Woman, 21, is diagnosed with a brain tumour the size of a SATSUMA after a roller coaster ride
Molly White, from Paignton in Devon, discovered she had astrocytoma brain cancer after riding on the Colossus roller coaster at Thorpe Park in 2016. She has since had two operations to treat it. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Anti-inflammatory drug halts strokes in children with rare disease
NIH researchers have identified a treatment that significantly decreases the risk of stroke in children with a rare genetic disease called DADA2 (deficiency of adenosine deaminase type 2), which can ultimately hinder blood flow to the brain and result in strokes. The treatment works by blocking the inflammatory effects of a protein - tumor necrosis factor - that is over-produced in people with DADA2 and other autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. Researchers published their findings in the April 18, 2019, issue ofThe New England Journal of Medicine. (Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights)
Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights - April 17, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: news

10 Biggest Myths About Sleeping, According To Researchers
(CNN) — Hey, sleepyheads. What you believe about sleep may be nothing but a pipe dream. Many of us have notions about sleep that have little basis in fact and may even be harmful to our health, according to researchers at NYU Langone Health’s School of Medicine, who conducted a study published Tuesday in the journal Sleep Health. “There’s such a link between good sleep and our waking success,” said lead study investigator Rebecca Robbins, a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone Health. “And yet we often find ourselves debunking myths, whether ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch News CNN Sleep Source Type: news

Scientists 'reverse engineer' brain cancer cells to find new targets for treatment
(University of Toronto - Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy) Glioblastoma is one of the most devastating forms of cancer, with few existing treatment options. It is also a leading cause of cancer-related death in children and young adults. Scientists have 'reverse engineered' brain cancer stem cells gene by gene, uncovering multiple potential targets for this hard-to-treat cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 16, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Summit empowers women to take charge of their brain health
UCLA alumna  and singer-songwriter Sara Bareilles blew the roof off a packed ballroom with her powerful performance of her anthem, “Brave,” setting the tone for a day of self-discovery and conversation about mental health at the Wonder of Women Summit on April 11.Johnese Spisso, president of UCLA Health, welcomed 500 attendees to the star-studded occasion, which melded the cream of Hollywood celebrities with UCLA trailblazers in fields ranging from medicine to athletics.Emceed by actress Lisa Kudrow, the event was hosted by UCLA ’s Friends of the Semel Institute and Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 15, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Rutgers researchers discover crucial link between brain and gut stem cells
(Rutgers University) Researchers at Rutgers University have identified a new factor that is essential for maintaining the stem cells in the brain and gut and whose loss may contribute to anxiety and cognitive disorders and to gastrointestinal diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How Common Are Brain Tumors Seen in Spasmus Nutans?
Discussion Nystagmus is periodic eye movement that is involuntary where there is a slow drift of fixation. The slow drift can be followed by a fast saccade back to fixation. The pathological movement is the slow phase, but nystagmus is described by the fast phase (i.e. horizontal nystagmus, vertical nystagmus). Spasmus nutans (SN) is a movement disorder that is rare. The classic triad includes nystagmus, head bobbing or titubation, and torticollis, with these problems being in the absence of any ophthalmological or neurological condition. Onset is in the first year of life but ranges from 6-36 months. Time to resolution ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - April 15, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

How Commonly Are Brain Tumors Seen in Spasmus Nutans?
Discussion Nystagmus is periodic eye movement that is involuntary where there is a slow drift of fixation. The slow drift can be followed by a fast saccade back to fixation. The pathological movement is the slow phase, but nystagmus is described by the fast phase (i.e. horizontal nystagmus, vertical nystagmus). Spasmus nutans (SN) is a movement disorder that is rare. The classic triad includes nystagmus, head bobbing or titubation, and torticollis, with these problems being in the absence of any ophthalmological or neurological condition. Onset is in the first year of life but ranges from 6-36 months. Time to resolution ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - April 15, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Maria Menounos describes devastating brain tumor diagnosis as mother was also battling cancer
Maria Menounos, 40, revealed in an interview with Fox News Radio that she was experiencing symptoms related to her brain tumor, but brushed them aside because she was 'busy'. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists believe they could DOUBLE survival time for pediatric brain cancer
A new study from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center has found that blocking a gene that helps glioblastoma grow and spread may increase survival time. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bright spot analysis for photodynamic diagnosis of brain tumors using confocal microscopy
(Kanazawa University) A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University have found that bright spot areas have generally lower fluorescence in brain tumors than in normal tissues in images captured by irradiation with a 405 nm wavelength laser and 544.5-619.5 nm band-pass filter. This may facilitate discrimination of glioblastoma with or without 5-aminolevulinic acid fluorescence and could be applicable to other tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Shutting down deadly pediatric brain cancer at its earliest moments
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) Cell-by-cell genetic analyses of developing brain tissues in neonatal mice and laboratory models of brain cancer allowed scientists to discover a molecular driver of the highly aggressive, deadly, and treatment-resistant brain cancer, glioblastoma. Published in Cell Stem Cell, the findings present an opportunity to find out if new therapeutic approaches can stop glioblastoma at its earliest stages of initial formation or recurrence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 11, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Releasing an immune system brake could help patients with rare but fatal brain infection
(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) The anti-cancer drug pembrolizumab has shown promise in slowing or stopping the progression of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a typically fatal infection of the brain caused by the JC virus (JCV). This finding comes from a small-scale study by scientists at National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health. The study appears in the New England Journal of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 10, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Compound in evodia shown to penetrate blood-brain barrier, could hold potential for treating glioblastoma
(Natural News) A study from Taipei Medical University in Taiwan revealed that evodiamine, a biological compound found in Evodia rutaecarpa, has potential therapeutic properties against glioblastoma. In their research, which appeared in The American Journal of Chinese Medicine, the researchers tested the anti-cancer properties of evodiamine in vivo and in vitro. Studies have identified some of the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cell phone tower shut down at elementary school after eight kids are diagnosed with cancer
The affected students at Weston Elementary School in Rippon are all under that age of 10, each with different types of cancer including brain and kidney. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists inject virus into kid's brains in a desperate attempt shrink 100% fatal tumors 
Abbie Mifsud died of DIPG, a 100% fatal brain cancer at just six, in 2011. Scores of trials are trying everything to treat the incurable disease, but Abbie's mother, Amanda remains wary. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Non-surviving patients with severe traumatic brain injury have maintained high serum sCD40L levels - Lorente L, Mart ín MM, González-Rivero AF, Ramos L, Argueso M, Cáceres JJ, Solé-Violán J, Jiménez A, Borreguero-León JM, García-Marín V.
BACKGROUND: Soluble cluster of differentiation 40 ligand (sCD40L) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor family with proinflamatory and procoagulant effects. A previous study found higher serum sCD40L levels at day 1 of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in no... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

AI Used to Assess Treatment Response for Brain Tumors
Researchers from Heidelberg University Hospital and the German Cancer Research Centre have developed a new method for the automated image analysis of brain tumors. In their recent publication, the authors show that machine learning methods carefully trained on standard MRI are more reliable and precise than established radiological methods in the treatment of brain tumors. Thus, they make a valuable contribution to the individualized treatment of tumors. In addition, the validated method is an important first step towards the automated high-throughput analysis of medical image data of brain tumors. One of the essential cri...
Source: MDDI - April 4, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MDDI Staff Tags: Imaging Source Type: news

New hope for treating childhood brain cancer
(Rockefeller University) Recent research has shown that a drug known as MI-2 can kill cells that cause a fatal brain cancer. But only now have scientists been able to explain how the compound works: by targeting cholesterol production in tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Wife of Detroit Lions quarterback Matthew Stafford reveals she has a brain tumor and needs surgery
Kelly Stafford, 29, wife of Detroit Lions quarterback Matthew Stafford, revealed she was diagnosed with an acoustic neuroma, a benign tumor that forms on a nerve leading from the inner ear to the brain. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Report: Researchers create CT, MRI image-altering malware to expose vulnerabilities
A group of researchers have created a malware program designed to exploit vulnerabilities in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging equipment to add realistic, malignant-seeming growths to scans in a bid to draw attention to vulnerabilities in medical equipment networks, according to a Washington Post report. Researchers Yisroel Mirsky, Yuval Elovici and two others at the University Cyber Security Research Center in Israel created the malware program for use in a blinded study involving real CT scans, according to the report. A total of 70 images were altered by the malware and were able to fool three skilled r...
Source: Mass Device - April 3, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Featured Imaging Software / IT Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence helps to better assess treatment response of brain tumors
(German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ)) A team from Heidelberg University Hospital and the German Cancer Research Centre has developed a new method for the automated image analysis of brain tumors. The authors show that machine learning methods carefully trained on standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more reliable and precise than established radiological methods in the treatment of brain tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 2, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New glioblastoma vaccine shows promising results in phase Ib clinical trial
(Thomas Jefferson University) A brain-cancer vaccine more than 20 years in the making suspends cancer growth in patients enrolled in early-stage trial. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 31, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

NexStim wins Health Canada approval for NBS, NexSpeech
Nexstim said today that it won approval from Health Canada for its NBS system and NexSpeech devices. The Helsinki-based company’s NBS system and NexSpeech comprise a diagnostic device intended for the non-invasive localization of the brain areas that control motor and speech functions. The devices are used by neurosurgeons for surgical planning prior to brain tumor operations or in treating treatment-resistant epilepsy, Nexstim said. Both the NBS system and NexSpeech use navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to better allow for personalized, accurate and reproducible stimulation of specific areas of the br...
Source: Mass Device - March 29, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Neurological Regulatory/Compliance Nexstim Source Type: news

Clinical trial finds therapy to be well-tolerated in patients with aggressive brain tumour
(Queen Mary University of London) A phase I clinical trial that set out to assess the safety of a new combination therapy for a type of aggressive brain tumour has found the treatment to be well tolerated in patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 29, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mother, 22, with terminal brain cancer is writing her son birthday cards so he doesn't forget her
Tyla Livingstone, 22, of Fife, is expected to live no more than five years after being diagnosed with a tumour dubbed 'The Terminator'. She feels guilty for leaving her two-year-old son Preston. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Helping infants survive brain cancer
(Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute) Choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC) is a particularly challenging type of brain cancer: The tumor most commonly arises in infants under the age of one. Progress in developing effective therapies has been hindered by the lack of models that could help researchers better understand the cancer. Now, scientists from SBP have developed a novel mouse model of CPC and have used it to identify multiple potential drug compounds. The study was published in Cancer Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Low-dose radiation therapy improves delivery of therapeutic nanoparticles to brain tumors
(Massachusetts General Hospital) A new study led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators finds that radiation therapy may increase the uptake of therapeutic nanoparticles by glioblastomas, raising the possibility of using both growth-factor-targeted and immune-system-based therapies against the deadly brain tumor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 27, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Stand up to Cancer funded research to be presented March 30-April 3 at AACR Annual Meeting
(Stand Up To Cancer) Stand Up To Cancer supported research immunotherapy; organoids, precision therapies and cancer interception; pancreatic, breast, ovarian, lung, brain, colorectal, and pediatric cancers will be presented by SU2C-affiliated researchers including Nobel laureate James P Allison, PhD; Elizabeth Jaffee, MD, Crystal L. Mackall, MD, E John Wherry, PhD, Peter Dirks, MD, PhD, among others. SU2C SAC vice chair Raymond DuBois, MD to be honored. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 27, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

FDA Scrambles to Prevent Shortages Amid Sterilization Shutdowns
Shutdowns of two facilities that use ethylene oxide to sterilize medical devices have raised concern about potential shortages in the medtech industry because this is such a popular sterilization method for medical devices. Ethylene oxide (EtO) is a flammable, colorless gas used to make a range of products. EtO also is used to sterilize equipment and plastic devices that cannot be sterilized by steam, such as medical equipment. In fact, about half of all sterilized medical devices undergo sterilization using this gas. According to the EPA, long-term exposure to EtO can irritate the eyes,...
Source: MDDI - March 26, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Sterilization Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news

SIR: Virtual reality beats fluoroscopy for catheter placement
Virtual reality may be a safer, more time-efficient alternative to conventional...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: VR, AR elevate radiologists' value in future of medicine Virtual reality may help plan, guide glioma resection 3D printing gives pediatric heart surgery a boost Virtual reality, 3D printing resolve obscure lung cancer Virtual reality adds depth to brain aneurysm diagnosis (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 26, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

What the End of a Promising Alzheimer ’s Drug Trial Means for One Patient in the Study
After he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2016, Peter Wooding says he and his wife JoAnn decided they wanted to be “part of the solution” in finding the first effective treatment for the neurodegenerative disease. He volunteered to be part of a trial for a promising new drug called aducanumab. While there is still no effective treatment for Alzheimer’s, in early studies aducanumab melted away the amyloid protein plaques that are the hallmark of the brain disorder. And people taking the drug showed improvements in some of their thinking skills. But last week, the drug’s developers, Bio...
Source: TIME: Health - March 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Drugs onetime Source Type: news

Here ’s Everything You Need to Know About Gut Health
It’s hardly news that the gastrointestinal tract is important to human health: It transports food from the mouth to the stomach, converts it into absorbable nutrients and stored energy, and shuttles waste back out of the body. If you don’t properly nourish yourself, you don’t live. It’s that simple. But in recent years, scientists have discovered that the GI system has an even bigger, more complex job than previously appreciated. It’s been linked to numerous aspects of health that have seemingly nothing to do with digestion, from immunity to emotional stress to chronic illnesses, including can...
Source: TIME: Health - March 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

A different kind of gut-brain connection: Can lessons learned from reduction of colon cancer deaths guide enhanced suicide prevention? - Schaffer A, Sinyor M.
[Abstract unavailable] Language: en... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Hundreds of scientists issue joint warning about cancer-causing effects of WiFi, Bluetooth and wireless communications
(Natural News) Warnings from concerned experts about the dangers of wireless communication devices like cellphones and tablets have been rumbling in the distance for some time now. And these warnings are becoming increasingly insistent as more evidence emerges linking this type of technology to brain, heart and other cancers. The established health effects of the non-ionizing electromagnetic... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brain-cancer patients reveal the subtle 'symptoms' they ignored
A study of 39 brain cancer sufferers by King’s College London reveals just how slight the signs can be, with many dismissing their poor memory and lack of balance as part of getting older. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

April 2019
Cancer Care Widens Its Reach : Reducing Cancer Health Disparities The Inflamed Brain : Recognizing Encephalitis and Meningitis How Much Alcohol Is Too Much? Why Tonsillitis Keeps Coming Back Mental Health Information (Source: NIH News in Health)
Source: NIH News in Health - March 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Understanding how people respond to symptoms of a brain tumor
(King's College London) A recent study from King's College London and Cambridge University highlighted that people may experience multiple subtle changes before being diagnosed with a brain tumor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study reveals the evolution of brain tumours
New treatments needed for glioblastomas Related items fromOnMedica New targeted drug could help treat advanced cancers Brain cancer research to receive £45m funding boost Genetic risk model could guide prostate cancer screening Cancer survival rates not improved much in a decade Combined treatment works best for anal cancer (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - March 22, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Another Promising Alzheimer ’ s Drug Trial Ends In Failure: ‘ This One Hurts ’
(CNN) — It’s another devastating blow in the search for a treatment for patients living with Alzheimer’s disease. Pharmaceutical giant Biogen and its Japanese partner Eisai announced Thursday they were halting two phase three clinical trials of a drug that targets the buildup in the brain of beta-amyloid, one of two proteins that researchers believe contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s. The drug, called aducanumab, was the most promising candidate in a field that has been littered with failures. It was so promising that the company was running two phase three trials simultaneously, said neur...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Alzheimer's Disease CNN Source Type: news

To Treat and Prevent Brain Mets, Use Best Therapy Up Front To Treat and Prevent Brain Mets, Use Best Therapy Up Front
Use newer, more effective targeted therapies first when possible to treat and stave off brain metastases in oncogene-driven lung cancers, says Mark Kris.Medscape Oncology (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - March 21, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology Commentary Source Type: news

The evolution of brain tumors
(German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ)) Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center found in a recent study that only three different genetic alterations drive the early development of malignant glioblastomas. At least one of these three cancer drivers was present in all tumors investigated. The tumors develop for up to seven years before they become noticeable as symptoms and are diagnosed. However, in contrast to their early development, glioblastomas, which return after therapy, share no concurrent genetic alterations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 21, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New drug combination shows promise for common pediatric brain tumor
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) A new combination treatment aimed at resistant and recurrent low-grade gliomas slowed tumor growth and killed tumor cells in laboratory and mouse models. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain Surgery for Metastasis Tied to Distinctive Tumor Spread Brain Surgery for Metastasis Tied to Distinctive Tumor Spread
In the absence of whole-brain radiation, neurosurgical resection in patients with brain metastases may boost pachymeningeal seeding, a new study hints.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines - March 21, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

AI, radiomics can help predict chemotherapy response
Artificial intelligence (AI) and radiomics can identify which non-small cell...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: AI may predict lymph node metastasis in gastric cancer AI singles out high-risk prostate cancer on mpMRI AI can predict breast cancer molecular subtypes on MRI AI can differentiate glioblastoma, brain metastasis AI uses features outside nodules to predict malignancy (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 20, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Kale Is One of the Most Contaminated Vegetables You Can Buy. Here ’s Why
Each year, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) publishes its Dirty Dozen list, which ranks the 12 pieces of produce that contain the highest amounts of pesticide residues. This year, one of the dirtiest fruits and vegetables turns out to be kale, occupying the third spot on the EWG’s list of most contaminated. Strawberries top the list, followed by spinach. (The full 2019 Dirty Dozen list, ranked from most contaminated to least, include strawberries, spinach, kale, nectarines, apples, grapes, peaches, cherries, pears, tomatoes, celery and potatoes.) The list is compiled from the results of regular testing done by t...
Source: TIME: Health - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Girl, nine, survives her inoperable cancer doctors d
Caroline Brown, from Northumberland, had an earache, weight loss, and lack of energy over four months in 2017. Then seven, a stage-four tumour was eventually found close to her brain. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Where does chronic pain begin? Scientists close in on its origins
(University of Texas at Dallas) A new study published March 19, 2019 in Brain has produced evidence of the source of chronic pain in humans, revealing several new targets for pain treatment. The paper examined human dorsal root ganglia, specialized nerve cells clustered near the base of the spine removed from cancer patients undergoing surgery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Joanne battles stage 4 kidney cancer
Four years ago, Joanne Romero, who lives in Texas, was diagnosed with stage 4 kidney cancer when she was 26 weeks pregnant. Despite her challenges, Joanne remains positive and hopes her story serves as an inspiration to others.   My journey began on Feb. 16, 2015. I was currently 26 weeks pregnant. I was experiencing a cough that continued to get worse. That day, I was scheduled to have a lung procedure to see what was causing the cough. My high-risk OB ordered an ultrasound the night before. She wanted to make sure my baby was doing well enough for the procedure. During the ultrasound, the ultrasound tech a...
Source: Kidney Cancer Association - March 18, 2019 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: news

Prophylactic cranial irradiation: Improvements for advanced NSCLC
(NRG Oncology) Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI), a technique used to prevent the clinical development of brain metastases, is established as a standard approach for many patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) after initial therapy. While studies established that PCI decreases the incidence of brain metastases for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC), there is no established indication for its use for such NSCLC patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 18, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news