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Space sperm produces healthy mice, raising prospect of future human settlement
Scientists say success of freeze-dried mouse sperm stored on international station could be significant for human reproduction when ‘space age’ arrivesReproduction may be possible in space, Japanese researchers have said, after freeze-dried sperm stored on the International Space Station for nine months produced healthy offspring.The scientists said their findings could have significant ramifications for human settlements in space, which they consider “likely”.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Elle Hunt Tags: Space Reproduction Biology Science Source Type: news

National Science Foundation to present FY 2018 budget request
National Science Foundation (NSF) Director France A. Córdova will present President Donald J. Trump's Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 NSF budget request to Congress at 3:00 p.m. EDT on Tuesday May 23. The presentation will take place at NSF's headquarters, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, Virginia. Following Córdova's presentation, there will be a question and answer session with NSF leadership. The presentation will be recorded. It will be posted on NSF.gov on the following ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=242010&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - May 23, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Me, Myself, and IKEA: What Our Love For Swedish Furniture Says About Narcissism
In general, people show a subtle bias toward the self. This is why we love the IKEA furniture we've built, and gravitate toward others with the same name. But there are much larger implications, too.(Image credit: Renee Klahr) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Shankar Vedantam Source Type: news

Your Lack Of Sleep Is Not Helping You Make Any Friends
Here's evidence that getting your beauty sleep isn't just a cliche: Sleep loss can make you appear less approachable to people, according to a new study. Researchers examined how strangers reacted to 25 men and women after only four hours of sleep and after the recommended eight hours. They found that the less sleep a person got, the less inclined strangers were to socialize with the person. The study volunteers were first asked to sleep eight hours for two consecutive nights. A week later, the participants were asked to get two consecutive nights of bad rest, where they only slept four hours or fewer. The s...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

International Eel Smuggling Scheme Centers On Maine
NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Bill Trotter, a fishery and environmental reporter for the Bangor Daily News, about the illegal eel fishing scheme in Maine. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Space-preserved sperm: It's a thing, scientists say, after successful experiment with mice
The freeze-dried sperm samples were launched in 2013 to the International Space Station and returned to Earth in 2014. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - May 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Technology & Science Source Type: news

At 94, Lithium-Ion Pioneer Eyes A New Longer-Lasting Battery
In 1980, John Goodenough's work led to the lithium-ion battery, now found in everything from phones to electric cars. He and fellow researchers say they've come up with a faster-charging alternative.(Image credit: Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mose Buchele Source Type: news

Pediatricians take aim at juice: It 'has no essential role in healthy, balanced diets of children'
The American Academy of Pediatrics has some new advice about juice: Kids should not drink it. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Hay fever mapping? There ’s an app for that | Letter from Dr Sheena Cruickshank
Dr Sheena Cruickshank on how ‘citizen sensors’ can help scientists to learn of how pollen, weather and pollution interact to trigger allergy symptomsSeasonal allergies, such as hay fever and allergic asthma, are on the rise in the UK as your article (First hay fever map of Britain offers some relief to sufferers, theguardian.com, 20 May) rightly points out, with up to one in four people now experiencing symptoms each year. However, these are complex conditions, and just mapping pollen levels does not tell the full story in allowing accurate prediction of allergy symptoms. Many people will react to multiple thin...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Hay fever Allergies Society Apps Technology iPhone iOS Software Android Immunology Medical research Biochemistry and molecular biology Science Source Type: news

Climate Change May Force Millions Of Americans To Move Inland
In low-lying island nations like Tuvalu and the Maldives, the term “climate migrant” is all too familiar. Rising sea levels have already forced some Pacific Ocean communities to flee from their homes and there are fears that several whole islands will be underwater in just a few decades. But it’s not just island dwellers who need to worry about climate-related migration. As coastal areas are deluged over this century, millions of mainland Americans could be forced to flee inland, where they may overwhelm already crowded cities, according to new research from the University of Georgia. &ldqu...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Dementia saliva testing 'shows early promise'
Conclusion The researchers are appropriately cautious in their conclusions. These findings have potential, but this is an early stage pilot – a starting point for further study. The tests were carried out in small samples of healthy people and those with cognitive impairment. They would have to be validated in much larger groups, in which it's possible the test would give different findings. The researchers calculate that they would need at least 100 people per group to develop models that could reliably detect significant differences in biomarkers between the groups. Even among this small sample, we don't know from ...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Medical practice Older people Source Type: news

Did you solve it? The maths problem for five-year-olds 'stumping' the web
The answers to today ’s three puzzlesEarlier today I set you the following three puzzles.1. In each of the four sectors of the outer circle, there is a two-digit number which is equal to the sum of the three numbers at the corners of its sector.The numbers in the individual circles can only be 1 to 9 and each number can be used only once. One number has been provided to get you started. Find the remaining four numbersContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Science Source Type: news

New FDA Pathway to Accelerate Development of Cell Therapies
Four products have already qualified for the regenerative medicine advanced therapy (RMAT) designation that provides extra interactions with the agency, and sooner. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Tags: News Analysis Source Type: news

Scientists identify 40 genes that shed new light on biology of intelligence
Study significantly adds to the tally of genes connected to intellect – but researchers caution genius isn’t all down to geneticsA major study into the genetics of human intelligence has given scientists their richest insight yet into the biology that underpins our cognitive skills.The research on 60,000 adults and 20,000 children uncovered 40 new genes that play a role in intelligence, a haul that brings the number of genes known to have a bearing on IQ to 52.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Genetics Science Neuroscience Biology Albert Einstein Netherlands Europe World news Source Type: news

The Desperate Gambit That Could Save A Tiny Porpoise From Extinction ... Or Kill It
In 2016, scientists made a distressing announcement: There were fewer than 30 vaquitas ― a tiny porpoise that dwells in Mexico’s Gulf of California ― left in the wild. With carcasses continuing to wash up, researchers worry the vaquita could be extinct by 2018, becoming yet another mammal forced off the face of the Earth.  Losing the porpoise would be a tragedy for Mexico, the World Wildlife Fund said this week ― akin to “losing a piece” of the country, according to Maria Jose Villanueva, a project coordinator for WWF Mexico. But the demise of the vaquita would be a blow to more than...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Interrogating proteins
Scientists from the University of Bristol have designed a new protein structure, and are using it to understand how protein structures are stabilised. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - May 22, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Institutes, Institutes, Bristol BioDesign Institute, Faculty of Science; Press Release Source Type: news

Can better tech improve doctor-patient conversations? A case study with CAT scans in the ER
A Yale-led team of researchers have developed an electronic application tool that puts patients at the center of a decision about an overused medical test: the CAT or CT scan. If it pans out in wider pilot testing, the innovative app could inform the way that health technology tools are developed and used by physicians and patients. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - May 22, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Yale News Source Type: news

$995 Bag Of Moon Dust Could Fetch $4 Million At Auction
(Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

In 2016, scientists discovered 18,000 new species. Now meet the Top 10
ESF announced its annual Top 10 list of new species for 2017. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Sean Greene Source Type: news

Here's How Long Your Trash Will Hang Around After You're Dead
This story is part of a series on ocean plastics. Some things you toss in the trash will have a longer life span on this planet than you will ― and that’s not good news for the environment.   Americans generated 258 million tons of trash in 2014, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. While some of this trash gets recycled or composted, most of it ends up in landfills, where it releases greenhouse gases that contribute to climate change. A lot of it also ends up in the oceans, where animals can eat it or get harmed by it ― particularly if it’s plastic trash like bottle ca...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Bacterial Photography Goes Technicolor
Genetically engineered"disco bacteria" sense and respond to different colors of light, creating both stunning art in the culture dish and new possibilities for synthetic biology. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Daily News,News & Opinion,The Scientist Source Type: news

Animal welfare and research 3Rs symposium
The University of Bristol held its first Animal Welfare and Research 3Rs symposium last month [Thursday 27 April]. During the symposium, scientists had the opportunity to find out about current research and share best practice of the ‘ 3Rs ’ : Replace, Reduce and Refine. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - May 22, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Science, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, School of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Sc Source Type: news

Neil deGrasse Tyson demands "science totalitarianism" across America, says anyone who disagrees with him is automatically "anti-science"
(Natural News) Perhaps the world’s biggest asshat with a superiority complex in all things “science,” charlatan Neil deGrasse Tyson, is on a mission to eradicate “anti-intellectualism” from the U.S. –  a.k.a. any belief that deviates from what he personally holds to be true about the world. In a recent video he released for Earth Day,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Checkup: The Science of Adolescent Sleep
Sleep deprivation is linked to behavioral and mental health problems and car accident risk, experts say, and starting school later could help. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: PERRI KLASS, M.D. Tags: Teenagers and Adolescence Sleep Driver Distraction and Fatigue Children and Childhood Source Type: news

How Statistics Weakened mRNAs Predictive Power
Transcript abundance isn't a reliable indicator of protein quantity, contrary to studies' suggestions. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Daily News,News & Opinion Source Type: news

The psychology of passwords: 'You won't change until you've been hacked'
We all know the risks of not changing our passwords – yet somehow it is never a priority. Louise Chunn explains why few people botherYou know you should; you know you must! But for some reason you just don ’t ever seem to get around to changing your passwords. You could simply start using apassword manager, an easy-to-access programme that safely tracks and stores your passwords, assigning different ones to each account. But do you? Surely there ’s not a part of you that actually wants to be hacked by fraudsters?Many of us struggle with tasks that need to be done, but do not appear to be urgent. “Of...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Louise Chunn Tags: Psychology Source Type: news

Can you solve it? The maths problem for 5-year-olds 'stumping' the web
The truth about the latest viral maths problem from Singapore - and another historic Oriental numbers puzzleHappy birthday Monday Puzzle!It is now exactly two years since thebirth of this column, which I started as a consequence of aSingapore maths problem that went viral. To celebrate this anniversary the internet has kindly provided me with a new Singapore maths problem. The webhas been aflutterthis past week about the following teaser reportedly given to Singaporean first year pupils, that ’s five to seven-year-olds, that is so difficult no one can solve.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Science Source Type: news

NASA Plans Emergency Spacewalk To Replace Key Computer On International Space Station
A pair of astronauts will venture outside the International Space Station on Tuesday for an emergency spacewalk to replace a failed computer, one of two that control major U.S. systems aboard the orbiting outpost, NASA said on Sunday. The primary device failed on Saturday, leaving the $100 billion orbiting laboratory to depend on a backup system to route commands to its solar power system, radiators, cooling loops and other equipment. The station’s current five-member crew from the United States, Russia and France were never in any danger, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration said in a statement. The Ex...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Faraday cage: from Victorian experiment to Snowden-era paranoia
Michael Faraday ’s pioneering work on electricity made him a 19th-century superstar. Now his signature invention is being repurposed for surveillance–proof bags, wallpaper and underpants – not to mention plot points in TV shows such as Better Call SaulThere is not much room to build a box the size of a garage in theRoyal Institution ’s lecture theatre. Tiered seating surrounds the large central table and leaves little room for much else. It was the same in January 1836, butMichael Faraday had no choice. He left his cramped lab in the basement of the building in London ’s Mayfair and set to wor...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Tags: Physics Chemistry Lost Better Call Saul Technology Science Source Type: news

‘I knew they were sugar pills but I felt fantastic’ – the rise of open-label placebos
IBS patient Linda Buonanno knew the pills she was given contained no active drugs, yet they had an immediate effect on her condition. So can placebos play a useful medical role?Linda Buonanno had suffered 15 years of intense cramps, bloating, diarrhoea and pain she describes as “worse than labour”. She was willing to try anything to get relief from her irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and leapt at the chance to take part in a trial of an experimental new therapy. Her hope turned to disappointment, however, when the researcher handed her a bottle of capsules he described as placebos containing no active ingredient...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nic Fleming Tags: Health & wellbeing Life and style Placebo effect Science Drugs Source Type: news

Pediatricians Advise No Fruit Juice Until Kids Are 1
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine Hobson Source Type: news

Moderate drinking may not ward off heart disease
(Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs) Many people believe that having a glass of wine with dinner -- or moderately drinking any kind of alcohol -- will protect them from heart disease. But a hard look at the evidence finds little support for that. That's the conclusion of a new research review in the May 2017 issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Doctors urge FDA to tighten regulations on 'filtered' cigarettes
(MediaSource) While the overall rate of lung cancer continues to decline in the United States, one form of the disease often found in the outer areas of the lungs continues to climb -- and experts think they know why. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

First ever data on number of gender confirmation surgeries
(MediaSource) For the first time, the world's largest plastic surgery organization is tracking national statistics on gender confirmation surgeries. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons found a nearly 20 percent increase in these surgeries in just the first year of reporting. In 2016, more than 3,200 surgeries were performed to help transgender patients feel more like themselves. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

3.3 million-year-old fossil reveals the antiquity of the human spine
(University of Missouri-Columbia) An international research team has found a 3.3 million Australopithecus afarensis fossilized skeleton, possessing the most complete spinal column of any early fossil human relative. The vertebral bones, neck and rib cage are mainly intact. This new research, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science demonstrates that portions of the human skeletal structure were established millions of years earlier than previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cultural backgrounds of media organizations affect international news coverage
(University of Missouri-Columbia) Researchers examined the photographic news coverage of a visit Pope Francis made to Cuba to determine how major media outlets from different countries covered the international event. They found that the cultural values of the photojournalists' home countries affected the ways in which the pope's visit was framed by each media outlet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Humanizing, harmonizing effects of music aren't a myth
(University of Arizona) UA professor Jake Harwood and his collaborators have found that listening to music from other cultures furthers one's pro-diversity beliefs. The findings have important implications for music education, K-12 education and efforts to improve cross-cultural intergroup dialogue and communication. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A leap for 3-D printing
(University of California - Santa Barbara) Tresa Pollock receives a $3 million Department of Defense fellowship to develop a platform for printing with new extreme-use materials (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Terlaky produces new textbook on operations and optimization
(Lehigh University) Tam á s Terlaky, chair of Lehigh University's Industrial and Systems Engineering department, along with fellow editors Miguel F. Anjos of Polytechnique Montr é al and Shabbir Ahmed of Georgia Institute of Technology, has released a new textbook to " provide a solid foundation for engineers and mathematical optimizers alike who want to understand the importance of optimization methods to engineering, and the capabilities of these methods. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Paper: 'No admit-No deny' settlements undercut accountability in civil enforcement
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) The failure of federal watchdog agencies to require admissions of guilt from the targets of civil enforcement can trigger calls for greater accountability from the public, says a new paper from U. of I. law professors Verity Winship and Jennifer K. Robbennolt. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Awareness of controversial Arizona immigration law influenced male students' classroom behavior
(University of Kansas) US-born Latino male middle school students who had familiarity with a controversial Arizona immigration-enforcement bill had more difficulty exhibiting proper behavior in the classroom, such as following instructions and staying quiet, according to a new study by researchers at Arizona State University and the University of Kansas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Risk of interval colorectal cancers higher among African-Americans
(American Cancer Society) An American Cancer Society study of Medicare enrollees finds the risk for interval colorectal cancers, cancers that develop after a colonoscopy but before the next recommended test, is higher for blacks than whites. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Field of 'sexting' research finds little to worry about
(North Carolina State University) A recent analysis of research into how so-called 'sexting' may affect sexual behavior finds that it has little impact on sexual activity -- but highlights significant shortcomings in the research itself. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Deep sleep maintains the learning efficiency of the brain
(University of Zurich) For the first time, researchers of the University of Zurich and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich have demonstrated the causal context of why deep sleep is important to the learning efficiency of the human brain. They have developed a new, noninvasive method for modulating deep sleep in humans in a targeted region of the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Harvard Pilgrim awards Quality Grant funding to 14 providers for 2017
(Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute) Physician practices in Massachusetts, Maine and New Hampshire will receive grant funding this year from Harvard Pilgrim Health Care's Quality Grants Program. Harvard Pilgrim's 18th annual grant program will fund 14 initiatives designed to improve care delivery and reduce costs within a variety of care delivery models. Over the past 17 years, Harvard Pilgrim has funded over 270 initiatives totaling more than $19 million dollars (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Effective intervention for binge drinking in adolescents
(Deutsches Aerzteblatt International) An intervention program based on school class groups has a preventive effect on subsequent drinking behavior, especially binge drinking, in adolescents who had previously consumed alcohol. This is the conclusion reached in a cluster-randomized study reported by Reiner Hanewinkel and colleagues in the current issue of the Deutsches Ä rzteblatt International (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Abused caregivers have double chance of poor health
(University of Queensland) Nearly one in 20 middle-age women face a cumulative health impact from taking on care-giving roles after experiencing intimate partner violence according to research from the University of Queensland. The women had twice the odds of experiencing depressive symptoms and stress and also had worse physical health than women without these life experiences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

City life could present psychosis risk for adolescents
(King's College London) Living in a city could significantly increase young people's vulnerability to psychotic experiences, according to a new study from King's College London and Duke University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People perceive attractive scientists as more interesting but less able, studies show
(University of Cambridge) A new study published today in Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) from researchers at the University of Cambridge and the University of Essex suggests that when it comes to judging scientists, we are more likely to find an attractive scientist interesting, but more likely to consider their less attractive colleagues to be better scientists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Intestinal fungi worsen alcoholic liver disease
(University of California - San Diego) Liver cirrhosis is the 12th leading cause of mortality worldwide and approximately half of those deaths are due to alcohol abuse. Yet apart from alcohol abstinence, there are no specific treatments to reduce the severity of alcohol-associated liver disease. Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) have linked intestinal fungi to increased risk of death for patients with alcohol-related liver disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news