Opioid vending machine opens in Vancouver
MySafe scheme for addicts aims to help reduce overdose deaths in Canadian cityA vending machine for powerful opioids has opened in Canada as part of a project to help fight the Canadian city ’s overdose crisis.The MySafe project, which resembles a cash machine, gives addicts access to a prescribed amount of medical quality hydromorphone, a drug about twice as powerful as heroin.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: William Turvill in Vancouver Tags: Drugs Opioids Canada Americas World news Science Society Drugs trade Source Type: news

Coronavirus: 99 more cases confirmed on cruise ship - live news
Diamond Princess evacuations begin as Japan warns outbreak ‘entering new phase’. Follow latest updatesRussian court orders woman who fled quarantine back to hospitalWhat is coronavirus and what should I do if I have symptoms?Tokyo marathon cancels mass race over coronavirus scareShare your experiences5.23pmGMTChina ’s president Xi Jinping spelled out his plan to contain the coronavirus crisis at a meeting of the core Chinese leadership today, Reuters reports.In the speech, Xi admitted there were “shortcomings” in China’s emergency response systems and said local officials would be punish...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jessica Murray (now), Aamna Mohdin and Alison Rourke (earlier) Tags: Coronavirus outbreak China Japan Hong Kong Australia news Asia Pacific Infectious diseases Science World news Source Type: news

Researchers claim solar efficiency breakthrough for flexible 'skin'
Engineers at the University of Queensland say technology could be used to power small devices, such as a phone, within two yearsA flexible solar “skin” that could be used to generate power on homes, cars and phones is a step closer to development after the technology was used to break a world record for electricity conversion, researchers say.Engineers at the University of Queensland have been working with nanoparticles known asquantum dots that pass electrons and generate an electrical current when exposed to solar energy.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Lisa Cox Tags: Solar power Australia news Nanotechnology Energy Environment Renewable energy Science Source Type: news

UK must prepare for more intense storms, climate scientists say
Government urged to create more natural drainage systems to cope with impact of crisisBritain must brace for more storms like Dennis and Ciara because rainfall will be more intense in a climate-disrupted future, scientists have warned.They said the government needed to increase the creation of more natural drainage systems if it wanted to avoid having to raise the level of sea and river defences every few years to counter the growing threat of flooding and storm surges.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jonathan Watts Tags: UK weather Extreme weather Climate change Science Environment UK news Source Type: news

Defining off-road running: a position statement from the Ultra Sports Science Foundation - Scheer V, Basset P, Giovanelli N, Vernillo G, Millet GP, Costa RJS.
Off-road running continues to grow in popularity, with differing event categories existing, and terminologies are often used interchangeably and without precision. Trail running, mountain running, skyrunning, fell running, orienteering, obstacle course rac... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Recreational and Sports Issues Source Type: news

Fashion imposter syndrome: why expensive designer clothes can be bad for your health
Researchers have identified a new psychological condition that affects some wearers of luxury items – although notably not those with a huge sense of entitlementName:Fashion imposter syndrome.Age:New for spring 2020.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Fashion Life and style Psychology Science Consumer affairs Money Source Type: news

What is coronavirus and what should I do if I have symptoms?
What are the symptoms caused by the virus from Wuhan in China, how does it spread, and should you call a doctor?Find all our coronavirus coverage hereHow to protect yourself from infectionIt is a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encountered before. Like other coronaviruses, it has come from animals. Many of those initially infected either worked or frequently shopped in the Huanan seafood wholesale market in the centre of the Chinese city, which also sold live and newly slaughtered animals.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley, Hannah Devlin and Martin Belam Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Medical research Microbiology Asia Pacific China Infectious diseases Science World news Source Type: news

Bay Area women lead from lab to C-suite and beyond
A number of key women Bay Area life science leaders share their opinion on the state of the industry and how to bring more women into leadership. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 17, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Kevin Truong Source Type: news

Zimbabwe: Nust Conducts Cancer Study
[Zimbabwe Standard] A study to ascertain women's awareness on breast and cervical cancer -- the most common cancers among women worldwide -- is being undertaken in Bulawayo by the National University of Science and Technology (Nust). (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 17, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Image of the Day: Coronavirus Under the Scope
The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases releases a series of images that offer a close up look at the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 17, 2020 Category: Science Tags: Image of the Day Source Type: news

Bay Area women lead from lab to C-suite and beyond
A number of key women Bay Area life science leaders share their opinion on the state of the industry and how to bring more women into leadership. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 17, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Kevin Truong Source Type: news

No 10 refuses to comment on PM's views of racial IQ
Move comes after hiring of new adviser who said black people have lower average IQsBoris Johnson ’s spokesman has refused to say whether the prime minister thinks black people have lower IQs on average, or agrees with eugenics, after No 10 hired an adviser with highly controversial views.In a tense briefing with the media, the prime minister ’s deputy official spokesman declined several times to distance Johnson from the views of his adviser,Andrew Sabisky, who has suggested “enforced contraception” be used to prevent the creation of a “permanent underclass”.Continue reading... (Source: ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Rowena Mason Deputy political editor Tags: Boris Johnson Conservatives Dominic Cummings Race Politics UK news Science Poverty Social exclusion Society World news Source Type: news

Congenital pituitary hypoplasia model developed
The first congenital pituitary hypoplasia model, developed from patient-derived iPS cells, has been published in theJournal of Clinical Investigation.Science Daily (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - February 17, 2020 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

South West to host Europe's largest Arm supercomputer
The region's leading universities, the GW4 Alliance, together with the Met Office, Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE), and partners, have been awarded £ 4.1 million by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) to create Isambard 2, the largest Arm-based supercomputer in Europe. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - February 17, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Grants and Awards, Research; Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, School of Computer Science, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, and Engineering Maths; Press Release Source Type: news

Americans evacuated from coronavirus-hit cruise ship return to US
Passengers flown from Japan after being stuck onboard now face 14 days in quarantineCoronavirus - live updatesTwo charter flights carrying cruise ship passengers from Japan have landed at military bases in California and Texas, with passengers facing a quarantine period to ensure they do not have the Covid-19 virus that has been spreading thoughout Asia.A plane carrying American passengers touched down at Travis air force base in northern California shortly before 11.30pm local time (0730 GMT) on Sunday. A second flight arrived at Lackland air force base in Texas about two and a half hours later.Continue reading... (Source...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Coronavirus outbreak US news Japan World news Asia Pacific Infectious diseases Science Source Type: news

Psychedelics have lost their cool. Blame Gwyneth Paltrow | John Semley
Mushrooms used to be the territory of hippies, explorers, indigenous people and artists. Now tech bros and wellness gurus have taken overOn a June evening in 1955, an investment banker and amateur mycologist named Robert Gordon Wasson found himself in an adobe house high in the mountains of Oaxaca, Mexico, encountering the divine. That night, Wasson, his wife, the photographer Allan Richardson and about 20 local indigenous people took part in a Mazatec ritual involvingpsilocybe mexicana, a species of hallucinogenic mushroom. As Wassonrecounted in Seeking the Magic Mushroom, his 1957 Lifemagazine photoessay: “We chewe...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: John Semley Tags: Culture Drugs Science Health Gwyneth Paltrow Source Type: news

Beavers cut flooding and pollution and boost wildlife populations
Five-year study of animals in Devon finds measurable benefits to wildlife and peopleBeavers have alleviated flooding, reduced pollution and boosted populations of fish, amphibians and other wildlife, according to a five-year study of wild-living animals in Devon.The report, which will help the government decide whether to allow wild beavers to return to England after being hunted to extinction more than 400 years ago, concludes that the species has brought measurable benefits to wildlife and people.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Barkham Tags: Wildlife Rivers Devon Animals University of Exeter Flooding Pollution Environment Science Higher education UK news Source Type: news

Fail productively … how to turn yourself into a super-learner
Whether you ’re taking up the oboe or finessing your Finnish, scientific research offers tips to aid learningIf your aim for 2020 was to learn a new skill, you may be at the point of giving up. Whether you are mastering a new language or a musical instrument, or taking a career-changing course, initial enthusiasm can only take you so far, and any further progress can be disappointingly slow.From these struggles, you might assume that you simply lack a natural gift – compared to those lucky people who can learn any new skill with apparent ease.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: David Robson Tags: Neuroscience Learning and teaching Education Source Type: news

Coronavirus updates: US flies out its Diamond Princess passengers as China cases pass 70,000 – live news
Global death toll reaches 1,775 with first case in Taiwan, as Canada prepares to airlift its citizens from Japan cruise ship. Follow live news and latest updates2.53amGMTThe economics research firm Capital Economics, has published some very interesting graphs which appear to show just how substantially activity in China has reduced as a result of the coronavirus outbreak.The first graph shows road congestion across 100 Chinese cities in the weeks before and after the lunar new year, comparing figures from the four years to 2020.2.29amGMTA fifth evacuation flight of Japanese citizens from Wuhan has landed in Tokyo.It landed...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Alison Rourke Tags: Coronavirus outbreak China Japan Hong Kong Australia news Asia Pacific Infectious diseases Science World news Source Type: news

Coronavirus: US evacuates Americans onboard cruise ship
Diamond Princess evacuations begin as China announces death toll in country up to 1,665Hundreds of Americans have been flown out of Japan after leaving the quarantined Diamond Princess cruise ship on Sunday night, as a further 70 people onboard tested positive for Covid-19, bringing the total to 355.The removal of US citizens from the ship, moored at Yokohama, south of Tokyo, came as other countries said they would fly their citizens home just four days before the official quarantine set by Japanese health authorities was set to end.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Justin McCurry in Tokyo and Rebecca Ratcliffe Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Japan US news Medical research Science World news Canada Source Type: news

Starwatch: close encounter between Mars and the moon
The waning crescent moon can be seen low in the pre-dawn sky passing the red planet and, from North America, blocking Mars from viewEarly morning skywatchers should look south-east tomorrow to see the waning crescentmoon pass close toMars. The red planet is by no means at its brightest but will still be visible as a moderately bright object in the morning sky for the next few months. And it will always display a distinctive red hue to its light. From London, UK, Mars rises a few hours before dawn. The chart shows the view looking south-east at 0600 GMT on 18 February. From Sydney, Australia, Mars is much easier to spot. It...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Clark Tags: Astronomy Mars The moon Science Space Source Type: news

Sandra the Orangutan, Granted Legal Personhood by Judge in Argentina, Celebrates 34th Birthday
(WAUCHULA, Fla.) — A orangutan named Sandra, who was granted legal personhood by a judge in Argentina and later found a new home in Florida, celebrated her 34th birthday on Valentine’s Day with a special new primate friend. Patti Ragan, director of the Center for Great Apes in Wauchula, Florida, says Sandra “has adjusted beautifully to her life at the sanctuary” and has befriended Jethro, a 31-year-old male orangutan. Prior to coming to Florida, Sandra had lived alone in a Buenos Aires zoo. Sandra was a bit shy when she arrived at the Florida center, which is home to 22 orangutans. “Sandra ap...
Source: TIME: Science - February 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized animals Florida onetime Source Type: news

Human composting could be the future of deathcare
Washington becomes first US state to legalise practice as interest in green burials surges in UKIt is viewed as a fitting end for a banana skin or a handful of spent coffee grounds. But now people are being urged to consider human composting and other environmentally friendly “deathcare” options.Speaking before a talk at the American Association for the Advancement of Science conference in Seattle on Sunday, Lynne Carpenter-Boggs, a professor of soil science and sustainable agriculture at Washington State University, said: “Death certainly isn’t the biggest environmental impact we have in our life p...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Death and dying Compost Environment World news Science Source Type: news

A photograph that is right for the website can be wrong for social media | Elisabeth Ribbans
Serious thought is given to publishing troubling images, of death or distress for example, but even then context is keyOn the morning after the Streatham terror attack, the Guardian ’s print edition carried a single-column photograph of the perpetrator, Sudesh Amman, at the bottom of the front page. The main image showedarmed police at the incident. Later in the day, an online reader contacted me to express concern at the prominence given tothe attacker; in fact, she thought that he should not be named at all. I drew her attention to a 2019column by my predecessor, Paul Chadwick, in which he supported the Guardian &r...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Elisabeth Ribbans Tags: Photography UK security and counter-terrorism UK news Coronavirus outbreak Science Infectious diseases Journalism, publishing and public relations Source Type: news

A photograph that is right for this website can be wrong for social media | Elisabeth Ribbans
Serious thought is given to publishing troubling images, of death or distress for example, but even then context is keyOn the morning after the Streatham terror attack, the Guardian ’s print edition carried a single-column photograph of the perpetrator, Sudesh Amman, at the bottom of the front page. The main image showedarmed police at the incident. Later in the day, an online reader contacted me to express concern at the prominence given tothe attacker; in fact, she thought that he should not be named at all. I drew her attention to a 2019column by my predecessor, Paul Chadwick, in which he supported the Guardian &r...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Elisabeth Ribbans Tags: Photography UK security and counter-terrorism UK news Coronavirus outbreak Science Infectious diseases Journalism, publishing and public relations Source Type: news

AI systems claiming to 'read' emotions pose discrimination risks
Expert says technology deployed is based on outdated science and therefore is unreliableArtificial Intelligence (AI) systems that companies claim can “read” facial expressions is based on outdated science and risks being unreliable and discriminatory, one of the world’s leading experts on the psychology of emotion has warned.Lisa Feldman Barrett, professor of psychology at Northeastern University, said that such technologies appear to disregard a growing body of evidence undermining the notion that the basic facial expressions are universal across cultures. As a result, such technologies – some of w...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Artificial intelligence (AI) Technology Consciousness Computing Science UK news Psychology Source Type: news

Coronavirus: more than 3,000 Britons tested
Eight of nine people who tested positive successfully treated and discharged from hospitalThe number of people tested for coronavirus in the UK has passed 3,000, according to official figures.Statistics from the Department of Health and Social Care show that 3,109 tests had been carried out in the UK as of 2pm on Sunday, an increase of 117 on the 2,992 reported on Saturday.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Frances Perraudin Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Science World news UK news Source Type: news

Taiwan reports first death from coronavirus
Taxi driver with diabetes and hepatitis B is fifth fatality outside mainland ChinaA taxi driver has died from the coronavirus in Taiwan, marking the first such death on the island and the fifth fatality outside mainland China from an epidemic that has curbed travel and disrupted global supply chains.The health minister, Chen Shih-chung, said during a news conference on Sunday that the deceased was a 61-year-old man who had diabetes and hepatitis B. Taiwan has to date reported 20 confirmed cases.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Rebecca Ratcliffe and agencies Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Taiwan China Infectious diseases Medical research Science World news Asia Pacific Source Type: news

Your DNA is a valuable asset, so why give it to ancestry websites for free? | Laura Spinney
DNA testing companies are starting to profit from selling our data on to big pharma. Perhaps they should be paying usThe announcement by 23andMe, a company that sells home DNA testing kits, that it hassold the rights to a promising new anti-inflammatory drug to a Spanish pharmaceutical company is cause for celebration. The collected health data of 23andMe ’s millions of customers have potentially produced a medical advance – the first of its kind. But a few weeks later the same company announced that it was laying off workers amid a shrinking market that its CEO put down to the public ’s concerns about pr...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Laura Spinney Tags: Genetics Biology Science Privacy Data protection Technology World news Source Type: news

Coronavirus in Hove: ‘I’m trying to be less scared … worry won’t keep us safe’
A mother-of-two finds strength in her communityThis month marked the first time I ’ve ever been to a queue-free post office, and been served by a man wearing gloves in the service station. “We’ve been told to use antibacterial gel every half hour too,” he told me. Supermarkets are quieter than usual, but with no signs of panic buying – unless hand sanitiser counts. “I went to five shops and couldn’t find any,” a neighbour texted me. Dozens of people are “self-isolating”, and it’s a risky place for secret affairs because of the chance everyone you’ve be...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Genevieve Roberts Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Science Infectious diseases Brighton UK news Source Type: news

Science is ever evolving, just like the human race | Kenan Malik
Scientific knowledge, whether about a human species or the planets, is powerful because it is provisional and cumulativeFor the past decade, scientists have thought that DNA sequences from Neanderthals were found only in non-African populations. Neanderthals, a human species that died out around 40,000 years ago, lived mainly in Europe and parts of Asia.AsHomo sapiens migrated from Africa into Europe and Asia some 70,000 years ago, the two species mingled. Roughly 2% of the genomes of modern European and Asian populations isinherited from Neanderthals. But sub-Saharan Africans, it was believed, possessed no Neanderthal DNA...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Kenan Malik Tags: Science Neanderthals Anthropology Astronomy Space UK news Source Type: news

Researchers create new tools to monitor water quality, measure water insecurity
(Northwestern University) A wife-husband team will present both high-tech and low-tech solutions for improving water security at this year's American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting in Seattle on Sunday, Feb. 16. Northwestern University's Sera Young and Julius Lucks come from different ends of the science spectrum but meet in the middle to provide critical new information to approach this global issue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Facial expressions don't tell the whole story of emotion
(Ohio State University) Facial expressions might not be reliable indicators of emotion, research indicates. In fact, it might be more accurate to say we should never trust a person's face, new research suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Our digital afterlife
(Arizona State University) It's a problem unique to the 21st century: What happens to your digital self after you die? Social media pages and accounts often turn into memorials when someone dies, giving people a chance to still feel connected to those they've lost. But after we're gone, who owns the information on our pages? Who can access them? Faheem Hussain, a clinical assistant professor at Arizona State University (ASU), will explore this topic in his discussion at the AAAS annual meeting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pressure grows to rescue Britons on liner stricken by coronavirus
US plan to airlift Americans from Diamond Princess adds urgency to pleas for evacuation from UK passengersPressure is growing on the British government to airlift UK citizens stranded on a cruise ship stricken by coronavirus, as a Chinese tourist in France yesterday became thefirst person to die from the disease in Europe.The USannounced late on Fridaythat it would be evacuating more than 400 of its nationals from the quarantined ship, the Diamond Princess, which has reported nearly 300 confirmed Covid-19 cases, and British travellers called on their government to do the same.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Emma Graham-Harrison Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Science Infectious diseases World news UK news US news Source Type: news

Pressure grows on UK to rescue citizens from coronavirus-stricken ship
Passengers on Diamond Princess liner ‘disillusioned’ with government over lack of action•All the day ’s developmentsPressure is growing on the British government to airlift citizens stranded on a cruise ship stricken by coronavirus, after a Chinese tourist in France became thefirst person to die from the disease in Europe.The US announced late on Friday that it would be evacuating more than 400 nationals from the quarantined ship, which has had nearly 300 confirmed coronavirus cases, and British travellers called on their government to do the same.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Emma Graham-Harrison Tags: Coronavirus outbreak UK news US news China Japan Asia Pacific Infectious diseases Science World news Source Type: news

What is coronavirus and what should I do if I have symptoms?
What are the symptoms caused by the virus from Wuhan in China, how does it spread, and should you call a doctor?Find all our coronavirus coverage hereHow to protect yourself from infectionIt is a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encountered before. Like other coronaviruses, it has come from animals. Many of those initially infected either worked or frequently shopped in the Huanan seafood wholesale market in the centre of the Chinese city, which also sold live and newly slaughtered animals.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley, Hannah Devlin and Martin Belam Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Medical research Microbiology Asia Pacific China Infectious diseases Science World news Source Type: news

Quarantines, Travel Bans And Cancelled Conferences Cost The Economy Billions —And Won’t Stop The COVID-19 Coronavirus
Governments have enacted harsh measures to contain the coronavirus outbreak. But science suggests it's better to go with a measured, nuanced approach. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - February 15, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Alex Knapp, Forbes Staff Source Type: news

Lessons from the ancient philosophers to help improve our lives today
We are meant to have desires and should worry less, said Aristotle, while Epicurus cautioned that most of the stuff we think we want won ’t make us happyFour hours spent wandering the aisles of Ikea for nothing. My boyfriend and I had long since stopped talking. I was ready to slap the next person who uttered a Swedish word. As I pushed my heaving cart into another room full of boxes I took a deep breath and fought the urge to cry. Thank God for philosophy, I thought to myself.I first got interested in philosophy as a teenager. It was on the curriculum at my high school in Paris, but its image was pretty crusty &ndas...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Marie Robert Tags: Life and style Psychology Science Health & wellbeing Source Type: news

An Unusual New York City Election Tests Whether Global Warming Can Win A Local Race
Costa Constantinides, a progressive candidate for Queens borough president, is prioritizing climate issues in his platform. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 15, 2020 Category: Science Source Type: news

Chinese tourist in France becomes Europe's first coronavirus fatality
French health minister confirms death of man from virus that has killed more than 1,500 peopleCoronavirus: latest updates – liveEurope has recorded its first coronavirus fatality, a Chinese tourist in France, it has been confirmed.The death of the 80-year-old man, who was visiting Paris with his daughter when he was taken to hospital three weeks ago after falling ill, also marks the first coronavirus mortality outside Asia since the start of the outbreak.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Kim Willsher in Paris and Simon Murphy Tags: Coronavirus outbreak France China Infectious diseases Science World news UK news Europe Asia Pacific Source Type: news

One Wuhan family ’s tale of quarantine, followed by infection … and tragedy
Liu Mengdi could only look on as her relatives were ravaged by the virus. Now she has been warned to stop posting about their traumaCoronavirus latest - liveLiu Mengdi, 25, has been keeping a diary of the past few weeks as the coronavirus has ravaged her home town of Wuhan.“Today is the sixth day of the Wuhan lockdown [the city has been under quarantine for the last three weeks]. I thought my family, prevented from going out, would at least be safe,” she wrote on 29 January from Italy, where she is in her last year of university. “It never occurred to me they wo uld not be able to escape this.”Conti...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Lily Kuo Tags: Coronavirus outbreak World news Infectious diseases Science China Asia Pacific Source Type: news

One Wuhan family ’s tale of coronavirus quarantine, followed by infection … and tragedy
Liu Mengdi could only look on as her relatives were ravaged by the virus. Now she has been warned to stop posting about their traumaCoronavirus latest - liveLiu Mengdi, 25, has been keeping a diary of the past few weeks as the coronavirus has ravaged her home town of Wuhan.“Today is the sixth day of the Wuhan lockdown [the city has been under quarantine for the last three weeks]. I thought my family, prevented from going out, would at least be safe,” she wrote on 29 January from Italy, where she is in her last year of university. “It never occurred to me they wo uld not be able to escape this.”Conti...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Lily Kuo Tags: Coronavirus outbreak World news Infectious diseases Science China Asia Pacific Source Type: news

Astronomers to sweep entire sky for signs of extraterrestrial life
Project is collaboration between privately-funded firm and New Mexico observatoryAstronomers will sweep the entire sky for signs of extraterrestrial life for the first time, using 28 giant radio telescopes in an unprecedented hunt for alien civilisations.The project is a collaboration between the privately-funded Seti Institute and the Very Large Array observatory in New Mexico, one of the world ’s most powerful radio observatories. Gaining real-time access to all the data gathered by VLA is considered a major coup for scientists hunting extraterrestrial lifeforms and an indication that the field has “gone main...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Astronomy Science World news Space US news Source Type: news

The verdict is in: Courtrooms seldom overrule bad science
(Association for Psychological Science) A new, multiyear study published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest (PSPI), a journal of the Association for Psychological Science (APS), finds that only 40% of the psychological assessment tools used in courts have been favorably rated by experts. Even so, lawyers rarely challenge their conclusions, and when they do, only one third of those challenges are successful. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In court, far-reaching psychology tests are unquestioned
(Arizona State University) Psychological tests are important instruments used in courts to aid legal decisions that profoundly affect people's lives. While increasingly used in courts, new research shows the tests are not all scientifically valid, and once introduced into a case they are rarely challenged, according to Tess Neal, an assistant professor of psychology at Arizona State University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Factories reimagined
(European Commission Joint Research Centre) Factories in the future will definitely look different than today. As the fourth industrial revolution transforms manufacturing from mass production to mass customization, factory workers will increasingly need to apply new ICT to work remotely, collaborate with robots or use AI-based assistants, to increase their performance while developing further their creative, innovative and improvisational skills. Advanced technologies offer factory workers unprecedented opportunities to organize their jobs in a more autonomous way. Industrial work, jobs and skills are therefore being radi...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Guardian view on looking for aliens: friends in the sky? | Editorial
Recent discoveries in space and Earth sciences have provided encouragement to searchers for distant civilisationsIs there anybody out there? For centuries human beings have wondered, although the ways in which we have gone about this have varied, encompassing spiritual and metaphysical questions as well as scientific ones. As we have gained greater understanding of the universe, however, our searches have taken on more concrete form. Questions about extraterrestrials have become a subject for science rather than science fiction and philosophy.Now anew collaboration between the Very Large Array observatory in New Mexico and...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Alien life Seti (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) Space Science Astronomy Source Type: news

Prevention vs. overreaction: Finding balance in meeting coronavirus threat
YSPH ’s Xi Chen says countries must do their best to prevent spread of the respiratory illness while being careful not to infringe on rights or encourage stigma. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - February 14, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Yale cardiologists share six clinical trends that are making an impact
Heart care is rapidly evolving. Yale Cardiovascular Medicine asked six faculty members to discuss emerging trends that could radically transform healthcare. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - February 14, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news