Nasa's Golden Record may baffle alien life, say researchers
Extraterrestrials will discover a species that loves to argue and sees beauty in flowers that roar like chainsawsIt was launched to the stars as a portrait of humanity: an alien ’s guide to life on Earth and the wonderful, rich culture of its dominant species.Butthe Golden Record, blasted into space byNasa in 1977, may deliver an entirely different message to any extraterrestrials who happen to encounter the cosmic missive, researchers point out.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 26, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Space Nasa Science Alien life UK news Music Photography Art and design Culture Source Type: news

New method for finding disease-susceptibility genes
(Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)) A team of researchers, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has unveiled a novel statistical algorithm, capable of identifying potential disease genes in a more accurate and cost-effective way. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UNIST professors honored with government awards
(Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)) Two faculty members in the School of Urban and Enviornmental Engineering at South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) have been honored with government awards. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Traces Of Opioids Found In Seattle-Area Mussels
Researchers said the discovery of pharmaceuticals and illicit drugs in local harbors is not uncommon, but the agency noted that this is the first time that oxycodone has been found in shellfish.(Image credit: David Silverman/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Vanessa Romo Source Type: news

Data Flash: What is this GDPR thing I keep hearing about?
This article, from Vox, puts it well: “…Norms are shifting once more. Looking back, we can frame the development of digital behavior into three phases: First, there was a naiveté phase, where consumers didn’t really understand the technology and what it meant. Then there was the careless phase, where people saw data rights or privacy as either unimportant or an acceptable price of entry to all the good, free stuff. Now it is clear we are entering the demand phase, which sees the emergence of a more savvy, engaged, and alarmed digital consumer — and related movements to create and enforce con...
Source: Dragonfly - May 26, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Ann Glusker Tags: Data Science Technology data privacy data protection Europe GDPR personal data Source Type: news

Breast cancer screening error may affect thousands more
Invitation glitch could date back further than previously thought, says cancer specialistMany more women could have missed out on breast cancer screening invitations dating back further than previously thought, according to a cancer expert.The health secretary, Jeremy Hunt, said this month thatwomen ’s lives may have been cut short by an IT error, which meant 450,000 patients in England missed crucial examinations.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ben Quinn Tags: Breast cancer Health Society Cancer research Medical research Science NHS Hospitals Women Life and style Source Type: news

Formula meal diet plan can tackle obesity in short term
Four drinks a day over eight weeks can help those at risk of heart disease, says studyObesity can be successfully tackled, at least in the short term, by giving up real food for formula meals for eight weeks, which removes temptation and any need to make difficult decisions about what to eat, a new study has found.The research, by the former government obesity advisor Professor Susan Jebb of Oxford University and colleagues, was designed to see whether a crash diet of just 810 calories a day – provided by four formula drinks – would help people whose obesity is putting them at high risk of health problems such ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Obesity Diets and dieting Health Diabetes Heart disease Society UK news Life and style Source Type: news

Food firms could face litigation over neuromarketing to hijack brains
Exclusive: Obesity experts consider lawsuits over marketing they say could be harmful to childrenLeading obesity experts are considering litigation against the food industry in the light of emerging research suggesting that junk food marketing could hijack a child ’s brain.Neuromarketing is of growing interest to food companies. Fast food, soft drinks and snack companies increasingly interact with children through social media and online games. Some are beginning to probe further, gathering information through brain scans about how unconscious decisions are made to eat one snack rather than another and targeting peop...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Obesity Food & drink industry Marketing PR Media Social media Children Health Society Fast food Neuroscience UK news Source Type: news

OHSU to participate in clinical trial for potentially 'life-transforming' drug
Oregon Health& Science University is part of a clinical trial for a drug approved this week for a rare and serious genetic disorder called phenylketonuria, or PKU. The Food and Drug Administration approved Palynziq, a daily enzyme injection for adults with PKU. The disease affects about 1 in 10,000 to 15,000 people in the U.S. All newborns are screened for the disease, among others, using a “heel stick” blood draw within 24 to 48 hours after birth. Pat ients are unable to break down an amino… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - May 25, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

OHSU to participate in clinical trial for potentially 'life-transforming' drug
Oregon Health& Science University is part of a clinical trial for a drug approved this week for a rare and serious genetic disorder called phenylketonuria, or PKU. The Food and Drug Administration approved Palynziq, a daily enzyme injection for adults with PKU. The disease affects about 1 in 10,000 to 15,000 people in the U.S. All newborns are screened for the disease, among others, using a “heel stick” blood draw within 24 to 48 hours after birth. Pat ients are unable to break down an amino… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 25, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

House Panel Approves Three Bipartisan DOE Science Bills
This week, the House Science Committee introduced and approved three bipartisan bills. One authorizes Department of Energy Office of Science programs. A second reauthorizes and broadens the mission of the Advanced Research Projects Agency –Energy — an agency that committee Republicans had not previously backed. A third provides national laboratory directors authority to enter small public–private partnerships without prior DOE approval. (Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News)
Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News - May 25, 2018 Category: Physics Authors: wthomas Source Type: news

Hawaii ’s Erupting Volcano Looks Even Crazier From Space at Night
A stunning image released by NASA shows what Kilauea, the volcano in Hawaii that has been erupting for three weeks, looks like from space. As the photo shows, Kilauea is not only visible from space — you can also see the lava spewing out of the volcano. Seven instruments aboard NASA ‘s International Space Station and partner satellites have been detecting active fissures, fires, ash and sulphur dioxide plume as well as the height and composition of volcanic plumes, a NASA release explains. “One of the first things emergency responders wanted to know was where the lava was coming out, where are all the fis...
Source: TIME: Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kate Samuelson Tags: Uncategorized hawaii onetime Source Type: news

Taking the embarrassment out of health problems
Yale Medicine explores why discussing potentially embarrassing symptoms with your doctor may be the only way to get the treatment you need. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - May 25, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Dino-bird dandruff research head and shoulders above rest
Palaeontologists from University College Cork (UCC) in Ireland have discovered 125 million-year-old dandruff preserved amongst the plumage of feathered dinosaurs and early birds, revealing the first evidence of how dinosaurs shed their skin. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - May 25, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Science, School of Earth Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Amishi Jha: How Can We Pay Better Attention To Our Attention?
What exactly is attention, and how can we reclaim it? Neuroscientist Amishi Jha says there's a powerful link between mindfulness, meditation and attention.(Image credit: Travis Harris/TED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NPR/TED Staff Source Type: news

Oldest known case of dandruff found in 125m-year-old dinosaur
Scientists have discovered fossilised dandruff on the skin of a feathered microraptorThe oldest known case of dandruff has been identified in a small feathered dinosaur that roamed the Earth about 125m years ago.Paleontologists found tiny flakes of fossilised skin on acrow-sized microraptor, a meat-eating dinosaur that hadwings on all four of its limbs.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Dinosaurs Science Palaeontology Fossils Evolution Zoology Biology World news UK news Source Type: news

NIH summit delivers recommendations to accelerate therapy development for Alzheimer ’s disease
Call for transformative research agenda, open and collaborative science, to enable precision medicine. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - May 25, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Science magazine special issue highlights antifungal resistance
Fri, 05/25/2018 - 14:02News blog (Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates)
Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates - May 25, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: BethBradshaw Source Type: news

Time's up for best-before dates. Which fresh foods keep best?
Tesco is to stop using date stamps on own-brand produce. Which fruit and veg improves with age and which loses most nutrients?Best-before dates have expired, at least for fruit and vegetables. This week Tesco revealed it is to stop using the date stamps onalmost 70 of its own-brand products in an attempt to tackle food waste. But is older produce as good for you as fresher stuff?Many nutrients, including certain vitamins in fresh produce, are unstable and levels drop after items are harvested. “Micronutrients start to reduce from the moment [produce] is cut, which is why frozen peas are actually better than canned or...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Nutrition Fruit Food safety Vegetables Tesco Science Business & drink Supermarkets UK news Food waste Environment Food science drink industry Source Type: news

‘I just knew he loved me. I could see it in his eyes’: can a psychologist cure lovesickness?
Psychotherapist Frank Tallis on one of his most extreme cases: Megan, a married woman with an undying passion for her dentistMegan was a conservatively dressed barrister ’s clerk in her mid-40s. Her hair was dark brown and styled in a neat bob. An uncharitable person might have described her as dowdy. Her GP’s referral letter summarised the key facts of her case, which contained the essential elements of a tragic love story: emotional extremity, reckless abandon , passion and desire.After a few introductory remarks about my role as a psychotherapist, I explained that I wanted to hear her version of events.Conti...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Frank Tallis Tags: Relationships Psychiatry Psychology Mental health Sex Life and style Society Science Source Type: news

What is Galileo and why are the UK and EU arguing about it?
Europe has started to exclude British firms from elements of the satellite programmeGalileo is an £8bn satellite navigation system intended to rival the US-controlled Global Positioning System. Once fully operational in 2020 it will provide accurate position, navigation and timing information to be used by governments, citizens and industry. It will be used by everything from smartphones to sec urity-critical military applications in target acquisition and tracking. The UK is developing receivers for military platforms that will incorporate Galileo’s encrypted Public Regulated Service (PRS).Continue reading... ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Daniel Boffey in Brussels Tags: Brexit Foreign policy European commission European Union Satellites Space Politics Science UK news World news Source Type: news

Is Monsanto going down like Big Tobacco? FAKE SCIENCE about to be exposed on a global scale
(Natural News) Monsanto is showing some clear signs that they’re getting nervous as their dishonest practices come significantly closer to being brought to light on a grand scale. Last week, the peer-reviewed manuscripts of the pilot phase of a study known as the Global Glyphosate Study were revealed at a European Parliament press conference, and... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Detroit medical body parts dealer sentenced to nine years for selling diseased body parts in the name of "science"
(Natural News) A former Grosse Pointe Park body parts dealer was sentenced to nine years in federal prison earlier this week after it was revealed that he had been selling and renting body parts that were infected with HIV and hepatitis to unsuspecting customers at various medical and dental schools across the country, Detroit News... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Opinion: How to Use Mobile Apps for Immunohistochemistry
This guide for apps comes from personal experience testing various programs aimed to improve productivity or to help with selecting reagents. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion,Opinion Source Type: news

This futuristic pill senses signs of disease inside the body, then sends a wireless alert to a phone
In the 1966 science fiction classic“Fantastic Voyage,” a submarine crew is miniaturized so it can squeeze inside a human body and travel to a hot spot where medical assistance is needed.A team from MIT has adapted this idea for real life, replacing the shrunken squad with specially engineered... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Bumblebees confused by iridescent colours
A new study published today by the University of Bristol shows for the first time that dazzling iridescent colours in animals can act as camouflage. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - May 25, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Biological Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Study examines the rise of plaque in arteries
A new Yale study looks at how arterial plaque forms at a molecular level, and may help produce targeted treatments for heart disease and stroke prevention. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - May 25, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

The Irish anti-abortion side will lose. There ’s nothing good about that | Melanie McDonagh
The no side were outnumbered by the established political class and the media together pushing the same illiberal viewTaoiseach Leo Varadkar – the Irish prime minister – has declared that he won’t be encouraging celebrations if, as seems inevitable, the yes side wins in the abortion referendum. We won’t, then, be treated to the same wild exuberance that met thegay marriage referendum vote, at least not officially. But he can be forgiven for a modestly self-congratulatory tone to his address to the Irish parliament on Wednesday, its last sitting before the referendum, in which he was joined by the le...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melanie McDonagh Tags: Irish abortion referendum Women Ireland Reproductive rights Society Pregnancy World news Europe Life and style Science Source Type: news

UK will build own satellite system if frozen out of EU's Galileo – chancellor
Philip Hammond says UK to ‘go it alone’ after Brexit if Brussels carries out access threatThe chancellor, Philip Hammond, has warned that the UK will build its own satellite navigation system to rival the European Union ’s €10bn Galileo project if Brussels carries out its threat to block access.The European commission has cited legal issues about sharing sensitive information with a non-member state to justify its decision to shut British firms out of the project. The EU has also said it will restrict access to encrypted signals from Galileo.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Daniel Boffey in Brussels Tags: Brexit European Union Satellites Philip Hammond Space GPS Defence policy Politics Foreign policy Article 50 Science Technology UK news World news Source Type: news

The Lost Boys by Gina Perry review – the experiment that made boys vicious
In 1954 the American psychologist Muzafer Sherif set out to prove that hate was learned with the help of two groups of warring 11-year-oldsAt the beginning of the 1950s, while William Golding was a teacher at a boys ’ school in Salisbury, he took a group of pupils to the nearby iron age hill fort of Figsbury Ring. The novelist told some of the boys to attack the fort while others defended its grassy ramparts. Golding was shocked at how quickly the schoolboys morphed into ferocious warring tribes: “My eyes c ame out like organ stops as I watched what was happening.”Golding ’s research into “the...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: PD Smith Tags: Science and nature books Culture Psychology Anthropology Source Type: news

Homeopathy for autism 'certainly not based on science,' B.C. health official says
B.C.’s top doctor says there are “huge potential harms” connected to a homeopathic treatment based on the unfounded claim that vaccines cause most cases of autism. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - May 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/British Columbia Source Type: news

Radiophobia: why do we fear nuclear power? – Science Weekly podcast
Nuclear energy is back on the UK government ’s agenda. However, concerns about safety have plagued this technology for decades. Given it kills less people than wind, coal or gas, why are we so radiophobic?Ian Sampleinvestigates.Subscribe and review onAcast,Apple Podcasts,Soundcloud,Audioboom andMixcloud. Join the discussion onFacebook andTwitterBy 2050, the UK will have a net zero carbon economy. That, at least, is what the government claims. How it will do this is yet to be decided but it could include projects like growing trees and restoring soils to absorb more carbon from the atmosphere. However, other measures ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Ian Sample and produced by Graihagh Jackson Tags: Science Environment Nuclear power Energy Source Type: news

A century on, why are we forgetting the deaths of 100 million? | Martin Kettle
The 1918 Spanish flu outbreak killed more people than both world wars. Don ’t imagine such a thing could never happen againThis year marks a century since somewomen got the vote; a century since theend of the first world war; 50 years since the1968 revolts; 70 since the founding ofIsrael andthe NHS. All have been well marked. So it is striking that the centenary of one of the most devastating events in human history has been allowed to pass thus far with almost no public reflection of any kind.This year is the 100th anniversary of the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918. Estimates about its impact vary. But when you read th...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Martin Kettle Tags: Flu pandemic Infectious diseases Ebola Health Society Medical research UK news World news Source Type: news

Top nitrogen researchers imagine world beyond fossil fuels
(Utah State University) At the invitation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, 17 top experts in nitrogen research gathered to discuss nitrogen activation chemistry and the field's future. Their conclusions form a review article in the journal 'Science.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 25, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A genetic algorithm predicts the vertical growth of cities
(FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology) The increase of skyscrapers in a city resembles the development of some living systems. Spanish researchers have created an evolutionary genetic algorithm that, on the basis of the historical and economic data of an urban area, can predict what its skyline could look like in the coming years. The method has been applied successfully to the thriving Minato Ward, in Tokyo. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 25, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NSF-Simons centers to search for the Rules of Life
(National Science Foundation) The National Science Foundation (NSF), in partnership with the Simons Foundation, has launched four new centers to bring mathematical perspectives to the biological search for the Rules of Life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 25, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Most concussion patients fall under the radar after ER visit
(University of Southern California) Research supported by the NIH and led by 65 scientists across the United States reveals a lack of follow-up with patients who have suffered a mild traumatic brain injury, even among patients who experience persistent, long-term symptoms after they leave the hospital. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Majority of premature infants still exposed to early antibiotics
(JAMA Network) Most premature infants, who are at   risk for sepsis but who may not have a culture confirmation of infection, continue to receive early antibiotics in the first few days of life, a finding that suggests neonatal antibiotic stewardship efforts are needed to help clinicians identify infants at lowest risk for infection to avoid unnecessary antibiotic exposure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Doctors fail to flag concussion patients for critical follow-up
(University of California - San Francisco) As evidence builds of more long-term effects linked to concussion, a nationwide study led by scientists at UCSF and the University of Southern California has found that more than half of the patients seen at top-level trauma centers may fall off the radar shortly after diagnosis, placing in jeopardy treatments for these long-term effects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NYU professor replicates famous marshmallow test, makes new observations
(New York University) A new replication study of the well-known 'marshmallow test' -- a famous psychological experiment designed to measure children's self-control -- suggests that being able to delay gratification at a young age may not be as predictive of later life outcomes as was previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A study shows that electoral outcomes affect the way we treat other people
(Bocconi University) After the unexpected results of the 2016 US Presidential election, the way Americans treat each other changed as a function of their party affiliation, a new study by Celia Moore (Bocconi University) and colleagues, published in PLOS ONE, documents. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Goal conflict linked to psychological distress
(University of Exeter) Being torn about which personal goals to pursue is associated with symptoms of psychological distress, new research shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New platform for analyzing global trade in the last two centuries
(Universidad Carlos III de Madrid) Researchers for the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), in collaboration with the University of Pisa (Italy), have created an interactive geo-referenced database which is able to analyse global trade in the last two centuries. Thanks to this new platform it is possible to more accurately assign a date to the first economic globalisation, which occurred much earlier than previously thought: in the 1830s. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Deforestation-free' palm oil not as simple as it sounds
(Imperial College London) Genuinely 'deforestation-free' palm oil products are problematic to guarantee, according to a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

$2.3 million grant will fund research on oxytocin neurons and social behavior
(Penn State) A team of Penn State researchers is planning to create a new map of the brain that will establish a neural circuit diagram of oxytocin, a compound often associated with affection and emotional behavior. Researchers hope the map will give them insight into how oxytocin in the brain drives social behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

USTC reveals the mechanism how moderate sunlight exposure improves learning and memory
(University of Science and Technology of China) USTC researchers have shed new lights on the correlation between sunlight exposure and related neurobehaviors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Professor Rodney S. Ruoff wins James C. McGroddy prize
(Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)) A professor, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has been awarded the James C. McGroddy Prize for New Materials by the American Physical Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UNIST wins first place in digital curling tournament
(Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)) A research team, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) was awarded first place in the 2018 GAT Curling Competition in Japan. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UNIST's design school recognized worldwide
(Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)) A design team, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has been honored with 2018 iF Design Award. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rotten teeth health warning on sugary drinks could deter buyers
Researchers find inclination to buy sugary drinks reduces with graphic tooth decay warningGraphic health warnings like those on cigarette packets, showing rows of rotten teeth on cans of cola and other sugary drinks, could deter some young adults from buying them, a study has shown.Sugary drinks are blamed for fuelling the obesity epidemic, but in spite of the large quantities of sugar they contain – nine teaspoons in a can of Coca Cola – they do not carry a red traffic-light warning, which is voluntary in the UK. Sugar taxes, like thatrecently introduced in the UK, may reduce sales, but obesity experts believe...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Sugar Obesity Food & drink industry Health Business Society UK news Diabetes Source Type: news