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In recovery from sports concussions, state of mind really does matter
When a student-athlete suffers a concussion, one of their biggest concerns is getting back to the playing field as soon as they are well. While the physical symptoms of their brain injury may fade after a week or two, for a small minority of them the emotional recovery is longer and more complicated.Researchers at UCLA have been taking a closer look at the psychological aspects of recovery from head injuries and have recently begun a program that integrates a common type of talk therapy as part of their treatment for athletes with lingering emotional impacts after their injuries.“Generally speaking, the psychological...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 17, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Girl with rare 'childhood Alzheimer's' turns 8
Eliza O'Neill, eight, suffers from Sanfilippo syndrome, known as childhood Alzheimers, which results in toxic waste in the brain. Her family began a foundation in South Carolina to find a cure. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

MRI sent to Guantanamo Bay for trial not functioning
The mobile MRI unit leased by the Pentagon for $370,000 to scan the brain of...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: MRI scanner shipped to Guantanamo Bay for trial Group to offer free brain scans in Wash. DC Advanced Mobility delivers Philips mobile MRI (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - November 17, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight Funding available! The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region, is accepting applications for health information outreach, health literacy initiatives, emergency preparedness partnerships and health sciences library projects. Applications will be due by COB on December 1. See a recent blog post from Executive Director, Kate Flewelling for details, or review our funding opportunities and start your application today! Closing Today! The Fall 2017 offering for the Health Sciences Library Association o...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - November 17, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

2017 Nobel Prize Winner Michael W. Young: An Interview 2017 Nobel Prize Winner Michael W. Young: An Interview
2017 Nobel Prize Winner Michael W. Young talks to Medscape about his groundbreaking research on circadian rhythms and what makes him tick.Medscape Neurology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Article Source Type: news

Research refutes theory linking family income, genetics, brain development
Researchers have debunked a popular theory linking socioeconomic status, genetics and cognitive development. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

7 medtech stories we missed this week: Nov. 17, 2017
[Image from unsplash.com]From Skyline Medical’s joint venture to Lensar receiving FDA clearance and CE Mark, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Skyline Medical launches JV deal with Helomics Skyline Medical announced in a Nov. 15 press release that it has signed a joint venture agreement with Helomics. The agreement comes after a strategic collaboration between the companies that allows Skyline to reach more markets. The joint venture leverages the Helomics D-Chip platform to develop and market new approaches for personalized cancer diagnostics and care. 2.&...
Source: Mass Device - November 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: 510(k) Diagnostics Food & Drug Administration (FDA) mHealth (Mobile Health) Neurological Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Regenerative Medicine Regulatory/Compliance Research & Development Helomics InnerScope iReliev LensAR Inc. Source Type: news

Jesse Jackson diagnosed with Parkinson's disease
Civil rights activist the Rev. Jesse Jackson said Friday that he has been diagnosed with Parkinson's disease. A neurological disorder with no cure, Parkinson's can cause tremors, stiffness and difficulty balancing, walking and coordinating movement. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brain pathway makes head and face pain very draining
(Reuters Health) - If head and facial pain seem stronger and scarier than pain elsewhere, it ’s because a special pathway in the brain is heightening our emotions from pain at those sites, according to studies in mice. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Thrombectomy Up to 24 Hours Effective in Certain Strokes Thrombectomy Up to 24 Hours Effective in Certain Strokes
Published results of the DAWN trial show patients with salvageable brain tissue identified by'clinical-core mismatch'benefitted from endovascular therapy up to 24 hours after onset.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

A Vest That Allows the Deaf to'Hear'A Vest That Allows the Deaf to'Hear '
Neuroscientist David Eagleman talks about time perception, synesthesia, and the vastness of human creativity.Medscape Neurology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Expert Interview Source Type: news

Code talker: A Q & A with genetic counselor Kira Dies
Your child has just been diagnosed with a rare genetic disorder. Your pediatrician has never heard of the condition and the internet doesn’t offer much information. Where do you turn? Kira Dies, a genetic counselor in the Department of Neurology at Boston Children’s Hospital, helps parents with these hard questions every day. One of about only 4,000 genetic counselors in the country, Dies has been trained in handling both the scientific and emotional sides of genetic disorders. Dies was also the recent winner of the Code Talker Award, presented by Genome Magazine and the National Society of Genetic Counselors (...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 17, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Ask the Expert genetic counselor Kira Dies Mustafa Sahin Neurogenetics Program SPG47 tuberous sclerosis complex tuberous sclerosis program Source Type: news

Brain Imaging Identifies CTE in a Living Person Brain Imaging Identifies CTE in a Living Person
A PET scan using a tau tracer accurately diagnosed chronic traumatic encephalopathy in a living professional football player, a finding researchers describe as a diagnostic'milestone. 'Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Are our dreams trying to tell us something – or should we sleep on it? | Oliver Burkeman
Night after night, elaborately crazy stories plant themselves in your mind through no choice of your own. Don ’t tell me something intriguing isn’t going onWhat are dreams for? It ’s one of those bottomless questions where the answer tells you mainly about the person doing the answering. Those who pride themselves on being hard-headed and scientific will say they’re meaningless nonsense or, at best, some kind of boring but essential process forconsolidating the memories of the day. Those who think of themselves as spiritual, meanwhile, will insist they ’re messages from beyond. Yet the hard-he...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Oliver Burkeman Tags: Psychology Science Health & wellbeing Life and style Sleep Source Type: news

Canavero: World's 1st human head transplant carried out
The announcement  was made by Italian Professor Sergio Canavero, director of the Turin Advanced Neuromodulation Group at a press conference in Vienna this morning. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

No, there hasn ’t been a human 'head transplant', and there may never be
Neurosurgeon Sergio Canavero is in the news again, claiming to haveperformed the first successful human head transplant. But even cursory analysis reveals that he hasn ’t. And scientific logic suggests he never willIn February 2015,Sergio Canavero appeared in this very publication claiming alive human head will be successfully transplanted onto a donor human body within two years. He ’s popped up in the media a lot since then, but two years and nine months later, how are things looking?Well, he ’s only gone and done it! As we can see in this Telegraph story from today,the world ’s first human head t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Dean Burnett Tags: Neuroscience Health Media Science and scepticism Source Type: news

Painful Truth: The Successful Failure Of A Biotech Startup
A investor's eulogy for Quartet Medicine: founded back in 2013, this biotech aspired to address neuropathic and inflammatory pain via a novel biologic mechanism. Unfortunately, after 3 years of solid drug discovery, the startup is being shut down due to an unexpected safety signal. R.I.P. Quartet (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - November 17, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Booth, Contributor Source Type: news

Painful Truth: Successful Failure Of A Biotech Startup
A investor's eulogy for Quartet Medicine: founded back in 2013, this biotech aspired to address neuropathic and inflammatory pain via a novel biologic mechanism. Unfortunately, after 3 years of solid drug discovery, the startup is being shut down due to an unexpected safety signal. R.I.P. Quartet (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - November 17, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Booth, Contributor Source Type: news

Could New'Brain Training' Program Help Prevent Dementia?
FRIDAY, Nov. 17, 2017 -- In what is being billed as a first, researchers report that healthy seniors who tried a new brain-training program were less likely to develop dementia down the road. " Everyone with a brain is at risk of dementia, " noted... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 17, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Ask Well: What Is Parkinsonism?
The stiffness, slowness and shuffling of the feet that are classic features of Parkinson ’ s disease can also be caused by other disorders. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: RONI CARYN RABIN Tags: Parkinson's Disease Brain Dopamine Source Type: news

Whistleblowing Neurosurgeon Wins Big, but at a Price Whistleblowing Neurosurgeon Wins Big, but at a Price
A neurosurgeon convinced a judge that he was fired for reporting a colleague whose license was later suspended for disruptive behavior. The victor's $17.5 million court award, though, comes at a price.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Did PET scan confirm CTE in living NFL player?
Based on a brain autopsy using PET with the radiopharmaceutical FDDNP, researchers...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: MRI shows promise in diagnosing CTE in living patients FDDNP-PET gives insight into brain trauma of NFL players FDDNP-PET shows toll of concussions on retired NFL players FDDNP-PET helps predict Alzheimer's progression PET with FDDNP helps find depression cause (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - November 17, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

South Africa:KwaZulu-Natal Gets First Black Woman Neurosurgeon
[News24Wire] Dr Nomusa Shezi knew as early as Grade 3 that she wanted to be a doctor: she remembers writing in an English essay as a little girl that she wanted to be the first person to find a cure for HIV/Aids. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 17, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Carefully crafted light pulses control neuron activity
This study is the first demonstration of using coherent control to regulate function in a living cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain activity buffers against worsening anxiety
(Duke University) Boosting activity in brain areas related to thinking and problem-solving may also protect against worsening anxiety, suggests a new study by Duke University scientists. Using noninvasive brain imaging, the researchers found that at-risk people were less likely to develop anxiety if they had higher activity in a region of the brain responsible for complex mental operations. The results may be a step towards tailoring psychological therapies to the specific brain functioning of individual patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain astrocytes linked to Alzheimer's disease
(University of Eastern Finland) Astrocytes, the supporting cells of the brain, could play a significant role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. This is the first time researchers discovered a direct association between astrocytes and AD. Published in Stem Cell Reports, the study investigated the brain cell function of familial AD patients by using stem cell technologies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Investigating patterns of degeneration in Alzheimer's disease
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) Alzheimer's disease (AD) is known to cause memory loss and cognitive decline, but other functions of the brain can remain intact. The reasons cells in some brain regions degenerate while others are protected is largely unknown. In a paper to be published in Stem Cell Reports, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital have found that factors encoded in the DNA of brain cells contribute to the patterns of degeneration, or vulnerability, in AD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hibernating ground squirrels provide clues to new stroke treatments
(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) In the fight against brain damage caused by stroke, researchers have turned to an unlikely source of inspiration: hibernating ground squirrels. While the animals' brains experience dramatically reduced blood flow during hibernation, just like human patients after a certain type of stroke, the squirrels emerge from their extended naps suffering no ill effects. Now, a team of NIH-funded scientists has identified a potential drug that could grant the same resilience to stroke patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study analyzes mutations in cerebrospinal fluid in lung cancer with brain metastases
(European Society for Medical Oncology) Researchers have explored the analysis of mutations in cerebrospinal fluid of lung cancer patients with brain metastases in a study presented at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress. Tumor tissue from brain metastasis is difficult to obtain and therefore less invasive methods are needed to identify and monitor the presence of known actionable mutations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 17, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

University of Guelph professor identifies protein key to cancer cells ability to spread
(University of Guelph) U of G scientists have made a discovery that could reduce the spread of cancer by hindering a protein that binds cancer cells together and allows them to invade tissues.The groundbreaking study identified a protein, known as cadherin-22, as a potential factor in cancer metastasis, or spread, and showed that hindering it decreased the adhesion and invasion rate of breast and brain cancer cells by up to 90 percent. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 17, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Risk of distracted driving predicted by age, gender, personality and driving frequency
(Frontiers) The first study of how personal traits affect driver distraction finds that young men, extroverted or neurotic people, and people who drive more often are more likely to report being distracted during driving, while older women and those who feel they could control their distracted behavior are less likely to report distraction. The study also proposes future directions for interventions to reduce distracted driving. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When male voles drink alcohol, but their partner doesn't, their relationship suffers
(Frontiers) Researchers find that the relationship between prairie vole couples suffers when the male has access to alcohol, but his female partner doesn't - similar to what has been observed in human couples. The researchers also found changes in a specific brain region in the male voles. The results could help researchers find strategies to overcome the negative effects of alcohol on human relationships. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Head injury mechanisms in FIS World Cup alpine and freestyle skiers and snowboarders - Steenstrup SE, Bakken A, Bere T, Patton DA, Bahr R.
INTRODUCTION: Head injuries represent a concern in skiing and snowboarding, with traumatic brain injuries being the most common cause of death. AIM: To describe the mechanisms of head and face injuries among World Cup alpine and freestyle skiers an... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Traumatic brain injury and posttraumatic stress disorder: conceptual, diagnostic, and therapeutic considerations in the context of co-occurrence - Vasterling JJ, Jacob SN, Rasmusson A.
The events leading to traumatic brain injury (TBI) are often psychologically traumatic (e.g., motor vehicle accidents) or occur within a broader context of psychological trauma, such as military combat or recurrent interpersonal violence. In such cases, po... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Effect of age on Glasgow Coma Scale in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury: an approach with propensity score-matched population - Rau CS, Wu SC, Chen YC, Chien PC, Hsieh HY, Kuo PJ, Hsieh CH.
BACKGROUND: The most widely used methods of describing traumatic brain injury (TBI) are the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS). Recent evidence suggests that presenting GCS in older patients may be higher than that in younger p... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Do people with severe traumatic brain injury benefit from making errors? A randomized controlled trial of error-based and errorless learning - Ownsworth T, Fleming J, Tate R, Beadle E, Griffin J, Kendall M, Schmidt J, Lane-Brown A, Chevignard M, Shum DHK.
BACKGROUND: Errorless learning (ELL) and error-based learning (EBL) are commonly used approaches to rehabilitation for people with traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, it is unknown whether making errors is beneficial in the learning process to promote s... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Comparison of neurologic trauma and motorcycle helmet use in drivers vs passengers - Evans TA, Sasor S, Duquette S, Chu MW, Munshi I, Soleimani T, Tholpady SS.
Motorcycle crashes are associated with significant morbidity and mortality in both passengers and drivers. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the proportion of fatalities attributed to motorcycles, compared with other passe... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

UCLA Operation Mend ’s wounded warriors march in New York City Veterans Day Parade
It was a frigid 32 degrees during the New York City Veterans Day Parade but the more than 60 people marching on behalf of UCLA Health ’s Operation Mend were all smiles.Patients, family members, physicians, staff and supporters from the Operation Mend program, which provides free medical treatment as well as psychological support to post-9/11 veterans injured during combat or training, have been walking in the parade each Veterans Day for the past seven years.“Not everybody gets to do this in their lifetime,” said Tony Casada, a retired Army infantry specialist and a patient of Operation Mend. “Being...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 17, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Texas Children ’s Hospital gets $10M gift from Charif Souki
Texas Children ’s Hospital announced Nov. 16 that Houston energy executive Charif Souki has committed $10 million to the Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute. In honor of the gift, the NRI atrium will be renamed the Charif Souki Atrium. Including the latest gift, Souki has given $16 million to the NRI in total, making him the institute’s second-largest donor. Souki’s $10 million gift will fund the Huda Y. Zoghbi, M.D. Director’s Endowment, according to a press release. The… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - November 16, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Olivia Pulsinelli Source Type: news

Researchers aim to create touch-sensitive, nerve-connected robotic prosthetic hand
Researchers at two academic facilities are aiming to create a first-of-its-kind bioengineered robotic hand that can grow and adapt to its environment, equipped with a living pathway to translate the robots touch sensation to the user’s brain. Teams from both Florida Atlantic University and the University of Utah School of Medicine said they have received a four-year, $1.3 million grant from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the National Institutes of health for the project, according to a press release. Read the whole story on our sister site, The Robot Report The post Researchers aim...
Source: Mass Device - November 16, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Prosthetics Research & Development Robotics Source Type: news

Can brain training reduce dementia risk? Despite new research, the jury is still out
There are good reasons to be cautious about a new study claiming computer-based training can reduce the risk of dementia. But what does work?More than 30 million people worldwide live with Alzheimer ’s disease, and while researchers are pushing hard to find a cure, their efforts so far havemetwithfailure. With no effective treatment on the horizon, prevention has become the only game in town. But what can be done to reduce the risk of dementia, now theleading cause of death in England and Wales?In researchpublished on Thursday, US scientists claim that a form of computer-based brain training can reduce the risk of de...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Alzheimer's Dementia Science Health Mental health Society Source Type: news

It's real: New evidence proves chronic fatigue syndrome is not psychological it alters brain chemistry
(Natural News) The scientific community has long dismissed chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and Gulf War illness (GWI) as mental health disorders, but a study published in Scientific Reports has revealed that the conditions are not all in the mind. The diseases exhibit similar symptoms such as malaise, muscle pain, and cognitive dysfunction. Recent figures also show that between... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cincinnati CEO: Businesses neglecting mental health benefits will see ‘brain drain’
Dr. Paul Keck is CEO of Lindner Center of Hope. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - November 16, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Barrett J. Brunsman Source Type: news

Nonpharma Intervention Cuts Dementia Risk by a Third Nonpharma Intervention Cuts Dementia Risk by a Third
Older adults who completed a computerized training intervention focused on'mental quickness'had a 29% lower risk for dementia compared with those who received no cognitive training.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Cincinnati CEO: Businesses neglecting mental health benefits will see ‘brain drain’
Dr. Paul Keck is CEO of Lindner Center of Hope. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 16, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Barrett J. Brunsman Source Type: news

Alcyone Lifesciences wins FDA nod for Alivio hydrocephalus shunt flusher
Alcyone Lifesciences said yesterday it won FDA 510(k) clearance for its Alivio ventricular catheter and flusher system designed for treating hydrocephalus. The newly cleared Alivio device is designed for the non-invasive retrograde flushing of the ventricular catheter to unblock occluded inlet holes or open a relief membrane to restore or increase cerebrospinal fluid flow in non-flowing shunts, the Lowell, Mass.-based company said. “For the first time in over half a century there has been a game changing improvement in the field of hydrocephalus treatment.  Ventricular shunting can help save lives and improve th...
Source: Mass Device - November 16, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: 510(k) Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Neurological Regulatory/Compliance Alcyone Lifesciences Source Type: news

Region specific alterations in astrocyte and microglia morphology following exposure to blasts in the mouse hippocampus - DeWalt GJ, Mahajan B, Foster AR, Thompson LDE, Marttini AA, Schmidt EV, Mansuri S, D'Souza D, Patel S, Tenenbaum M, Brandao-Viruet KI, Thompson D, Duong B, Smith DH, Blute TA, Eldred WD.
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious public health concern, especially injuries from repetitive insults. The main objective of this study was to immunocytochemically examine morphological alterations in astrocytes and microglia in the hippocampus 48ho... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Photobiomodulation for traumatic brain injury and stroke - Hamblin MR.
There is a notable lack of therapeutic alternatives for what is fast becoming a global epidemic of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Photobiomodulation (PBM) employs red or near-infrared (NIR) light (600-1100nm) to stimulate healing, protect tissue from dying,... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Program and Other Evaluations, Effectiveness Studies Source Type: news

MIT finds stress can cause you to make risky decisions
Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology have identified the part of the brain that becomes impaired under stress and leads to poor decision-making. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA Turns to Emerging Tech for Opioid Crisis
It will take more than medication alone to win the battle against opioid addiction, and now U.S. clinicians finally have a device-based therapy to help reduce the symptoms of opioid withdrawal. FDA granted a new indication to Innovative Health Solutions for its NSS-2 Bridge nerve stimulator. The new indication was reviewed under FDA's de novo pathway. “There are three approved drugs for helping treat opioid addiction. While we continue to pursue better medicines for the treatment of opioid use disorder, we also need to look to devices that can assist in this therapy,” said FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD. G...
Source: MDDI - November 16, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news