FDA Researchers Advance Science for Vaccines to Prevent Mumps and Whooping Cough
Reported cases of mumps and pertussis have risen in the US in recent years even though many people are vaccinated. As part of the FDA commitment to protect the public health, FDA scientists are working to learn why more cases are occurring. (Source: FDA Consumer Health Information Updates)
Source: FDA Consumer Health Information Updates - May 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: FDA Source Type: news

Brought to you by NSF
Every day you encounter something made possible by the National Science Foundation. More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/btyb/index.jsp?WT.mc_id=USNSF_51 This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - May 22, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Trilobites: ‘ Battle of the Thermostat ’ : Cold Rooms May Hurt Women ’ s Productivity
In a new study, women scored better on tests they took in warmer rooms. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: VERONIQUE GREENWOOD Tags: Temperature Air Conditioning Women and Girls Tests and Examinations Mathematics Gender Research your-feed-science Language and Languages PLoS One (Journal) Source Type: news

NIH Suspends Duke University Grants Amid Misconduct Allegations
The accusations concerned the safety of research participants. The school says an investigation did not conclude misconduct had occurred. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - May 22, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

The Debate Over Office Temperatures Just Heated Up, Thanks to a New Study
There are new data to throw into the ongoing debate over office thermostats—but they likely won’t settle any arguments. The question of how cold to keep an office often splits workplaces by gender, since women typically prefer a warmer workspace than men for reasons both biological and sociological. Men expend more energy than women at rest and thus tend to run warmer, while women have higher core temperatures, which can make cold air feel more jarring. Office dress codes may also require men to wear suits or jackets, while women can dress for warmer days with skirts or dresses. These differences begin to expl...
Source: TIME: Health - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized embargoed study Research Source Type: news

Genetically Personalized Fruit Flies Screen for Cancer Drugs
Fly avatars bearing multiple genetic changes akin to those of a cancer patient lead to a tailor-made treatment that has shrunk the patient's tumors. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - May 22, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Canadian Arctic fossils are oldest known fungus on Earth
Fungus is half a billion years older than previous record holder found in WisconsinTiny fossils found in mudrock in the barren wilderness of the Canadian Arctic are the remains of the oldest known fungus on Earth, scientists say.The minuscule organisms were discovered in shallow water shale, a kind of fine-grained sedimentary rock, in a region south of Victoria island on the edge of the Arctic Ocean.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Biology Canada Archaeology Science Arctic Source Type: news

NOAA Warns 5G Spectrum Interference Presents Major Threat to Weather Forecasts
According to a recent analysis by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and NASA, U.S. weather forecasting capabilities would be set back decades if the Federal Communications Commission proceeds with its current plans for opening a 24 gigahertz spectrum band to next-generation telecommunications providers. (Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News)
Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News - May 22, 2019 Category: Physics Authors: jbehrens Source Type: news

The Science, Skill, and Luck, Behind Evacuation Order Calls
(THE CONVERSATION) Government officials order coastal evacuation even when it’s sunny at the beach with not a cloud in the sky and no hint of the ominous threat thousands of miles away other than from satellite images. People who know I study hurricane evacuations have often asked me to explain this curious decision. In the end, evacuation planning is part science, part skill based on experience, and part luck.   Who makes the call Evacuations are an example of the precautionary principle: protect people from harm before an event occurs. In the case of hurricanes, the harm is the storm surge – the rise in ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - May 22, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Image of the Day: Fish Fences
Structures built in tropical coastal waters capture fish, but harm the ecosystem and may lead to overfishing. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - May 22, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Image of the Day Source Type: news

The Lawmakers Behind'Fetal Heartbeat' Abortion Bans Are Lying To You
There is no "fetal heartbeat" at six weeks, doctors say. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 22, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

News Brief: Impeaching Trump, Iran Threat, CRISPR Modified Viruses
House Democrats meet to decide whether to move forward with impeaching the president. Lawmakers on Capitol Hill are briefed on the threat Iran poses. And, the latest on genetically modified viruses. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Noel King Source Type: news

Scientists Modify Viruses With CRISPR To Create New Weapon Against Superbugs
Superbugs are bacteria that can beat modern medicine's most powerful drugs. So doctors are racing to find new ways to fight back, such as developing "living antibiotics."(Image credit: Rob Stein/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Here Are the Safest and Most Effective Sunscreens
Summer means more time in the sun, which can be good for the bones—all that vitamin D—but bad for the skin. In its annual report on the sunscreens with the least toxic ingredients that are also effective, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) found more than 250 products that measure up. All are free of two ingredients the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has deemed are not generally safe and effective—PABA and trolamine salicylate—based on research showing these chemicals can contribute to immune system changes and other adverse health effects. The FDA has determined that two other active ingredi...
Source: TIME: Health - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Cancer environmental toxins sunscreens Source Type: news

Final Cohort Selected For Pioneering Digital Health Accelerator Programme
Propel@YH has announced the six start-ups to participate in its inaugural digital health accelerator programme, aimed at navigating the complex healthcare landscape and building an NHS-relevant business case. The Leeds-based programme is commissioned by the Yorkshire & Humber AHSN (Academic Health Science Network) in partnership with mHabitat, an NHS-owned specialist and expert in the application of digital to health and care. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - May 22, 2019 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Industry Business and Industry Source Type: news

Computerized Model Reveals Details Of How Human Cells Divide
The nonprofit Allen Institute in Seattle has produced a visualization of human cell division that promises to be useful for professional scientists and curious amateurs alike.(Image credit: Allen Institute) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Richard Harris Source Type: news

Three-quarters of food bought in UK hospitals is unhealthy, audit shows
NHS staff, patients and visitors shun nutritious snacks in favour of crisps, sweets and cakesResearchers have called for radical restrictions on junk food in UK hospitals after an audit of NHS health centres found that people overwhelmingly bought unhealthy snacks and drinks on the premises.Three-quarters of the best-selling snacks in hospital cafes and canteens were rated as unhealthy, along with half of the most popular cold drinks, according to a report by the audit ’s authors.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: NHS Nutrition Science Obesity Society Health UK news Food Source Type: news

Long-lived roundworms help identify new anti-aging compounds among the FDA approved drugs
(Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology) Researchers from Gero, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech), Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) collaborated to derive a transcriptomic signature of aging, which they confirmed using large transcriptomic databases. They discovered that aging in nematodes is partially programmed and can be therapeutically reversed by a number of FDA-approved drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Exercise may help teens sleep longer, more efficiently
(Penn State) Getting more exercise than normal -- or being more sedentary than usual -- for one day is enough to affect sleep later that night. Researchers found that when teenagers got more physical activity than they usually did, they got to sleep earlier, slept longer and slept better that night. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Long-lived roundworms helped identify new anti-aging compounds among FDA approved drugs
(Gero) Researchers from Gero, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech), Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) collaborated to derive a transcriptomic signature of aging, which they confirmed using large transcriptomic databases. They discovered that aging in nematodes is partially programmed and can be therapeutically reversed by a number of FDA-approved drugs. The study is published in Scientific Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study shows crowdsourced traffic data could save lives
(University of California - Irvine) A new University of California, Irvine-led pilot study finds, on average, Waze 'crash alerts' occur two minutes and 41 seconds prior to their corresponding California Highway Patrol (CHP)-reported crash. These minutes could mean the difference between life and death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTSA political scientist analyzes the UN's Twitter feed to improve diplomatic relations
(University of Texas at San Antonio) Through research by a political scientist at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), there is potential to see diplomacy between nations improve through the use of Twitter. UTSA researcher, Matthias Hofferberth, is exploring how the United Nations (UN), uses Twitter as a diplomacy tool, an approach that has been discussed as Twiplomacy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Stanford research examines how augmented reality affects people's behavior
(Stanford University) Stanford scholar Jeremy Bailenson and other researchers found that people's interactions with a virtual person in augmented reality, or AR, influenced how they behaved and acted in the physical world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Social networks and suicide prevention
(Flinders University) Depression and mental health problems are increasing - and suicide and drug overdose rates are rising dramatically in the USA. In many US communities, traditional social networks -- face-to-face contacts of daily life -- are unraveling with the loss of social supports, Flinders University psychiatrists warn in a letter published in the international journal The Lancet. This is associated with increasing 'deaths of despair' related to alcohol, opiate overdose and suicide 'becoming more prevalent than ever.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Strategies for racetrack betting
(World Scientific) 'Exotic Betting at the Racetrack,' by William T. Ziemba, is a thorough account of racetrack betting. It covers the efficient-inefficient strategy to price and find profitable racetrack bets, along with handicapping that provides actual bets made by the author on essentially all of the major wagers offered at US racetracks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Doctoral dissertation: The Secret Gospel of Mark is not a fake
(University of Helsinki) Dissertation research in New Testament exegetics proves that the letter by Clement of Alexandria to Theodore, a suspected forgery, is in fact genuine. The letter contains controversial passages from The Secret Gospel of Mark (also known as The Longer Gospel of Mark). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New therapeutic target for depression identified
(University of Malaga) There are different pharmacological treatments for depression, mainly therapies that act on the serotonin system -- the so-called SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). However, it has been evidenced that these antidepressants take around two weeks to have an effect and, what's more, around 30% of patients are resistant to this drug.Researchers of the Department of Human Physiology of the UMA Faculty of Medicine have taken a step closer to a new therapeutic target to face this mental disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lack of evaluation in countering violent extremism may boost terror threat
(University of Birmingham) A lack of evaluation of the impact of countering violent extremism (CVE) and counter-terrorism (CT) efforts may actually be increasing the threat and risk of terrorism, a new study points out. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Help for youth who have experienced sexual or physical abuse
(Goethe University Frankfurt) There have not been many scientifically evaluated therapies for teens and young adults who have suffered physical or sexual abuse until now. Psychologists at Goethe University have closed the gap by developing a psychotherapeutic approach designed specifically for this age group. Its effectiveness has now been proved in a nationwide study lasting four years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ancient proteins offer clues to the past
(American Chemical Society) Archeologists once relied solely on artifacts, such as skeletal remains, fossils and pottery sherds, to learn about past species and cultures. Today's scientists can also study ancient proteins to paint a more complete picture of the people who lived at archeological sites, and the plants and animals they raised and ate, according to an article inChemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chimpanzees at the crossroads: adapt to living outside protected areas
(University of Kent) Chimpanzees at the crossroads: how they adapt to living outside protected areasResearch carried out into the impact of changes to chimpanzee habitats found they have adapted to human developments in a number of ways -- including learning how to cross roads safely and the best times to visit human habitats -- but their survival is still threatened. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NUS pilot study opens new possibilities for AI to enhance cognitive performance
(National University of Singapore) Results of a pilot study conducted by researchers from the National University of Singapore provided evidence that an artificial intelligence known as CURATE.AI has the potential to enhance learning, and could pave the way for promising applications in personalized digital therapy, including the prevention of cognitive decline. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cocktails with Cleopatra?
(The Hebrew University of Jerusalem) A team of scientists from Hebrew University, Israel's Antiquities Authority, Tel Aviv University and Bar-Ilan University create ancient alcohol from ancient yeast. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study questions European Parliament's perception as champion of gender equality
(Wiley) The European Parliament is often viewed as the most democratic and gender equal decision-making institution of the European Union. A new Journal of Common Market Studies article critically scrutinizes this assumption through an analysis of female members' perceptions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Residential child care project addresses emotional pain without causing it
(Cornell University) A model of care for children's residential agencies takes children's emotional pain into account and emphasizes the bond between the children and their caregivers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Allen Institute for Cell Science debuts first comprehensive view of human cell division
(Allen Institute) The Allen Institute today released the Integrated Mitotic Stem Cell, a data-driven model and visualization tool that captures -- for the first time -- a holistic view of human cell division. By enabling a deeper understanding of how healthy human cells divide, a process known as mitosis, the model will further basic biology research as well as studies of cancer, a disease that often results from cell division gone awry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ancient toy inspires tool for state-of-the-art science
(Georgia Institute of Technology) A 5,000-year-old toy still enjoyed by kids today has inspired an inexpensive, hand-powered scientific tool that could not only impact how field biologists conduct their research but also allow high-school students and others with limited resources to realize their own state-of-the-art experiments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Defects in heart valve cilia during fetal development cause mitral valve prolapse
(Medical University of South Carolina) Genetic mutations in heart valve cells of the developing fetus lead to mitral valve prolapse, report a global collaborative of researchers, including Medical University of South Carolina investigators, in today's Science Translational Medicine. These mutations or genetic variations cause defects in antenna-like cellular structures called primary cilia. This finding of a developmental cause for the disease highlights the importance of early intervention and may lead to the rethinking of treatment guidelines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Charging into the future -- novel rock salt for use in rechargeable magnesium batteries
(Tokyo University of Science) By synthesizing novel material for electrode that facilitates reversing of the chemistry of ions, a group of researchers led by Professor Idemoto from Tokyo University of Science combat the wasteful aspects of energy sources by laying an important foundation for the production of next-generation rechargeable magnesium secondary batteries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New study estimates preventable cancer burden linked to poor diet in the US
(Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus) A new study from researchers at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts estimated the association between suboptimal consumption of seven types of foods and specific cancers. They found that poor diet is on par with alcohol, excessive body weight, and physical activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Using fruit flies to identify new treatment for a colorectal cancer patient
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Erdem Bangi and colleagues demonstrate a new approach to developing personalized therapy for a patient with treatment-resistant colorectal cancer: using a fruit fly genetically modified with a patient's own cancer mutations to test candidate treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mung beans enrich soil organic carbon in cereal-cereal cropping systems
(Natural News) A study funded by the Indian Council of Agricultural Research revealed that mung beans (Vigna radiata) could be used to boost soil organic carbon levels in cereal-cereal cropping systems, ensuring their long-term sustainability. The study was published in the Archives of Agronomy and Soil Science. The researchers posited that mung beans can be beneficial when used in... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Verily Forms ‘Ultimate Alliance’ with Pharma Heavy Hitters
What is Alphabet’s Verily up to now, is probably a question that is asked and answered on a regular basis. Google’s farmer life science’s arm has worked with some pretty big players in healthcare on projects ranging from surgical robotics to smart contact lenses. On Tuesday, Verily revealed yet another long-term project – one that would have it work with some of the top players in the pharmaceutical industry, in an effort to improve clinical research. The company said it had formed strategic alliances with Novartis, Otsuka, Pfizer, and Sanofi to implem...
Source: MDDI - May 22, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Digital Health Business Source Type: news

YSPH graduates urged to “Speak Up! Speak Out!” and engage with the world
“At its best, public health changes lives, saves lives,” said Dr. Mary Travis Bassett in her keynote speech at YSPH’s 2019 Commencement ceremony. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - May 21, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Can CBD Reduce Cravings And Stress In Opioid Users?
Researchers wanted to know if CBD can help people who are former opioid users resist relapse. Their double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial suggests CBD can help reduce stress and cravings. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Allison Aubrey Source Type: news

"Marriageology": Belinda Luscombe offers tips for a lasting marriage
A new book suggests science holds the key to a successful marriage. "Marriageology: The Art and Science of Staying Together" looks at what research reveals about how to build a strong and lasting relationship. According to a 2017 study, about 50% of American adults are married, and another research found roughly 40 to 50% of married couples in divorce. Author Belinda Luscombe joins “CBS This Morning” to discuss her research. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - May 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Found: A Cancer Drug's Mechanism of Action
As ONC201 moves through human clinical trials, scientists finally figure out that the compound and its analogs target a mitochondrial protease. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - May 21, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Brazilian Academics Protest Against Budget Cuts
Blocked resources and the suspension of research scholarships threaten the future of Brazilian science, academics say. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - May 21, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Global Sea Levels Could Rise by Much More Than Previously Predicted, According to New Study
Global sea levels could rise by over 6 feet by 2100––twice as much as had previously been predicted––threatening major cities and potentially flooding hundreds of millions of people, a study published Monday warned. The implications for coastal populations around the world could be severe if the predictions in the study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences prove accurate. In the worst-case scenario, where global emissions are not curtailed and the climate warms by 5°C (9° Fahrenheit), the report authors predict sea levels could rise by as much as 7.8 feet. Large parts of ...
Source: TIME: Science - May 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ciara Nugent Tags: Uncategorized Environment onetime Source Type: news

Cholesterol levels are improving for American kids and teens, study shows
Cholesterol levels in children and teens have improved, according to the latest analysis of U.S. health surveys, yet only half of them had readings considered ideal.Overall, 7% of kids had high cholesterol in surveys from 2009-16. That was down from 10% a decade earlier. In children, high levels... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news