Via Truck And Helicopter, Mountain Goats Find New Home
The National Park Service is transporting hundreds of wild mountain goats via truck and helicopter from Olympic National Park to the North Cascades in Washington state.(Image credit: Ashley Ahearn/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - September 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ashley Ahearn Source Type: news

Mosquitoes Genetically Modified To Crash Species That Spreads Malaria
Scientists demonstrate that a "gene drive" can rapidly spread a genetic mutation through a species, perhaps providing a potent new weapon against malaria. But there are plenty of skeptics.(Image credit: Andrew Hammond) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - September 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Science Reveals How Fruit Keeps A Lid On Ripening Until The Time Is Right
Humans have harnessed the ripening power of the plant hormone ethylene for centuries, but a recent discovery of how a plant controls the hormone may lead to more precise human control of ripening.(Image credit: Arne Dedert/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - September 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rachel Ehrenberg Source Type: news

The New Health Care: Congratulations. Your Study Went Nowhere.
Researchers should embrace negative results instead of accentuating the positive, which is one of several biases that can lead to bad science. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: AARON E. CARROLL Tags: Research Medicine and Health Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Antidepressants Source Type: news

Can't Get Comfortable In Your Chair? Here's What You Can Do
Chair design shifted dramatically about a hundred years ago, and it hasn't been good for our backs. Our daily lives are filled with chairs that make our posture worse. Luckily, we've got hacks.(Image credit: Erin Brethauer for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - September 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michaeleen Doucleff Source Type: news

Teens Sleeping Too Much, Or Not Enough? Parents Can Help
Though teenagers need about nine hours of rest a night, most get only seven and are suffering. A new survey suggests their parents are struggling, too. Here's how to improve the quality of teen sleep. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - September 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: April Fulton Source Type: news

Flu vaccine propaganda: Real science vs the CDC
(Natural News) The great campaign to coax more Americans into getting a flu shot seems to get more aggressive every year. As the mainstream media continues to push the narrative that flu vaccines are some sort of miraculous tool for keeping illness at bay, vaccine skeptics like Robert F. Kennedy Jr. are speaking out –... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

GMO Answers, Sense About Science, Genetic Literacy Project all exposed as fake science front groups for Monsanto / Bayer
(Natural News) Documents recently uncovered by U.S. Right To Know have revealed that Monsanto put together a massive, multi-step plan to undermine the International Agency for Cancer Research’s position on glyphosate. A number of purportedly “independent” websites and academic organizations have been revealed for what they are: Front groups who work “behind the scenes” with... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How The Myers-Briggs Personality Test Began In A Mother's Living Room Lab
"The language of type can be immensely clarifying," says author Merve Emre. In The Personality Brokers she describes how a mother-daughter duo started a multi-million dollar "people sorting" industry.(Image credit: Cameron Pollack/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - September 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melissa Block Source Type: news

Climate Change Comes Home To Roost In North Carolina
Breached swine lagoons. Overflowing coal waste ponds. Sewage in the streets. The hellish aftermath of climate-fueled Hurricane Florence. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 22, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

The lunar gateway: a short cut to Mars?
Nasa plans to put a module in orbit around the moon as a springboard for missions to the red planet – and beyondSpaceflight will mark an important milestone this year – when Nasa celebrates the 50th anniversary of US astronauts reaching the moon. In December 1968 Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and Bill Anders – on Apollo 8 – swept over the lunar surface and captured bright blue images of Earth rising above the grey plains of the moon. It was one of the most drama tic space missions ever flown. Manned landings followed, but after a few years, the US lost interest in lunar space flights.But now Nasa has rev...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Tags: Space Nasa Science Technology European Space Agency Source Type: news

Study: Since The 1970s, Drug Overdoses Have Grown Exponentially
The research suggests that the ongoing opioid crisis may be part of a larger epidemic going back decades. The study also shows more users take multiple drugs — many of which are more potent. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - September 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rhitu Chatterjee Source Type: news

It ’s Officially the First Day of Fall. Here Are 4 Things You Should Know About Autumn
Though Starbucks has been selling its famous pumpkin spice lattes for weeks, fall wasn’t here — until now. The fall equinox, sometimes called the September equinox, is on Saturday, Sept. 22 this year and will mark the first day of fall for the Northern Hemisphere. Just in time for the foliage to appear, here’s everything you need to know about the first day of fall, what happens when the season changes and what kind of weather we can expect this year. When is the first day of fall? The first day of fall is on Saturday, Sept. 22. Beginning at 9:54 p.m. (E.S.T.), it will officially be autumn for the Norther...
Source: TIME: Science - September 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Rachel E. Greenspan Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

Alcohol causes one in 20 deaths worldwide, says WHO
Report finds 13.5% of deaths among people in their 20s are linked to alcoholAlcohol is responsible for more than 5% of all deaths worldwide, or around 3 million a year, new figures have revealed.The data, part of a report from the World Health Organization, shows that about 2.3 million of those deaths in 2016 were of men, and that almost 29% of all alcohol-caused deaths were down to injuries – including traffic accidents and suicide.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Alcohol Health Society World news World Health Organization Science Young people Source Type: news

Archaeologists and curators leaving UK over Brexit fears
Visa uncertainty and expected loss of EU funding affecting culture industry, leaders sayA no-deal Brexit would cause severe disruption across the UK ’s culture, science and design sectors, industry leaders have said.The expected loss of EU funding and uncertainty over the status of EU nationals after March 2019 meant UK museums were already losing scientists, researchers and curators, and there was a shortage of archaeologists, they said.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Batty Tags: Museums Heritage Archaeology Travel Arts funding Brexit Culture Politics Science UK news Source Type: news

Nasa launches satellite to precisely track how Earth's ice is melting
The $1bn, decade-in-the-making creation can measure height and thickness of ice sheets to within a centimeterThe world will soon have a much clearer picture of how quickly humans are melting Earth ’s ice and expanding the seas, with data collected by a sophisticated satellite launched by Nasa.Every 91 days, the $1bn, decade-in-the-making creation will orbit over more than 1,000 paths. The satellite, about the size of a Smart car, will point six lasers at ice sheets in the Arctic and Antarctica. It will then calculate how long the beams take to bounce back. Nasa will be able to more accurately measure the heights of i...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Emily Holden in Washington Tags: Nasa Environment Sea level Oceans Science Space Climate change Polar regions US news Arctic Antarctica Source Type: news

Cornell researcher who studied what we eat and why will step down after six studies are retracted
A Cornell University professor whose attention-getting studies reported that guests at Super Bowl parties consumed more calories when served snacks from larger bowls and that couch potatoes ate nearly twice as much when watching an action-packed movie than when viewing a PBS talk show will step... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

One in 20 of all deaths due to alcohol, says WHO
Report finds 13.5% of deaths among people in their 20s are linked to boozeAlcohol is responsible for more than 5% of all deaths worldwide, or around 3 million a year, new figures have revealed.The data, part of a report from the World Health Organization, shows that about 2.3 million of those deaths in 2016 were of men, and that almost 29% of all alcohol-caused deaths were down to injuries – including traffic accidents and suicide.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Alcohol Health Society World news World Health Organization Science Young people Source Type: news

Science in the fight to uphold the rights of children - Caplan AL, Hotez PJ.
The United States is the only major nation to not yet have ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC). Recently, there has been an erosion of the rights of children across America, Europe, and elsewhere, but through science, ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Alumna Patricia Nez Henderson on breaking boundaries at Yale
Henderson ’94 M.P.H., ’00 M.D. discussed her work promoting the wellness of the Navajo community in a conversation with President Peter Salovey on Sept. 17. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - September 21, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Spiders Cover Shores Of Greek Town With 1,000-Foot Web
Someone in Aitoliko is going to have to do a lot of dusting. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 21, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Gut of Mice Communicates with the Brain Through the Vagus Nerve
The researchers who made the discovery suggest the signaling may form a sixth sense. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 21, 2018 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Yale Explores events coming to Philadelphia and New York City this fall
The innovative program is back for the fall semester, traveling down I-95 for stops in Philadelphia and New York on Oct. 3 and Oct. 11, respectively. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - September 21, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Research Funds Reallocated to Child Immigrant Detention Centers
Money from the NIH's budget, among others, will be used to care for kids in federal custody. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 21, 2018 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Remembrance For Walter Mischel, Psychologist Who Devised The Marshmallow Test
Walter Mischel had an idea that became a pop culture touchstone. He wanted to see if preschoolers seated in front of a marshmallow could delay their gratification. What did the experiment really mean?(Image credit: Marcie LaCerte/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - September 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Julie Carli Source Type: news

How strong patent portfolios attract strategic investments and deals
Amassing strong patent portfolios helps medical device companies attract interest from strategic investors and potential acquirers. David J. Dykeman, Greenberg Traurig and Patrick West, Mirus Capital Advisors [Image from unsplash.com]The medical device industry has demonstrated strong and sustainable growth in recent years. Given the aging population, increasing incidence of chronic and lifestyle diseases, emergence of artificial intelligence (AI) and big data, and significant investments in R&D and M&A, the medtech sector appears to be in prime health. According to KPMG, the medical device industry’s gl...
Source: Mass Device - September 21, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Business/Financial News Mergers & Acquisitions Wall Street Beat DeviceTalks Boston devicetalksboston Greenberg Traurig intellectualproperty Mirus Capital Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight September is National Preparedness Month. Disasters Happen. Prepare Now. Learn How. This week: Check your coverage. The Fall 2018 offering for The Health Sciences Library Association of New Jersey’s Group Licensing Initiative (HSLANJ GLI) is now available. MAR members are eligible for this cost-saving opportunity! The deadline to participate is Friday, November 9. Learn more. National Network of Libraries of Medicine News Funding Available: NNLM MAR has funding available for two grants of $19,000. Libraries, community...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - September 21, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Eight of ten with cancer risk genes don ’t know it
Without routine screening, most only discover they carry cancer-associated gene variants when that person or family members receive a cancer diagnosis. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - September 21, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

A Prominent Researcher on Eating Habits Resigned After a Scandal Over His Studies
A prominent food researcher has resigned from his post at Cornell University after an investigation found major issues with his research. Six of his high-profile journal articles were retracted earlier this week. Brian Wansink, known for his buzzy behavioral science studies focusing on food, has been removed from all research and teaching at Cornell following an internal investigation that revealed academic misconduct, the school announced in a statement Thursday. “The committee found that Professor Wansink committed academic misconduct in his research and scholarship, including misreporting of research data, problem...
Source: TIME: Health - September 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Research Source Type: news

5% of all deaths due to alcohol, WHO says
Report finds 13.5% of deaths among people in their 20s are linked to boozeAlcohol is responsible for more than 5% of all deaths worldwide, or around 3 million a year, new figures have revealed.The data, part of a report from the World Health Organization, shows that about 2.3 million of those deaths in 2016 were among men, and that almost 29% of all alcohol-caused deaths were down to injuries – including traffic accidents and suicide.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Alcohol Health Society World news World Health Organization Science Source Type: news

‘Conflict and cooperation’: chemistry at the human bacteria interface
The Yale Chemical Biology Institute ’s Jason Crawford describes his work to uncover the mechanisms of how bacteria regulate the human immune system. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - September 21, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

NSF announces new awards for Understanding the Rules of Life
The National Science Foundation (NSF) announced 29 awards in support of Understanding the Rules of Life, one of the agency's "10 Big Ideas for Future NSF Investments." The awards, totaling $15 million, demonstrate NSF's commitment to address some of the greatest challenges in understanding the living world, in all of its complex levels of organization, ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=296660&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - September 21, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

It ’s bare sick that the OED cares how young people speak | Coco Khan
With culture wars raging, it matters that such an institution would reach out to Britain ’s young for help with slang wordsAnyone ’s who’s played a heated game of Scrabble will know that the dictionary is much more than a simple resource that records and define common words. It is also a place where history and culture is preserved. When a word enters the dictionary, it is “real”; established, bona fide, and must be ac cepted. It plays an active role in defining not just words but our world.So I was delighted to find that this week the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) asked the public to help g...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Coco Khan Tags: Language Science Young people Society UK news Reference and languages books Source Type: news

Researchers Take Action to End Airlines' Restrictions on Lab Animals
United Airlines, British Airways, China Southern Airlines, and Qatar Airways face a formal complaint over their refusal to transport animals for scientific research. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 21, 2018 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Extreme biohacking: the tech guru who spent $250,000 trying to live for ever
Silicon Valley millionaire Serge Faguet thinks pills, injections and implants will turn him into a superhuman. Could they?In September last year, the young Silicon Valley entrepreneur Serge Faguetposted an article on the tech website Hacker Noon. It was headlined: “I’m 32 and spent $200k on biohacking. Became calmer, thinner, extroverted, healthier& happier. ” Significantly more intelligent, too, he added, with an increased sex drive that dovetailed nicely with his newfound ease at “picking up girls”.These last two points especially grabbed the attention of the site ’s hundreds of th...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Stefanie Marsh Tags: Science Technology Silicon Valley Medical research Life and style Source Type: news

People with depression have a larger hypothalamus which may disrupt the HPA axis
Research, published inActa Psychiatrica Scandinavica, suggests that people who suffer from depression have a larger hypothalamus, which may disrupt the HPA axis to increase cortisol release.Science Daily (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - September 21, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Early warning sign of psychosis detected
Brains of people at risk of psychosis exhibit a pattern that can help predict whether they will go on to develop full-fledged schizophrenia, says a new study. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - September 21, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Image of the Day: On the Wing
 A model helps recapitulate the geometric patterning of insect wings. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 21, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Image of the Day Source Type: news

The human league: what separates us from other animals?
From masturbating dolphins to chimps using tools, animals often display behaviours that we ’d consider human. So what makes us unique?You are an animal, but a very special one. Mostly bald, you ’re an ape, descended from apes; your features and actions are carved or winnowed by natural selection. But what a special simian you are. Shakespeare crystallised this thought a good 250 years beforeCharles Darwin positioned us as a creature at the end of the slightest of twigs on a single, bewildering family tree that encompasses 4bn years, a lot of twists and turns, and 1 billion species.“What a piece of work is...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Adam Rutherford Tags: Science and nature books Charles Darwin Evolution Culture William Shakespeare Anthropology Biology Source Type: news

NSF Unveils New Sexual Harassment Policy
The measures include, in specific cases, terminating awards for researchers who have been found guilty in investigations by their institutions. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 21, 2018 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Octopuses On Ecstasy Reveal Commonalities with Humans
Just as in people, the drug stimulates the animals to behave more socially. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 21, 2018 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Scientists reveal secrets of oldest known animal fossil – video
Associate Professor Jochen Brocks from the Australian National University shares a discovery which founda fossilised lifeform that existed 558m years ago.The Dickinsonia fossil has been identified as the oldest known animal, according to Brock's new researchContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 21, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Fossils Archaeology Science Universities Biology Evolution Source Type: news

Solving the genome puzzle
With advances in gene technology helping to diagnose very rare diseases, has the new era of personalised medicine finally arrived?Evie Walker sits on her mother ’s lap, playing a game she never grows tired of: turning her mother’s hand over and over, stroking and examining it. When she takes a break and looks around, it is with the open-mouthed look of curiosity and awe that you see in many infants. Evie’s vocabulary currently consists of a repertoire of squawks and “mmm” sounds. In the past few months, she has begun to stand unaided for short periods – even taking a few steps in her wal...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: Genetics Health Society Politics Children Cancer Cancer research Medical research Science Biology Source Type: news

Is a vegan diet healthy? Anjana Ahuja looks at the science
‘A diet of fags, booze and chips is technically vegan – but won’t help you outlive your burger-munching peers’ (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - September 21, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Carnegie Mellon biologist receives NSF 'Understanding Rules of Life' grant
(Carnegie Mellon University) The Department of Biological Sciences' Dannie Durand is one of 29 recipients of the National Science Foundation's (NSF) 'Understanding the Rules of Life' grants. The grants are part of a $15 million investment by the NSF to address some of the greatest challenges to understanding the living world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 21, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Whose water is it anyway? CSU shares $4.9 million grant for evaluating water rights
(Colorado State University) Climate change, population growth and other factors mean that Western water allocation strategies may benefit from changes over the long term. To bring scientific veracity to these inevitable changes, researchers at Colorado State University, in partnership with the University of Nevada, Reno; Desert Research Institute; Northern Arizona University; and Arizona State University have received a $4.9 million grant from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How will changes in snowpack affect water rights in arid western US?
(Arizona State University) Mountain snowpack is melting earlier, leaving water regulators searching for new approaches and farmers concerned about the risk to their crops. The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Thursday awarded $4.9 million to an interdisciplinary team of researchers from five institutions in three states, to help stakeholders find solutions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research reveals a mitochondrial gene that protects against dementia and other diseases of aging
(University of Southern California) New research from USC has uncovered a previously unknown genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. The study provides insights on how these conditions, and other diseases of aging, might one day be treated and prevented. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Philly refinery fails to include public input in cleanup efforts
This report recommends steps to correct Sunoco's oversight, as well as the need to explore cleanup standards more stringent than those appropriate for ongoing refinery operations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers successfully train employees to respond to opioid overdose, administer naloxone
(New York University) A small study shows that business managers and staff -- such as those running coffee shops and fast-food restaurants -- can be trained to reverse opioid overdoses, which are known to occur in public bathrooms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news