Long Covid: doctors find ‘antibody signature’ for patients most at risk
Low levels of certain antibodies found to be more common in those who go on to develop long CovidCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageDoctors have discovered an “antibody signature” that can help identify patients most at risk of developing long Covid, a condition wheredebilitating symptoms of the disease can persist for many months.Researchers at University hospital Zurich analysed blood from Covid patients and found that low levels of certain antibodies were more common in those who developed long Covid than in patients who swiftly recovered.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 25, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Long Covid Coronavirus Health Society World news Science Infectious diseases Medical research Source Type: news

‘Unproven and unethical’: experts warn against genetic embryo tests
Risk analysis tests for IVF embryos are being marketed in US and likely to become more widely availableExperts have warned against the “unproven” and “unethical” use of genetic tests to predict the risk of complex diseases in embryos created through IVF.Though not currently available in the UK, such tests are being marketed in the US and their availability is likely to increase as the technology develops, representatives from the European Society of Human Genetics (ESHG) said.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 25, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: IVF Fertility problems Health Genetics Society UK news Source Type: news

Vaccination plus infection creates 'super immunity' against COVID-19, study finds
Contracting COVID-19 after becoming fully vaccinated and or becoming vaccinated after being sickened with the virus provide strong immunity against future infection, a study published by the Science Immunology found. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - January 25, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Movie theater safety during COVID, the sequel: This time it's personal
Two years into the pandemic, do health experts and industry leaders have updated recommendations to make moviegoing safer? Spoiler alert: They do. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 25, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Michael Ordo ña Source Type: news

Gambia: Football for Health - Science Proves That Playing Football On a Regular Basis Contributes to Improvement of Public Health
[The Point] On the occasion of the FIFA World Cup in South Africa 2010 and in the same journal, a special issue was dedicated to the prevention of risk factors for non-communicable diseases through playing football. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 25, 2022 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Reports Q4 and Full-Year 2021 Results
New Brunswick, N.J. (January 25, 2022) – Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) today announced results for fourth-quarter and full year 2021. “Our 2021 performance reflects continued strength across all segments of our business. Guided by Our Credo, I am honored to assume the role of CEO, leading our global teams in continuing our work to deliver life-changing solutions to consumers, patients, and health care providers” said Joaquin Duato, Chief Executive Officer. “Given our strong results, financial profile, and innovative pipeline we are well positioned for success in 2022 and beyond.” OVERALL F...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - January 25, 2022 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Financial Source Type: news

How the first pig-to-human heart transplant was done
Earlier this month, in a medical first, surgeons from the University of Maryland transplanted a genetically altered pig heart into a living person. Doctors believed it was their only chance to save the life of David Bennett, a 57-year-old patient who was considered too ill for a human organ replacement. With hundreds of thousands of people worldwide in need of new organs, are animals set to be the future of transplantation?Ian Sample talks to bioethicist Prof Arthur Caplan about how the operation was made possible, and what could be nextArchive: NBC News, BBC News, ITV NewsContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 25, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Ian Sample, produced by Anand Jagatia, sound design by Rudi Zygadlo Tags: Science Medical research Source Type: news

Zimbabwe: National University of Science and Technology Starts Making PCR Test Kits
[The Herald] THE National University of Science and Technology (Nust) is set to start manufacturing Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) kits next month following delivery of a US$86 000 reagents manufacturing machine. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 25, 2022 Category: African Health Source Type: news

James Webb Space Telescope Arrives At Observation Post 1 Million Miles Away
“We’re one step closer to uncovering the mysteries of the universe. And I can’t wait to see Webb’s first new views of the universe this summer!” NASA Administrator Bill Nelson said. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 25, 2022 Category: Science Source Type: news

Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Alcohol Intake and Dependence Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Alcohol Intake and Dependence
Are higher levels of cardiorespiratory fitness related to greater rates of alcohol consumption and dependence? A new study investigates the possible connection.Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - January 25, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Orthopaedics Journal Article Source Type: news

Giving Cash to Low-Income Mothers Linked to Increased Brain Activity in Their Babies, Study Suggests
New research suggests giving extra cash to low-income mothers can change their infants’ brain development. Brain measurements at age 1 showed faster activity in key brain regions in infants whose low-income families received $300-plus monthly for a year, compared with those who got $20 each month, U.S. researchers reported Monday. The same type of brain activity has been linked in older children to learning skills and other development, although it’s unclear whether the differences found will persist or influence the infants’ future. The researchers are investigating whether the payments led to better nut...
Source: TIME: Science - January 25, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Lindsey Tanner/AP Tags: Uncategorized overnight Research wire Source Type: news

COVID outbreak on relief ship causes fears of spread in Tonga
Since the pandemic began, Tonga has reported just a single case of COVID-19 and has avoided any outbreaks.(Image credit: Tonga Red Cross Society/via AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - January 25, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: The Associated Press Source Type: news

James Webb telescope reaches its final destination in space, a million miles away
The $10 billion telescope is nearly ready to begin capturing images that scientists hope will help uncover the mysteries of the universe. And help scope out other possible habitable planets.(Image credit: NASA/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - January 25, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Vanessa Romo Source Type: news

The James Webb telescope reaches its final destination in space, a million miles away
The $10 billion telescope is nearly ready to begin capturing images that scientists hope will help uncover the mysteries of the universe — and scope out other possible habitable planets.(Image credit: NASA/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - January 25, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Vanessa Romo Source Type: news

James Webb space telescope takes up station a million miles from Earth
$10bn observatory manoeuvred into position at four times the orbit of the moon, with first images expected in JuneThe world ’s largest and most powerful telescope has reached its final destination – an observation post one million miles away from Earth.Nasa ’s $10bnJames Webb space telescope launched on Christmas Day last year from French Guiana on a quest to behold the dawn of the universe. Due to its sheer size, Webb had to launch folded inside the Ariane 5, a European rocket.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 24, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Maya Yang and agencies Tags: James Webb space telescope Nasa Science Source Type: news

Most Medical Papers Didn't Disclose Industry Payments: Preprint
Authors of papers published in JAMA and NEJM received millions in undisclosed payments in 2017, an analysis finds. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - January 24, 2022 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

UCLA food studies institute to tackle global food challenges
Increasingly, scholars are studying food — its production, preparation, sharing, consumption and disposal — to better understand and tackle global challenges such as climate change, health and social disparities and labor conditions, and to improve access to information.Already a leader in the emerging field offood studies, UCLA has created an interdisciplinary institute devoted to research, teaching and policy about food, made possible by an anonymous $13.5 million gift.The UCLA Rothman Family Institute for Food Studies will bring together faculty, staff, students, chefs and members of the community and h...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 24, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Medicare helps close racial gaps in access to healthcare
A new Yale-led study uses the sudden transition to Medicare eligibility at age 65 to test whether universal health coverage can help reduce racial disparities. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - January 24, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How Omicron's Mutations Allow It To Thrive
Thirteen of Omicron ’s mutations should have hurt the variant’s chances of survival. Instead, they worked together to make it thrive. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 24, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carl Zimmer Tags: Coronavirus Omicron Variant Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Evolution (Biology) Research Genetics and Heredity Viruses Antibodies your-feed-science Source Type: news

James Webb Space Telescope Reaches Final Destination 1 Million Miles From Earth
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — The world’s biggest, most powerful space telescope reached its final destination 1 million miles from Earth on Monday, a month after it lifted off on a quest to behold the dawn of the universe. The James Webb Space Telescope fired its rocket thrusters for nearly five minutes to go into orbit around the sun at its designated spot, and NASA confirmed the operation went as planned. The mirrors on the $10 billion observatory still must be meticulously aligned and the infrared detectors sufficiently chilled before science observations can begin in June. But flight controllers in Baltimore were...
Source: TIME: Science - January 24, 2022 Category: Science Authors: MARCIA DUNN / AP Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Space wire Source Type: news

Cancer Transplant Pioneers Model'Team Science'Cancer Transplant Pioneers Model'Team Science '
Two close colleagues at New York's Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, world leaders in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have published their 100th peer-reviewed paper as coauthors.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - January 24, 2022 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Researchers use mobile device data to predict COVID-19 outbreaks
A recent Yale-led study was able to accurately predict outbreaks of COVID-19 in Connecticut by using anonymous location information from mobile devices. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - January 24, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Is omicron infection inevitable?
Yale Medicine doctors explain how you can still protect yourself against omicron and why it ’s not a good idea to try to get infected with the variant. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - January 24, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Risks Discussed for Alternative Peripartum, Neonatal Practices
MONDAY, Jan. 24, 2022 -- The risks associated with emerging alternative peripartum and neonatal practices are discussed in a report published online Jan. 24 in Pediatrics. Dawn Nolt, M.D., M.P.H., from the Oregon Health and Science University in... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 24, 2022 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Did you solve it? The viral maths video that will have you in stitches
The solution to today ’s pro-o-o-o-o-oblemEarlier todayI posted the following video, in which I asked Google Assistant to calculate the factorial of 100.The factorial of 100 is the multiplication 100 x 99 x 98 x … x 3 x 2 x 1 in which 100 is multiplied by every whole number below it.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 24, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Education Science Google Technology Source Type: news

Hippo talk: study sheds light on purpose of call and response
Researchers say ‘wheeze honks’ are identity signals, with reactions ranging from calls to spraying dung linked to level of familiarityA call from a stranger may elicit myriad responses – panic, confusion, maybe even excitement – but it turns out that hippos have a rather more corporeal reaction: they spray dung.Researchers studying hippopotamuses in Mozambique have revealed that the creatures not only react to the vocalisations of other hippos, but that the calls act as an identity signal. In other words, they allow hippos to tell the difference between a familiar individual and a stranger.Continue ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 24, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Wildlife Mozambique Environment Conservation Science Animals Source Type: news

Vaccine refusers have been asked on to Question Time. Is this a disaster waiting to happen?
Fiona Bruce has encouraged unvaccinated people to join the TV show ’s debate. I have misgivings about this attempt to bridge a growing divideAt the start of 2020, I was working on a piece about Question Time, and how it had transformed over time from being an ambling, rather niche discussion show into politics ’ answer toJeremy Kyle, with an audience of incredibly angry people trash-talking imaginary immigrants living in mansions with their 14 imaginary children. Oh, the spiral!Some lefty would inventthe term “gammons”, and then the Twitterati would have an even more vicious spin-off row about wheth...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 24, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Zoe Williams Tags: Coronavirus UK news Fiona Bruce Television & radio Culture Media Question Time Politics TV Life and style Psychology Source Type: news

‘Paradigm shift’ needed in way WHO is funded, says director general
Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus says Covid pandemic has proven that health is ‘an international issue’The head of theWorld Health Organization has warned member countries that the UN ’s global health body is being “set up to fail” without a “paradigm shift” in the way that it is funded and supported.In stark language delivered to the WHO ’s executive board, the organisation’s director general,Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, said that the coronavirus pandemic, which has claimed more than 5.5 million lives, had underlined the need to strengthen health systems as well as pandemic p...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 24, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Peter Beaumont Tags: World Health Organization United Nations World news Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Source Type: news

Even Mild Covid-19 Can Cause Brain Dysfunction And Cognitive Issues
The research provides new clues as to why some people with long Covid experience long-term cognitive issues after being infected with the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - January 24, 2022 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Victoria Forster, Contributor Tags: Healthcare /healthcare Innovation /innovation Science /science Editors' Pick editors-pick Coronavirus business pharma & Source Type: news

Can you solve it? The viral maths video that will have you in stitches
Are you smarter than Google Assistant?“Hey Google, what’s the factorial of 100?”There are several clips doing the rounds of what happens when you ask Google Assistant this question. The response is both hilarious and terrifying.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 24, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Google Assistant Education Science Technology Arithmetic puzzles Source Type: news

Scientometric analysis of public health emergencies: 1994-2020 - Liu J, Wang Y, Zhang Q, Wei J, Zhou H.
The purpose of this paper is to summarize the research hotspots and frontiers in the field of public health emergencies (PHE) between 1994-2020 through the scientometric analysis method. In total, 2247 literature works retrieved from the Web of Science cor... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 24, 2022 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

Reaching for military metaphors won ’t help Britain learn to live with Covid | Philip Ball
There will be no ‘victory’ or ‘armistice day’ – the reality of how pandemics end is far more complicated than thatThe Covid pandemic has entered a perplexing phase, challenging our beliefs about what the best responses are and how we should behave. Is Omicron now “just like the flu”, meaning we can relax – or does that overlook the continuing crisis in hospitals, therecord hospitalisation rates for children, the continuing deadly danger for elderly and clinically vulnerable people, and the lengthening shadow of long Covid? Is it time, as the government has decided in England,...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 24, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Philip Ball Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research World news Vaccines and immunisation Health Society Science Source Type: news

Equations built giants like Google. Who ’ll find the next billion-dollar bit of maths? | David Sumpter
Obscure, generations-old theorems have been transformative in tech, and there are still plenty out there to be usedIn 1998, a computer science PhD student called Larry Pagesubmitted a patent for internet search based on an obscure piece of mathematics. The method, known today as PageRank, allowed the most relevant webpages to be found much more rapidly and accurately than ever before. The patent, initially owned by Stanford, was sold in 2005 for shares that are today worth more than $1bn. Page ’s company, Google, has a net worth of well over $1tr.It wasn ’t Page, or Google’s cofounder Sergey Brin, who cre...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 24, 2022 Category: Science Authors: David Sumpter Tags: Mathematics Science Artificial intelligence (AI) Technology Computing Google Alphabet Source Type: news

‘Defeat The Mandates’ Rally Against Covid-19 Precautions Held During Omicron Surge
The rally included speakers like Robert Malone, Robert F. Kennedy Jr., and others who have had histories of making anti-vaccination and other questionable statements. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - January 24, 2022 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Y. Lee, Senior Contributor Tags: Healthcare /healthcare Innovation /innovation Science /science business pharma Source Type: news

Long Covid: nearly 2m days lost in NHS staff absences in England
MPs urge support for workers after data shows extent of ongoing illness in first 18 months of pandemicCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageNHS trusts in England lost nearly 2m days in staff absences due to long Covid in the first 18 months of the pandemic, according to figures that reveal the hidden burden of ongoing illness in the health service.MPs on the all-party parliamentary group (APPG) on coronavirus estimate that more than 1.82m days were lost to healthcare workers with long Covid from March 2020 to September 2021 across England ’s 219 NHS trusts.Continue reading... (Source: Guar...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 24, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Long Covid Coronavirus Health NHS Infectious diseases Medical research Society Source Type: news

Brown bears ‘switch habitats’ to hunt vulnerable prey
'Highly predatory ’ animals emerge from hibernation and move to areas with reindeer and moose calves, finds studyBrown bears switch habitats in the spring so they can hunt reindeer and moose calves, research suggests.After emerging from hibernation, the animals embark on an active hunting strategy to take full advantage of the calving period.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 24, 2022 Category: Science Authors: PA Media Tags: Animal behaviour Animals Wildlife Environment World news Science Source Type: news

Five Great Reads: hedonism, ‘narco-pentecostals’, and life as a super smeller
Guardian Australia ’s summer wrap of brilliant writing and juicy journalism selected by our lifestyle editor,Alyx GormanSign up to receive Five Great Reads as an emailHappy morning tea. For those who have returned to work this week, well done on making it through the first few hours of Monday. Welcome to Five Great Reads, your summertime, weekday wrap of fantastic features, selected by me, Guardian Australia ’s lifestyle editor, Alyx Gorman.Sign up for the Five Great Reads emailContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 23, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Alyx Gorman Tags: Psychology Australian Broadcasting Corporation Radio Christianity Gangs Drugs Source Type: news

Is Your N95 Respirator A Counterfeit? How To Spot Fake Face Masks
Here are 10 ways to tell that a face mask has not actually been approved by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) as a N95 respirator. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - January 23, 2022 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Y. Lee, Senior Contributor Tags: Healthcare /healthcare Innovation /innovation Science /science business pharma Source Type: news

Half of first-wave Covid cases may have lasting harm to sense of smell
Early findings in Swedish study show range of chronic olfactory problems in people infected in 2020Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageNearly half of those who became ill with Covid in the first wave of infections may have long-term and even permanent changes to their sense of smell, according to preliminary research from Sweden.A sudden loss of smell, or an impaired or distorted perception of odours, emerged as an unusual symptom of Covid early on in the pandemic. While many people swiftly recovered, others found that their sense of smell never quite returned to normal.Continue reading... (So...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 23, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Long Covid Coronavirus Health Science World news Medical research Source Type: news

Social Security  Opens to Survivors of Same-Sex Couples Who Could Not Marry
Challenging a policy that limited survivor ’s benefits to married couples, even though some couples were legally barred from marriage, took years. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 23, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paula Span Tags: your-feed-science Same-Sex Marriage, Civil Unions and Domestic Partnerships Social Security (US) Finances Elderly Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund Social Security Administration Helen Thornton your-feed-health Source Type: news

Mark Warner obituary
Pioneering physicist whose study of elastomers opened up new technology for creating artificial musclesWe are all familiar with elastic bands and other soft, rubbery materials, but familiarity should not diminish our surprise at their properties. What other solids can be stretched many times their original length without breaking, then returned perfectly to their original shape?The theoretical physicist Mark Warner, who has died aged 69 of cancer, not only explained the behaviour of existing soft materials but also predicted the existence and properties of entirely new classes of them – not just once but several time...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 23, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Tom McLeish Tags: Physics People in science Education Technology Source Type: news

If you are an alcoholic and you get amnesia, would you remain an alcoholic?
The long-running series in which readers answer other readers ’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific and philosophical conceptsIf you are an alcoholic or addict of some kind and you get amnesia, would you remain an alcoholic?Jane Ricard, AutunPost your answers (and new questions) below or send them tonq@theguardian.com. A selection will be published on Sunday.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 23, 2022 Category: Science Tags: Memory Life and style Alcoholism Psychology Mental health Source Type: news

UK is over worst of Covid but beware of bumps on the road, says Prof Ferguson
Epidemiologist optimistic that UK deaths and hospitalisations will fall thanks to high immunity levelsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe UK is past the worst of the Covid pandemic but should be braced for some “possible bumps on the road”, according to the scientist who helped shape Britain’s lockdown strategy.Prof Neil Ferguson, an epidemiologist at Imperial College London,said things were looking up as the country passed the peak of yet another wave of coronavirus infections.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 23, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Science Medical research UK news Source Type: news

How S ão Paulo Became ‘The World’s Vaccine Capital’
Many non-Brazilians, even epidemiologists, were astonished by the announcement in November 2021 that Sao Paulo had achieved universal full vaccination of adults against Covid-19. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - January 23, 2022 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Christine Ro, Contributor Tags: Science /science Innovation /innovation Healthcare /healthcare Source Type: news

Can they fix it? UK project to explore ability and desire to repair tech
Exclusive: Experts aim to find out whether there are hotspots around country where electronic waste is avoidedFrom fancy toys to smartphones, when technology breaks, it often seems simplest to ditch it for a new model.But now experts are hoping to challenge the status quo, launching a citizen science project to explore attitudes to repair, and pinpoint parts of the UK where the mending mindset is thriving.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 23, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Technology Waste Environment UK news Science Source Type: news

How colleges are dealing with high COVID case counts on campus
Despite the omicron surge, college students are starting the spring semester on campus – and administrators are bracing for the worst. (Image credit: Anke Gladnick for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - January 23, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Elissa Nadworny Source Type: news

Simone Biles has a rival — a tiny bark beetle (but it can't stick the landing)
A team of researchers has discovered the gymnastic ability of bark beetle larvae. Scientists recently recorded the larvae performing the twisting leap for the first time. (Image credit: Adrian Smith/Matt Shipman) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - January 23, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Megan Lim Source Type: news

Can a sick note make you better? Dr Gavin Francis on the power of convalescence
After serious illness, busy lives mean a proper convalescence is now a rarity. But a full and proper recovery takes time. GP and writer Gavin Francis reveals why a sick note can be a ‘powerful prescription’While training to become a GP, Gavin Francis became ill with a severe sinus problem. In acute pain and exhausted as he waited for an operation, he chose to reduce his hours to three days a week. “I persuaded myself that there was no point risking burnout for the sake of sticking to a schedule,” he writes in his new book,Recovery: The Lost Art of Convalescence. “I qualified all the same, albe...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 23, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Emma Beddington Tags: Health & wellbeing Science Life and style Medical research Society GPs NHS Doctors Books Culture Source Type: news

‘I’ve got this little extra strength’: the rare, intense world of a super smeller
From petrol and perfume to Parkinson ’s disease, super-smellers can detect scents others are oblivious to. For Krati Garg, the ability’s both power and painA few years ago Dr Krati Garg, an oral and maxillofacial surgeon in Melbourne, was in theatre about to commence work on a patient when she told the anaesthetist she could smell sevoflurane.Sevoflurane is the anaesthetic gas used to put – and keep – patients asleep during surgery. Ingested via a tube that is placed down the throat, in large quantities its bitter smell can be noticeable, but trace amounts are largely indiscernible.Continue reading....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 22, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Bronwyn Adcock Tags: Society Psychology Science Australia news Source Type: news

Darling buds: how best friends keep us healthy and happy
Strong social networks have been shown to improve wellbeing, but what are the extra perks of having a really close friend? And why are women more likely to have one?“We met when we were five. I don’t know how I would have managed without her.” As children, Barbara Kastelein, from Ashford in Kent, and her best friend, nicknamed “Tulip”, both had alcoholic fathers. Their friendship was an escape from unhappy homes.The best friends are now both 55 and their relationship is as solid as ever. Barbara says they are more like sisters – and still there for each other during tough times. When Bar...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 22, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Katherine Latham Tags: Psychology Friendship Neuroscience Loneliness Society Life and style Source Type: news