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Avocado Hand Injuries Are Real. Is A Seedless Fruit The Answer?
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Maanvi Singh Source Type: news

Building a niche in clinical trial research
There ’s a saying that the only difference between screwing around and science is writing it down. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - December 15, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Laura Williams-Tracy Source Type: news

Is ‘Oumuamua an alien spacecraft? Initial scans show no signs of technology
Mysterious object detected hurtling through our solar system swept for radio signals, but scientists have found no evidence it is anything other than rockThe first scans for alien technology aboard a mysterious object that is barreling through the solar system have found no evidence it is the work of an intelligent civilisation.The cigar-shaped object was spotted hurtling through the solar systemin October and while astronomers suspected it was an interstellar asteroid, its curious shape led them to propose sweeping it for radio signals in case it happened to be an alien craft.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 15, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Space Alien life Astronomy Science Asteroids Source Type: news

Traffic safety science: research agenda for the way forward - Tiwari G.
[Abstract unavailable] Language: en... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

Nasa find first alien solar system with as many planets as our own
Kepler scientists team up with Google AI specialists to detect eighth planet orbiting distant starScientists on Nasa ’s Kepler mission have spotted an eighth planet around a distant star, making it the first alien solar system known to host as many planets as our own.The newfound world orbits a star named Kepler 90 which is larger and hotter than the sun and lies 2,500 light years from Earth in the constellation of Draco.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 15, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Space Science Astronomy Nasa Google Technology Artificial intelligence (AI) Source Type: news

Data will change the world, and we must get its governance right
The chancellor ’s announcement of a new centre for data ethics is welcome. But we must ensure that it has the power to address the ethical issues it identifiedData, data everywhere – but will it make our lives better, or put us at risk? In recent months it has become clear that while the opportunities presented by ever-growing data are abundant, so too are the threats. That’s why we need better governance – a set of guiding principles as to how this new technology is use d and developed – not least because misuse threatens to turn the public against such innovations.Data breaches from companie...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 15, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Daniel Zeichner Tags: Science Big data Artificial intelligence (AI) Technology Computing Budget 2017 (November) Source Type: news

Is ‘Oumuamua an alien spacecraft? First scans show no signs of technology
Mysterious object detected hurtling through our solar system swept for radio signals, but scientists have found no evidence it is anything other than rockThe first scans for alien technology aboard a mysterious object that is barreling through the solar system have found no evidence it is the work of an intelligent civilisation.The cigar-shaped object was spotted hurtling through the solar systemin October and while astronomers suspected it was an interstellar asteroid, its curious shape led them to propose sweeping it for radio signals in case it happened to be an alien craft.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 15, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Space Alien life Astronomy Science Asteroids Source Type: news

Could drinking tea really be linked to a lower risk of glaucoma?
A study has found a link between hot tea and a lower risk of glaucoma, but experts say there ’s no evidence that a cuppa will protect you from the conditionDrinking hot tea could be linked to a lower risk of having an eye condition that can lead to blindness, research has suggested – although experts say the study does not show that the brew offers any protective effect.Glaucoma is an eye condition in which the pressure of fluids inside the eye damages the optic nerve – and can lead to blindness if left undetected. Many are unaware they have the condition, and while the risk of glaucoma increases with age...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Medical research Tea Health Science Society Source Type: news

Scientists find a miniature version of our solar system, with eight planets and a sun-like star
Scientists applying artificial intelligence to data from NASA ’s Kepler Space Telescope have discovered an eighth planet around the star Kepler-90 — breaking the record for the star with the most exoplanets and, for the first time, tying with our own.The planet Kepler-90i, described at a briefing... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - December 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Amgen Teams Up With Cambridge Biotech Community To Select Two Startups To Receive Golden Tickets At LabCentral
Amgen Golden Tickets Provide Innovative Startup Companies With Free Lab Space to Aid in Further Advancement of Their Science CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Dec. 14, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN) and LabCentral today announced that Kernal Biologics Inc. and QurAlis have won the Amgen Golden Ticket at LabCentral. The two Golden Ticket winners were chosen by an Amgen internal committee and live audience members at a "Quick Pitch" event hosted by Amgen at its Cambridge R&D and Operations facility on Dec. 11, 2017. Five finalists pitched their business plan to attendees where the audiences' input represented on...
Source: Amgen News Release - December 14, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Nasa find first alien solar system with as many worlds as our own
Kepler scientists team up with Google AI specialists to detect eighth planet orbiting distant starScientists on Nasa ’s Kepler mission have spotted an eighth planet around a distant star, making it the first alien solar system known to host as many planets as our own.The newfound world orbits a star named Kepler 90 which is larger and hotter than the sun and lies 2,500 light years from Earth in the constellation of Draco.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Space Science Astronomy Nasa Google Technology Artificial intelligence (AI) Source Type: news

Meeting an octopus with children's book author Jan Brett
Gilligan the octopus was putting on a show, and her aquarist was delighted.“We can’t make any promises with an octopus,” said Angelina Komatovich, who takes care of the giant Pacific octopus at the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach. “Most of the time she’s hiding in a corner.”Not Saturday.... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - December 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Kids Environment Kids Health
A resource for kids, parents, and teachers to find fun and educational materials related to health, science, and the environment we live in today. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

U.S. R & D Increased by $20 Billion in 2015, to $495 Billion; Estimates for 2016 Indicate a Rise to $510 Billion
New data indicate that research and development performed in the United States totaled $495.1 billion in 2015. The estimated total for 2016, based on performer-reported expectations, is $510.0 billion. These numbers compare to U.S. R&D totals of $454.0 billion in 2013 and $475.4 billion in 2014. In 2008-just before the onset of the main economic effects of the national and international financial crisis and the Great Recession-the U.S. total was $404.8 billion. Data are from the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics, National Science Foundation. (Source: NSF - Statistics on U.S. Science and Engineering Resources)
Source: NSF - Statistics on U.S. Science and Engineering Resources - December 14, 2017 Category: Statistics Source Type: news

GMR Sponsors Two Sites for Upcoming MLA Webinar on REDCap!
Congratulations to the Wisconsin Health Science Library Association and the University of Detroit Mercy! Both organizations applied for and are being sponsored by the GMR office to access next week’s MLA webinar Go Red! REDCap for Library Data Services and Data Collection. Members affiliated with these organizations can view the webinar live or view a recording for up to 6 months. In addition, each organization will receive 25 CE codes that can be distributed at their discretion to individuals who attend the live, or view the recorded, session. Just a reminder that the GMR accepts applications on a rolling basis for ...
Source: The Cornflower - December 14, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Derek Johnson Tags: Blog Source Type: news

Webinar: Improving sex and gender equity in health research
YaleWomen hosts this thought-provoking discussion, a “call to action” about the failure of the medical establishment to address women's health needs. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - December 14, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Lectureship in Digital Health and Care
Location: Bristol, United Kingdom Job Type: Full-Time Employer: University of Bristol Closing Date: 02 January 2018 The School of Computer Science, Electrical and Electronical Engineering and Engineering Mathematics is seeking to appoint a Lecturer in Digital Health and Care. In collaboration with the Anchor Society, this reflects a mutual desire to expand the School's research and educational activities around technologies that can support the UK's ageing population. The position is an open-ended contract, signalling the School's long-term commitment to this area. ...
Source: eHealth News EU - December 14, 2017 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Jobs Source Type: news

Science Speed-Dating Aims To Boost Accuracy In TV And Film
When was the last time you got really excited by good science depicted in a movie? Anthropologist Barbara J. King joined scientists last week in helping producers make more accurate TV and movies.(Image credit: bestdesigns/Getty Images/iStockphoto) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Barbara J. King Source Type: news

NASA Mission Management Scrutinized at Space Telescopes Hearing
A recent House Science Committee hearing on NASA ’s in-development and future space telescopes probed the agency’s mission management practices and revealed substantial concerns that the James Webb Space Telescope may experience new schedule delays. NASA announced at the hearing it is planning an independent review of the mission’s pre-launc h preparations. (Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News)
Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News - December 14, 2017 Category: Physics Authors: wthomas Source Type: news

Colorado life sciences funding set record in 2017
All funding for Colorado life science companies set a record at $1.2 billion this year, according to the state bioscience association. The Colorado BioScience Association said the 2017 funding was a 100 percent increase over last year, adding that venture capital funding of $519 million this year placed the state third in the country, behind only California and Massachusetts. “The success of our sector’s fundraising in 2017 shows investors recognize the critical work our companies are doing… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 14, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Ben Miller Source Type: news

Killing fields: explaining police violence against persons of color - Jones JM.
This concluding article situates the police violence against persons of color in an historical context, suggesting that the current wave of killings replicates historical trends. A social science explanation is proposed to better understand the antecedents... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

The trauma lens of police violence against racial and ethnic minorities - Bryant-Davis T, Adams T, Alejandre A, Gray AA.
Police violence against racial and ethnic minorities has been researched through the lens of multiple social science disciplines including psychology. Within psychology, the study of trauma lends itself to understanding the dynamics of unjustified violence... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

What social science research says about police violence against racial and ethnic minorities: understanding the antecedents and consequences--an introduction - Dukes KN, Kahn KB.
Police violence against racial and ethnic minorities by law enforcement is an international social justice issue that has elicited substantial societal attention, both historically and more recently since the death of Michael Brown in 2014 in the United St... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

Lung experts 'deeply concerned' by low flu jab uptake in England
Barely two in five people in at-risk groups have been vaccinated as NHS hospitals buckle under strain caused by cold snapFewer than half those eligible for a free winter flu jab have had one, despite high-profile warnings that this winter could bring the biggest flu outbreak in years, NHS figures reveal.The low uptake, which will alarm NHS bosses, come as many hospitals showed clear signs of starting to buckle under the extra demand for care caused by the cold snap that began last week.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Denis Campbell and Pamela Duncan Tags: Flu Vaccines and immunisation Society Flu pandemic Health World news NHS GPs Doctors Hospitals Infectious diseases Science Microbiology Source Type: news

Are real or artificial Christmas trees better for the environment?
The question: Is a real Christmas tree better for the environment than a fake one?The answer: It depends on your plans for the future.Every year, 95 million families in America put up a Christmas tree. Deciding whether to go with the real thing or an artificial version involves lots of factors.... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - December 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jessica Roy Source Type: news

Here Come The Penitent Penguins: The Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards Are Back
Penitent penguins. A seal aghast. A turbocharged wigeon, a vain gnu and a kickboxing kangaroo. We have the photos. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Hersher Source Type: news

New Resource Ranks Chemical Probes for Human Proteins
With many probes being seriously flawed, Probe Miner helps researchers find those that are most specific and effective for manipulating their chosen proteins. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - December 14, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Daily News,News & Opinion Source Type: news

YouTube threatens to shut down Health Ranger channel over this podcast that discusses the FBI's routine obstruction of justice and forensic science fraud
(Natural News) Seven weeks after the posting of a podcast that examines the FBI’s corruption and cover-up regarding the Mandalay Bay shooting in Las Vegas, YouTube has threatened to censor the Health Ranger channel for obvious political purposes. It’s part of the worsening pattern of censorship of political speech by YouTube, which is owned and... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Size does matter: wine glasses are seven times larger than they used to be
In the 1700s the average-sized wine glass could hold just 66ml of the tipple. Today it ’s not unusual to be handed a glass that holds almost half a litreOur Georgian and Victorian ancestors may have enjoyed a Christmas tipple but judging by the size of the glasses they used they probably drank less wine than we do today.Scientists at theUniversity of Cambridge have found that the capacity of wine glasses has ballooned nearly seven-fold over the past 300 years, rising most sharply in the last two decades in line with a surge in wine consumption.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Rebecca Smithers Consumer affairs correspondent Tags: Alcohol Environment Food & drink UK news Health Life and style Society Wine Research Medical research Science Source Type: news

Flashback: CSPI (Center for Science in the Public Interest) jumps in bed with Monsanto, claims GMO labeling would be "misleading" to consumers
(Natural News) Remember when Gregory Jaffe, the Director of Biotechnology at the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), openly proclaimed that labeling genetically-modified organisms (GMOs) would be “confusing” and “misleading” to consumers? We sure do. And we just wanted to remind our loyal readers that this Monsanto front organization is still shilling for... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Your water could be causing your eczema: Hard water found to damage the protective barrier on skin
(Natural News) Science has found evidence that your tap water — yes, the same water you use when you take a shower — can harm you and can even lead to eczema. Experts from the King’s College London and the University of Sheffield have found that exposure of the skin to hard water (defined as... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New underwater discoveries in Greece reveal ancient Roman engineering
Underwater excavations at Lechaion, the ancient harbour of Corinth, provide insight into engineering by the Roman EmpireNew archaeological excavations at the ancient port of Corinth have uncovered evidence of large-scale Roman engineering. Named Lechaion, the port was one of a pair that connected the city of ancient Corinth to Mediterranean trade networks. Lechaion is located on the Gulf of Corinth, while Kenchreai is positioned across the narrow Isthmus of Corinth on the Aegean Sea. These two strategic harbours made Corinth a classical period power, but the Romans destroyed the city in 146 BC when conquering Greece. Juliu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Peter B Campbell Tags: Archaeology Greece Science Source Type: news

In 10 years' time trains could be solar powered
A technique has been devised that allows electricity to flow directly from solar panels to electrified train tracks to the trains themselves making solar powered trains more feasible than ever beforeLast week, my10:10 colleague Leo Murray co-authored anew report on solar-powered trains with Nathaniel Bottrell, an electrical engineer at Imperial College.It ’s exciting stuff. We think solar could power 20% of the Merseyrail network in Liverpool, as well as 15% of commuter routes in Kent, Sussex and Wessex. There’s scope for solar trams in Edinburgh, Glasgow, Nottingham, London and Manchester too, and there’...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Alice Bell Tags: Science Environment Energy Transport Science policy Climate change Solar power Renewable energy Transport policy Source Type: news

‘A different dimension of loss’: inside the great insect die-off
Scientists have identified 2 million species of living things. No one knows how many more are out there, and tens of thousands may be vanishing before we have even had a chance to encounter them. By Jacob MikanowskiThe Earth is ridiculously, burstingly full of life. Four billion years after the appearance of the first microbes, 400m years after the emergence of the first life on land, 200,000 years after humans arrived on this planet, 5,000 years (give or take) after God bid Noah to gather to himself two of every creeping thing, and 200 years after we started to systematically categorise all the wo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jacob Mikanowski Tags: Invertebrates Taxonomy Insects Animals Wildlife Environment Extinct wildlife Science Biology Source Type: news

Smoking, drinking and drug abuse decline among U.S. teens, who prefer pot and vaping, study finds
Nearly 1 in 3 high school seniors say they used a vaping device in the past year. Use of pot remained stable, but fewer teens disapprove of regular marijuana use and daily use is more popular than daily tobacco smoking. Abuse of opioid painkillers is down, partly because they are harder to get. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - December 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Journaling inspires altruism through an attitude of gratitude
(University of Oregon) Gratitude does more than help maintain good health. New research at the University of Oregon finds that regularly noting feelings of gratitude in a journal leads to increased altruism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Canada's aging population signals need for more inclusive, accessible transportation system
(Council of Canadian Academies) Older Canadians on the Move is a new expert panel report by the Council of Canadian Academies. The report addresses key obstacles faced by today's older travelers and explores innovative and technological solutions for adapting Canada's transportation system to meet future needs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Insight into how infants learn to walk
(Lancaster University) Ten-week-old babies can learn from practicing walking months before they begin walking themselves. Researchers gave the infants experience at 'reflex walking' which is a primitive instinct in babies which disappears around 12 weeks of age. Results show that brain activity is associated with the perception of walking even at such a young age. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Children's screen-time guidelines too restrictive, according to new research
(University of Oxford) Digital screen use is a staple of contemporary life for adults and children, whether they are browsing on laptops and smartphones, or watching TV. Pediatricians and scientists have long expressed concerns about the impact of overusing technology on people's wellbeing. However, new Oxford University research suggests that existing guidance managing children's digital media time may not be as beneficial as first thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Do bullies have more sex?
(Springer) Adolescents who are willing to exploit others for personal gain are more likely to bully and have sex than those who score higher on a measure of honesty and humility. This is according to a study in Springer's journal Evolutionary Psychological Science which was led by Daniel Provenzano of the University of Windsor in Canada. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New insight into battery charging supports development of improved electric vehicles
(Elsevier) A new technique developed by researchers at Technische Universit ä t M ü nchen, Forschungszentrum J ü lich, and RWTH Aachen University, published in Elsevier's Materials Today, provides a unique insight into how the charging rate of lithium ion batteries can be a factor limiting their lifetime and safety. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Probing Alzheimer's at both ends of the spectrum
(Case Western Reserve University) Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have received two grant awards, in partnership with investigators from other institutions, from the National Institutes of Health to conduct major studies on Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of memory loss and other forms of dementia in older persons. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Womb natural killer cell discovery could lead to screening for miscarriage risk
(University of Warwick) For the first time the functions of natural killer cells in the womb have been identified. Researchers at the University of Warwick and University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire (UHCW) NHS Trust have discovered the role that they play in preparing the womb for pregnancy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study suggests social workers lack tools to identify potential chronic child neglect
(University at Buffalo) Neglect accounts for the majority of all child protection cases in the United States, yet child welfare workers lack effective assessment tools for identifying the associated risk and protective factors of chronic neglect. The ineffective assessments are often the result of using instruments that are not specifically designed to include elements predicting chronic neglect, according to a new study by a University at Buffalo research team. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Startup 'MGov' develops a financial education service via cellphone text message
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Tests for the Project PoupeMais ('SaveMore'), which involves 10,000 account holders in Brazil who are beneficiaries of State social programs, will be carried out through reverse-charge voice calls and the startup's very own SMS system. MGov's founder made the TOP 10 list of most innovative Brazilian young entrepreneurs from MIT's Technology Review. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ANU archaeologist finds world's oldest funereal fish hooks
(Australian National University) An archaeologist from The Australian National University has uncovered the world's oldest known fish-hooks placed in a burial ritual, found on Indonesia's Alor Island, northwest of East Timor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Landmark paper on global oceans garners international award
(University of Minnesota) The results made audiences gasp: Five percent of all the nitrogen in the Gulf of Mexico comes from Minnesota and 11 percent comes from Iowa. Few people thought it was possible for such small patches of land to have major effects on enormous bodies of water. These and other eye-popping findings were possible only after the publication of a 1996 paper in Biogeochemistry that is the recipient of ASLO's 2018 John H. Martin Award. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The spirit of innovation
(University of California - Santa Barbara) UCSB optical engineer Daniel J. Blumenthal named a 2017 fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sovereign debt in the twentieth century
(University of Konstanz) A scientific network involving the economic historian Junior Professor Julia Rischbieter from the University of Konstanz examines the significance and effects of sovereign debt by investigating the actions of individual agents. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Intervention offered in school readiness program boosts children's self-regulation skills
(Oregon State University) Adding a daily 20 to 30 minute self-regulation intervention to a kindergarten readiness program significantly boosted children's self-regulation and early academic skills, an Oregon State University researcher has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news