Alzheimer's link to herpes virus in brain, say scientists
Research reveals strains of virus more abundant in brains with early stage of disease, though uncertainly whether virus is a trigger or a symptomThe presence of viruses in the brain has been linked to Alzheimer ’s disease in research that challenges conventional theories about the onset of dementia.The results, based on tests of brain tissue from nearly 1,000 people, found that two strains of herpes virus were far more abundant in the brains of those with early-stage Alzheimer ’s than in healthy controls. However, scientists are divided on whether viruses are likely to be an active trigger, or whether the brain...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Alzheimer's Medical research Neuroscience Dementia Ageing Health Society Mental health Source Type: news

Herpes virus may play role in Alzheimer's, study says
Doctors don't know what causes Alzheimer's or how to treat it best, but they have new evidence to suggest that a common virus may play a role in who gets it. The study, out Thursday, is running in the journal Neuron. It suggests the human herpes virus, 6A and 7 to be specific, may have a role in the disease that robs people of their memory and cognitive functions. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rasagiline Added to Riluzole in ALS May Help'Fast Progressors'Rasagiline Added to Riluzole in ALS May Help'Fast Progressors '
Adding rasagiline to riluzole did not extend survival, the primary endpoint, in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, but post hoc analysis suggests it may benefit those deemed'fast progressors. 'Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Brain Lesion Pattern May Guide Diagnosis of Rare Disorder Brain Lesion Pattern May Guide Diagnosis of Rare Disorder
Specific patterns of white matter hyperintensities in the brain may guide diagnosis of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, a disorder predominantly characterized by severe thunderclap headaches.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - June 21, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Cerebral Therapeutics raises $3m for epilepsy drug-device therapy
Cerebral Therapeutics closed a $3 million Series A financing round this week to support the development of its drug-device therapy designed for patients with refractory epilepsy. The Aurora, Co.-based company’s product uses an implanted, refillable catheter system to deliver a continuous, intracerebroventricular dose of an anti-epileptic drug – valproic acid. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Cerebral Therapeutics raises $3m for epilepsy drug-device therapy appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - June 21, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Funding Roundup Neurological Pharmaceuticals Cerebral Therapeutics Source Type: news

Herpesvirus may contribute to Alzheimer's development, researchers say
Certain species of herpesviruses may play a role in Alzheimer's disease according to a study of brain samples from people with and without the disease. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - June 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘ This Is How I Save My Life ’ Excerpt From Amy B. Scher
Amy B. Scher’s “This Is How I Save My Life” is the true story of a fiery young woman diagnosed with late-stage, chronic Lyme disease whose journey takes her from near-death in California to a trip around the world in search of her ultimate salvation. This excerpt coincides with the book’s release in paperback from Gallery Books, an imprint CBS sister company Simon & Schuster. I am twenty-eight years old when I arrive in magnificent India. I am here with my parents, an updated vaccine record, and a visa, searching for something I cannot find at home: a cure. In a tiny hospital on the outskirts of...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Simon and Schuster Source Type: news

Cath Lab Recap:'Smart Stent'; Thrombectomy for Free-Floating Thrombi
(MedPage Today) -- Interventional cardiology news to note (Source: MedPage Today Neurology)
Source: MedPage Today Neurology - June 21, 2018 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson hits the Big Apple with latest JLabs site
Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) opened its latest life science incubator in New York City, the healthcare giant said today. The 30,000-square-foot JLabs @ NYC is a collaboration between Johnson & Johnson Innovation, New York State and the New York Genome Center. Sited at the genome center in SoHo, the incubator is home to 26 startups and has room for four more, New Brunswick, N.J.-based J&J said. “Johnson & Johnson has deep entrepreneurial roots in New York and we are pleased to see our unique JLabs model applied in this rich ecosystem to foster the creation of new healthcare innovations that have t...
Source: Mass Device - June 21, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Funding Roundup Research & Development johnsonandjohnson Source Type: news

As Loneliness Rises Among Americans, Experts Warn It ’ s Making Many Sick
(CBS Local)- Former Surgeon General Doctor Vivek Murthy brought mental health to the forefront last September when he wrote in the Harvard Business Review that loneliness is a “growing health epidemic.” Now a recent survey by health service company Cigna adds to that by showing many Americans say they sometimes or always feel alone. The survey of more than 20,000 U.S. adults ages 18 years and older revealed some alarming findings: Nearly half of Americans report sometimes or always feeling alone (46 percent) or left out (47 percent). One in four Americans (27 percent) rarely or never f...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Local TV Mental Health talkers Source Type: news

Dr. Gawande tapped to lead Amazon-JPM-Berkshire health play | Personnel Moves – June 21, 2018
The joint healthcare venture between Amazon (NSDQ:AMZN), Berkshire Hathaway and J.P. Morgan Chase said this week it named Brigham and Women’s Hospital surgeon, New Yorker magazine staff writer and bestselling author Dr. Atul Gawande as its CEO, effective July 9. The joint venture said that the newly formed company will be headquartered in Boston, and will operate as an independent entity free from profit-making incentives and constraints. Dr. Gawande also serves as a professor of Harvard Medical School and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and is the founding executive director of health system...
Source: Mass Device - June 21, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News AirXpanders Amazon Avantis Medical Systems Inc. Berkshire Hathaway Boston Scientific CHF Solutions Inc. Corindus Vascular Robotics Haemonetics Intuitive Surgical IsoRay JP Morgan Chase medicen Medtronic Source Type: news

Eptinezumab Safe, Effective for Migraine Prevention Eptinezumab Safe, Effective for Migraine Prevention
A single dose of eptinezumab, which targets calcitonin gene-related peptide, provides rapid efficacy lasting up to 3 months in the prevention of chronic migraine, say PROMISE-2 investigators.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Scientists Are Using a New Weapon to Fight Drug-Resistant Bacteria —Viruses
A new medical research center in San Diego is embracing an innovative way to treat antibiotic resistant infections called bacteriophage therapy—phage therapy for short—which uses viruses as weapons against hard-to-treat infections. Antibiotic-resistant infections are part of a growing global health problem. Each year in the United States, at least two million people contract drug-resistant infections, and 23,000 die from those illnesses. Bacteria naturally grow resistant to the drugs used to treat them, and for people with especially tough infections that aren’t responding to the usual medications, the op...
Source: TIME: Health - June 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine Source Type: news

Reduced-Intensity Warfarin Safe With On-X Heart Valve Reduced-Intensity Warfarin Safe With On-X Heart Valve
Low-dose warfarin plus aspirin was associated with less bleeding without increasing thromboembolic events compared with standard-dose warfarin after aortic valve replacement with the On-X mechanical valve.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

A Common Virus May Play Role in Alzheimer ’ s Disease, Study Finds
The research did not find that viruses cause Alzheimer ’ s. But it showed that two types of herpes interact with Alzheimer ’ s-related genes and might drive the disease process (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: PAM BELLUCK Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Research Brain Herpes Viruses Immune System Source Type: news

InVivo Therapeutics prices $13m offering
InVivo Therapeutics (NSDQ:NVIV) today priced a public stock offering worth more than $13 million for the neurospinal scaffold it’s developing to treat spinal cord injuries. Cambridge, Mass.-based InVivo said it plans to float some 388,000 shares and another 388,000 warrants at a combined price of $2 per unit, plus 6.2 million pre-funded warrants and 6.2 million standard warrants at $1.99 apiece. Gross proceeds from the offering are expected to reach $13.2 million, the company said in a regulatory filing. Ladenburg Thalmann & Co. is the sole book-runner for the offering. The warrants have an exercise pri...
Source: Mass Device - June 21, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Funding Roundup Regenerative Medicine Wall Street Beat InVivo Therapeutics Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Persistent stress may lead to vision loss, study shows
A new analysis of existing studies shows that persistent psychological stress can lead to conditions such as glaucoma, retinal neuropathy, and vision loss. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Eye Health / Blindness Source Type: news

Medtronic wins expanded FDA indications for Kyphon HV-R bone cement
Medtronic (NYSE:MDT) said yesterday it won expanded FDA 510(k) clearance for its Kyphon HV-R bone cement designed for the fixation of pathological fractures of the sacral vertebral body. The Fridley, Minn.-based company’s Kyphon HV-R bone cement is now indicated for treating pathological fractures of the vertebral body due to osteoporosis, cancer or benign lesions using a cementoplasty procedure. The cement is also indicated for the fixation of pathological fractures of the sacral vertebral body or ala using sacral vertebroplasty or sacroplasty, the company said. “Patients who experience sacral insuff...
Source: Mass Device - June 21, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: 510(k) Orthopedics Regulatory/Compliance Spinal Medtronic Source Type: news

Changing the colours given off by mobiles and TVs could combat both daytime sleepiness, study finds
Researchers from the University of Manchester found that adding or removing a turquoise hue to phone screen's three primary colours tricks the brain into thinking it is day or night time. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scars of Childhood Stress Visible in the Brain Scars of Childhood Stress Visible in the Brain
Early childhood stress has long-lasting effects, but the neurodevelopment trajectories are unclear. A study shows early childhood stress accelerates normal brain maturation, while adolescent stress delays it.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news

Does watching this video of ear licking give you a 'brain orgasm'?
In one of the first studies into the health benefits of ASMR clips, which number more than 13 million on YouTube, scientists at the University of Sheffield found the strange videos carry health benefits. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Long-term DBS Linked to Less Psychosis, Falls in Parkinson's Long-term DBS Linked to Less Psychosis, Falls in Parkinson's
Ten-year follow-up of patients with Parkinson's disease who underwent subthalamic deep-brain stimulation (DBS) shows they had lower risk for psychosis and falls than those not receiving DBS.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

50% of Patients With PD on DAs Develop Impulse Disorders 50% of Patients With PD on DAs Develop Impulse Disorders
Almost half of patients with Parkinson's disease who take dopamine agonists develop impulse control disorders at 5 years, a large longitudinal study shows.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

What does running do to your brain?
Neuroscientists have studied treadmill runners, ultramarathon athletes – and a number of lab animals – to investigate the effects of running on grey matterIt may seem obvious – as you push on through a long run, veering wildly between sensations of agony and elation – that running can have a huge effect on your state of mind. It is an intuitive idea that a growing number of neuroscientists have begun to take seriously, and in recent years they have started to show us what actually plays out on the hills and valleys of your grey matter as you run.Their findings confirm what many runners know from the...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ben Martynoga Tags: Running Fitness Ultrarunning Life and style Neuroscience Mindfulness Health & wellbeing Source Type: news

How should AI be used in breast ultrasound?
How can radiologists make the most of artificial intelligence (AI) software...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Deep learning accurately detects brain hemorrhage SIIM: AI can accurately detect cerebral microbleeds How does radiology AI fit into value-based healthcare? Quantitative ultrasound CAD analyzes multiple conditions Ultrasound CAD aids in characterizing breast lesions (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 21, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Parkinson's drugs may lead to compulsive behavior
A new study finds that, with time, half of those who take dopamine agonists develop compulsive shopping, eating, gambling, or sexual behaviors. (Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today)
Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today - June 21, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: Parkinson's Disease Source Type: news

The Non-neuronal and Nonmuscular Effects of Botulinum Toxin The Non-neuronal and Nonmuscular Effects of Botulinum Toxin
New research suggests that botulinum neurotoxins may have a much wider range of both dermatological and nondermatological applications than originally thought.The British Journal of Dermatology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dermatology Journal Article Source Type: news

Scientists print sensors on gummi candy
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Microelectrodes can be used for direct measurement of electrical signals in the brain or heart. These applications require soft materials, however. With existing methods, attaching electrodes to such materials poses significant challenges. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now succeeded in printing electrodes directly onto several soft substrates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 21, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New research provides expanded insights into the brain's response to opioids
(Temple University Health System) Opioids are powerful painkillers that act on the brain, but they have a range of harmful side effects including addiction. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in collaboration with researchers from the Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria, University of Innsbruck, and the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, have developed a tool that gives deeper insights into the brain's response to opioids. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fright and flight: Deciding when to escape
(Sainsbury Wellcome Centre) How does your brain decide what to do in a threatening situation? A new paper published in Nature describes a mechanism by which the brain classifies the level of a threat and decides when to escape. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Your brain anatomy may play a role in determining your food choices
(INSEAD) Our ability to exercise self-control is linked to our neurobiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain tingles: First study of its kind reveals physiological benefits of ASMR
(University of Sheffield) Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) - the relaxing 'brain tingles' experienced by some people in response to specific triggers, such as whispering, tapping and slow hand movements -- may have benefits for both mental and physical health, according to new research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Allen Institute for Brain Science database release nearly doubles mouse brain cell data
(Allen Institute) The Allen Institute for Brain Science today announced the release of new data, tools to analyze those data and a new web-based 3D viewer to explore anatomy and connections in the mouse brain, the Allen Brain Explorer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists discover how brain signals travel to drive language performance
(Drexel University) Using transcranial magnetic stimulation and network control theory, researchers have taken a novel approach to understanding how signals travel across the brain's highways and how stimulation can lead to better cognitive function. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Antifreeze' molecules may stop and reverse damage from brain injuries
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The key to better treatments for brain injuries and disease may lie in the molecules charged with preventing the clumping of specific proteins associated with cognitive decline and other neurological problems, researchers from Penn report in a new study published in Neurobiology of Disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists solve the case of the missing subplate, with wide implications for brain science
(Rockefeller University) A new study shows that a group of neurons, previously thought to die in the course of development, in fact become incorporated into the brain's cortex. This research has implications for understanding -- and possibly treating --several brain disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH-funded study finds new evidence that viruses may play a role in Alzheimer ’ s disease
(NIH/National Institute on Aging) Analysis of large data sets from post-mortem brain samples of people with and without Alzheimer's disease has revealed new evidence linking viruses to Alzheimer's clinical traits and genetic factors. Researchers funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health, made the discovery by harnessing data from brain banks and cohort studies participating in the Accelerating Medicines Partnership-Alzheimer's Disease (AMP-AD) consortium. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 21, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

More evidence for controversial theory that herpesviruses play role in Alzheimer's disease
(Cell Press) In a large-scale analysis published in the journal Neuron, researchers use data from three different brain banks to suggest that human herpesviruses are more abundant in the brains of Alzheimer's patients and may play a role in regulatory genetic networks that are believed to lead to the disease. This work lends support to the controversial hypothesis that viruses are involved in Alzheimer's disease and offers potential new paths for treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 21, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Unusually high levels of herpesviruses found in the Alzheimer's disease brain
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) Two strains of human herpesvirus -- human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) and human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) -- are found in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease at levels up to twice as high as in those without Alzheimer's, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai report. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 21, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New funding to UC Riverside to significantly boost cancer, ALS research
(University of California - Riverside) Maurizio Pellecchia at the University of California, Riverside has received two grants to continue his research aimed at finding therapeutics for cancer, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and other neurodegenerative diseases. The first grant from the US-Egypt Science and Technology Joint Fund of the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine totals $190,000 for two years. The second is a nearly $2.3 million, five-year grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 21, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Neanderthal brain organoids come to life
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Cohen, J. Tags: Biotechnology, Development, Evolution In Depth Source Type: news

Aberrant choice behavior in alcoholism
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Spanagel, R. Tags: Neuroscience perspective Source Type: news

Hard feelings
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Bauer, E. Tags: Neuroscience books Source Type: news

Rebalancing strength between synapses
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Stern, P. Tags: Neuroscience twis Source Type: news

Mechanisms of drug action
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ray, L. B. Tags: Cell Biology, Neuroscience twis Source Type: news

Finding the vulnerable minority
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Medicine, Diseases, Neuroscience twis Source Type: news

A molecular mechanism for choosing alcohol over an alternative reward
Alcohol addiction leads to increased choice of alcohol over healthy rewards. We established an exclusive choice procedure in which ~15% of outbred rats chose alcohol over a high-value reward. These animals displayed addiction-like traits, including high motivation to obtain alcohol and pursuit of this drug despite adverse consequences. Expression of the -aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter GAT-3 was selectively decreased within the amygdala of alcohol-choosing rats, whereas a knockdown of this transcript reversed choice preference of rats that originally chose a sweet solution over alcohol. GAT-3 expression was selectivel...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Augier, E., Barbier, E., Dulman, R. S., Licheri, V., Augier, G., Domi, E., Barchiesi, R., Farris, S., Nätt, D., Mayfield, R. D., Adermark, L., Heilig, M. Tags: Medicine, Diseases, Neuroscience r-articles Source Type: news

Locally coordinated synaptic plasticity of visual cortex neurons in vivo
Plasticity of cortical responses in vivo involves activity-dependent changes at synapses, but the manner in which different forms of synaptic plasticity act together to create functional changes in neurons remains unknown. We found that spike timing–induced receptive field plasticity of visual cortex neurons in mice is anchored by increases in the synaptic strength of identified spines. This is accompanied by a decrease in the strength of adjacent spines on a slower time scale. The locally coordinated potentiation and depression of spines involves prominent AMPA receptor redistribution via targeted expression of the ...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: El-Boustani, S., Ip, J. P. K., Breton-Provencher, V., Knott, G. W., Okuno, H., Bito, H., Sur, M. Tags: Neuroscience reports Source Type: news

In vivo brain GPCR signaling elucidated by phosphoproteomics
A systems view of G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in its native environment is central to the development of GPCR therapeutics with fewer side effects. Using the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) as a model, we employed high-throughput phosphoproteomics to investigate signaling induced by structurally diverse agonists in five mouse brain regions. Quantification of 50,000 different phosphosites provided a systems view of KOR in vivo signaling, revealing novel mechanisms of drug action. Thus, we discovered enrichment of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway by U-50,488H, an agonist causing aversion, ...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Liu, J. J., Sharma, K., Zangrandi, L., Chen, C., Humphrey, S. J., Chiu, Y.-T., Spetea, M., Liu-Chen, L.-Y., Schwarzer, C., Mann, M. Tags: Cell Biology, Neuroscience, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Analysis of shared heritability in common disorders of the brain
Disorders of the brain can exhibit considerable epidemiological comorbidity and often share symptoms, provoking debate about their etiologic overlap. We quantified the genetic sharing of 25 brain disorders from genome-wide association studies of 265,218 patients and 784,643 control participants and assessed their relationship to 17 phenotypes from 1,191,588 individuals. Psychiatric disorders share common variant risk, whereas neurological disorders appear more distinct from one another and from the psychiatric disorders. We also identified significant sharing between disorders and a number of brain phenotypes, including co...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: The Brainstorm Consortium, Anttila, V., Bulik-Sullivan, B., Finucane, H. K., Walters, R. K., Bras, J., Duncan, L., Escott-Price, V., Falcone, G. J., Gormley, P., Malik, R., Patsopoulos, N. A., Ripke, S., Wei, Z., Yu, D., Lee, P. H., Turley, P., Grenier-Bo Tags: Genetics, Medicine, Diseases, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news