Climate change making storms like Idai more severe, say experts
Destructive power of storms likely to increase in future as world warms upThe climate crisis that is drivingsea level rises and moreextreme rainfall is making deadly storms like the one thathit southern Africa more severe, according to experts.Cyclone Idai, the tropical storm that ravagedMozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe, has been described as theworst weather-related disaster to hit the southern hemisphere, and the UN says more than 2 million people have been affected. Storm-surge floods of up to six metres have caused widespread devastation.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Matthew Taylor Tags: Natural disasters and extreme weather Climate change Mozambique Malawi Zimbabwe Africa World news Environment Science Source Type: news

Sweetened Drinks Linked to Higher Mortality Risk
While sugary beverages seem to be the worst offenders, artificially sweetened drinks might also associated with health problems, an observational study suggests. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 19, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Chemical Company Agrees To Stop Force-Feeding Beagles With Fungicide
Corteva Agriscience said it will “make every effort to rehome the animals” after a Humane Society undercover investigation revealed sickening practices. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 19, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Therapy on the couch, plus the London book fair – books podcast
On this week ’s show, Claire and Sian meet up at London book fair to discuss the trends and biggest books announced for 2019 and 2020. Then they sit down with neuropsychologist AK Benjamin and novelist Anthony Good, who have written two very different books turning the tables on therapy. Benjamin’s genre-bus ting take on mental health, Let Me Not Be Mad, puts the author centre stage, while Good’s Kill [redacted] is a thriller in which a man grieving the murder of his wife attempts to justify his right to revenge through letters to his therapist.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Sian Cain and Claire Armitstead. Produced by Susannah Tresilian Tags: Books Health & wellbeing London book fair Publishing Culture Fiction Health, mind and body books Mental health Psychiatry Psychology Booker International prize Fiction in translation Awards and prizes Life and style Society Source Type: news

Wyatt Technology Launches All New Multi-Angle Light Scattering Instruments
Wyatt Technology, the world leader in instrumentation for absolute macromolecular and nanoparticle characterization, announces the launch of its next-generation multi-angle light scattering (MALS),... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 19, 2019 Category: Science Tags: The Scientist The Marketplace Source Type: news

Mary Anning biopic director defends film's lesbian romance storyline
Kate Winslet picture about renowned fossil hunter had been criticised by relatives for ‘unconfirmed’ portrait of her sexualityThe director of a new biopic about the celebrated fossil hunter Mary Anning has defended his film after criticism of its lesbian romance storyline.Ammonite, which stars Kate Winslet and Saoirse Ronan, recently began filming in Lyme Regis, the coastal town in Dorset where Anning lived in the early 19th century. Anning never married and is not known to have had any direct descendants, but a report in the Telegraph suggested her distant relatives were at odds over the film ’s central ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Pulver Tags: Film Kate Winslet Saoirse Ronan Fossils Biology Culture Evolution Science Sexuality Society Source Type: news

NAS Member Is First Woman to Win the Abel Prize
The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters will award the Abel Prize in Mathematics for 2019 to Karen Keskulla Uhlenbeck of the University of Texas at Austin“for her pioneering achievements in geometric partial differential equations, gauge theory, and integrable systems, and for the fundamental impact of her work on analysis, geometry, and mathematical physics.” Established in 2002, the Abel Prize recognizes contributions to the field of mathematics that are of extraordinary depth and influence. The prize amount is NOK 6 million. Visit Abelprize.no for more information on the prize. (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - March 19, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Federal Science and Engineering Obligations to Academic Institutions Increase 2%; Support to HBCUs Declines 17%
In FY 2017, federal agencies obligated $32.4 billion to institutions of higher education in support of science and engineering (S&E), up 2% from the $31.6 billion obligated in FY 2016. Funding for research and development to universities and colleges increased 4% to $29.8 billion. Meanwhile, total S&E support to historically black colleges and universities declined for the third year in a row, to $308 million, down 17% from FY 2016. Data are from the FY 2017 Survey of Federal Science and Engineering Support to Universities, Colleges, and Nonprofit Institutions, conducted by the National Center for Science and Engin...
Source: NSF - Statistics on U.S. Science and Engineering Resources - March 19, 2019 Category: Statistics Source Type: news

Federal Science and Engineering Support to Universities, Colleges, and Nonprofit Institutions: Fiscal Year 2017
Tables present FY 2017 data on federal obligations to academic and nonprofit institutions for science and engineering research and development. Data include type of activity and trends, as well as ranking by state, agency, and individual institution. Data are from the Survey of Federal Science and Engineering Support to Universities, Colleges, and Nonprofit Institutions by the National Center for Science and Engineering within the National Science Foundation. (Source: NSF - Statistics on U.S. Science and Engineering Resources)
Source: NSF - Statistics on U.S. Science and Engineering Resources - March 19, 2019 Category: Statistics Source Type: news

Does Sharing the Womb with a Brother Affect Girls?
A study links having a male twin with women’s educational, financial, and childbearing decisions. Researchers suspect prenatal exposure to testosterone may play a role. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 19, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

New study reveals the importance of health literacy and patient advocacy for wound healing
  When patients actively collaborate with physicians during their wound care process, the results are favorable for everyone involved. With open doctor-patient communication, physicians consider patient concerns and preferences and are mindful of carefully explaining treatment procedures. Doing so increases patient understanding and treatment adherence, and ultimately, drives positive outcomes. While there is enough evidence to suggest that patient-centered care is essential to wound healing, many patients lack the knowledge and support to be fully involved. A recent study conducted by Healogics Wound S...
Source: Advanced Tissue - March 19, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: AdvancedTissue Tags: Wound Care Wound healing Source Type: news

Weirdly shaped, very dark: Ultima Thule is revealing the outer solar system ’s secrets
NASA ’s New Horizons spacecraft successfully flew past the most distant world ever explored by humans on New Year’s Day. Now, a clearer picture of the 22-mile-long object known as Ultima Thule is beginning to take shape — and it has scientists baffled.“We’ve never seen anything like this,” said... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Merck to collaborate with GenScript to accelerate cell and gene therapy industrialization in China
Merck, a leading science and technology company, today announced the signing of a non-binding Memorandum of Understanding with Chinese biotech company GenScript for a strategic alliance focusing on plasmid and viral vector manufacturing. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - March 19, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Merck Group Business and Industry Source Type: news

Marcelo Gleiser Wins Templeton Prize For Quest To Confront 'Mystery Of Who We Are'
The prestigious award comes with nearly $1.5 million in winnings. The physicist, who teaches at Dartmouth and has written for NPR, says he's driven by the "many questions we still have no clue about."(Image credit: Eli Burakian/Dartmouth College) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Colin Dwyer Source Type: news

Massive U.S. Machines That Hunt For Ripples In Space-Time Just Got An Upgrade
The twin sites in the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory are about to go back online. New hardware should make them able to sense more colliding black holes and other cosmic events.(Image credit: Caltech/MIT/LIGO Lab) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Human Brainwaves' "Hum" Responds to Changes in the Magnetic Field
A study of people ’s brainwaves hints at their unconscious ability to perceive the Earth’s magnetic field. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 19, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Image of the Day: Organ Crosstalk
Zooming in on the ovarioles of Drosophila could reveal links between muscles, nutrition, and the development of eggs. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 19, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Image of the Day Source Type: news

President Trump Proposes Large Budget Cuts for Science
The White House released the President’s Budget Request for fiscal year (FY) 2020 on March 11, 2019, proposing deep cuts to science funding for the third consecutive year. The proposal calls for significant cuts to many federal science agencies, including the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The $4.7 trillion FY 2020 budget framework includes $1.3 trillion in discretionary spending and provides $543 billion (-5 percent) for nondefense discretionary spending, which is the source for ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - March 19, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

USGS Slated for Restructuring, 16 percent Budget Cut
Under President Trump’s budget plan for fiscal year (FY) 2020, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) would be funded at $983.5 million, a 17 percent cut from the FY 2019 level. The budget proposes to consolidate the agency’s seven mission areas into five new mission areas to reflect “stakeholder-focused realignment of program priorities.” The five new mission areas would be: Ecosystems, Energy and Mineral Resources, Natural Hazards, Water Resources, and Core Science Systems. Programs formerly under the Environmental Health area would be moved into the Ecosystems and Water Resources areas and p...
Source: Public Policy Reports - March 19, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

White House Proposes 31 Percent Cut to EPA
The White House has proposed a $6.1 billion for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for fiscal year (FY) 2020, a 31 percent cut from the agency’s FY 2019 budget of $8.8 billion. The Administration had proposed drastic cuts to EPA’s budget in FY 2018 and FY 2019 as well, which Congress rejected both times. The plan summary states that the funding priorities will be “reviewing and revising regulations, improving the permitting process, and enhancing collaboration with state, tribal and federal partners.” The agency stated that the proposal “maintains EPA’s focus on its core mis...
Source: Public Policy Reports - March 19, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

AIBS House Testimony: Restore Funding for Interior and Environment Science
The American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) has provided testimony to the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies regarding FY 2020 funding for biological research programs within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Smithsonian Institution. An excerpt from the testimony: “We encourage Congress to provide the USGS with $1.2 billion in FY 2020 and at least $234 million for the Ecosystems mission area within USGS. We further request that Congress provide EPA Science and Technology with at least...
Source: Public Policy Reports - March 19, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Short Takes
Democratic lawmakers in the Senate have introduced a bill to block the White House's plan to establish an "adversarial" panel to reassess the government's analysis of climate science and examine whether climate change impacts national security. The legislation would bar any funding for the proposed science review panel led by known climate skeptic William Happer. The bill is led by Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY), Armed Services Ranking Member Jack Reed (D-RI), and Environment and Public Works Ranking Member Tom Carper (D-DE), and co-sponsored by 13 other Senators. The bill follows a letter from 58 former in...
Source: Public Policy Reports - March 19, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Become an Advocate for Science: Join the AIBS Legislative Action Center
Quick, free, easy, effective, impactful! Join the AIBS Legislative Action Center. The Legislative Action Center is a one-stop shop for learning about and influencing science policy. Through the website, users can contact elected officials and sign-up to interact with lawmakers. The website offers tools and resources to inform researchers about recent policy developments. The site also announces opportunities to serve on federal advisory boards and to comment on federal regulations. This new tool is made possible through contributions from the Society for the Study of Evolution and the Botanical Society of America. AIBS an...
Source: Public Policy Reports - March 19, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Preventing liver steatosis with five-flavor fruit
(Natural News) A team of researchers from Korea Food Research Institute and the University of Science & Technology in South Korea suggests that five-flavor fruit (Schisandra chinensis) can be used as a therapeutic agent for the prevention of steatosis or fatty liver. The researchers assessed the effects of five-flavor fruit extract on fatty liver in... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

National Science Foundation presents the President’s FY 2020 budget request
Today, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) released details of the President's Fiscal Year (FY) 2020 Budget Request to Congress, which includes a proposed level of funding for the National Science Foundation (NSF). Detailed information will be available on NSF's website. NSF Director France Córdova issued the following statement: Under the President's FY2020 budget request, NSF will ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=298028&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - March 19, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Pole position: human body might be able to pick up on Earth's magnetic field
Scientists say there are signs of humans having a subconscious magnetic senseIt sounds like a power to be boasted of by the X-Men, but researchers say humans might have the ability to pick up on Earth ’s magnetic field.Many animals, from pigeons to turtles, use it to navigate, while research has shown cattle prefer to align themselves with the field when standing in, well, a field. Even dogs make use of it –albeit when defecating.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Science Neuroscience UK news World news Animals US news Source Type: news

Hot topics at Experimental Biology in Orlando, April 6-9
(Experimental Biology) Want to find out how scientists are applying CRISPR gene-editing technology, learn about today's most promising avenues for fighting chronic diseases or explore how scientists are grappling with inequities in research? The Experimental Biology (EB) 2019 meeting is your source for the latest research and discussion on today's hot topics in science and medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study suggests why some young adults may be more likely to engage in unsafe sex
(Taylor& Francis Group) Findings may contribute to improved education and preventive efforts to help control the spread of sexually transmitted infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dartmouth's Marcelo Gleiser wins 2019 Templeton Prize
(Dartmouth College) Marcelo Gleiser, the Appleton Professor of Natural Philosophy and a professor of physics and astronomy at Dartmouth, has been awarded the 2019 Templeton Prize. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

First Anatolian farmers were local hunter-gatherers that adopted agriculture
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) An international team has analyzed eight prehistoric individuals, including the first genome-wide data from a 15,000-year-old Anatolian hunter-gatherer, and found that the first Anatolian farmers were direct descendants of local hunter-gatherers. These findings provide support for archaeological evidence that farming was adopted and developed by local hunter-gatherers, rather than being introduced by a large movement of people from another area. Interestingly, the study also indicates a pattern of genetic interactions with neighboring groups. (Source: EurekAlert! - So...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Meditation enhances social-emotional learning in middle school students
(Center for Wellness and Achievement in Education) Middle school students practicing meditation as part of a school Quiet Time program had significant improvements in social-emotional competencies and psychological distress, according to a new study published in Education. This is the first study to evaluate effects of the Quiet Time program on teacher-rated social-emotional learning in middle school students. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Health insurance associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease among aging immigrants
(New York University) Aging immigrants' risk for cardiovascular disease may be heightened by their lack of health insurance, particularly among those who recently arrived in the United States, finds a study led by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. The findings are published in the Journal of Nursing Scholarship. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Meal kits and recipe tastings increase healthy food selections among food pantry clients
(UConn Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity) Food pantry clients are more likely to select nutrient dense products when they are arranged with all ingredients needed to make a meal. These findings can help food pantries maximize the nutritional quality of food available and improve the diets of their clients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A nutty solution for improving brain health
(University of South Australia) Long-term, high nut consumption could be the key to better cognitive health in older people according to new research from the University of South Australia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Human diet changes influenced consonant prevalence distribution in languages
(Kazan Federal University) Labiodental sounds, such as F and V, have been known to be rarely met in hunter-gatherer languages. To understand how this has occurred, the authors undertook a massive statistical inquiry. 2,400 languages were analyzed, and a biomechanical model of mouth and lip movements was created. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

GARDP and Evotec announce new partnership to discover novel antibiotics
(Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative) The Global Antibiotic Research and Development Partnership (GARDP) and Evotec AG have formed a new strategic public-private partnership to tackle the growing threat of antimicrobial resistance. By joining forces, Evotec and GARDP will leverage their capabilities and networks to address drug-resistant bacterial infections. This includes bringing together GARDP's clinical expertise and sustainable access commitment with Evotec's leading drug discovery platform, expertise in medicinal chemistry and pharmacology as well as its world-leading collection of bacterial pathogens. (Source: E...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A study analyzes pre-installed software on Android devices and its privacy risks for users
(IMDEA Networks Institute) A study that encompasses 82,000 pre-installed apps in more than 1,700 devices manufactured by 214 brands, reveals the existence of a complex ecosystem of manufacturers, mobile operators, app developers and providers, with a wide network of relationships between them. This includes specialized organizations in user monitoring and tracking and in providing Internet advertising. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When development and conservation clash in the Serengeti
(University of Copenhagen) New or upgraded roads in the Greater Serengeti Ecosystem around Serengeti National Park will not reduce growing pressure on the ecosystem, a study shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

World's largest study to monitor air quality exposure of 250 children
(King's College London) A new study by King's scientists will monitor air quality exposure of 250 children on their way to school and in the classroom. The announcement was made today at Haimo Primary School in Greenwich by the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, who is funding the study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Schedule announced for Nutrition 2019
(American Society for Nutrition) Nutrition 2019, the flagship meeting of the American Society for Nutrition, will be held June 8-11, 2019 at the Baltimore Convention Center. The meeting will feature new research findings and panel discussions addressing hot topics in nutrition science, clinical practice and policy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New peer-reviewed journal Death Research: The Last Frontier announced
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Mary Ann Liebert Inc. publishers announces the launch of Death Research: The Last Frontier, a bold new peer-reviewed journal dedicated to the science, technology, applications, and physical aspects of death and postmortem research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Insectageddon' is 'alarmist by bad design': Scientists point out the study's major flaws
(Pensoft Publishers) Amidst worldwide talks about 'Insectageddon': the extinction of 40 percent of the world's insects, according to a recent scientific review, a response was published in the open-access journal Rethinking Ecology. Its authors point out major flaws in the earlier study: query- and geographically biased summaries; mismatch between objectives and cited literature; and misuse of existing conservation data. Instead of serving as a wake-up call, those would rather compromise the credibility of conservation science, they warn. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UMass Amherst food scientist receives Young Scientist Research Award
(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) Guodong Zhang, assistant professor of food science at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, is being honored with the 2019 Young Scientist Research Award from the American Oil Chemists' Society (AOCS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 19, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New model IDs primate species with potential to spread Zika in the Americas
(Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies) In the Americas, primate species likely to harbor Zika -- and potentially transmit the virus -- are common, abundant, and often live near people. So reports a new study published today in Epidemics. Findings are based on an innovative model developed by a collaborative team of researchers from Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies and IBM Research through its Science for Social Good initiative. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 19, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Older people less anxious, more active and less likely to fall in retirement communities
(Lancaster University) A new report shows older people benefit from improved physical and mental health in retirement communities, resulting in cost savings to the NHS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Trigger warnings do little to reduce people's distress, research shows
(Association for Psychological Science) Trigger warnings that alert people to potentially sensitive content are increasingly popular, especially on college campuses, but research suggests that they have minimal impact on how people actually respond to content. The findings are published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chicago's Large Lot Program sowing change in inner-city communities
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Chicago's Large Lot Program is promoting positive change in inner-city neighborhoods by enabling residents to buy and repurpose vacant lots that attracted crime and other problems, a new study by University of Illinois researchers and the USDA Forest Service. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Experts to support global companies against cyber threats
(University College London) A consortium of UK cyber security experts including UCL academics is to support global businesses to tackle online threats and protect themselves from cybercrime.The Cyber Readiness for Boards project, which is jointly funded by the National Cyber Security Centre and the Lloyd's Register Foundation, has launched to explore the factors shaping UK board decisions around cyber risk and develop interventions to provide guidance and support. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Data-driven modeling and estimation of lithium-ion battery properties
(Data Science Institute at Columbia) Two Columbia professors affiliated with the Data Science Institute are developing a machine-learning model that can more accurately estimate a Li-Ion battery's charge level. Current estimates of a battery's state of charge have error rates of five percent, whereas this team's model aims for an error rate of one percent. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study suggests dogs bring people closer, help humans get along better
(Natural News) Have you heard about the new trend among millennials to bring their furry companion to work to promote positive work environments? It is actually more than just a trend; it’s science. Researchers at Central Michigan University found that having a dog in the office may increase productivity, workplace happiness, and trust among group... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news