FDA Okays Stiripentol (Diacomit) for Dravet Syndrome FDA Okays Stiripentol (Diacomit) for Dravet Syndrome
Stiripentol is indicated for patients aged 2 years or older who are also taking clobazam.FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Alert Source Type: news

Are Docs Giving Patients the Wrong Idea About Brain Death? Are Docs Giving Patients the Wrong Idea About Brain Death?
Many patients'family members don't feel that brain death is true death, and some recent cases in which'brain-dead'patients recovered add to the conundrum.Medscape Business of Medicine (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - August 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care Commentary Source Type: news

Pennsylvania Case Could Affect Evidence for Malpractice Defense
Appeals center on relevance of consent, known risks and complications presented at trial (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - August 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Cardiology, Dermatology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Infections, AIDS, Internal Medicine, Allergy, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Nursing, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, ENT, Source Type: news

The 1.2-Second Diagnosis; Drug Deaths Out of Control; DBS for RLS
(MedPage Today) -- News and commentary from the world of neurology and neuroscience (Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry)
Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry - August 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news

Neuroinflammation in Chronic and Widespread Pain Neuroinflammation in Chronic and Widespread Pain
This article examines the contribution of neuroinflammation to the pathophysiology of chronic and widespread pain. Might neuroinflammation be a target for novel therapeutic approaches?Anesthesiology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - August 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Anesthesiology Journal Article Source Type: news

How a Healthy Heart Can Help Lower Risk of Dementia
To ward off heart disease, the American Heart Association (AHA) has a helpful list of the most important risk factors that can lower your chances of having heart problems. It turns out those very same things can also reduce the risk of dementia. In a new study published in JAMA, researchers led by Cecilia Samieri, an epidemiologist at Bordeaux University and INSERM in France, investigated the AHA’s Life’s Simple 7 metrics that the organization says can help lower the risk of heart disease. But Samieri and her colleagues evaluated them for how they affected dementia risk. The measures include not smoking, having...
Source: TIME: Health - August 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Brain Dementia healthytime Heart Disease Source Type: news

Radiation for Childhood Brain Tumor Can Hinder Memory
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - August 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Family Medicine, Neurology, Oncology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, News, Source Type: news

UNC Rockingham physicians practices join UNC Physicians Network
UNC Rockingham Health Care's six physician practices in Eden and western Rockingham County have become part of UNC Physicians Network. The move brings the expertise and services of the larger UNC Health Care System's network of specialty care providers to the Rockingham County, according to Dana Weston, president of UNC Rockingham. The practices involved in the transition will change their names: Morehead Family Practice to UN C Family Medicine at Eden Morehead Neurospine to UNC Neurosurgery… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - August 21, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John Joyce Source Type: news

Breath-focused practices help alleviate symptoms of ADHD and cognitive decline
(Natural News) Breathing does more than sustain life. When practiced with meditation, it can benefit the body and, according to Irish researchers, help with ADHD and cognitive decline. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects children and teenagers. As its name suggests, it is characterized by the inability to focus and... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Window into the brain
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) In collaboration with scientists from the Ioffe Institute, HSE University researchers have developed an ultra-sensitive atomic magnetometric scheme with a sensitivity of 5 fTl × Hz-1/2, setting a performance record for sensors operating in the Earth's magnetic field. The scheme will be used to design a multichannel atomic magnetoencephalograph, expected to be the most accurate and compact device available today for non-invasive measurement of the brain's electrical activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 21, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How do muscles know what time it is?
(Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health) How do muscle cells prepare for the particular metabolic challenges of the day? Scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen (LMU), members of the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), have investigated this question and published their results in 'PLOS Biology'. The study has uncovered a metabolic network which is, contrary to expectations, not controlled by the brain but rather by the 'circadian clock' of muscle cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 21, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Dehydration alters human brain shape and activity, slackens task performance
(Georgia Institute of Technology) Sweating up a storm gardening? This is what your brain might be doing: Reasonably customary dehydration led to shape changes inside the brains of test persons in a new study. Neuronal activity also got busier and broader. The subjects' average performance of a motor task also slipped markedly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 21, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

BrainsWay ’s New Indication Is Aimed at OCD Patients
About 3% of the US population suffers from obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), according to an article published on HealthyPlace.com Statistics also show that one in every 200 children suffers from the disorder. BrainsWay is looking to use its technology to help treat the illness, which is described as a disorder of the brain that adversely affects behavior and causes intense anxiety in those with the condition. The Jerusalem, Israel-based company recently received De Novo clearance from FDA for its deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (Deep TMS) system for the treatment of OCD in adults. BrainsWay said this clearance r...
Source: MDDI - August 21, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Business Source Type: news

Experts Offer Tips for Provider Appeal of Denied Medical Claims
Recommendations include asking for exceptions to payer policies and citing regulatory information (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - August 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Cardiology, Dermatology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Infections, AIDS, Internal Medicine, Allergy, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Nursing, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, ENT, Source Type: news

Ear-tickling device to end the misery of indigestion
The new device, being trialled at Massachusetts General Hospital in the U.S., eases symptoms by stimulating the vagus nerve - which travels from the brain, behind the ears, to the stomach. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Icy Truth: The World of Resuscitation is NOT Flat
For those looking for a better way to preserve the brain and vital organs in the future, an article released recently about work by scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital may give us a peek at a future tool in our resuscitation toolbox. It’s a process that might prove valuable if used in conjunction with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), impedance threshold devices (ITDs) and head-up CPR to keep people in a suspended state of animation until their malady is found, corrected and allowed to begin healing. Massachusetts General is the original and largest teaching hospital at Harvard Medical School. Thei...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 20, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: A.J. Heightman, MPA, EMT-P Tags: Exclusive Articles Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news

This Is Your Brain on a Long ED Shift: HealthLeaders Media
(MedPage Today) -- Also, strategies to enhance in-hospital patient mobility (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - August 20, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Why head clashes can lead to heart attacks: Concussion stresses the heart to protect the brain  
Dr J. Patrick Neary, a professor of kinesiology and health studies at the University of Regina in Canada explains how the brain makes sure the heart sends the right amount of blood it needs to heal. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: 1 In 15 Americans Smell ‘ Phantom Odors ’
BOSTON (CBS) – Do you ever detect bad smells that no one else does? A new study from the National Institutes of Health finds that 1 in 15 or almost seven percent of Americans over the age of forty smell odors that aren’t there. This was one of the first national studies to try to determine how common the problem is. It’s called phantom odor perception and the smells that people detect are usually unpleasant ones. The study found it’s more common as we age and more common among women. When severe, phantom odor perception can affect someone’s quality of life, impacting their appetite, food prefe...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Watch Listen Dr. Mallika Marshall HealthWatch Source Type: news

FDA warns of high stroke, mortality risk with SynCardia TAH-t C2 controller
The FDA on Friday released a letter warning of a higher mortality risk and stroke rate than expected for patients receiving treatment from SynCardia Systems’ Temporary Total Artificial Heart Companion 2 Driver System. Data indicating the higher mortality and stroke rate came from a post-approval study conducted by the company itself, the FDA said. The study indicated that patients treated with the previous generation driver of the device, the Circulatory Support System Console, experienced a lower rate of stroke and mortality compared with the C2. The TAH-t system is designed to function as a bridge to a heart transp...
Source: Mass Device - August 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Food & Drug Administration (FDA) SynCardia Source Type: news

Small study links behavioral, neural changes in ADHD boys receiving video game intervention
A recent small study published in Nature ’s Translational Psychiatry journal observed a change in the brain networking and behavior of boys receiving a video game-based treatment for ADHD. Conducted in Singapore, the study was conducted as part of a larger controlled investigation of boys with ADHD. It compared an intervention group of 1 8 participants (mean age 9 years) to a control arm of 11 participants (mean age 9.45 years). (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - August 20, 2018 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Pediatricians Group: Doctors Should Prescribe Play Time For Kids
BOSTON (CBS) – A new report is recommending kids do something critical for healthy development – play. The report ‘The Power of Play’ from the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends all pediatricians tell children that playing with parents and peers is a critical part of healthy development, fundamental for learning life skills and reducing stress. Dr. Michael Yogman of Mount Auburn Hospital authored the report which shows playtime has decreased significantly in the past 15 years, while screen time has increased. And about 30 percent of kindergarten children don’t go out for recess. “...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local American Academy Of Pediatrics Dr. Mallika Marshall Dr. Michael Yogman Source Type: news

Doctors Should Prescribe More Play Time For Kids, Study Shows
BOSTON (CBS) – A new report is recommending kids do something critical for healthy development – play. The report ‘The Power of Play’ from the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends all pediatricians tell children that playing with parents and peers is a critical part of healthy development, fundamental for learning life skills and reducing stress. Dr. Michael Yogman of Mount Auburn Hospital authored the report which shows playtime has decreased significantly in the past 15 years, while screen time has increased. And about 30 percent of kindergarten children don’t go out for recess. “...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local American Academy Of Pediatrics Dr. Mallika Marshall Dr. Michael Yogman Source Type: news

DOD awards grant for lung cancer research
The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) has awarded a $673,000 grant to researchers...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Samsung NeuroLogica wins $250M DOD contract U.S. DOD grants ATO status to ScImage PACS software U.S. DOD grants ATO status to Fuji PACS Virtual Imaging lands big DOD x-ray order Fuji scores DOD OK for web viewer (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - August 20, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Cognitive Disability Most Prevalent Type in Young Adults
Disability - specific disparities prevalent in access to health care, especially for young, middle - aged adults (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - August 20, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Internal Medicine, Neurology, Nursing, Orthopedics, Psychiatry, Rheumatology, Journal, Source Type: news

MRI shows link between radiation and memory loss in kids
MRI scans have shown how the effects of radiation therapy can reduce the volume...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Soccer ball heading more risky for women than men MRI shows how kids compensate for dyslexia MRI shows the uniqueness of brain anatomy DTI-MRI finds abnormal brain connections in autistic kids fMRI offers clues about memory loss in older adults (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - August 20, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

DePuy Launches New Interbody Implant For Degenerative Disc Disease
DePuy Synthes, an orthopedic and neurosurgery company owned by Johnson & Johnson, recently announced the launch of their new flagship technology, the CONCORDE LIFT Interbody Implant. The new implantable device was designed to help treat patients suffering from degenerative disc disease, a condition that can cause extreme pain from a damaged disc in the spine. The implantable device was designed as part of a new procedural solution that can simplify minimally invasive spine surgery procedures used to help restore disc height in the spinal column. This is typically done through the process of spinal fusion, a surgical pr...
Source: MDDI - August 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kristopher Sturgis Tags: Orthopedics Source Type: news

Two-year-old with rare 'childhood Alzheimer's' thought to be the youngest ever diagnosed in the UK
Reggie Griffiths, two, from Knutton in Staffordshire was diagnosed with the rare brain condition Sanfilippo syndrome in January, and the disease stops him from speaking and will eventually kill him. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Electrical Brain Stimulation May Improve Post-Stroke Aphasia (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Patients with long-term aphasia named more words with noninvasive technique (Source: MedPage Today Primary Care)
Source: MedPage Today Primary Care - August 20, 2018 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Insufficient acetylcholine responsible for those "senior moments" – here are natural ways to increase its levels
(Natural News) Acetylcholine earned its title of the “memory molecule” for a good reason. Low levels of the normally numerous neurotransmitter can make even young and otherwise smart people every bit the senile senior citizen. An article on Be Brain Fit shows how you can boost the amount of acetylcholine in your brain. The initial... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Prescription for play? It's "brain building" for kids, study finds
New guidance out overnight calls on pediatricians to write a "prescription for play," and for parents to help fill that order. The clinical report from the American Academy of Pediatrics says "play is not frivolous -- it is brain building." Dr. Tara Narula joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss the benefits of unstructured play. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - August 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Doctors Not Talking About Newer Meningitis Vaccine
MONDAY, Aug. 20, 2018 -- Many U.S. doctors aren't telling teenaged patients and their parents about a newer vaccine for potentially deadly bacterial meningitis infections, a new study finds. Bacterial meningitis is an infection of the brain and... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 20, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Labourer has 18 months to live due to a rare cancer in his brain
Jordan Payne, 23, from Ripley in Derbyshire, is battling a golf ball-sized brain tumour that is made of germ cells - created as a foetus grows in the womb. They eventually become sperm or eggs. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The brain-boosting benefits of high-quality olive oil
(Natural News) The Mediterranean diet is one of the best ways to eat for a healthier and longer life, thanks to its primary component, olive oil. People living in the Mediterranean region are some of the healthiest and long-lived people in the world. Olive oil provides many health benefits, but its benefits to brain health are... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Labourer, 23, has 18 months to live due to a rare tumour in his brain
Jordan Payne, 23, from Ripley in Derbyshire, is battling a golf ball-sized brain tumour that is made of germ cells - created as a foetus grows in the womb. They eventually become sperm or eggs. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

MGH to study medical device for concussions, Alzheimer's
Massachusetts General Hospital has begun a four-year research project with a New Jersey-based medical device company looking at concussive brain injuries and Alzheimer ’s disease. The company, electroCore, said it is providing MGH with $1 million over four years as seed funding for multiple preclinical studies on its non-invasive electric nerve stimulation device. The device is already on the market for migraines, but executives said they hope to expand the ma rket to other conditions. “The… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - August 20, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

Comparison of two prehospital predictive models for mortality and impaired consciousness after severe traumatic brain injury - Pannatier M, Delhumeau C, Walder B.
BACKGROUND: The primary aim was to investigate the performance of a National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics based predictive model (NACA-BM) for mortality at 14  days and a reference model using motor GCS (GCS-RM). The secondary aim was to compare the ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

Concussion incidence in amateur Australian Rules Footballers - Costello DM, Ernest J, Kaye AH, O'Brien TJ, Shultz SR.
This study measured the con... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Recreational and Sports Issues Source Type: news

Quality and feasibility of sonographic measurement of the optic nerve sheath diameter to estimate the risk of raised intracranial pressure after traumatic brain injury in prehospital setting - Houz é-Cerfon CH, Bounes V, Guemon J, Le Gourrierec T, Geeraerts T.
OBJECTIVE: In Trauma brain injury (TBI) patients, early detection and subsequent prompt treatment of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) is a challenge in the pre-hospital setting, as physical examination is limited in comatose patients, and invasive devi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Traumatic brain injury and stroke: does recovery differ? - Castor N, El Massioui F.
BACKGROUND: Traumatic brain injury and stroke often lead to cognitive, neurological and psychological disorders, which can result in many difficulties. Despite the existence of various disorders, improving cognitive capacities may be possible for these two... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Wearables for gait and balance assessment in the neurological ward - study design and first results of a prospective cross-sectional feasibility study with 384 inpatients - Bernhard FP, Sartor J, Bettecken K, Hobert MA, Arnold C, Weber YG, Poli S, Margraf NG, Schlenstedt C, Hansen C, Maetzler W.
BACKGROUND: Deficits in gait and balance are common among neurological inpatients. Currently, assessment of these patients is mainly subjective. New assessment options using wearables may provide complementary and more objective information. METHOD... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Penetrating cervical traumatic spinal cord injury due to lawn mowing: an unusual case report - Borgstedt-Bakke JH, Duel P, Rasmussen MM.
We present a case of a 55-year-old farmer who suddenly experienced an electric sensation in the left half of his body during lawn mowing. Neurological examination discovered neurological deficits corresponding to an incomplete spinal cord injury. Magnetic ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Frequency and characteristics of traumatic brain injury in restrained drivers involved in road traffic accidents - Inamasu J, Nakaya M, Kujirai D, Mayanagi K, Nakatsukasa M.
BACKGROUND: While seatbelt is an important device protecting drivers from traumatic brain injury (TBI), it has rarely been reported how often and in what circumstances restrained drivers sustain TBI after road traffic accident (RTA). Whole-body computed to... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Cocaine self-administration is increased after frontal traumatic brain injury and associated with neuroinflammation - Vonder Haar C, Ferland JN, Kaur S, Riparip LK, Rosi S, Winstanley CA.
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been linked to the development of numerous psychiatric diseases, including substance use disorder. However, it can be difficult to ascertain from clinical data whether the TBI is cause or consequence of increased addiction ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

The association between the Functional Status Scale and the Pediatric Functional Independence Measure in children who survive traumatic brain injury - Maddux AB, Cox-Martin M, Dichiaro M, Bennett TD.
OBJECTIVES: To determine the association between the Functional Status Scale and Pediatric Functional Independence Measure scores during the rehabilitation stay in children who survive traumatic brain injury. DESIGN: Secondary analysis of a prospec... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Neuroscience Claims Space at CHI St. Vincent North
The $30 million renovation and construction project at CHI St. Vincent North in Sherwood can’t finish soon enough for Polly Davenport. (Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care)
Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care - August 20, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Lithium: Keeping the Cellphone and the Brain Humming
The element that Canada’s Standard Lithium Ltd. hopes to mine from south Arkansas’ underground brine deposits has many uses, from a steady power supply for your laptop to stabilizing your mood. (Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care)
Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care - August 20, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Childhood brain tumor treatment impairs new memory formation
(Society for Neuroscience) Young people who received radiation therapy for the most common pediatric brain tumor struggle to create new memories about specific events, according to a study of children and adolescents published in JNeurosci. Their ability to recall events prior to treatment, however, remains intact. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Children with brain tumors who undergo radiation less likely to recall recent events
(Baylor University) Children with certain types of brain tumors who undergo radiation treatment are less likely to recall the specifics of events they experienced after radiation than to remember pre-treatment happenings, according to a Baylor University study comparing them to children with healthy brains. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Taking the brain apart to put it all together again
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) A new Organ Chip system from the Wyss Institute has fluidically linked a Brain Chip with two blood-brain barrier (BBB) Chips to recapitulate the interactions between the brain and its blood vessels. This system reacts to methamphetamine exposure just like a human brain, and has allowed scientists to make new discoveries about just how important our blood vessels are for our mental function. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news