Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

FDA: Lamotrigine Tied to Rare, Serious Immune System Reaction FDA: Lamotrigine Tied to Rare, Serious Immune System Reaction
The FDA will add a warning about the risk for hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis to the prescribing information on lamotrigine drug labels.News Alerts (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Alert Source Type: news

Tiny Lab-Grown 'Brains' Raise Big Ethical Questions
Scientists are growing increasingly large and sophisticated clusters of human brain cells. Ethicists are now wondering what to do if these minibrains start thinking.(Image credit: Courtesy of Pasca lab/Stanford University) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jon Hamilton Source Type: news

Old Drug May Get New Life in Parkinson's Prevention Old Drug May Get New Life in Parkinson's Prevention
Inflammatory bowel disease raises the risk for Parkinson's disease, but anti-TNF therapy may reduce the risk, researchers report.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Novel Agent Significantly Curbs Excessive Sleepiness in Narcolepsy Novel Agent Significantly Curbs Excessive Sleepiness in Narcolepsy
A novel agent currently in development helps those with type 1 or type 2 narcolepsy experience less excessive sleepiness, enabling them to maintain wakefulness for longer periods.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Mind "reboot"? How sensory deprivation impacts the brain
The average person scrolls through 300 feet of mobile content a day – so we explored one of the ways people are trying to short-circuit the noise (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA Alert on MR-Guided Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy Devices FDA Alert on MR-Guided Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy Devices
The agency says there is a risk of tissue overheating because of inaccurate magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry with MR-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy devices.News Alerts (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Alert Source Type: news

Cerliponase Alfa May Slow Symptoms of CLN2 Disease in Children Cerliponase Alfa May Slow Symptoms of CLN2 Disease in Children
Enzyme-replacement therapy with intraventricular cerliponase alfa may delay motor and language declines in ceroid lipofuscinosis type 2 (CLN2) disease, a fatal neurodegenerative disorder.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What is the cause of drooling?
We describe tools, tips, and medications that can reduce or eliminate this symptom. We also explore causes and complications. Learn more here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ear, Nose and Throat Source Type: news

Studies: Dark chocolate can lower stress and inflammation, improve memory
Consuming dark chocolate has several benefits to brain function, including reducing stress levels and inflammation and improving mood, memory and immunity. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How to Kick Your Caffeine Dependence for Good
An estimated 64% of Americans drink coffee every day, according to data from the National Coffee Association. In many ways, that’s a healthy habit: research has found that coffee may boost longevity and decrease the risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease and more. But when the habit crosses the line from a pleasant pick-me-up to a daily necessity, the equation gets a little more complicated. People can develop a dependence on coffee and other caffeinated beverages, such as tea, soda and energy drinks, says Merideth Addicott, an assistant professor at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences’ Psychiatric ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Dark chocolate health benefits: Sweet treat can BOOST brain power
A DAILY bite of dark chocolate is not only good for your health but boosts brain power too, research revealed today. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The darkest chocolate bars on the market are best for your health
While many wince at bars with more than 70 percent cacao, the team at  Loma Linda University in California found such a high concentration helps boost the brain and heart by reducing inflammation. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How sensory deprivation and floating impacts the brain
Our series Pay Attention looks at how to retrain our focus and recapture our attention under the bombardment of technology and information that distracts us. "CBS This Morning" co-host John Dickerson explores if sensory deprivation can short-circuit the noise. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

WATCH: Does dark chocolate make you smarter?
Dr. Jennifer Ashton discusses what to know about a new study that says dark chocolate may improve brain health. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

Doctor warns world about "chemtrail lung," a new health epidemic causing brain and lung problems across society
(Natural News) The existence of chemtrails used to be a topic of debate, but they are now being more widely acknowledged by experts like meteorologists to scientists. It’s becoming increasingly difficult to deny that they exist as more and more people are coming down with illnesses related to chemtrails. When TV host Rachel Reenstra had... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

PixarBio CEO Faces Criminal Fraud Charges
In the latest turn of what has been one of the more peculiar medtech/biotech stories to develop over the past couple years, PixarBio CEO Frank Reynolds and two of his associates were arrested Tuesday on charges of securities fraud. The arrest comes just shy of two months after PixarBio threatened to sue Reynolds' former company, InVivo Therapeutics, for libel and patent rights to the company's scaffold device. The U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Massachusetts said Tuesday that Reynolds, Jay Herod, and Kenneth Stromsland were charged with engaging in a scheme to defraud PixarBio investors by making false and misl...
Source: MDDI - April 25, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Business Source Type: news

SAMHSA Head Stands Firm on Marijuana's Dangers
(MedPage Today) -- Also says younger generation of providers is key to opioid fight (Source: MedPage Today Neurology)
Source: MedPage Today Neurology - April 25, 2018 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

ARRS: DTI-MRI shows brain damage from cocaine use
WASHINGTON, DC - MRI scans with a diffusion-tensor imaging protocol (DTI-MRI)...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: DTI-MRI finds abnormal brain connections in autistic kids DTI-MRI ties lack of fitness to cognitive decline Court rules that DTI-MRI scans are not 'junk science' DTI-MRI poses new cause for schizophrenia DTI-MRI sheds light on Parkinson's disease (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 25, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Exercise and Cognitive Symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease Exercise and Cognitive Symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease
This study suggests that exercise may be effective in preserving the cognitive health of older adults at risk of or who have Alzheimer disease, with aerobic exercise providing the most benefit.Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Journal Article Source Type: news

Synaptic communication controls neuronal migration
(Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science) Development of the mammalian neocortex requires the precise migration of billions of neurons. Synapses are structures that allow neurons to communicate with each other. Scientists at the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science have identified a novel role of synapses in neuronal migration during neocortical development. They show that transient synapses are formed between subplate neurons, which function as guidance cells, and newborn neurons. This interaction promotes the proper migration of newborn neurons. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 25, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Brain cell's Achilles' heel may prompt hydrocephalus
(Duke University) Viruses may spark hydrocephalus by exploiting a surprising weakness of cells that circulate fluid in the brain, called ependymal cells, report Duke University scientists. The researchers discovered that ependymal cells from mice require a continuous production of a transcription factor called Foxj1 to maintain their shape and function. Viruses known to infect the brain have found a way to shut down the production of Foxj1 and disable the cells, the researchers show. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Understanding the Neuroscience of Addiction: what it means for prevention and treatment
Advances in the understanding of brain development, as well as the role that genes and environment play in addiction, are the focus of a review article published today in The American Journal of Psychiatry. The authors discuss how more than three decades of research in genetics and neuroscience... (Source: NIDA News)
Source: NIDA News - April 25, 2018 Category: Addiction Tags: Addiction Science, Evidence-Based Practices, Genetics, NIDAMED News, Prevention Research, Researchers, Tobacco, Opioids, Brain and Addiction, Alcohol Source Type: news

American College of Physicians, April 19 - 21
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - April 25, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Cardiology, Dermatology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Infections, AIDS, Internal Medicine, Allergy, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, ENT, Pathology Source Type: news

Healthy elderly brains DO grow new cells just as many as young adult brains, according to new research
(Natural News) Many older people don’t seem as mentally sharp as young people, and it’s long been believed that brains stop making new cells as they age. Some research has even indicated that adults do not grow new neurons. Now, a new study in the journal Cell Stem Cell casts these ideas in serious doubt... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How a head injury could make you see yourself differently
Amy Schumer's insecure character in her new movie I Feel Pretty gets a new leash on life after a head injury changes her brain and gives her new confidence - and science says it may be possible. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Exposure to "safe" levels of BPA during pregnancy found to alter brain development, behavior
(Natural News) A new study provides an explanation for how exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) during pregnancy can affect brain development and behavior of the unborn child later in life, even at levels lower than the regulated “safe” human exposure level. BPA is a widely used chemical in a variety of plastic products, such as water... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

COLUMN: Knowing the health indicators of a brain aneurysm can save your life
A brain aneurysm is a silent, dangerous ticking time bomb. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Anesthesia Doesn't Seem to Harm Child's IQ: Study
At ages 8 to 12 and 15 to 20, all three groups were similar in terms of IQ, memory and several other measures of brain function, according to the study authors. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mother Forms Company to Tackle Brain-Based Disorders
What do you do when you have a child that’s suffering from a neurological disorder and nothing seems to work? What do you do when each visit to the doctor leads to more questions and more confusions. It’s a scenario that no mother wants to go through, yet Malekeh Amini found herself in with her son. “He was diagnosed with one neurological disorder at the age of 5, then another when he was six and another,” Amini told MD+DI. “It just continued to become more and more complex. After running around from one clinic to another and not knowing how to manage his symptoms and not knowing really how to...
Source: MDDI - April 24, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Digital Health Business Source Type: news

Light effectively relieves chronic pain in study with mice
Scientists have developed a light-sensitive chemical that provides chronic neuropathic pain relief from touch, based on a study of mice. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Boston Sci Sees Strong Data From Parkinson & #039;s Treatment Study
This study meets a new level of rigor in evaluating the effectiveness of a DBS system," Jerrold Vitek, MD, Phd, McKnight professor and chair, Department of Neurology, University of Minnesota Medical School and coordinating principal investigator for the INTREPID study, said in a release. "The double-blind design gives us confidence that the improvements in patients on time with good symptom control, as evaluated by the diary data, are an objective measure of the outcomes and suggests patients will benefit from the Vercise System." Boston Scientific received FDA approval for Vercise late last year. The device...
Source: MDDI - April 24, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Implants Source Type: news

Predictive Factors ID'd for Neurodegeneration in Idiopathic RBD
(MedPage Today) -- Opens the door to intervening with neuroprotective therapy (Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry)
Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry - April 24, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news

Girl With Rare Disease Races Time Via Virtual Tech Girl With Rare Disease Races Time Via Virtual Tech
Pediatric brain disease patients the latest to gather data for clinical trails from the comfort of their own home.WebMD Health News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Feds arrest PixarBio CEO Reynolds on securities fraud charges
The bizarre saga of biotech executive Frank Reynolds took another turn today when federal authorities arrested the PixarBio (OTC:PXRB) CEO and two associates on securities fraud charges, claiming they misled investors about its opioid substitute and falsely claimed a $1 billion valuation. PixarBio is purportedly developing a drug to replace morphine and other opiates, but prosecutors alleged that the product is actually an older anti-convulsant called carbamazepine, sold under the trade name Tegretol, that’s used to treat epilepsy and neuralgia; PixarBio plans to re-formulate the drug as a time-release...
Source: Mass Device - April 24, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Legal News Wall Street Beat PixarBio Source Type: news

How to live longer: Having a nap for this amount of time can help achieve longevity
HOW TO live longer: Quitting smoking, exercising and eating a balanced diet are obvious things to help a person achieve longevity. Scientists also say having a nap in the day is good for your health, and can prevent your brain from ageing - but the sleep should be for a certain amount of time and at a certain point in the day. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can Marijuana Be the Answer for Pain? Can Marijuana Be the Answer for Pain?
Could marijuana be the next pain reliever of choice?WebMD Health News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

IBD and Parkinson's; Exercise and ALS; New Concussion Biomarker?
(MedPage Today) -- News and commentary from the world of neurology and neuroscience (Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry)
Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry - April 24, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news

A Bedside Test to Differentiate Dementias? A Bedside Test to Differentiate Dementias?
From the AAN Annual Meeting, Medscape speaks with Dr Aman Deep about his research into differentiating two forms of dementia.Medscape Neurology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Expert Interview Source Type: news

Could eating fish stave off Parkinson's disease?
We know that eating fish protects brain health. A new study identifies the protein responsible for this and explains how it fights 'Parkinson's protein.' (Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today)
Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today - April 24, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: Parkinson's Disease Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Could eating fish stave off Parkinson's disease?
We know that eating fish protects brain health. A new study identifies the protein responsible for this and explains how it fights 'Parkinson's protein.' (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Parkinson's Disease Source Type: news

Soccer Heading & mdash;Not Collisions & mdash;Cognitively Impairs Players
April 24, 2018—(BRONX, NY)—Worse cognitive function in soccer players stems mainly from frequent ball heading rather than unintentional head impacts due to collisions, researchers atAlbert Einstein College of Medicine have found. The findings suggest that efforts to reduce long-term brain injuries may be focusing too narrowly on preventing accidental head collisions. The study published online today in the Frontiers in Neurology. (Source: Einstein News)
Source: Einstein News - April 24, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Parkinson’s disease: Add this 28p meal to your shopping list to slash brain condition risk
PARKINSON ’S disease symptoms include tremors, slow movement, and muscle stiffness. But, you could prevent the brain condition by adding this cheap meal to your diet, scientists have revealed. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Do I Have to Lose Me to Love You?
As codependents we lose ourselves in relationships, unaware that losing our Self is the greatest despair. When the relationship inevitably ends, it’s devastating because we are lost. We lack autonomy because that task wasn’t completed by adulthood. Often there are power struggles, characterized by repeated, unresolved arguments, either about a single recurring issue or numerous trivial things. Many of them boil down to the question of who has control, whose needs will be met, or how intimate they will be. Intimacy problems are a common symptom of codependency. Avoidance of intimacy, and the vulnerabil...
Source: Psych Central - April 24, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Abuse Codependence Narcissism Personality Relationships & Love Self-Esteem Autonomy Boundaries Closeness Codependency Denial dependent personality Emotional Abuse Guilt Identity Independence Intimacy Manipulation Resent Source Type: news

Boston Scientific touts 1-year data on Vercise DBS in Parkinson ’ s
This study meets a new level of rigor in evaluating the effectiveness of a DBS system,” coordinating principal investigator Dr. Jerrold Vitek, of the University of Minnesota Medical School, said in prepared remarks. “The double-blind design gives us confidence that the improvements in patients on time with good symptom control, as evaluated by the diary data, are an objective measure of the outcomes and suggests patients will benefit from the Vercise System.” Vercise won CE Mark approval in the European Union to treat essential tremor in 2014. FDA approval to treat Parkinson’s followed las...
Source: Mass Device - April 24, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Clinical Trials Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Boston Scientific Parkinson's disease Source Type: news

Controversial epilepsy drug that causes birth defects is banned
The Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency has changed the licence for sodium valproate, which controls electrical functions in the brain to prevent life-threatening seizures. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heading footballs may cause brain injuries
Researchers from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, claim that heading may cause brain injury and, as players are in control, the consequences can be prevented. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Round-Up of Seven New Neurology Studies A Round-Up of Seven New Neurology Studies
Dr Diener reports on a wide range of studies in neurology and critical care medicine published in February and March, 2018.Medscape Neurology (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - April 24, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Commentary Source Type: news

Boston Scientific Announces Positive Late-Breaking Data From The INTREPID Study
MARLBOROUGH, Mass., April 24, 2018 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Boston Scientific Corporation (NYSE: BSX) today announced one-year data from the INTREPID study, the first and only prospective, double-blind, randomized, sham-controlled, mul... Devices, Neurology Boston Scientific, INTREPID study, deep brain stimulation, Parkinson's disease (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - April 24, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

AAN 2018: Lilly's Galcanezumab Significantly Reduced Monthly Migraine Headache Days in Patients with Migraine Who Previously Failed to Respond to Multiple Preventive Therapies
INDIANAPOLIS, April 24, 2018 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY) announced today results from a post-hoc subgroup analysis which demonstrated efficacy of galcanezumab in patients with episodic and chronic migrain... Biopharmaceuticals, Neurology Eli Lilly, galcanezumab, migraine (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - April 24, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Linear Link for Physical Activity, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
TUESDAY, April 24, 2018 -- There is a linear correlation for physical activity (PA) with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), according to a study published online April 23 in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery& Psychiatry. Anne E. Visser,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 24, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news