an innovative robotic system that, operating within an MRI scanner, can deliver a minimally invasive probe into the brain to destroy metastatic brain tumors with high-intensity therapeutic ultrasound under real-time guidance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 13, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Surprising Research on Cannabis
Much of what we think we know about cannabis may soon change as a result of new research that uncovers some surprising facts. Indeed, the topic, which can be emotionally charged, is the focus of intense scientific study. Is cannabis good for you? Is it addictive? What long-term harms can use cause? The answers to these questions are multi-layered and not always clear-cut, which is why cannabis research continues with even more urgency. FACTS ON CANNABIS ADDICTION AND DEPENDENCE Current estimates are that one in 10 cannabis users will develop cannabis addiction or dependence. The potency of the delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol ...
Source: Psych Central - November 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Addictions Habits Healthy Living Memory and Perception Miscellaneous Drugs Neuroscience Substance Abuse Source Type: news

An Impatient Truth
15 years ago, I introduced the concept of patient centricity at our first ‘Patient Summits’ in London and Philadelphia. At the time, the idea was somewhat alien; pharmaceutical executives were more interested in patient compliance, the science of getting patients to take their medicine as instructed, and driving sales through repeat prescriptions.The existing language of the day was aggressive. It was all about ‘capturing’ market share and ‘dominating’ the minds of customers. I’ll never forget being berated by one delegate because a conference talk had deviated from the agenda &nda...
Source: EyeForPharma - November 9, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Paul Simms Source Type: news

Should You Take Aspirin Every Day? Here ’s What the Science Says
Aspirin is best known as an over-the-counter painkiller. But acetylsalicylic acid, as it’s called chemically, has many other health benefits, as well as side effects, in the body that have only become clear in recent years. Here’s what the latest science says about the health benefits and side effects of aspirin, as well as which conditions it may treat and those it doesn’t appear to improve. (If you are taking aspirin for any reason other than for periodic pain relief, it’s best to consult with your doctor to confirm whether the benefits outweigh the risks in your particular case.) How aspirin affe...
Source: TIME: Health - November 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthytime Source Type: news

Identifying Low-Risk Medulloblastoma to De-escalate Therapy Identifying Low-Risk Medulloblastoma to De-escalate Therapy
Children with brain tumors that have a low-risk chromosomal signature could eventually be given lower-intensity treatment, suggests a new analysis.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

3D head models reduce workload for brain radiotherapy
3D-printed models of human heads may remove the need for brain cancer patients...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: 3D printing enhances training for cleft lip repair 3D printing boosts efficiency of rib fracture repair Virtual reality, 3D printing resolve obscure lung cancer 3D-printed device aids knee replacement surgery 3D-printed hips may improve complex fracture diagnosis (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - November 8, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

The Bigger the Brain, the Bigger the Tumor Risk?
Title: The Bigger the Brain, the Bigger the Tumor Risk?Category: Health NewsCreated: 11/6/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 11/7/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - November 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Tiny molecule has big effect in childhood brain tumor studies
(University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio) A very small molecule under study at UT Health San Antonio is able to kill a childhood brain cancer, and the lead researcher said it may be possible to reduce by 90 percent the amount of chemotherapy and radiation required to kill such tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The Bigger the Brain, the Bigger the Tumor Risk?
(Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer - November 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The Bigger the Brain, the Bigger the Tumor Risk?
It's a matter of math: A large brain means more brain cells, and more cells means more cell divisions that can go wrong and cause mutations that trigger cancer, authors of a new study explain. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - November 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: Proton therapy better than radiation for children's brain tumors
Children with brain tumors had better neurocognitive outcomes with proton therapy treatment compared with X-ray radiation therapy, according to a new study. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - November 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fluorescence Can ID High - Grade Glioma During Sx for Brain Tumor
Visible fluorescence shows presence of high - grade glioma cells within tumor mass during surgery (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - November 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Neurology, Oncology, Pathology, Radiology, Surgery, Conference News, Source Type: news

The Bigger the Brain, the Bigger the Tumor Risk?
TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 -- The bigger your brain, the greater your risk for a deadly brain cancer, new research from Norway suggests. It's a matter of math: A large brain means more brain cells, and more cells means more cell divisions that can go... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Fluorescence Can ID High-Grade Glioma During Sx for Brain Tumor
TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 -- The presence of visible fluorescence can serve as an intraoperative diagnostic surgical biomarker of high-grade glioma within a brain tumor, according to a study presented at the 2018 National Cancer Research Institute... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - November 6, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Proton therapy works well for pediatric brain tumors
Children with brain tumors who were treated with proton therapy had better...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Success of proton therapy may depend on who pays for it (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - November 6, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Study shows potential to develop brain tumor liquid biopsies
(Cancer Research UK) Scientists are making strides in developing liquid biopsies for brain tumors by detecting tumor DNA in the fluid from around the brain and spine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Brain-derived compounds show surprising -- and beneficial -- results for cancer in lab studies
(Veterans Affairs Research Communications) In a Veterans Affairs study, a manmade compound based on a brain hormone spurred the growth of cancer in Petri dishes but enigmatically had the opposite effect in mice. The compound and others like it are being looked at not only for their effect on cancer, but for their ability to regrow healthy tissue to heal damaged hearts and other organs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Fluorescent marker can help guide surgeons to remove dangerous brain tumour cells more accurately
A chemical that highlights tumour cells has been used by surgeons to help spot and safely remove brain cancer in a trial presented by a University of Bristol academic at the 2018 NCRI Cancer Conference. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - November 5, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, International, Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, Faculty of Health Sciences, Translational Health Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news