New data for Roche ’s OCREVUS (ocrelizumab) reinforce significant benefit on slowing disease progression in relapsing and primary progressive multiple sclerosis
Basel, 16 April 2021 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced new OCREVUS ® (ocrelizumab) analyses supporting its significant benefit on disease progression in early-stage relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and primary progressive MS (PPMS) as well as demonstrating high persistence and strong adherence to twice-yearly (six-monthly) dosing. These data are being presented virtually at the 73rd American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Annual Meeting from 17–22 April 2021. OCREVUS is the number one prescribed MS medication in the U.S. for patients starting a new treatment, and more than 200,000 peop...
Source: Roche Investor Update - April 16, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

A new treatment for rare muscular disease
(University of Cincinnati) Hani Kushlaf, MD, an associate professor in both the Department of Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine and the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Cincinnati, is presenting findings on a possible new treatment for Pompe disease virtually at the American Academy of Neurology on April 20. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 16, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

MS Hospital Visits Increase in Warmer Weather MS Hospital Visits Increase in Warmer Weather
The authors of a new study warn that global warming could have serious implications for people living with multiple sclerosis and for healthcare usage.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Emergency Medicine Headlines)
Source: Medscape Emergency Medicine Headlines - April 15, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

COVID-Related Syndrome Tied to Neurologic Symptoms in Kids COVID-Related Syndrome Tied to Neurologic Symptoms in Kids
Approximately half of children with pediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 had new-onset neurologic symptoms.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - April 15, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Children With Worse Atopic Dermatitis More Likely to Have Learning Disabilities
Findings independent of socioeconomic characteristics, onset age, and other related disorders (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - April 15, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Dermatology, Family Medicine, Neurology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Journal, Source Type: news

Sinus Inflammation May Inhibit Aspects of Brain Connectivity Sinus Inflammation May Inhibit Aspects of Brain Connectivity
People with sinonasal inflammation show decreased functional brain connectivity, according to a small proof-of-concept study.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines - April 15, 2021 Category: Radiology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Cardiologists Can Perform Stroke Thrombectomy to Fill'Unmet Need'Cardiologists Can Perform Stroke Thrombectomy to Fill'Unmet Need '
Interventional cardiologists can competently perform stroke thrombectomy after training, with similar outcomes to neuroradiology centers, a study shows. US neuro-interventionalists oppose that strategy.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - April 15, 2021 Category: Cardiology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

The predictive value of neurobiological measures for recidivism in delinquent male young adults - Zijlmans J, Marhe R, Bevaart F, van Duin L, Luijks MJA, Franken I, Tiemeier H, Popma A.
BACKGROUND: Neurobiological measures have been associated with delinquent behaviour, but little is known about the predictive power of these measures for criminal recidivism and whether they have incremental value over and above demographic and behavioural... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Social consequences and contexts of adverse childhood experiences - Trinidad JE.
Adverse childhood experiences' (ACEs) negative consequences on health, education, and life opportunities are often explained through the neurodevelopmental changes in a person's stress reactivity and coping, which contribute to the adoption of health-damag... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Harnessing Stem Cells to Model Neurological Disorders
(Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Tags: Sponsored Webinars Source Type: news

Stress Not Always a Trigger for Relapse in Eating Disorders: Study
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - April 15, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Neurology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Nutrition, Preventive Medicine, News, Source Type: news

Brain clots 'more likely' with Covid infection than vaccine
A rapid review of US patients says people being vaccinated should be reassured by the findings. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dietary Spermidine Boosts Cognition in Insects and Rodents
Mice and flies given the polyamine in their diet have increased brain cell metabolism and cognitive function, and epidemiological data hints at a similar benefit in humans. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Ubrogepant Safety, Efficacy Not Affected by Triptans Ubrogepant Safety, Efficacy Not Affected by Triptans
The CGRP receptor antagonist shows promise, but hurdles set up by insurance companies limit its potential, experts say.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - April 15, 2021 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Tipping Point: Woman has voice reconstructed thanks to ITV show appearance
Helen Whitelaw appeared on Tipping Point before Motor Neurone Disease rendered her speechless. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AAN: Neurological Manifestations Common in Children With PIMS-TS
THURSDAY, April 15, 2021 -- About half of children with pediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (PIMS-TS) have new-onset neurological symptoms, according to a study... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 15, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

AAN: Race May Affect Response to Anti-CD20 Therapy for MS, NMOSD
THURSDAY, April 15, 2021 -- For patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) receiving anti-CD20 treatment, B-cell repopulation occurs in more African American than White patients between six and 12 months... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 15, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Scientists Report Creating the First Embryo With Human and Non-Human Primate Cells
In a ground-breaking experiment, researchers have successfully created the first human-monkey chimera. The work, published in the journal Cell, describes the the first embryo containing both human and monkey cells that was cultured for 20 days. Led by Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, the study represents the culmination of decades of work in understanding early embryo development in non-human species, which Belmonte hopes will now apply to humans. But it is bound to raise serious ethical questions about the implications of combining human cells with those from a different species (even if it is a closely related one), and the...
Source: TIME: Health - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Neighborhood Disadvantage Tied to Cognitive Decline in Older Adults
THURSDAY, April 15, 2021 -- There is a longitudinal association of neighborhood-level disadvantage with cortical thinning and cognitive decline, according to a study published online April 14 in Neurology. Jack F. V. Hunt, Ph.D., from the University... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 15, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

AHA News: The Link Between Structural Racism, High Blood Pressure and Black People's Health
THURSDAY, April 15, 2021 (American Heart Association News) -- High blood pressure. Structural racism. What do they have in common? Researchers say they are two of the biggest factors responsible for the gap in poor heart and brain health between... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 15, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Vaccine ban outrage: '10x more likely to get brain blood clot from coronavirus than a jab'
A BLOOD clot is 10 times more likely if you catch coronavirus than if you have any of the Covid vaccines, an Oxford study has found. In particular, coming in contact with SARS-CoV-2 unprotected and unvaccinated puts you at greater risk of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis than any coronavirus vaccine. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Your Zip Code Could Help or Harm Your Brain
THURSDAY, April 15, 2021 -- Where you live could affect your brain health as you age, a new study claims. Specifically, it found that middle-aged and older people in poorer neighborhoods showed more brain shrinkage and faster mental decline than... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 15, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Roche ’s Evrysdi continues to improve motor function and survival in babies with Type 1 Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)
Basel, 15 April 2021 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced new 2-year data from Part 2 of FIREFISH, a Phase 2/3 global study evaluating Evrysdi ™ (risdiplam) in infants aged 1-7 months at enrollment with symptomatic Type 1 spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The data showed Evrysdi continued to improve motor function between months 12 and 24, including the ability to sit without support. The study also showed Evrysdi continued to improve survi val, improve ability to feed orally and reduce the need for permanent ventilation*. Exploratory data suggested Evrysdi continued to improve the ability to swallow and...
Source: Roche Media News - April 15, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche ’s Evrysdi continues to improve motor function and survival in babies with Type 1 Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)
Basel, 15 April 2021 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced new 2-year data from Part 2 of FIREFISH, a Phase 2/3 global study evaluating Evrysdi ™ (risdiplam) in infants aged 1-7 months at enrollment with symptomatic Type 1 spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The data showed Evrysdi continued to improve motor function between months 12 and 24, including the ability to sit without support. The study also showed Evrysdi continued to improve survi val, improve ability to feed orally and reduce the need for permanent ventilation*. Exploratory data suggested Evrysdi continued to improve the ability to swallow and...
Source: Roche Investor Update - April 15, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

An ion pump to deliver chemotherapy agents to the brain
(Link ö ping University) Despite surgery and subsequent treatment with chemotherapy and radiation, the majority of patients experience recurrence of malignant brain tumours. Researchers at Link ö ping University, Sweden, and the Medical University of Graz, Austria, have shown in cells in culture that an ion pump can deliver drugs more accurately, which gives less severe adverse effects in chemotherapy. The results have been published in Advanced Materials Technologies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 15, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A neuromagnetic view through the skull
(Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB)) The brain processes information using both slow and fast currents. Until now, researchers had to use electrodes placed inside the brain in order to measure the latter. For the first time, researchers from Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), successfully visualized these fast brain signals from the outside - and found a surprising degree of variability. According to their article in PNAS*, the researchers used a particularly sensitive magnetoencephalography device to accomplish this feat. (Source: EurekAlert! -...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

No increase in brain health problems in middle age for men who played football in high school
(Wolters Kluwer Health) Decades after their days on the gridiron, middle-aged men who played football in high school are not experiencing greater problems with concentration, memory, or depression compared to men who did not play football, reports a study in Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UZH researchers find new measure to predict stress resilience
(University of Zurich) Researchers at the University of Zurich show that increased sensitivity in a specific region of the brain contributes to the development of anxiety and depression in response to real-life stress. Their study establishes an objective neurobiological measure for stress resilience in humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Spending time on household chores may improve brain health
(Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care) Engaging in household chores may be beneficial for brain health in older adults. In a recent Baycrest study, older adults who spent more time on household chores showed greater brain size, which is a strong predictor of cognitive health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Japanese-European research team discovers novel genetic mitochondrial disorder
(Fujita Health University) The list of known genetic mitochondrial disorders is ever-growing, and ongoing research continues to identify new disorders in this category. In an article recently published in Brain, a Japanese-European team of scientists, including researchers from Fujita Health University, describe mutations in the LIG3 gene, which plays a crucial role in mitochondrial DNA replication. These mutations cause a previously unknown syndrome characterized by gut dysmotility, leukoencephalopathy, and neuromuscular abnormalities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Physicists develop theoretical model for neural activity of mouse brain
(Emory Health Sciences) The dynamics of the neural activity of a mouse brain behave in a peculiar, unexpected way that can be theoretically modeled without any fine tuning, suggests a new paper by physicists at Emory University. Physical Review Letters published the research, which adds to the evidence that theoretical physics frameworks may aid in the understanding of large-scale brain activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 15, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Unlocking new avenues for curing cancer: Cell receptor neuropilin-1 could hold the key
(Cactus Communications) Scientists have been exploring the cellular mechanisms underlying cancers for centuries in an attempt to successfully treat them. Collating recent research on one avenue of this exploration, the role of cell membrane receptor neuropilin-1, a review article published in Chinese Medical Journal gives a glimpse of how much we know of the disease, how much we still need to find out, and new promising treatments that we've begun to apply. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 15, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Protein linked to ALS/Ataxia could play key role in other neurodegenerative disorders
(University of Utah Health) A new study suggests that some neurological disorders share a common underlying thread. Staufen1, a protein that accumulates in the brains of patients with certain neurological conditions, is linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease, along with other neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease, according to University of Utah Health scientists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FSU College of Medicine research links Parkinson's disease and neuroticism
(Florida State University) New research from the Florida State University College of Medicine has found that the personality trait neuroticism is consistently associated with a higher risk of developing the brain disorder Parkinson's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pause on J & J Vaccination in U.S. Continues as CDC Committee Asks for More Data
After federal health agencies in the U.S. recommended a temporary halt on using the Johnson & Johnson-Janssen COVID-19 vaccine, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on April 14 convened a 13-member Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) to review the six reports of unusual blood clots occurring in people vaccinated with the shot. The ACIP sets policies for how any approved or, in the case of COVID-19, authorized, vaccines are to be used—when and how the shots should be given and to which age groups. After the meeting, the CDC said it would continue to recommend the pause. The committ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Neuropixels 2.0: A miniaturized high-density probe for stable, long-term brain recordings
Measuring the dynamics of neural processing across time scales requires following the spiking of thousands of individual neurons over milliseconds and months. To address this need, we introduce the Neuropixels 2.0 probe together with newly designed analysis algorithms. The probe has more than 5000 sites and is miniaturized to facilitate chronic implants in small mammals and recording during unrestrained behavior. High-quality recordings over long time scales were reliably obtained in mice and rats in six laboratories. Improved site density and arrangement combined with newly created data processing methods enable automatic...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Steinmetz, N. A., Aydin, C., Lebedeva, A., Okun, M., Pachitariu, M., Bauza, M., Beau, M., Bhagat, J., Böhm, C., Broux, M., Chen, S., Colonell, J., Gardner, R. J., Karsh, B., Kloosterman, F., Kostadinov, D., Mora-Lopez, C., OCallaghan, J., Park, J. Tags: Neuroscience, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Recording many neurons for a long time
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Stern, P. Tags: Neuroscience twis Source Type: news

Mosaic synapses in epilepsy
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Shohayeb, B., Cooper, H. M. Tags: Neuroscience perspective Source Type: news

More is not always better
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Hines, P. J. Tags: Neuroscience twis Source Type: news

Comment on "Circadian rhythms in the absence of the clock gene Bmal1"
Ray et al. (Reports, 14 February 2020, p. 800) recently claimed temperature-compensated, free-running mRNA oscillations in Bmal1–/– liver slices and skin fibroblasts. We reanalyzed these data and found far fewer reproducible mRNA oscillations in this genotype. We also note errors and potentially inappropriate analyses. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Abruzzi, K. C., Gobet, C., Naef, F., Rosbash, M. Tags: Neuroscience t-comment Source Type: news

Female-specific synaptic dysfunction and cognitive impairment in a mouse model of PCDH19 disorder
Protocadherin-19 (PCDH19) mutations cause early-onset seizures and cognitive impairment. The PCDH19 gene is on the X-chromosome. Unlike most X-linked disorders, PCDH19 mutations affect heterozygous females (PCDH19HET) but not hemizygous males (PCDH19HEMI); however, the reason why remains to be elucidated. We demonstrate that PCDH19, a cell-adhesion molecule, is enriched at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses. Pcdh19HET but not Pcdh19HEMI mice show impaired mossy fiber synaptic structure and physiology. Consistently, Pcdh19HET but not Pcdh19HEMI mice exhibit reduced pattern completion and separation abilities, which require mo...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Hoshina, N., Johnson-Venkatesh, E. M., Hoshina, M., Umemori, H. Tags: Neuroscience, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Are Humans More Sensitive To Screams From Sex Than From Fear?
A study claims that the brain processes alarm calls less efficiently than a scream of pleasure or joy. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - April 14, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: JV Chamary, Contributor Tags: Science /science Innovation /innovation Healthcare /healthcare technology Source Type: news

CDC vaccine advisers seek more data on rare blood clots before deciding whether to resume Johnson & Johnson shots
Federal health officials had recommended Tuesday that states pause use of the vaccine while agencies review six U.S. cases of a rare and severe type of brain blood clot among the more than 7 million people who received the shot. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - April 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lena H. Sun Source Type: news

COVID Vaccine'Side Effect' or Functional Neurological Disorder? COVID Vaccine'Side Effect' or Functional Neurological Disorder?
Reports of unusual movements after COVID-19 vaccination may be a result of this complex neuropsychiatric condition rather than being caused directly by the vaccine, experts suggest.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Pharmacist Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pharmacist Headlines - April 14, 2021 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Use of Comfort Care Increasing After Stroke, May Reduce Costs Use of Comfort Care Increasing After Stroke, May Reduce Costs
Patients'likelihood of receiving comfort care, which includes hospice or palliative care, may depend on their gender, race, and region, researchers find.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - April 14, 2021 Category: Cardiology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Brain imaging with CT, MRI in kidney cancer patients finds metastases
Baseline brain imaging using CT or MRI in patients with metastatic kidney cance...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: CT results in COVID-19 patients predict abnormal brain MRI findings CT-guided renal ablation is safe for treating cancer in obese patients MRI leads the way in neuroimaging innovation MGH researchers develop portable MRI scanner Working group uses MRI to analyze brain trauma (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 14, 2021 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

' Novel, Striking' Data on Early CVD Risk Factors and Cognition'Novel, Striking' Data on Early CVD Risk Factors and Cognition
High body mass index, systolic blood pressure, and fasting glucose level during early adulthood are associated with increased cognitive decline in later life, new research shows.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - April 14, 2021 Category: Cardiology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Many Kids Who Develop Severe MIS-C Have Neurologic Symptoms
Research finds that these young patients often develop neurologic symptoms along with the respiratory issues they might face. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - April 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Many Kids Who Develop Severe COVID-Linked Syndrome Have Neurologic Symptoms
WEDNESDAY, April 14, 2021 -- In very rare cases, children infected with the new coronavirus can develop a severe illness known as multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C). Now, research finds that these young patients often develop neurologic... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 14, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Woman with brain tumour fell pregnant before drugs would have made it impossible
Carly Beasley, 33, from Chippenham, Wiltshire, delayed her chemotherapy after her slow-growing, incurable brain tumour was removed so she could travel the world with her husband Kris, 34. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news