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Poverty Affects Severity of Organ Damage Due to Lupus
And, pregnancy complications higher among non - white patients with lupus (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - May 23, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Family Medicine, Gynecology, Internal Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Nursing, Pathology, Pulmonology, Rheumatology, Journal, Source Type: news

The woman determined to have a family DESPITE brain tumour
Katie Smith, from the West Midlands, is eight months pregnant - even though she's already battling a potentially-deadly health condition. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

No Harm Seen in MRI Gadolinium Retention in Brain, FDA Says No Harm Seen in MRI Gadolinium Retention in Brain, FDA Says
Nearly 2 years of study yield no evidence of adverse events, but the FDA continues to recommend that clinicians use gadolinium-based contrast agents sparingly.News Alerts (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Radiology News Alert Source Type: news

Morning Break: Medicaid on Chopping Block; NFL to Neurosurgery; Ebola Back
(MedPage Today) -- Health news and commentary from around the Web gathered by the MedPage Today staff (Source: MedPage Today Emergency Medicine)
Source: MedPage Today Emergency Medicine - May 22, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: news

Opioid Oversupply Common After Surgery Opioid Oversupply Common After Surgery
Most patients have unused opioid pills after treatment of surgical pain, while few report awareness of proper storage or disposal practices.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Four Studies on Stroke Treatment and Prevention Four Studies on Stroke Treatment and Prevention
Dr Diener discusses recent stroke studies that highlight prevention efforts and where we are falling short.Medscape Neurology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Commentary Source Type: news

Des Peres doctor to pay nearly $300,000 to settle false billing allegations
The federal government has reached a civil settlement with Dr. Sherry Ma and Aima Neurology, following alleged false Medicare billings related to Dr. Ma ’s Botox and Myobloc injections at the medical group, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Missouri. Dr. Ma, of Ladue, and Aima Neurology will repay the United States $291,288, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office. According to the U.S. Attorney's Office, Dr . Ma received Botox and Myobloc at no charge to use… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 22, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Veneta Rizvic Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for May 22, 2017
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. BoneSupport launches trial of antibiotic-eluting bone graft BoneSupport said today that the 1st patient has been enrolled in the pivotal investigational device exemption trial for its injectable antibiotic-eluting bone graft su...
Source: Mass Device - May 22, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Brain Stimulation Helps Kick Chronic Knee Pain Brain Stimulation Helps Kick Chronic Knee Pain
Transcranial direct-current stimulation provides benefit over sham stimulation in reducing pain associated with knee osteoarthritis, randomized results show.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

9 Signs That You're An Ambivert
I’m sure you’ve been asked many times whether you’re an introvert or an extrovert. For some people, it’s an easy choice, but for most of us, it’s difficult to choose one way or the other. It’s hard to choose because the introvert/extrovert dichotomy reflects a tired and outdated view of personality. Personality traits exist along a continuum, and the vast majority of us aren’t introverts or extroverts — we fall somewhere in the middle. Personality consists of a stable set of preferences and tendencies through which we approach the world. Personality traits form at an early ag...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

American Pain Society (APS) 2017 Annual Scientific Meeting American Pain Society (APS) 2017 Annual Scientific Meeting
Read clinically focused news coverage of key developments from APS 2017Medscape Neurology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Conference Coverage Source Type: news

Nine of Ten Practices Surveyed Have Dismissed Patients
Reasons include inappropriate behavior toward staff, violation of Rx policies, repeatedly missed appointments (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - May 22, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Dermatology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Internal Medicine, Allergy, Nephrology, Neurology, Nursing, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, ENT, Psychiatry, Pulmonology, Rheumatology, Urology, Anesthesiology Source Type: news

Patients Often Prescribed Futile Drugs in Last Months of Life
Researchers find many still prescribed long - term disease - preventing medications (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - May 22, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Internal Medicine, Critical Care, Nephrology, Neurology, Nursing, Oncology, Pharmacy, Pulmonology, AIDS, Anesthesiology & Pain, Journal, Source Type: news

Dementia saliva testing 'shows early promise'
Conclusion The researchers are appropriately cautious in their conclusions. These findings have potential, but this is an early stage pilot – a starting point for further study. The tests were carried out in small samples of healthy people and those with cognitive impairment. They would have to be validated in much larger groups, in which it's possible the test would give different findings. The researchers calculate that they would need at least 100 people per group to develop models that could reliably detect significant differences in biomarkers between the groups. Even among this small sample, we don't know from ...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Medical practice Older people Source Type: news

Scientists identify 40 genes that shed new light on biology of intelligence
Study significantly adds to the tally of genes connected to intellect – but researchers caution genius isn’t all down to geneticsA major study into the genetics of human intelligence has given scientists their richest insight yet into the biology that underpins our cognitive skills.The research on 60,000 adults and 20,000 children uncovered 40 new genes that play a role in intelligence, a haul that brings the number of genes known to have a bearing on IQ to 52.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Genetics Science Neuroscience Biology Albert Einstein Netherlands Europe World news Source Type: news

Matter: In ‘ Enormous Success, ’ Scientists Tie 52 Genes to Human Intelligence
The genes account for just a tiny fraction of the variation in test scores, experts say. Many are yet to be found, and environmental factors are also greatly important. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARL ZIMMER Tags: Intelligence and Intelligence Tests (IQ) Genetics and Heredity DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid) Brain Source Type: news

Keeping up with Amanda: Life after brain surgery
In most ways, Amanda LePage is just like any other rambunctious fourth grader. She loves school, dance class, playing basketball and keeping up with her twin sister Macy and older brother Nathan. Sometimes it just takes her a little longer to do these everyday things. That’s because Amanda has been through a lot in her short nine years. Amanda was just 5 months old when she was brought by helicopter to Boston Children’s Hospital for a hemorrhage in her brain from an intracranial aneurysm, a type of vascular malformation. Despite long odds, Amanda survived two life-saving brain surgeries and a massive strok...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 22, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Our Patients’ Stories brain aneurysm Dr. Caroline Robson Dr. Craig McClain Dr. Edward Smith Dr. Peter Manley Hydrocephalus low-grade glioma pediatric stroke Source Type: news

Sanfilippo sufferer told NHS won't fund life-saving drugs
Harley Bond, from Sheffield, has Sanfilippo - a rare life-limiting condition that damages the brain and central nervous system. The condition is currently incurable. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New insight into life-threatening childhood brain cancer
(Newcastle University) The most common type of malignant childhood brain cancer has been identified as seven separate conditions each needing a different treatment, new research has revealed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study examines polyneuropathy and long-term opioid use
(The JAMA Network Journals) Polyneuropathy is a common painful condition, especially among older patients, which can result in functional impairment.In a new article published by JAMA Neurology, Christopher J. Klein, M.D., and his colleagues at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., examined the association of long-term opioid therapy with functional status, adverse outcomes and death among patients with polyneuropathy. The population-based study included data from 1,993 patients with polyneuropathy who were receiving opioid therapy and a group of control patients for comparison. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Deep sleep maintains the learning efficiency of the brain
(University of Zurich) For the first time, researchers of the University of Zurich and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich have demonstrated the causal context of why deep sleep is important to the learning efficiency of the human brain. They have developed a new, noninvasive method for modulating deep sleep in humans in a targeted region of the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Think Suicide Is Selfish? Here's Why You've Got It All Wrong
This has been a pretty f.ing horrible week. On Wednesday, a suicide hit way too close to home, and it’s been awful.  No, it wasn’t Chris Cornell ― it was someone much closer to my inner circle ― but both events on the same day evoked an overwhelming amount of emotional commentary, both on social media and in person. Unfortunately, when suicides occur, there are some people who blame the victim. There are many who lash out in anger at the one who caused others pain by taking their own life. It’s understandable to be angry about a loss, but when anger is directed at the person who took their own li...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could brain scans spot elderly people at risk of fraud?  
Researchers at Cornell University discovered the brains of older people who have lost large amounts of money in financial scams have distinct differences in two key parts of their brains. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How to Tell a Persons Brain Age
Using brain scans and methylation markers, scientists develop ways to assess neurologic aging in humans. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Tags: News Analysis Source Type: news

Cancer Research UK funded scientists to test Zika virus on brain tumours
Scientists funded by Cancer Research UK will investigate the effectiveness of the Zika virus in destroying brain tumour cells, which could lead to new treatments for cancer. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - May 21, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Ghana: First Lady Meets Celebrated Ghanaian Neurosurgery Resident
[Ghana Star] Rebecca Akufo-Addo, the first lady of Ghana has met with trailblazer, Nancy Abu-Bonsrah, a Ghanaian neurosurgeon making waves across the world. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - May 21, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

5 Choices You Will Regret Forever
Our days are filled with a constant stream of decisions. Most are mundane, but some are so important that they can haunt you for the rest of your life. A recent study from Columbia University found that we’re bogged down by more than 70 decisions a day. The sheer number of decisions we have to make each day leads to a phenomenon called decision fatigue, whereby your brain actually tires like a muscle. A new study from the University of Texas shows that even when our brains aren’t tired, they can make it very difficult for us to make good decisions. When making a decision, instead of referencing the knowledge we...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The decision neuroscience perspective on suicidal behavior: evidence and hypotheses - Dombrovski AY, Hallquist MN.
PURPOSE of review: Suicide attempts are usually regretted by people who survive them. Furthermore, addiction and gambling are over-represented among people who attempt or die by suicide, raising the question whether their decision-making is impaired. Advan... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Suicide and Self-Harm Source Type: news

Variables affecting to attitudes towards suicide among general adult population in the city of Bucheon - Kim Y, Lee SI, Kim H, Lee A, Mun KS, Kim SG, Jung HY.
Kim Y, et al. J Korean Neuropsychiatr Assoc. 2016 Nov;55(4):376-385. https://doi.org/10.4306/jknpa.2016.55.4.376 Language: ko... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Risk Factor Prevalence, Injury Occurrence Source Type: news

Why Brain Scientists Are Still Obsessed With The Curious Case Of Phineas Gage
In 1848, a railroad worker survived an accident that drove a 13-pound iron bar through his head. The injury changed his personality, and our understanding of the brain.(Image credit: Wikimedia) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jon Hamilton Source Type: news

This Is What Happens To Your Brain When You Fail (And How To Fix It)
A version of this article was originally published on Forbes. Sign up for Caroline’s newsletter to get her writing sent straight to your inbox. Four months after graduating college among the top of my class, I failed. I moved to Vancouver to be with my boyfriend and travel somewhere. I tried to be Lululemon’s Senior Director of Marketing, but somehow that didn’t work out. So I wound up a legal secretary—a job that was, for me, unfulfilling and unrelated to my passions. It got worse. I scrambled to sidestep my situation and applied to several top tier PhD programs. I didn’t get in to any. I&rsq...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

10 Things That Set The Best Bosses Apart
TalentSmart has conducted research with more than a million people, and we’ve found that the best bosses have a lot in common. In particular, 90% of them are skilled at managing their emotions in order to stay focused, calm, and productive. These folks have high emotional intelligence (EQ), a skill set that’s critical to achieving your dreams. It also happens to make them great to work for. It’s through a leader’s actions—what he or she does and says on a daily basis—that the essence of great leadership becomes apparent. Behavior can change, and leaders who work to improve themselve...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How a skull cap could help to zap deadly brain cancer
Patients with glioblastoma, a type of brain cancer that affects about 4,000 people in the UK every year, has an estimated survival rate of 12 to 18 months. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ghana: How I Got to Johns Hopkins - First Ghanaian Neurosurgeon Resident
[Ghana Star] Nancy Abu-Bonserah, the first Ghanaian and only black female to gain admission to Johns Hopkins University to read neurosurgery has revealed that her self-driven passion to achieve more propelled her to where she is now. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - May 20, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

10 Ways Smart People Stay Calm
The ability to manage your emotions and remain calm under pressure has a direct link to your performance. TalentSmart has conducted research with more than a million people, and we’ve found that 90 percent of top performers are skilled at managing their emotions in times of stress in order to remain calm and in control. If you follow my work, you’ve read some startling research summaries that explore the havoc stress can wreak on one’s physical and mental health (such as the Yale study, which found that prolonged stress causes degeneration in the area of the brain responsible for self-contr...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Wearable Devices Communicate Vital Brain Activity Information
What can we learn about emotions, the brain and behavior from a wristband? Plenty, according to a prominent engineer. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 20, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Dementia link to stroke: One in three 'will develop brain condition within five years'
THE link between stroke and dementia is highlighted by figures released today. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CHMP Backs Cenegermin (Oxervate) for Neurotrophic Keratitis CHMP Backs Cenegermin (Oxervate) for Neurotrophic Keratitis
The CHMP has recommended granting marketing authorization for Oxervate for the treatment of adults with moderate or severe neurotrophic keratitis.International Approvals (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ophthalmology News Alert Source Type: news

Zimmer Biomet warns on isocentric movement issues in Rosa platforms
Zimmer Biomet (NYSE:ZBH) today issued a voluntary medical device field action for its Rosa Brain, Rosa Spine and Rosa One surgical robotic platforms over movement issues with the systems’ robotic arms. The company said that a situation can occur where the robot arm’s position is automatically sent to the trajectory input due to an imperfect mathematical model that could prevent the arm from reaching its desired position. If the error occurs during isocentric micromoves used in brain surgeries while instrumentation is already in place inside the patient’s anatomy, the company warned that a hazardous s...
Source: Mass Device - May 19, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Robot-Assisted Surgery Robotics zimmerbiomet Source Type: news

Pulmonary embolism following severe traumatic brain injury: incidence, risk factors and impact outcome - Bahloul M, Chelly H, Regaieg K, Rekik N, Bellil S, Chaari A, Bouaziz W, Chabchoub I, Haddar S, Hamida CB, Bouaziz M.
[Abstract unavailable] Language: en... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Recovery of working memory following pediatric traumatic brain injury: a longitudinal analysis - Gorman S, Barnes MA, Sw. PR, Ewing-Cobbs L.
In a prospective longitudinal study, the trajectory of verbal and visual-spatial working memory (WM) development was examined 2-, 6-, 12-, and 24-months following complicated-mild to severe pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI; n  = 55) relative to an or... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Scientists To Test Whether Zika Can Kill Brain Cancer Cells
(Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Scientists To Test Whether Zika Can Kill Brain Cancer Cells
(Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

SPECT links omega-3 with Alzheimer's prevention
SPECT images of the brain show that a diet containing omega-3 fatty acids increases...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Alzeca touts study of MRI agent in Alzheimer's FDG-PET outshines SPECT for Alzheimer's disease Dementia link? SPECT finds brain changes in football players MRI shows fish-filled diet helps lower Alzheimer's risk SPECT ties functional brain abnormalities to fibromyalgia (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Brain Injuries in Sport Are Real Public Health Problem, Senators Told
(MedPage Today) -- Advocates push senators to act, Sen. Blumenthal promises new bill (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - May 19, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Study: Cannabis May Reduce Crack Use
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for May 19, 2017
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. The key components of a well-designed wearable: Sense, analyze, act One of the earliest uses of a wearable technology was recorded during Emperor Nero’s rule over the Roman Empire from 54 to 68 AD. A brutal leader, the em...
Source: Mass Device - May 19, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Policy groups decry GOP-led funding proposal for Medicaid
Adrianne Gunther was a senior at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia when her symptoms began — first an inability of focus and an overwhelming sense of confusion, and then soon after graduating, a loss of vision in her left eye. A neural ophthalmologist diagnosed her with optic neuritis, telling her that it was one of the first signs of multiple sclerosis, a debilitating autoimmune disea se that causes lesions to form on the brain and in the spinal cord, interrupting nerve pathways and causing… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Lydia Nuzum Source Type: news

Myron Rolle's journey from NFL to neurosurgery
Myron Rolle, former NFL player and Rhodes Scholar, opens up about concussions, his aspirations, and starting his neurosurgery residency at Harvard Medical School this summer. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - May 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Storing a memory involves distant parts of the brain
In studies with mice, researchers discovered that to maintain certain short-term memories, the brain ’s cortex relies on connections with the thalamus. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news