Why Food Could Be the Best Medicine of All
When Tom Shicowich’s toe started feeling numb in 2010, he brushed it off as a temporary ache. At the time, he didn’t have health insurance, so he put off going to the doctor. The toe became infected, and he got so sick that he stayed in bed for two days with what he assumed was the flu. When he finally saw a doctor, the physician immediately sent Shicowich to the emergency room. Several days later, surgeons amputated his toe, and he ended up spending a month in the hospital to recover. Shicowich lost his toe because of complications of Type 2 diabetes as he struggled to keep his blood sugar under control. He wa...
Source: TIME: Health - February 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized health Nutrition Source Type: news

Do Moon Phases Or Storms Affect Childbirth?
Can moon phases or storms affect child birth? Here's what the science says. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - February 22, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Marshall Shepherd, Contributor Source Type: news

Allegations Against the Maker of OxyContin Are Piling Up. Here ’s What They Could Mean for the Billionaire Family Behind Purdue Pharma
Executives from Purdue Pharma, the manufacturer of the powerful opioid painkiller OxyContin, admitted in federal court in 2007 that Purdue’s marketing practices and interactions with doctors had understated the strength and addictive potential of the drug — an omission that many experts believe contributed to an opioid epidemic that claimed nearly 50,000 American lives in 2017 alone. But on Thursday, the release of a previously sealed deposition from 2015 showed that Purdue executives knew of OxyContin’s strength long before that $600 million settlement. The deposition, which had been filed in court, reve...
Source: TIME: Health - February 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Trump Administration Blocks Funds for Planned Parenthood and Others Over Abortion Referrals
The new rule would steer federal family planning funds under Title X to anti-abortion and faith based groups. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: PAM BELLUCK Tags: your-feed-science Birth Control and Family Planning Abortion United States Politics and Government Planned Parenthood Federation of America Trump, Donald J Title X Source Type: news

UnitedHealth Loses Case to the Health Venture Begun by Amazon, Berkshire-Hathaway and JPMorgan Chase
A court battle over trade secrets highlighted how the Big Three corporations ’ new unit is unnerving major insurers in the field. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: REED ABELSON Tags: Health Insurance and Managed Care Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Amazon.com Inc Berkshire Hathaway Inc Optum Inc your-feed-science UnitedHealth Group Inc Source Type: news

Trump Administration Blocks Funds for Planned Parenthood and Others Over Abortion Referrals
The new rule would steer federal family planning funds under Title X to anti-abortion and faith based groups. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: PAM BELLUCK Tags: your-feed-science Birth Control and Family Planning Abortion United States Politics and Government Planned Parenthood Federation of America Trump, Donald J Title X Source Type: news

Israeli company sends world's first privately funded mission to moon
The unmanned robotic capsule, called Beresheet, will land on the moon in mid-AprilAnIsraeli spacecraft aboard a SpaceX rocket has launched from Cape Canaveral in Florida, beginning a two-month journey to land on the Moon.If successful, Israel, a state with fewer than 9 million citizens, will join Russia, the US and China as the only countries to have made a controlled landing on the surface of earth ’s nearest neighbour.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Oliver Holmes in Jerusalem Tags: Israel Space Florida Nasa Science US news World news Elon Musk Technology SpaceX Source Type: news

Boy, 12, said to have created nuclear reaction in playroom lab
Hobbyists say Jackson Oswalt of Tennessee is youngest person to achieve fusionAn American 14-year-old has reportedly become the youngest known person in the world to create a successful nuclear reaction.The Open Source Fusor Research Consortium, a hobbyist group, has recognised the achievement by Jackson Oswalt, from Memphis, Tennessee, when he was aged 12 in January 2018.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Mattha Busby Tags: Nuclear power Science Energy US news World news Tennessee Source Type: news

Bedtime social media use may be harming UK teenagers, study says
Exclusive: a fifth of 13- to 15-year-olds ‘spend five hours or more a day on social media’Teenagers in Britain may be putting their health and education at risk by spending too much time on social media at bedtime, according to a major study into adolescent sleep habits.More than a third of teenagers spent at least three hours a day on social media, with a fifth devoting at least five hours to the activity, researchers found. Those who were on social media for three hours or more daily were most likely to get to sleep late.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Social media Science Digital media Children Society UK news Sleep Health & wellbeing Life and style Education Source Type: news

Donna Spiegelman: biostatistician, hiker, avid reader
Spiegelman, the Susan Dwight Bliss Professor of Biostatistics at YSPH, discusses her research, her goals at Yale, and spending time with her family. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - February 22, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Can Eating Dessert Be Good for Your Diet?
The case against dessert seems open and shut. The sugar that makes treats so sweet has been linked to weight gain and chronic diseases ranging from type 2 diabetes to cancer; many desserts also have an abundance of saturated fats, which potentially harm the heart, and plenty of empty calories. But some studies are suggesting that having dessert every once in a while — the real, indulgent kind, not the cut-up fresh-fruit kind — may actually be a useful tool for eating more healthfully, when it’s used strategically. It turns out that picking dessert first — instead of after a meal, like most of us do ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

Gut viruses may increase diabetes risk
Research, published inScientific Reports, suggests that high levels of intestinal enteroviruses may increase type-1 diabetes risk in children.Science Daily (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - February 22, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Diving into Earth ’ s interior helps scientists unravel secrets of diamond formation
Understanding the global carbon cycle provides scientists with vital clues about the planet ’ s habitability. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - February 22, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Earth Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Israeli Spacecraft Rockets To The Moon For The Country's First Attempted Lunar Landing
The spacecraft — called Beresheet, Hebrew for Genesis or “In The Beginning” — will take nearly two months to reach the moon. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 22, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Killer Whale Head-Butts Scientist's Camera And She's Just Thrilled
Marine mammal expert Regina Eisert said she thinks the whale wanted to share its dinner with her. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 22, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

The lessons infantile adults can learn from children go far beyond climate change | Richard Russell
As a teacher, how do I show my pupils the right values when they see so little of it from their adult ‘role models’?The children ’sclimate strike has become another lightning rod in the never-ending culture war. Those on the left applauded them for their brave moral stand. Jonathan Freedland – not without basis –pointed to the strike as evidence that children were acting more like adults than the adults. But on the right the focus seemed to be on chiding them and telling them to get back to school – from the prime minister’s spokesperson to Toby Young, whosaw the children ’s ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Richard Russell Tags: Children Climate change Environment Science Society Schools Education Young people Activism UK news Environmental activism Protest Politics Source Type: news

Kids are striking over climate change because adults are too infantile | Richard Russell
As a teacher, how do I show my pupils the right values when they see so little of it from their adult ‘role models’?The children ’sclimate strike has become another lightning rod in the never-ending culture war. Those on the left applauded them for their brave moral stand. Jonathan Freedland – not without basis –pointed to the strike as evidence that children were acting more like adults than the adults. But on the right the focus seemed to be on chiding them and telling them to get back to school – from the prime minister’s spokesperson to Toby Young, whosaw the children ’s ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Richard Russell Tags: Children Climate change Environment Science Society Schools Education Young people Activism UK news Environmental activism Protest Politics Source Type: news

Image of the Day: Seeing is Bee-lieving
Four decades after it was thought to have disappeared in the wild, scientists have found a single female Wallace ’s giant bee in Indonesia. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 22, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Image of the Day Source Type: news

A Japanese Spacecraft Has Landed on an Asteroid to Look for Clues on Origins of Life
(TOKYO) — A Japanese spacecraft touched down on a distant asteroid Friday on a mission to collect material that could provide clues to the origin of the solar system and life on Earth. Workers at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency control center applauded Friday as a signal sent from space indicated the Hayabusa2 spacecraft had touched down. During the touchdown, Hayabusa2 is programmed to extend a pipe and shoot a pinball-like object into the asteroid to blow up material from beneath the surface. If that succeeds, the craft would then collect samples to eventually be sent back to Earth. Three such touchdowns are...
Source: TIME: Science - February 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight space Source Type: news

Do we need another massive particle collider? Science Weekly podcast
With the Large Hadron Collider reaching its upper limits, scientists around the world are drawing up plans for a new generation of super colliders. Ian Sample weighs up whether or not the potential new discoveries a collider may make will justify the cost of building them.Cern recentlyannounced a proposal to build a machine that would dwarf theLarge Hadron Collider.It could cost around $12bn. But Cern isn ’t the only lab looking at building such a monster machine.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Ian Sample and produced by Danielle Stephens Tags: Particle physics Science Cern Source Type: news

Food allergies: A research update
(Children's National Health System) Families impacted by food allergies will need psychosocial support as they try promising new therapies that enable them to ingest a food allergen daily or wear a patch that administers a controlled dose of that food allergen. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

US opioid deaths jump fourfold in 20 years; epidemic shifts to Eastern states
(Stanford Medicine) Opioid-related deaths nationwide jumped fourfold in the last two decades, and the epidemic has made major inroads in the Eastern states, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Harvard University and the University of Toronto. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Are the French lousy at languages? Not if there's noise!
(CNRS) It is often said that the French have poor English skills. But according to a study conducted by a CNRS researcher and her colleagues in the Netherlands, Finland and the UK, when it comes to process English spoken in a noisy environment like a caf é or a restaurant, the French have nothing to be ashamed of! (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: With Twitter, race of the messenger matters
(University of Kansas) University of Kansas journalism researchers showed real tweets about the NFL anthem protests to a group of millennials. Eye tracking software found they viewed tweets from white males the longest, but self-reported data showed they gave the most credibility to African-American males. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study explores the role of citrus peel in reducing gut inflammation
(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) University of Massachusetts Amherst Professor Hang Xiao, Clydesdale Scholar of Food Science, has received a $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study how substances produced in the gut from citrus compounds are involved in decreasing inflammation in the colon. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ETRI won AVSS contest on traffic surveillance technology
(National Research Council of Science& Technology) A vehicle recognition technology for traffic surveillance developed by South Korea's Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) won an international contest. ETRI announced that its researchers ranked first and third respectively, in the vehicle detection section of the international competition hosted by Advanced Video and Signal-based Surveillance (AVSS), the world's largest video security conference. The event was held in Auckland, New Zealand, for four days starting from November 27, 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Studying species interactions using remote camera traps
(Forschungsverbund Berlin) In a recent study carried out by researchers from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Germany and University of California, Davis, USA, the scientists explored to what extent camera trap data are suitable to assess subtle species interactions such as avoidance in space and time. The study is published in the international journal Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Political corruption scars young voters forever, new research finds
(Bocconi University) New research by Bocconi University, Milan, finds that political corruption has a long-term scarring effect on trust in democratic institutions and on voters' behavior and that such an effect differs according to one's age cohort, with first-time voters at the time of corruption revelation still being affected 25 years later. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The ancient people in the high-latitude Arctic had well-developed trade
(AKSON Russian Science Communication Association) Russian scientists studied the Zhokhov site of ancient people, which is located in the high-latitude Arctic, and described in detail the way of life of the ancient people had lived there. It turned out that, despite the sparsely populated area, the ancient people had communicated with representatives of other territories and had even exchanged various objects with them through some kind of the fairs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Israel's first lunar lander blasts into space from Florida
The unmanned robotic capsule, called Beresheet, will land on the moon in mid-AprilAnIsraeli spacecraft aboard a SpaceX rocket haslaunched from Cape Canaveral in Florida, beginning what will be a two-month journey to land on the Moon.If successful, Israel, a state with less than nine million citizens, will join Russia, the US and China as the only countries to have made a controlled landing on the surface of earth ’s nearest neighbour.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Oliver Holmes in Jerusalem Tags: Israel Space Nasa Science US news Source Type: news

Jello for the brain? Gelatin helps heal acute brain injuries, according to research
(Natural News) Science has come a long way as far as treating injuries to the human brain is concerned. It seems like every day you’ll hear about a new breakthrough in the field of brain research, and today is no exception. Researchers from the Neuronano Research Center or NRC at Lund University now have a... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ivanka Trump Retweets Praise Of Administration As'Driver For Science,' Twitter Gags
Snarky tweets reminded the president's daughter about White House denials of climate change. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 22, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Japan ’s Hayabusa 2 successfully touches down on Ryugu asteroid
The probe was due to fire a pellet into the surface of the asteroid to try to capture dustA Japanese spacecraft has successfully touched down on a speeding asteroid 300 million kilometres from the Earth as it attempts an audacious manoeuvre to collect samples and bring them back for scientists to study.The Hayabusa 2 probe touched down on the asteroid Ryugu at around 11:30pm GMT on Thursday. Data from the probe showed changes in speed and direction, indicating it had reached the asteroid ’s surface, according to officials from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA).Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Kate Lyons, and Ian Sample, science editor Tags: Space Science Japan World news Asia Pacific Source Type: news

Sackler Testimony Appears to Conflict With Federal Investigation
Publication of a sealed deposition by Richard Sackler of Purdue Pharma shows inconsistencies between his statements about OxyContin and evidence presented in a Justice Department report. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: BARRY MEIER Tags: your-feed-science Opioids and Opiates OxyContin (Drug) Drug Abuse and Traffic Advertising and Marketing Purdue Pharma Sackler, Richard (1945- ) Source Type: news

'Historical Google Earth' project captures a changing Britain
Cambridge University launches free digital archive of aerial photos going back to 1945A “historical Google Earth” featuring aerial photographs of Britain going back to 1945 has been made freely available by Cambridge University.The vast archive captures 70 years of change across urban and rural landscapes, from thebomb-scarred postwar period to the emergence of motorways and skyscrapers.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Aamna Mohdin Tags: Heritage Archaeology Photography Science Art and design UK news Culture University of Cambridge Source Type: news

AIBS Member Donates $13,000 to Support Graduate Student Leadership
An American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) member has anonymously donated $13,000 to help endow the AIBS Emerging Public Policy Leadership Award program. The award recognizes graduate students who demonstrate outstanding leadership potential at the intersection of biology and science policy. Thirsty-one individuals have been recognized with the Award and an additional 23 scientists have received Honorable Mention recognition since the program was launched 16 years ago. Award winners join a growing network of leaders who will advance the biological sciences for years to come through the promotion of effecti...
Source: AIBS News - February 21, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Can we all move to Mars? Prof Martin Rees on space exploration – video
The first of a series of films called 'Five minute masterminds' starts with Prof Martin Rees, the astronomer royal. He asks how the future of space exploration will transform how we think of humanity and if we can rely on mass emigration to Mars to save us from the Earth's problemsContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jess Gormley Joseph Pierce Noah Payne-Frank Dan Susman Tags: Space Science Mars Martin Rees Astronomy Source Type: news

Spacewatch: Nasa to produce new survey of the universe
Comprehensive mission known as SPHEREx will collect data on more than 300m galaxiesNasa has approved a new sky survey mission that will explore the origins of the universe and its galaxies and of water in planetary systems.This comprehensive mission is known asSPHEREx (the spectro-photometer for the history of the universe, epoch of reionization and ices explorer). It will survey the sky in 96 different colour bands that span the optical and near-infrared wavelengths of light.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Clark Tags: Space Nasa Astronomy Science Source Type: news

Researchers Discover World's Biggest Bee Isn't Extinct After All
Wallace's giant bee has a wingspan of more than 2.5 inches (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 21, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

A missing gene makes a big difference in patients ’ recovery from mild stroke
More than 6 million Americans live with disabilities following a stroke. Even mild strokes can leave survivors with arm and leg weakness, poor muscle control and memory lapses that worsen with age. Now UCLA neuroscientists have found that patients born without a gene called CCR5 recover better from mild stroke than patients with the gene. The team partnered with Israeli researchers to study the missing gene ’s effect on brain function.Published Feb. 21 in the journal Cell,  the findings could lead to the first pill to reverse the physical and mental aftermath of mild stroke.“This is the first time tha...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 21, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

World's Largest Bee Is Spotted For First Time In Decades
The bee towers over its apian cousins. Females have been recorded as being at least an inch and a half long. Add to that a pair of gigantic mandibles, and it's a bee like no other.(Image credit: Clay Bolt/claybolt.com) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bill Chappell Source Type: news

Scientists have new clues in the 66-million-year-old case of the dinosaurs' demise
It ’s one of the greatest whodunits of all time: What killed the dinosaurs, along with three-quarters of all other species on Earth?We never tire of the story of this grisly extinction. Perhaps the demise of the dinosaurs gives us a sense of geologic schadenfreude. Or perhaps it ’s just the opposite:... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Julia Rosen Source Type: news

Final FY19 Appropriations: National Institute of Standards and Technology
The budget for research programs at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology will remain flat in fiscal year 2019, while funding for research facility construction will drop sharply following last year ’s one-time funding boost for building renovations. (Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News)
Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News - February 21, 2019 Category: Physics Authors: aschwarber Source Type: news

Matter: DNA Gets a New — and Bigger — Genetic Alphabet
DNA is spelled out with four letters, or bases. Researchers have now built a system with eight. It may hold clues to the potential for life elsewhere in the universe and could also expand our capacity to store digital data on Earth (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARL ZIMMER Tags: your-feed-science Genetics and Heredity DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid) Data Storage Research Chemistry RNA (Ribonucleic Acid) Steven A. Benner Source Type: news

Immunotherapy for cancer patients is impaired by antibiotic use, new study finds
(Natural News) The misuse of antibiotic medicine leading to antibiotic resistance in diseases that they are supposed to help cure has long been understood. New research now shows that taking antibiotics can affect the effectiveness of immunotherapy in cancer patients as well. A recent study, published in the journal Science this November by a group of... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Achieving longevity requires balance: Scientists have discovered how human cells age
(Natural News) Scientists now believe they have found the ever-elusive “fountain of youth” — but not in some mystical outside source but in our actual bodies. Just this month, scientists at the University of California San Diego began to understand cell aging. Using a combination of biology, computer science, and engineering, they were able to... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

China Uses DNA to Track Its People, With the Help of American Expertise
The Chinese authorities turned to a Massachusetts company and a prominent Yale researcher as they built an enormous system of surveillance and control. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: SUI-LEE WEE Tags: China Xinjiang (China) Uighurs (Chinese Ethnic Group) Genetics and Heredity Politics and Government Political Prisoners Forensic Science DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid) Human Rights and Human Rights Violations Thermo Fisher Kenneth Kidd Source Type: news

The mummy of all Tutankhamun shows will land in London
Saatchi Gallery to host exhibition of 150 artefacts before their permanent return to EgyptThe largest number ofKing Tutankhamun treasures ever to leave Egypt are heading to London for an exhibition which organisers say will never happen again. It was announced on Thursday that theSaatchi Gallery in London will be the only UK venue for a world tour of 150 original artefacts from Tutankhamun ’s tomb, 60 of which have never left Egypt before.The tour marks the upcoming centenary of the sensational discovery of the boy pharaoh ’s tomb by British explorer Howard Carter in 1922.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Mark Brown Arts correspondent Tags: Egyptology Archaeology Tutankhamun Saatchi gallery Culture UK news Art Art and design Source Type: news

Sleep Deprivation Hardly Harms Fruit Flies
Some individuals sleep just minutes a day. And keeping flies awake does not have untoward effects on longevity. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 21, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Half-a-billion-year-old weird wonder worm finally gets its place in the tree of life
Palaeobiologists from the University of Bristol have shed new light on a jaw-snapping species of prehistoric worm using half-a-billion-year-old fossils kept at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington DC. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - February 21, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, School of Earth Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news