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Astronaut Scott Kelly's Latest Mission: A Book
After a year in space, Kelly says, writing a book was harder than he thought — but still, he adds, "If I write a bad sentence people are only going to get angry with me. They're not going to die."(Image credit: NASA/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rachel Martin Source Type: news

Taylor & Francis Partner with ReadCube on Highly-Successful Share More Easily Book Pilot
Taylor & Francis Group, a leading publisher of specialist academic books and journals and part of Informa PLC, has completed a successful pilot of its Share More Easily program in partnership with ReadCube, a Digital Science technology company. Launched in June 2017, the program was designed specifically to support Taylor & Francis’ book authors and offered special sharing links to free-to-read full-text versions of their complete books. These links could then be easily shared across social media, scholarly collaboration networks, or emailed to those in their network – opening new channels to ...
Source: News from STM - October 17, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Digital Featured Source Type: news

LIGO and Virgo make first detection of gravitational waves produced by colliding neutron stars
Watch the archive video of the press conference at https://youtu.be/AFxLA3RGjnc. For the first time, scientists have directly detected gravitational waves -- ripples in space-time -- in addition to light from the spectacular collision of two neutron stars. This marks the first time that a cosmic event has been observed in both gravitational waves and light. The discovery was made using the U.S.-based Laser ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=243382&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - October 17, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Controversial Cadiz water pipeline gets OK from federal government
In an about-face, the federal government has givenCadiz Inc. the go-ahead to lay a pipeline for its proposed desert water project in an existing railroad right-of-way.The decision by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management follows otherTrump administration moves to eliminate a legal hurdle erected... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Bettina Boxall Source Type: news

Scientists Press For Marine Sanctuary After Massive Penguin Chick Die-Off
Only two Adelie chicks survived of those born to 36,000 adults in Antarctica. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 17, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Nostalgia Isn't Just A Fixation On The Past - It Can Be About The Future, Too
Is nostalgia an emotion that's bitter, or sweet? Psychologist Clay Routledge explains what causes us to feel nostalgic and how nostalgia affects us.(Image credit: Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rhaina Cohen Source Type: news

Doctors urged to make a public commitment to talk to their patients about guns and gun safety
As guardians of health and gatekeepers to the world of medicine, primary care doctors are expected to plunge dauntlessly into the most delicate topics with their patients. Now, in the wake of the worst mass shooting in recent U.S. history, a new campaign is challenging these physicians to talk... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Neutron stars collision: Australian science reacts – as it happened
Australia ’s chief scientist Alan Finkel leads a panel discussing the extraordinary astronomical event witnessed for the first time• New frontier for science as astronomers witness neutron stars colliding• Gravitational wave observation is astronomical alchemy11.52pmBSTAnd that concludes the press conference.You can read our full story here:Related:New frontier for science as astronomers witness neutron stars colliding11.47pmBSTA journalist asks why observation in radio waves is so significant.Tara Murphy explains: the radio emissions come from the shock as it passes through the gas and dust from the merger...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Michael Slezak Tags: Astronomy Space Black holes Gravity Gold Science Australia news Source Type: news

4 Surprising Facts About the Universe We Just Discovered in a Cosmic Breakthrough
News from space always arrives late — and in a discovery announced Monday, that meant 130 million years late. It was that long ago that two neutron stars in Galaxy NGC 4993, in the Hydra constellation, spiraled in toward one another and collided in a titanic eruption, sending out waves of energy that literally shook our world. The shaking happened on Aug. 17 at 8:41 a.m. E.T., as gravitational waves released by the event — ripples in spacetime that Albert Einstein first predicted in 1915 but weren’t confirmed until a full century later — at last reached and passed through the Earth. While the first...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Black Holes Cosmology Einstein gamma rays gravitational waves NASA neutron stars onetime Science space telescopes Source Type: news

Research in Nicaragua inspires career path for recent YSPH graduate
A study that Cara Safon conducted as an M.P.H. student led to two published articles and a plan to continue maternal child health research in the future. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - October 16, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Fetal care team heals baby boy
The Fetal Care Center, a partnership between Yale Medicine and Yale New Haven Children's Hospital, developed a plan to cure the baby's esophageal atresia. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - October 16, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

In A First, Scientists Spot Light Amid Gravitational Waves Emitted By Colliding Stars
“We’ve heard this thunder before," one scientist said, "but this is the first time we’ve also been able to see the lightning.” (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 16, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Electric Vehicles Are Here. Now We Need to Figure Out How to Charge Them
In the century since the dawn of the mass-market car, more than 100,000 gas stations have popped up along the country’s 4 million miles of roads and highways–and a stop to refuel became a crucial part of the quintessential U.S. road trip. But the heyday of the gas station as a place to refuel is probably drawing to a close. Analysts project that sales of electric vehicles will outnumber sales of gas-powered cars by midcentury. That means a wholesale rethinking of the infrastructure that consumers use to charge their batteries Powering that electric-car fleet will require a dramatic increase in public charging s...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized driving electric vehicles Source Type: news

Trump says he'll declare the US opioid crisis a national emergency 'next week'
Trump teases ‘major announcement, probably next week, on the drug crisis’Says he could revisit Tom Marino nomination as drug czarDonald Trump on Monday teased a long-awaited announcement on tackling the crisis ofopioid addiction. He also suggested his choice to lead to lead the National Office of Drug Control Policy might be under review.Related:West Virginians struggle for answers in America's worst hit opioid epidemic stateContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ben Jacobs in Washington Tags: Opioids US news Donald Trump Drugs Science World news Source Type: news

Scientists Somehow Just Discovered A New System Of Vessels In Our Brains
The lymph vessels probably escaped detection because they’re inside a thick membrane, the dura mater, which is the consistency of leather. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 16, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Short Takes
Representative Bill Foster (D-IL) has introduced legislation to address the distribution of funding from the National Science Foundation across states. The Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, better known as EPSCoR, provides roughly $500 million a year in research funding to scientists in states and territories who receive relatively little federal funding. H.R. 3763 would change the formula for program eligibility to a per-capita basis. Currently, a state can qualify for EPSCoR funding if it receives no more than 0.75 percent of NSF’s overall annual research budget. The Government Accountability...
Source: Public Policy Reports - October 16, 2017 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Become an Advocate for Science: Join the AIBS Legislative Action Center
Quick, free, easy, effective, impactful! Join the AIBS Legislative Action Center. The Legislative Action Center is a one-stop shop for learning about and influencing science policy. Through the website, users can contact elected officials and sign-up to interact with lawmakers. The website offers tools and resources to inform researchers about recent policy developments. The site also announces opportunities to serve on federal advisory boards and to comment on federal regulations. This new tool is made possible through contributions from the Society for the Study of Evolution, Association for the Sciences of Limnology ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - October 16, 2017 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

NSF Announces Major Changes to Grant Solicitation Process
The National Science Foundation (NSF) will no longer require pre-proposals for certain biology research programs. Instead, the Directorate for Biological Sciences is implementing a no deadline, full-proposal review process for four of its five divisions. The new process starts in January 2018, but does not include the Division of Emerging Frontiers, which runs the MacroSystems Biology and Early NEON Science program and the Origin of Life program. All other biology research programs will be impacted. Consequently, the Division of Environmental Biology and the Division of Integrative Organismal Systems will discontinue thei...
Source: Public Policy Reports - October 16, 2017 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Climate Change Skeptic Nominated to Lead White House Environmental Council
Kathleen Harnett White has been nominated to chair the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ). She is director of a conservative think tank and a former chair and member of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. Harnett White has been a vocal defender of fossil fuels and has questioned the science underlying climate change on numerous occasions. Among her beliefs on the matter are that “carbon dioxide has none of the characteristics of a pollutant that could harm human health” and that we don’t know the extent that humans are contributing to climate change, but “it’s not likely to be ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - October 16, 2017 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Sleep Scientist Warns Against Walking Through Life 'In An Underslept State'
"Human beings are the only species that deliberately deprive themselves of sleep for no apparent gain," says sleep scientist Matthew Walker. His new book is Why We Sleep. (Image credit: MCKIBILLO/Getty Images/Imagezoo) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Terry Gross Source Type: news

New frontier for science as astronomers witness neutron stars colliding
Extraordinary event has been ‘seen’ for the first time, in both gravitational waves and light – ending decades-old debate about where gold comes fromThe collision of a pair of neutron stars, marked by ripples through the fabric of space-time and a flash brighter than a billion suns, has been witnessed for the first time in the most intensely observed astronomical event to date.The extraordinary sequence, in which the two ultra-dense stars spiralled inwards, violently collided and, in all likelihood, immediately collapsed into a black hole, was first picked up by the US-based Laser Interferometer Gravitati...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Science Astronomy Space Black holes Gravity Gold Commodities World news Source Type: news

Whisper it – Greek theatre's legendary acoustics are a myth
Tour guides may tell you that a pin dropping can be heard in every seat of the ancient theatre of Epidaurus – but scientists disagreeIt has been held up as a stunning example of ancient Greek sound engineering, but researchers say the acoustics of the theatre atEpidaurus are not as dazzling as they have been hailed.Dating from the fourth century BC, and seating up to 14,000 spectators, the theatre has long been admired for its sound quality, with claims that audiences are able to hear a pin drop, or a match being struck, at any seat in the house. Even the British archaeologist Sir Mortimer Wheelerraved about the thea...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Science Greece Theatre Culture Europe Stage World news Technology History of science Source Type: news

Seeking Information Specialist - Cochrane Mental Disorders, York, UK
Based at: University of York - Heslington Campus, UKHours of Work: Part-timeSalary:  £31,604 - £38,832 reduced pro rataApply by: 3 November 2017Following their move to the  University of York, the Cochrane Common Mental Disorders group are seeking to recruit a part-time Information Specialist, based in the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination.You will be educated to degree level with a qualification in librarianship, information science, health sciences or a related subject or equivalent experience are essential. You will have a strong health information background with experience of de...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - October 16, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

After Hurricane Power Outages, Looking To Alaska's Microgrids For A Better Way
Alaska is a leader in microgrids since its remote communities have had to power themselves for decades.(Image credit: Eric Keto/Alaska's Energy Desk) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rachel Waldholz Source Type: news

Whales and dolphins lead 'human-like lives' thanks to big brains, says study
The cultural brain hypothesis of human development could also explain cetaceans forming friendships – and even gossipingLife is not so different beneath the ocean waves. Bottlenosedolphins use simple tools, orcas call each other by name, and sperm whales talk in local dialects. Manycetaceans live in tight-knit groups and spend a good deal of time at play.That much scientists know. But in a new study, researchers compiled a list of the rich behaviours spotted in 90 different species of dolphins, whales and porpoises, and found that the bigger the species ’ brain, the more complex – indeed, the more “...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Katharina Kropshofer Tags: Science Cetaceans Whales Dolphins Evolution Biology Marine life Wildlife UK news Animals Source Type: news

Studies Skewed By Focus On Well-Off, Educated Brains
What does a "normal" brain look like? Something a lot different when researchers make sure that study participants reflect the race, education and income levels of the U.S. at large.(Image credit: Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jon Hamilton Source Type: news

Communicating Science to the Public: Follow the Science
October 19, 2017 11:00am ET. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - October 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Austria is on the verge of electing a 31-year-old. Does his age matter? | Stefan Stern
World leaders seem to be getting younger. But whether youthful energy and verve can ever make up for lack of experience remains a vexed questionGrey power this is not. Sebastian Kurz, the 31-year-old leader of the conservative Austrian People ’s Party (ÖVP),looks set to become the world ’s youngest head of government after Sunday’s elections. The country of elegantly dressed, respectably middle-aged ladies and gentlemen has handed the keys of the Mercedes to a fresh-faced kid.Kurz may look young but he is not a new figure on the Austrian political scene. Four years ago he was madeforeign minister. Cl...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Stefan Stern Tags: Austria Europe World news Young people Society Politics UK news Ageing Science Source Type: news

NAM Announces Recipients of Awards, Honors
The National Academy of Medicine presented two prestigious awards at its annual meeting today, as well as announced the 2017 class of NAM Fellows. The 2017 Gustav O. Lienhard Award for Advancement of Health Care was given to Diane Meier, professor of geriatrics and palliative medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, for her leading role in driving awareness and adoption of palliative care services in the United States. In addition, the Academy awarded the 2017 Rhoda and Bernard Sarnat International Prize in Mental Health was awarded to Joseph Coyle, whose research laid the foundation for integrating neuroscience ...
Source: News from the National Academies - October 16, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Winners of 2017 D.C. Public Health Case Challenge Announced
The winners of the fifth annual D.C. Public Health Case Challenge were announced at this year's National Academy of Medicine Annual Meeting. The challenge aims to promote interdisciplinary, problem-based learning around a public health issue of importance to the local Washington, D.C. community. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 16, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

John Curtis retires after 19 years with Yale Medicine magazine
John Curtis leaves behind an enduring legacy of journalistic excellence with the award-winning publication he helped shape. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - October 16, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Key to expanding genetic code described by Yale scientists
Yale scientists have described the atomic structure of a protein that is the key tool in efforts by synthetic biologists to expand the genetic code. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - October 16, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

LIGO: Einstein Was Right
A century ago, Albert Einstein predicted gravitational waves -- ripples in the fabric of space-time that result from the universe's most violent phenomena. A hundred years later, NSF-funded researchers using the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) have detected gravitational waves. More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/ligoevent/?WT.mc_id=USNSF_51 This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - October 16, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

A Groundbreaking Astronomy Discovery Gave Scientists Their Best Look Ever at How Gold Was Created
(WASHINGTON) — It was a faint signal, but it told of one of the most violent acts in the universe, and it would soon reveal secrets of the cosmos, including how gold was created. Astronomers around the world reacted to the signal quickly, focusing telescopes located on every continent and even in orbit to a distant spot in the sky. What they witnessed in mid-August and revealed Monday was the long-ago collision of two neutron stars — a phenomenon California Institute of Technology’s David H. Reitze called “the most spectacular fireworks in the universe.” “When these things collide, all h...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Seth Borenstein / AP Tags: Uncategorized astronomy onetime Source Type: news

Astronomers Strike Gravitational Gold In Colliding Neutron Stars
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Monday's gravitational wave observation is astronomical alchemy
Proof that celestial collisions called kilonovas create gold is the first wonder to arise from coordinated observations – expect more to comeIf you are wearing a piece of gold jewellery, take a good, hard look at it and consider this: you are likely to be wearing the celestial debris of a cataclysmic stellar collision, a collision so devastating that it literally shook the universe. That ’s the conclusion from Monday’sannouncement of gravitational wave signal GW170817.It is another reminder that we are intimately connected to the cosmos around us. At heart, astronomy is not really about remote and abstrac...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Clark Tags: Science Gravity Astronomy Space Source Type: news

Yale ’s Amy Arnsten elected to National Academy of Medicine
Yale neuroscientist Amy Arnsten has been elected to the National Academy of Medicine, formerly the Institute of Medicine. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - October 16, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Astronomers strike gold – and platinum – as they watch two neutron stars collide
For the first time, scientists have witnessed the collision of two neutron stars - and in the process, they've confirmed that this is how gold and other heavy metals are made. Some researchers are saying this is a bigger deal than the first detection of gravity waves. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

NAM Elects 80 New Members
The National Academy of Medicine today announced the names of 80 new members at its 47th annual meeting. Election to the NAM is considered one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine and recognizes individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievement and commitment to service. Annual Meeting Page (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 16, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Nanoantenna arrays power a new generation of fluorescence-based sensors
Researchers from the Universities of Bristol and Bedfordshire, in collaboration with multinational company ABB, have designed and tested a series of plasmonic nanoantenna arrays that could lead to the development of a new generation of ultrasensitive and low-cost fluorescence sensors that could be used to monitor water quality. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - October 16, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International, Research; Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, School of Computer Science, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, and Engineering Maths, Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Physics; Press Release Source Type: news

At-Home Microbiology Tests Trigger Concerns about Scientific Value and Impact from Microbiologists and Clinical Laboratory Scientists
As science learns more about the human genome, new companies are being formed to offer consumers at-home microbiology test kits, a development many microbiologists consider worrisome Can consumers rely on the accuracy of at-home microbiology tests that promise to give them useful information about their microbiome? That’s just one question being asked by clinical laboratory […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - October 16, 2017 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory News Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing American Academy of Microbiology American Gut Project ASM clinical laboratory Dark Daily dark intelligence gr Source Type: news

NAM Honors Members for Outstanding Service
For their outstanding service, the National Academy of Medicine honored members Barbara J. McNeil, Ridley Watts Professor and founding head of the department of health care policy at Harvard Medical School and professor of radiology at Brigham and Women's Hospital; Richard O. Hynes, investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Daniel K. Ludwig Professor for Cancer Research in the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and Ruth R. Faden, Philip Franklin Wagley Professor of Biomedical Ethics and founder of the Berman Center for Bioethics at Johns Hopkins Univer...
Source: News from the National Academies - October 16, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Illumina Ventures Closes $230 Million Fund
Genomics-focused fund will support breakthroughs in life science research, clinical diagnostics, novel therapeutic platforms, and other technologies impacting human health SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 16, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Illumi... Biopharmaceuticals, Personalized Medicine, Venture Capital Illumina Ventures, genomics, precision medicine (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - October 16, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

ITV's Victoria illustrates how 19th-century sexism helped syphilis to spread
With concealment common and women expected not even to show knowledge of the disease, infection of families by men was widespread across all classesSpoiler alert! Plot points fromVictoria are revealed in this blogHistorically,syphilis was extremely difficult to cure. Often patients would think that their disease had disappeared or been cured, only to be have their bodies betray them with a resurgence of symptoms. This was the story outlined in Sunday night ’s episode of Victoria – but aside from the obvious scientific questions about drugs and treatment regimes, it also raises points about the treatment of wome...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Dr Anne Hanley Tags: Science Sexual health History of science Women Society Feminism Source Type: news

Why do we feel so guilty all the time? – podcast
Food, sex, money, work, family, friends, health, politics: there ’s nothing we can’t feel guilty about, including our own feelings of guilt•Read the text version hereSubscribe viaAudioboom,Apple Podcasts,Soundcloud,Mixcloud,Acast&Sticherand join the discussion onFacebook andTwitterContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Written by Devorah Baum, read by Ruth Barnes and produced by Simon Barnard Tags: Ethical and green living Psychology Philosophy Religion Source Type: news

Grizzlies Saved This Vietnam Vet's Life. Now He's Fighting To Return The Favor.
Doug Peacock, of Montana, is a plaintiff in a lawsuit to restore federal protections for Yellowstone grizzly bears. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 16, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

The science of seeing differently
The truths about the brain and its perceptions will be explored by neuroscientist and founder of Lab of Misfits Studio at a free University of Bristol public lecture next month. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - October 16, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Public engagement, Research; Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, School of Computer Science, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, and Engineering Maths; Press Release Source Type: news

Ashfield to host workshop at the 14th annual eyeforpharma Patient Summit Europe 2017, London, UK
Ashfield is proud to be a supporting sponsor of the conference, taking place 19 – 20 October, and will be hosting a workshop session at 14:50 on day 1, where Jessica Brueggeman, EVP Health Behaviour Group, MicroMass Communications, and Jo Fearnhead-Wymbs, Patient Engagement Director, Ashfield Healthcare Communications, will be sharing insight into: The key to improving patient outcomes and brand performance Traditional pharma marketing approaches that only provide education and information are not enough to change patient behaviour Evidence-based strategies from behavioural science and health psychology provide a ro...
Source: Ashfield Healthcare News - October 16, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Sarah Edwards Tags: Ashfield Source Type: news

Mindfulness Apps Aim To Help People Disconnect From Stress
Finding inner calm hard to come by? Some people use their device obsession to help them disconnect. The apps aren't a quick fix, therapists say, but might help you stick to a mindfulness practice.(Image credit: Photo Illustration by Carolyn Rogers/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Allison Aubrey Source Type: news

Technology from the movies is on the way: A look at the many ways it will change our future
(Natural News) Science fiction may become reality sooner rather than later. Of course, when predictions about the future are thrown around, past performance is no guarantee of future results, as they say in the financial industry. A 10-part anthology series airing on Channel 4 in the U.K. called “Electric Dreams” explores the works of Blade... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news