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A boy ’s basketball-size tumor was slowly killing him. He died days after doctors removed it.
The basketball-size tumor was finally gone, and the first signs after Emanuel Zayas’s surgery were deceptively encouraging. The 14-year-old’s eyes had begun to react to stimulation. The muscles on his face were strengthening. For a moment, his family, doctors and other supporters exhaled. But inside, the teen was already dying, according to Miami NBC-affiliate WTVJ. Days after […]Related:This flu season keeps getting deadlier, and a shutdown will make things worseHe ate raw fish almost every day — until a 5-foot-long tapeworm slithered out of his bodyHHS releases new rule on health worker...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

He ate raw fish almost every day — until a 5-foot-long tapeworm slithered out of his body
[Warning: This story contains descriptions and photographs that some people may find disturbing.] He told an emergency room physician he had a liking for raw fish — specifically, salmon sashimi. It's what the 30-year-old man, from Fresno, Calif., suspected had landed him in the bathroom with stomach cramps and bloody diarrhea. But what he did not anticipate was the moment he spotted something […]Related:HHS releases new rule on health workers’ religious, moral objectionsThis flu season keeps getting deadlier, and a shutdown will make things worseThe 10-year-old was...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This flu season keeps getting deadlier, and a shutdown will make things worse
A bad flu season that has hit the entire continental United States has yet to peak and already has caused  the deaths of more children than what normally would be expected at this time of the year, according to officials and the latest data released Friday. During the second week of January, more people sought care for […]Related:HHS releases new rule on health workers’ religious, moral objectionsNew HHS civil rights division charged with protecting health-care workers with moral objectionsTeens are daring each other to eat Tide pods. We don’t need to tell you that’s a bad idea. (Sou...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

HHS releases new rule on health workers ’ religious, moral objections
Citing President Trump's “pro-life mission,” the Health and Human Services Department announced actions on Friday that are designed to roll back key health-care policies of the Obama administration. Roger Severino, director for the HHS Office of Civil Rights, said a proposed rule on “conscience rights” will further protect health-care workers who think they are being punished or discriminated against because […]Related:New HHS civil rights division charged with protecting health-care workers with moral objectionsTeens are daring each other to eat Tide pods. We don&rsq...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The 10-year-old was healthy as ‘ an ox. ’ Then he caught a deadly case of the flu.
Nico Mallozzi was known for his antics, his sly smile — and his good health. The 10-year-old hockey player from New Canaan, Conn., is depicted in photographs suited up and looking fierce on the ice. His coaches said he “captivated, entertained and kept us on our toes,” according to a GoFundMe page. His mother said “he was like an ox” — strong […]Related:New HHS civil rights division charged with protecting health-care workers with moral objectionsTeens are daring each other to eat Tide pods. We don’t need to tell you that’s a bad idea...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New HHS civil rights division charged with protecting health-care workers with moral objections
Acting Health and Human Services secretary Eric Hargan on Thursday announced the creation of a new conscience and religious freedom division aimed at protecting doctors, nurses and other health-care workers who decline to participate in care that goes against their moral or religious convictions. Speaking at an event featuring Republican lawmakers and religious leaders, Hargan noted that […]Related:FDA to release more clinical trial information for newly approved drugsCDC postpones session on ‘preparing for the unthinkable’: a nuclear blastFirst treatment approved for breast cancer with BRCA ge...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A family ’ s wrenching goodbye to their 5-year-old touched hearts. Days later, she died.
Braylynn Lawhon's nickname was Princess Bel. Nurses in Florida recently dressed the terminally ill 5-year-old girl in a canary yellow ball gown, “hoping she'll wake up and lose her mind over how she turned into a princess overnight,” her mother wrote Friday on Facebook. “What she doesn't know, though, is that she has ALWAYS been a […]Related:FDA to release more clinical trial information for newly approved drugsTeens are daring each other to eat Tide pods. We don’t need to tell you that’s a bad idea.CDC postpones session on ‘preparing for the unthinkable’: a nuclear bla...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA to release more clinical trial information for newly approved drugs
The Food and Drug Administration is taking steps to make it easier for doctors, patients and researchers to get access to clinical trial data amassed during the process of approving new drugs, Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said Tuesday. Gottlieb announced the actions just before a speech on FDA transparency at a Washington forum. The meeting, attended by […]Related:CDC postpones session on ‘preparing for the unthinkable’: a nuclear blastFirst treatment approved for breast cancer with BRCA genetic mutationCDC says, ‘There’s lots of flu in lots of places.’ And it’s not going away...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Teens are daring each other to eat Tide pods. We don ’ t need to tell you that ’ s a bad idea.
First, it was the “gallon challenge” and the “cinnamon challenge.” Then some teenagers started playing the “bath-salt challenge.” They have dared each other to pour salt in their hands and hold ice till it burns, douse themselves in rubbing alcohol and set themselves ablaze, and throw boiling water on unsuspecting peers. Now videos circulating on […]Related:CDC postpones session on ‘preparing for the unthinkable’: a nuclear blastFirst treatment approved for breast cancer with BRCA genetic mutationCDC says, ‘There’s lots of flu in lots of places.’ And ...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CDC postpones session on ‘ preparing for the unthinkable ’ : a nuclear blast
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has rescheduled a teaching session on the public health response to a nuclear blast that was supposed to take place Tuesday. The session, which was to feature presentations from U.S. experts on public health preparedness and response and radiation, included a session titled "Preparing for the Unthinkable." The […]Related:First treatment approved for breast cancer with BRCA genetic mutationCDC says, ‘There’s lots of flu in lots of places.’ And it’s not going away anytime soon.FDA warns against giving kids cough and cold medicines with co...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CDC says, ‘There ’ s lots of flu in lots of places. ’ And it ’ s not going away anytime soon.
A nasty flu season is in full swing across the United States, with a sharp increase in the number of older people and young children getting hospitalized, federal health officials said Friday. The latest weekly data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show influenza has spread across the country. “Flu is everywhere in the United States […]Related:First treatment approved for breast cancer with BRCA genetic mutationFDA warns against giving kids cough and cold medicines with codeine or hydrocodoneNew study on abortion pill shows high success, low rate of complications (Source: Wash...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

First treatment approved for breast cancer with BRCA genetic mutation
The Food and Drug Administration on Friday cleared the first treatment for patients with advanced breast cancer caused by BRCA mutations, which are genetic defects that raise the risk of malignancies. The drug, called Lynparza, already is approved for certain patients with advanced ovarian cancer associated with the same mutations. Richard Pazdur, director of the […]Related:FDA warns against giving kids cough and cold medicines with codeine or hydrocodoneNew study on abortion pill shows high success, low rate of complicationsHe was 21 and fit. He tried to push through the flu — and it killed him. (Source: Wash...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA warns against giving kids cough and cold medicines with codeine or hydrocodone
The Food and Drug Administration warned Thursday that children and adolescents should not be prescribed cough and cold medicines containing codeine and hydrocodone because of serious safety risks posed by the opioid ingredients. The agency said it is requiring manufacturers to change the wording on their labels to make clear that such products should not be used for […]Related:New study on abortion pill shows high success, low rate of complicationsHe was 21 and fit. He tried to push through the flu — and it killed him.The rural-urban sex divide in three simple charts (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New study on abortion pill shows high success, low rate of complications
Ever since the abortion pill RU-486 began to hit the market in the 1980s, questions have lingered about its safety, especially for women who take it in countries where terminating an unwanted pregnancy is restricted and they cannot openly seek help from a medical professional if something goes wrong. As reports of deaths and injuries grew in the early 2000s and the pill became a […]Related:He was 21 and fit. He tried to push through the flu — and it killed him.The rural-urban sex divide in three simple chartsIbuprofen appears to mess with male hormones. Should ...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Trump administration to allow work requirements for Medicaid recipients, a major shift that could bring legal challenges
The new guidance will enable states to deny benefits to able-bodied adults unless they have jobs or participate in work-related activities or “community engagement.” Such requirements, long pushed by conservatives, represent a tectonic change for the Medicaid program — which for more than a half-century has been a pillar of the nation’s social safety net. […]Related:A 12-year-old was told she had the flu. The misdiagnosis may have caused her death.He was 21 and fit. He tried to push through the flu — and it killed him.The rural-urban sex divide in three simple charts (Source: Washington...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A 12-year-old was told she had the flu. The misdiagnosis may have caused her death.
Alyssa Alcaraz loved to sing, not only in her school's choir but in videos she would post to Musical.ly, an app that allows users post short music, lip-syncing and dance videos. Now those videos provide comfort to her 31-year-old mother, Keila Lino. As she clicks through them, she wonders if there was more she could […]Related:He was 21 and fit. He tried to push through the flu — and it killed him.The rural-urban sex divide in three simple chartsIbuprofen appears to mess with male hormones. Should you be worried? (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

He was 21 and fit. He tried to push through the flu — and it killed him.
Local 21-year-old dies of flu complications SAD STORY: A 21-year-old man from Latrobe died of complications from the flu. http://on.wpxi.com/2ElTmwD Posted by WPXI-TV Pittsburgh on Monday, January 8, 2018 Kyler Baughman seemed to be the face of fitness. The 21-year-old aspiring personal trainer filled his Facebook page with photos of himself riding motorbikes and lifting weights. He […]Related:The rural-urban sex divide in three simple chartsIbuprofen appears to mess with male hormones. Should you be worried?A top hospital knew this surgeon was accused of raping patients but kept him on staff, report says ...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The rural-urban sex divide in three simple charts
Political pundits, policymakers and demographers often talk about the divide between rural America and urban America, and we know a lot about the differences in jobs, incomes, health, education and numerous other indicators. But what about sex? There's been an odd gap in our knowledge about rural-urban variation in sexual activity and contraceptive use, but a new analysis from […]Related:Ibuprofen appears to mess with male hormones. Should you be worried?The cancer death rate has dropped again. Here’s why.‘Raw water’ is the latest health craze. Here’s why drinking it may b...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ibuprofen appears to mess with male hormones. Should you be worried?
In recent decades, prompted by concerns that men's sperm quality is declining, researchers have looked at things they suspect of potentially disrupting the body’s endocrine system — from chemicals in water bottles to WiFi laptops to wearing tight underwear instead of boxers. You can add ibuprofen to the list. In a study published Monday in the Proceedings […]Related:The cancer death rate has dropped again. Here’s why.‘Raw water’ is the latest health craze. Here’s why drinking it may be a bad idea.Trump administration fires all members of HIV/AIDS advisory council (Source...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A top hospital knew this surgeon was accused of raping patients but kept him on staff, report says
A Cleveland Clinic surgeon accused of sexually assaulting two patients was kept on staff at the prominent Ohio hospital during confidential settlement negotiations, according to a recent investigation by USA Today. The newspaper reported Friday that Ryan Williams, a colorectal surgeon, was accused of anally raping two women during medical procedures in 2008 and 2009 — and […]Related:The cancer death rate has dropped again. Here’s why.‘Raw water’ is the latest health craze. Here’s why drinking it may be a bad idea.Trump administration fires all members of HIV/AIDS advisory coun...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The cancer death rate has dropped again. Here ’ s why.
The nation's overall cancer death rate declined 1.7 percent in 2015, the latest indication of steady, long-term progress against the disease, according to a new report by the American Cancer Society. Over nearly a quarter-century, the mortality rate has fallen 26 percent, resulting in almost 2.4 million fewer deaths than if peak rates had continued. […]Related:Calcium and vitamin D supplements may not protect against bone fracturesWhy this may be a bad flu season, especially around the holidaysWhat’s the most embarrassing way you’ve ever injured yourself? (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘Raw water’ is the latest health craze. Here’s why drinking it may be a bad idea.
Hold your canteen under a natural spring and you'll come away with crystal clear water, potentially brimming with beneficial bacteria as well as minerals from the earth. That's what proponents of the “raw water” movement are banking on — selling people on the idea of drinking water that contains the things they say nature intended without the chemicals, such as chlorine, often used […]Related:Trump administration fires all members of HIV/AIDS advisory councilCalcium and vitamin D supplements may not protect against bone fracturesA boy’s basketball-size ...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘ Raw water ’ is the latest health craze. Here ’ s why drinking it may be a bad idea.
Hold your canteen under a natural spring and you'll come away with crystal clear water, potentially brimming with beneficial bacteria as well as minerals from the earth. That's what proponents of the “raw water” movement are banking on — selling people on the idea of drinking water that contains the things they say nature intended without the chemicals, such as chlorine, often used […]Related:Trump administration fires all members of HIV/AIDS advisory councilCalcium and vitamin D supplements may not protect against bone fracturesA boy’s basketball-size ...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Trump administration fires all members of HIV/AIDS advisory council
The remaining members of the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS were fired en masse this week. Months after a half-dozen member resigned in protest of the Trump administration's position on health policies, the White House dismissed the rest through a form letter. The notice “thanked me for my past service and said that my appointment […]Related:White, rural drug users lack needle exchange programs to prevent HIV infections (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Calcium and vitamin D supplements may not protect some against bone fractures
One of the most contentious questions in nutrition science over the past decade has been whether older adults should be taking supplemental vitamin D and calcium. As the world's population ages and broken bones and fractures become even more of a public health concern, with huge social and economic consequences, researchers have been trying to make sense of […]Related:Why this may be a bad flu season, especially around the holidaysWhat’s the most embarrassing way you’ve ever injured yourself?ACA enrollment for 2018 nearly matches last year’s, despite Trump administration efforts to u...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Calcium and vitamin D supplements may not protect against bone fractures
One of the most contentious questions in nutrition science over the past decade has been whether older adults should be taking supplemental vitamin D and calcium. As the world's population ages and broken bones and fractures become even more of a public health concern, with huge social and economic consequences, researchers have been trying to make sense of […]Related:Why this may be a bad flu season, especially around the holidaysWhat’s the most embarrassing way you’ve ever injured yourself?ACA enrollment for 2018 nearly matches last year’s, despite Trump administration efforts to u...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A boy ’s basketball-size tumor is slowly suffocating him. Doctors will attempt a risky removal.
Noel Zayas paraded his son to a never-ending carousel of Cuban doctors, but none of them would touch the boy. Emanuel Zayas’s basketball-size facial tumor was too complex, they told his family. The surgery to remove it too risky. “I knocked on a lot of hospital doors,” Zayas told the Miami Herald. “To see our son […]Related:Why this may be a bad flu season, especially around the holidaysWhat’s the most embarrassing way you’ve ever injured yourself?Someone stole a child’s parcel off his porch. It contained his kidney transplant medication. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why this may be a bad flu season, especially around the holidays
This flu season could be a potentially harsh one, and experts say the worst time could coincide with the height of the holiday season and start of the new year. “Flu is picking up and picking up early,” said Daniel Jernigan, director of the influenza division at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “A […]Related:What’s the most embarrassing way you’ve ever injured yourself?ACA enrollment for 2018 nearly matches last year’s, despite Trump administration efforts to undermine itSenate Democrats and more than 300 public-health groups call on Trump officials to reverse HHS l...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What ’s the most embarrassing way you’ve ever injured yourself?
Louis Greenstein was 28 and working as an extra in a friend’s movie in rural Pottsville, Pa. There was a lot of waiting around, and he noticed an electric cow fence. He picked up a twig and flicked it at the fence. Nothing happened. He “bravely” touched the twig to the wire. Nothing. You can […]Related:Why this may be a bad flu season, especially around the holidaysACA enrollment for 2018 nearly matches last year’s, despite Trump administration efforts to undermine itSenate Democrats and more than 300 public-health groups call on Trump officials to reverse HHS language restrictions (Source: W...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Someone stole a child ’ s parcel off his porch. It contained his kidney transplant medication.
When Austin Taylor turned 4, his father reminisced about the young life doctors said the boy would likely never have. “1,461. It may seem like an odd number to post on Facebook. But this number holds more meaning to our family then you realize. This is the number of days Austin has gone beyond the doctor's life expectancy,” […]Related:ACA enrollment for 2018 nearly matches last year’s, despite Trump administration efforts to undermine itSenate Democrats and more than 300 public-health groups call on Trump officials to reverse HHS language restrictionsThis model lost her leg because o...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

ACA enrollment for 2018 nearly matches last year ’ s, despite Trump administration efforts to undermine it
Nearly 9 million Americans signed up for Affordable Care Act health plans for 2018 in the 39 states relying on the federal HealthCare.gov website, approaching the 2017 total despite an enrollment season cut by half and other tactics by the Trump administration to undermine the law's insurance marketplaces. The figure of approximately 8.8 million sign-ups […]Related:Senate Democrats and more than 300 public-health groups call on Trump officials to reverse HHS language restrictionsThis model lost her leg because of toxic shock syndrome. Here’s what she wants you to know.She finally had a baby naturally — w...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Senate Democrats and more than 300 public-health groups call on Trump officials to reverse HHS language restrictions
In two letters Thursday, a group of Senate Democrats and more than 300 public-health organizations called on top Trump administration officials to lift any restrictions on how Health and Human Services employees communicate in official documents. The missives come in the wake of reports by The Washington Post that budget writers at the Centers for […]Related:FDA approves first gene therapy for an inherited diseaseDebate erupts within HHS about ‘words to avoid’ such as ‘vulnerable,’ ‘diversity’ and ‘entitlement’FDA takes more aggressive stance toward homeopathic drugs (...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Senate Democrats and more than 300 public health groups call on Trump officials to reverse HHS language restrictions
In two separate letters Thursday, a group of Senate Democrats and more than 300 public health organizations called on top Trump administration officials to lift any restrictions on how Health and Human Services employees communicate in official documents. The missives come in the wake of reports by The Washington Post that budget writers at the […]Related:FDA approves first gene therapy for an inherited diseaseDebate erupts within HHS about ‘words to avoid’ such as ‘vulnerable,’ ‘diversity’ and ‘entitlement’FDA takes more aggressive stance toward homeopathic drugs (Sou...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This model lost her leg because of toxic shock syndrome. Here ’ s what she wants you to know.
Lauren Wasser woke up in a hospital bed 80 pounds heavier than she was supposed to be — filled with fluids to try to flush the toxins from her body. She struggled to move, and her feet felt like they were being lit with a lighter again and again. But the American model did not know how […]Related:She finally had a baby naturally — with a 24-year-old frozen embryo.FDA approves first gene therapy for an inherited diseaseDebate erupts within HHS about ‘words to avoid’ such as ‘vulnerable,’ ‘diversity’ and ‘entitlement’ (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

She finally had a baby naturally — with a 24-year-old frozen embryo.
When Tina Gibson got married seven years ago, she knew it was unlikely that she would have children naturally. Her husband, 33-year-old Benjamin Gibson, had cystic fibrosis, a condition that can make men infertile, the couple told CNN. The East Tennessee couple decided they would eventually adopt a child instead — and that they would foster several children […]Related:FDA approves first gene therapy for an inherited diseaseThis model lost a leg because of an infection from tampons. Here’s what she wants you to know.Debate erupts within HHS about ‘words to avoid’ such as ‘...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This baby was born from an embryo frozen 24 years ago
When Tina Gibson got married seven years ago, she knew it was unlikely that she would have children naturally. Her husband, 33-year-old Benjamin Gibson, had cystic fibrosis, a condition that can make men infertile, the couple told CNN. The East Tennessee couple decided they would eventually adopt a child instead — and that they would foster several children […]Related:FDA approves first gene therapy for an inherited diseaseThis model lost a leg because of an infection from tampons. Here’s what she wants you to know.Debate erupts within HHS about ‘words to avoid’ such as ‘...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA approves first gene therapy for an inherited disease
In a historic move, the Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved a pioneering gene therapy for a rare form of childhood blindness, the first such treatment cleared in the United States for an inherited disease. The approval signals a new era for the gene therapy field, which struggled for decades to overcome devastating setbacks […]Related:Debate erupts within HHS about ‘words to avoid’ such as ‘vulnerable,’ ‘diversity’ and ‘entitlement’FDA takes more aggressive stance toward homeopathic drugsHe was a renowned surgeon — until a doctor found his initials b...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A model lost her leg because of an infection from tampons. Here ’ s what she wants you to know.
Lauren Wasser woke up in a hospital bed 80 pounds heavier than she was supposed to be — filled with fluids to try to flush the toxins from her body. She struggled to move, and her feet felt like they were being lit with a lighter again and again. But the American model did not know how […]Related:She finally had a baby naturally — with a 24-year-old frozen embryo.FDA approves first gene therapy for an inherited diseaseDebate erupts within HHS about ‘words to avoid’ such as ‘vulnerable,’ ‘diversity’ and ‘entitlement’ (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This model lost a leg because of an infection from tampons. Here ’ s what she wants you to know.
Lauren Wasser woke up in a hospital bed 80 pounds heavier than she was supposed to be — filled with fluids to try to flush the toxins from her body. She struggled to move, and her feet felt like they were being lit with a lighter again and again. But the model did not know how dire […]Related:Debate erupts within HHS about ‘words to avoid’ such as ‘vulnerable,’ ‘diversity’ and ‘entitlement’FDA takes more aggressive stance toward homeopathic drugsHe was a renowned surgeon — until a doctor found his initials burned on a patient’s liver (Source...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Debate erupts within HHS about ‘ words to avoid ’ such as ‘ vulnerable, ’ ‘ diversity ’ and ‘ entitlement ’
Health and Human Services Department officials confirmed Monday that they had singled out a handful of words that should be avoided in the upcoming budget process, but said they had not blocked employees from using them outright. A department spokesman further said that the guidance came from within HHS, not from the Office of Management […]Related:FDA takes more aggressive stance toward homeopathic drugsHe was a renowned surgeon — until a doctor found his initials burned on a patient’s liverA baby was born with her heart outside her body — and survived (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA takes more aggressive stance toward homeopathic drugs
The Food and Drug Administration on Monday proposed a tougher enforcement policy toward homeopathic drugs, saying it would target products posing the greatest safety risks, including those containing potentially harmful ingredients or being marketed for cancer, heart disease and opioid and alcohol addictions. Homeopathy is based on an 18th-century idea that substances that cause disease […]Related:He was a renowned surgeon — until a doctor found his initials burned on a patient’s liverA baby was born with her heart outside her body — and survived‘Phenomenal’ trial results may lead to a ...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA to target homeopathic drugs that pose safety risks
The Food and Drug Administration proposed a tougher enforcement stance Monday toward homeopathic drugs, saying it would target products that pose the greatest safety risks, including those that contain potentially harmful ingredients or that are being marketed for serious diseases without proven benefits. Homeopathy is based on an 18th-century idea that substances that cause disease […]Related:He was a renowned surgeon — until a doctor found his initials burned on a patient’s liverA baby was born with her heart outside her body — and survived‘Phenomenal’ trial results may lead to a trea...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

He was a renowned surgeon — until a doctor found his initials burned on a patient ’ s liver
Patients often can't help but wonder what doctors and nurses are doing while they're sedated. Some suspect trash talking. Others are wary of racially-charged comments. On Wednesday, a British surgeon gave patients something new to worry about: Getting their doctors' initials burned into their organs while they are unconscious. Simon Bramhall, 53, pleaded guilty to two counts of assault […]Related:A baby was born with her heart outside her body — and survived‘Phenomenal’ trial results may lead to a treatment for Huntington’s disease, experts sayTrump reportedly drinks 12 ca...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A baby was born with her heart outside her body — and survived
Immediately after Vanellope Hope Wilkins was born, she was put in sterile plastic to protect her heart — which was beating outside her tiny chest. It was a moment that her parents, Dean Wilkins and Naomi Findlay, had hoped for but were not certain would actually come — a moment in which their baby girl would come into the world, and live. […]Related:‘Phenomenal’ trial results may lead to a treatment for Huntington’s disease, experts sayTrump reportedly drinks 12 cans of Diet Coke each day. Is that healthy?New CDC head faces questions about financial co...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘Phenomenal’ trial results may lead to a treatment for Huntington ’ s disease, experts say
The discovery of a drug that may treat the fatal disease known as Huntington's is being hailed as “historic” by Louise Vetter, president and CEO of the Huntington's Disease Society of America, and “phenomenal” and “fantastically promising” by Huntington's researchers, including the woman who discovered the genetic mutation that causes the disease. “I'm ecstatic,” said Nancy Wexler, […]Related:A baby was born with her heart outside her body — and survivedTrump reportedly drinks 12 cans of Diet Coke each day. Is that healthy?New CDC head faces questions a...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘ Phenomenal ’ trial results may lead to a treatment for Huntington ’ s disease, experts say
The discovery of a drug that may treat the fatal disease known as Huntington's is being hailed as “historic” by Louise Vetter, president and CEO of the Huntington's Disease Society of America, and “phenomenal” and “fantastically promising” by Huntington's researchers, including the woman who discovered the genetic mutation that causes the disease. “I'm ecstatic,” said Nancy Wexler, […]Related:Trump reportedly drinks 12 cans of Diet Coke each day. Is that healthy?New CDC head faces questions about financial conflicts of interestSurge in gun sales after Sandy H...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Trump reportedly drinks 12 cans of Diet Coke each day. Is that healthy?
Those keeping tabs on President Trump's diet know that Wendy's and McDonald's are staples. While campaigning, Trump inhaled Filets-o-Fish and Big Macs, savored bacon, eggs and sausage and snacked on Oreos. He'd then wash it all down with a Diet Coke. Just how much diet soda the president consumes, though, was revealed Saturday by the New York Times, which […]Related:New CDC head faces questions about financial conflicts of interestSurge in gun sales after Sandy Hook led to spike in accidental gun deaths, study saysA mother got the flu from her children — and was dead two days later (Source:...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New CDC head faces questions about financial conflicts of interest
ATLANTA — After five months in office, President Trump’s new director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has been unable to divest financial holdings that pose potential conflicts of interest, hindering her ability to fully perform her job. Brenda Fitzgerald, 71, who served as the Georgia public health commissioner until her appointment to the […]Related:Surge in gun sales after Sandy Hook led to spike in accidental gun deaths, study saysA mother got the flu from her children — and was dead two days laterGene therapy makes a big advance treating hemophilia B blood disorder (Sour...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Surge in gun sales after Sandy Hook led to spike in accidental gun deaths, study says
In the days after the horrific shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, gun enthusiasts rushed to buy millions of firearms, driven by fears that the massacre would spark new gun legislation. Those restrictions never became a reality, but a new study concludes that all the additional guns caused a significant jump in accidental firearm deaths. […]Related:A mother got the flu from her children — and was dead two days laterGene therapy makes a big advance treating hemophilia B blood disorderThe moral differences between pro- and anti-vaccine parents (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Surge in gun sales after Sandy Hook shooting led to spike in accidental gun deaths, study says
In the days after the horrific shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, gun enthusiasts rushed to buy millions of firearms, driven by fears that the massacre would spark new gun legislation. Those restrictions never became a reality, but a new study concludes that all the additional guns caused a significant jump in accidental firearm deaths. […]Related:A mother got the flu from her children — and was dead two days laterGene therapy makes a big advance treating hemophilia B blood disorderAn Illinois doctor traded drugs for sex and cash. He just pleaded guilty. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news