Combination drug therapy for childhood brain tumors shows promise in laboratory models
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) In experiments with human cells and mice, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report evidence that combining the experimental cancer medication TAK228 (also called sapanisertib) with an existing anti-cancer drug called trametinib may be more effective than either drug alone in decreasing the growth of pediatric low-grade gliomas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Dementia becomes UK's biggest killer': Here's how to keep your brain healthy
Dementia has become Britain's biggest killer - overtaking long-feared cancer and heart disease in the process. One in eight deaths in the UK is now due to the condition which, on average, strikes a new victim every three minutes. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Being active may improve radiation therapy outcomes
Patients who are physically active before they undergo thoracic radiation therapy...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: ASTRO, ACR update RT practice parameters RT improves elderly brain cancer patient survival IMV: Imaging boosts precision in radiation therapy ASTRO: Whole, partial breast RT yield similar cosmetic results Varian to highlight RT management system at AAPM meeting (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 14, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

How AI Can Predict Heart Attacks and Strokes
Artificial intelligence is making its way into health care, and one of its first stops is making sense of all of those scans that doctors order. Already, studies have shown that AI-based tools can, in some cases, pick out abnormal growths that could be cancerous tumors better than doctors can, mainly because digesting and synthesizing huge volumes of information is what AI does best. In a study published Feb. 14 in Circulation, researchers in the U.K. and the U.S. report that an AI program can reliably predict heart attacks and strokes. Kristopher Knott, a research fellow at the British Heart Foundation, and his team condu...
Source: TIME: Health - February 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Artificial Intelligence Heart Disease Source Type: news

Scientists find ally in fight against brain tumors: Ebola
One of the world ’s deadliest viruses may be useful in treating one of the deadliest of brain cancers, finds a new Yale study. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - February 12, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Keep Your Teen Moving To Reduce Risk Of Depression, Study Says
(CNN) — Science shows moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise is good for us — it improves sleep; lowers blood pressure; protects against heart disease, diabetes and cancer; reduces stress; boosts mood; and fights anxiety and depression. It’s especially important in adolescence, where the first signs of depression often begin, studies show. But unless your child is an athlete, it can be tough to wean them away from social media and the ever-present screen to swim laps or go for a blood-pumping jog. A new study has some good news: even light exercise may help protect children against developing depression. T...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Depression Source Type: news

Scientists find ally in fight against brain tumors: Ebola
Glioblastomas are relentless, hard-to-treat, and often lethal brain tumors. Yale scientists have enlisted a most unlikely ally in efforts to treat this form of cancer - elements of the Ebola virus. "The irony is that one of the world's deadliest viruses may be useful in treating one of the deadliest of brain cancers," said Yale's Anthony van den Pol, professor of neurosurgery, who describes the Yale efforts Feb. 12 in the Journal of Virology. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - February 12, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Scientists find ally in fight against brain tumors: Ebola
(Yale University) Glioblastomas are relentless, hard-to-treat, and often lethal brain tumors. Yale scientists have enlisted a most unlikely ally in efforts to treat this form of cancer -- elements of the Ebola virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gene associated with autism also controls growth of the embryonic brain
A UCLA-led study reveals a new role for a gene that ’s associated with autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability and language impairment.The gene, Foxp1, has previously been studied for its function in the neurons of the developing brain. But the new study reveals that it ’s also important in a group of brain stem cells — the precursors to mature neurons.“This discovery really broadens the scope of where we think Foxp1 is important,” said Bennett Novitch, a member of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA and the senior author ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 12, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Stroke: Macrophages migrate from the blood
(University of Bonn) Macrophages are part of the innate immune system and essential for brain development and function. Using a novel method, scientists from Jena University Hospital, the University of Bonn and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (USA) succeeded in visualizing macrophages that were formed in the bone marrow. This technology enabled to observe that shortly after a stroke, numerous macrophages that had migrated from the blood begin to attack dead and adjacent healthy brain tissue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Removing Tissue Surrounding Brain Tumor May Double Survival in Patients with Glioblastoma
The results presented in this study indicated that neurosurgeons may need to change how they approach tumor removal and, when safe, include non-contrast-enhancing tumor during resection achieve maximal resection. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - February 11, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Hannah Slater Source Type: news

More Aggressive Surgery Can Extend Survival From Brain Cancer: Study
Title: More Aggressive Surgery Can Extend Survival From Brain Cancer: StudyCategory: Health NewsCreated: 2/7/2020 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 2/10/2020 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - February 10, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Roche provides topline results from investigator-led Phase II/III trial with gantenerumab in rare inherited form of Alzheimer ’s disease
Basel, 10 February 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the gantenerumab arm of the Phase II/III DIAN-TU-001 study did not meet its primary endpoint in people who have an early-onset, inherited form of Alzheimer ’s disease (AD). This form of AD, known as autosomal dominant AD (ADAD), accounts for less than 1% of all cases of the disease.1 The study, sponsored by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, US, did not show a significant slowing of the rate of cognitive decline in people treated with investigational medicine gantenerumab as measured by the novel DIAN Multivariate Co...
Source: Roche Media News - February 10, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche provides topline results from investigator-led Phase II/III trial with gantenerumab in rare inherited form of Alzheimer ’s disease
Basel, 10 February 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the gantenerumab arm of the Phase II/III DIAN-TU-001 study did not meet its primary endpoint in people who have an early-onset, inherited form of Alzheimer ’s disease (AD). This form of AD, known as autosomal dominant AD (ADAD), accounts for less than 1% of all cases of the disease.1 The study, sponsored by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, US, did not show a significant slowing of the rate of cognitive decline in people treated with investigational medicine gantenerumab as measured by the novel DIAN Multivariate Co...
Source: Roche Investor Update - February 10, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Finding a cure for Fido's brain cancer may help us find a cure for ourselves
(Jackson Laboratory) For cancers such as glioma, preclinical research models have failed to provide sufficient insight for medical progress. A team led by Jackson Laboratory's Roel Verhaak thoroughly analyzed sporadic canine gliomas and found that their molecular characteristics, including gene mutations and duplications, resemble those of humans. The results indicate that dogs provide an effective model for human gliomas, and learning how to more effectively treat our pets will likely inform better prognoses for human patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 10, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

More Aggressive Surgery Can Extend Survival From Brain Cancer: Study
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - February 7, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Family Medicine, Neurology, Oncology, Surgery, News, Source Type: news

More Aggressive Surgery Can Extend Survival From Brain Cancer: Study
FRIDAY, Feb. 7, 2020 -- Adults with glioblastoma -- the most common and deadly type of brain tumor -- could survive more than twice as long if surgeons removed surrounding tissue as well as the tumor, a new study finds. That involves cutting out... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 7, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

More aggressive surgery may improve brain cancer survival
A new, more aggressive surgical approach may double survival rates in adults with brain tumors, a study published Thursday in the Journal JAMA Oncology has revealed. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Computer simulation for understanding brain cancer growth
(Newcastle University) Scientists have developed a computer simulation, BioDynaMo that can be used on standard laptops or desktop computers and provides a software platform which can be used to easily create, run and visualise 3D agent-based biological simulations for brain cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 6, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Brain tumor surgery that pushes boundaries boosts patients survival
(University of California - San Francisco) Survival may more than double for adults with glioblastoma, the most common and deadly type of brain tumor, if neurosurgeons remove the surrounding tissue as aggressively as they remove the cancerous core of the tumor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 6, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Unprecedented exploration generates most comprehensive map of cancer genomes to date
(University of Melbourne) An international team has completed the most comprehensive study of whole cancer genomes to date, significantly improving our fundamental understanding of cancer and signposting new directions for its diagnosis and treatment.Published today in Nature, more than 700 researchers have analysed more than 2600 samples from 38 cancer types ranging from common cancers like colorectal and breast cancers, to rare cancer types including pancreatic and brain cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 5, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New way to study pituitary tumors holds potential for better diagnoses and treatments
(Houston Methodist) Houston Methodist neurosurgeons are looking at a new way to classify pituitary tumors that could lead to more precise and accurate diagnosing for patients in the future. These tests also could have potential for better diagnoses in other brain tumors. The findings, published Jan. 28 in Scientific Reports, describe a new way to study the blood of pituitary adenoma patients to determine tumor type and whether they might respond to medical treatment rather than surgery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nurse celebrates surviving brain cancer 10 YEARS after being told it was terminal 
Gemma Wensley, 37, of Exeter, Devon, even began planning her own funeral when she was told she had a inoperable brain tumour a decade ago. She said doctors don't know how she was so lucky. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Poliovirus therapy shows potential as cancer vaccine in lab studies
A modified form of poliovirus, pioneered at Duke Cancer Institute as a therapy for glioblastoma brain tumors, appears in laboratory studies to also have applicability for pediatric brain tumors when used as part of a cancer vaccine. In preclinical studies using mice and human cancer cells, an injection of the modified poliovirus vector instigated an immune response that homed in on mutated cancer cells that predominate in diffuse midline glioma (DMG) tumors. The cancer strikes children and is universally deadly. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - January 30, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Poliovirus therapy shows potential as cancer vaccine in lab studies
(Duke University Medical Center) A modified form of poliovirus, pioneered at Duke Cancer Institute as a therapy for glioblastoma brain tumors, appears in laboratory studies to also have applicability for pediatric brain tumors when used as part of a cancer vaccine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 30, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Advanced medical imaging combined with genomic analysis could help treat cancer patients
(The Translational Genomics Research Institute) Melding the genetic and cellular analysis of tumors with how they appear in medical images could give physicians new insights into how to best treat patients, especially those with brain cancer, according to a new study led by TGen. Published in the scientific journal PLOS ONE, this study suggests that the tumor microenvironment -- essentially all the cells both in and surrounding a tumor -- play a vastly under-studied role in the development and growth of cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 30, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Technology and road safety: Brain-training game helps improve the driving skills of older people
(Natural News) Older adults looking to improve their driving skills may need to sit down and play a brain-training video game before hitting the road, according to a new study. Carried out by Tohoku University in Sendai, Japan and led by Rui Nouchi, associate professor in the Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, the research found that seniors... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Organoids (in vitro brains) to study pediatric brain tumors
(Università di Trento) Hundreds of miniature brains were grown in the laboratories of the University of Trento to study the genetic mechanisms responsible for the most common brain cancer affecting children. The results of a collaborative research effort, coordinated by the University of Trento and carried out with Sapienza University and Ospedale pediatrico Bambino Ges ù in Rome and Irccs Neuromed, were published today in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain tumors remodel neuronal synapses to promote growth
(Baylor College of Medicine) Scientists discovered that glioma, a lethal form of brain cancer, alters the activity of neighboring neurons, accelerating a vicious cycle that drives tumor-associated epilepsy and tumor progression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 29, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Not 'brains in a dish': Cerebral organoids flunk comparison to developing nervous system
(University of California - San Francisco) A new UC San Francisco study offers a more restrained perspective on brain organoids suggested for lab experiments, by showing that widely used organoid models fail to replicate even basic features of brain development and organization, much less the complex circuitry needed to model complex brain diseases or normal cognition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 29, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Stem cells, CRISPR and gene sequencing technology are basis of new brain cancer model
(University of California - San Diego) University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers created a new type of brain cancer model for glioblastoma using stem cells, CRISPR and gene sequencing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 28, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Image of the Day: Tumor Vasculature
Researchers use a cutting-edge technique to map the blood vessels of brain tumors as patients are awake during surgery with the hope of reducing damage to adjacent tissues. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - January 24, 2020 Category: Science Tags: Image of the Day Source Type: news

UH treats its 1st glioblastoma patient with genetically modified poliovirus
(University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center) University Hospitals (UH) Seidman Cancer Center treated its first patient in a new clinical trial to validate the groundbreaking effects of the poliovirus on glioblastoma (GBM), a deadly Grade IV cancer of the brain. UH is the only Midwest site participating in this clinical trial, which was initiated at Duke Cancer Institute in Durham, NC. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 24, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Low vitamin K levels associated with disability and mobility limitations in the elderly
(Natural News) Vitamin K is an essential vitamin that plays a vital role in bone and heart health. It is one of the main vitamins responsible for blood coagulation and bone mineralization and also helps maintain brain function, boost metabolism, and protect against certain cancers. While vitamin K deficiency is rare, a lower-than-average intake of... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rwanda: Rwandan Neurosurgery Ops Go High-Tech
[New Times] Medics in Rwanda are working on scaling up the use of minimally invasive neurosurgery operations that don't require them to open the patient's skull while treating tumors in the brain and the skull base. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 23, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Immune system cells contribute to the invading capacity of brain tumours
(Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona) An article published in Brain Communications, coordinated by Carlos Barcia, researcher at Institut de Neuroci è ncies de la UAB, describes how the immune system facilitates the expansion of tumour cells in the brain. The study was performed on human samples of glioblastoma, the most aggressive brain tumour, and on cell culture models. These findings will help to develop treatments for this type of tumour, for which there is not an effective therapy at the moment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 23, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Immune system cells contribute to the invading capacity of brain tumors
(Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona) An article published in Brain Communications, coordinated by Carlos Barcia, researcher at Institut de Neuroci è ncies de la UAB, describes how the immune system facilitates the expansion of tumor cells in the brain. The study was performed on human samples of glioblastoma, the most aggressive brain tumor, and on cell culture models. These findings will help to develop treatments for this type of tumor, for which there is not an effective therapy at the moment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 23, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Taylor Swift's Mother Has Brain Tumor
While Taylor Swift's mother was undergoing treatment for breast cancer, doctors discovered that she also had a brain tumor (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - January 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Innovative research award' helps Colorado scientists block brain cancer escape routes
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) 'Innovative research award' will help University of Colorado Cancer Center investigators pinpoint the genetic changes that allow BRAF pediatric brain cancers to become resistant to BRAF inhibitors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 21, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Violence and adversity in early life can alter the brain
(American College of Neuropsychopharmacology) But social supports can reduce the negative effects of childhood stress. Childhood adversity is a significant problem in the US, particularly for children growing up in poverty. Those who experience poverty have a much higher risk of being exposed to violence and suffering from a lack of social support, which can have long-term consequences including higher rates of diabetes, cancer, and other diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Surgery May Add Years for Patients With Deadly Brain Cancer: Study
Title: Surgery May Add Years for Patients With Deadly Brain Cancer: StudyCategory: Health NewsCreated: 1/15/2020 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 1/16/2020 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - January 16, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Zika virus' key into brain cells ID'd, leveraged to block infection and kill cancer cells
(University of California - San Diego) Two different UC San Diego research teams identified the same molecule --αvβ5 integrin -- as Zika virus' key to brain cell entry. They found ways to take advantage of the integrin to both block Zika virus from infecting cells and turn it into something good: a way to shrink brain cancer stem cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 16, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Improved brain chip for precision medicine
(University of Houston) The Akay Lab biomedical research team at the University of Houston is reporting an improvement on a microfluidic brain cancer chip previously developed in their lab. The new chip allows quick assessment of the effectiveness of cancer drugs on brain tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Surgery May Add Years for Patients With Deadly Brain Cancer: Study
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - January 15, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Neurology, Oncology, Surgery, News, Source Type: news

Scientists breach brain barriers to attack tumors
Yale researchers have found a novel way to circumvent the brain ’s natural defenses, offering an immunotherapeutic treatment for glioblastoma patients. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - January 15, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Surgery May Add Years for Patients With Deadly Brain Cancer: Study
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20, 2020 -- Surgical removal of the entire tumor may extend the lives of patients with a rare and deadly type of brain cancer called brainstem high-grade gliomas, a new study suggests. Researchers analyzed data from 103 patients in... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 15, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Scientists breach brain barriers to attack tumors
(Yale University) The brain is a sort of fortress, equipped with barriers designed to keep out dangerous pathogens. But protection comes at a cost: These barriers interfere with the immune system when faced with dire threats such glioblastoma, a deadly brain tumor for which there are few effective treatments. Yale researchers have found a novel way to circumvent the brain's natural defenses when they're counterproductive by slipping immune system rescuers through the fortresses' drainage system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 15, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Meningeal lymphatic network: A new avenue in the treatment of brain tumors
(INSERM (Institut national de la sant é et de la recherche m é dicale)) Glioblastomas are the most common type of brain tumor, and their prognosis is often highly unfavorable. A collaborative study by Jean-L é on Thomas, Inserm researcher at the Brain& Spine Institute (Inserm/CNRS/Sorbonne Universit é ) and Piti é -Salp ê tri è re Hospital AP-HP, and Akiko Iwasaki (Department of Immunology, Yale University School of Medicine, USA), has revealed the beneficial role played by the meningeal lymphatic vascular network in treating these tumors -- in the short and longer term. ...
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 15, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

AI Metrics joins forces with Imaging Biometrics
Artificial intelligence (AI) technology developer AI Metrics has signed advanced...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Imaging Biometrics nets NIH grant Imaging Biometrics points to brain tumor study Imaging Biometrics teams with CorTechs Labs Imaging Biometrics debuts IB Server software Imaging Biometrics touts research paper on DSC MRI (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 14, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

CNS Pharmaceuticals Licenses DNA-Binding Agent from MD Anderson, Doubling its Drug Pipeline
HOUSTON, Jan. 13, 2020 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- CNS Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: CNSP) (“CNS” or the “Company”), a biotechnology company specializing in the development of novel treatments for brain tumors, today announced it has ent... Biopharmaceuticals, Oncology, Licensing CNS Pharmaceuticals, WP1244, blood-brain barrier (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - January 13, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news