Study Confirms Central Role of Brain ’s Support Cells in Huntington’s, Points to New Therapies
New research gives scientists a clearer picture of what is happening in the brains of people with Huntington ’s disease and lays out a potential path for treatment. The study, which appears today in the journal Cell Stem Cell, shows that support cells in the brain are key contributors to the disease. (Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases)
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - December 14, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: University of Rochester Medical Center Source Type: news

Scientists discover genetic ‘missing links’ underlying mechanism of psychiatric diseases
Since the completion of the groundbreaking Human Genome Project in 2003, researchers have discovered changes to hundreds of parts of DNA, called genetic variants, that are associated with autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia and other psychiatric diseases. Now, a new, large-scale study has linked many of those changes in DNA to their molecular effects in the brain, revealing for the first time mechanisms behind those diseases.In 10 studies published today in  Science and two related journals, UCLA researchers and collaborators from more than a dozen other institutions around the world provide a comprehensive data s...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 14, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New Brain Research Sheds Light On Mental Illness
Researchers looked at specific genes and their regulatory networks to learn more about changes in the brain as it develops, how that varies between individuals, and the causes of certain mental disorders. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - December 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Off-Label Drug Research Generates'Medical Uncertainty'Off-Label Drug Research Generates'Medical Uncertainty '
Research that explores/supports off-label use of pregabalin and other medications may be misleading if early promising results are not subsequently validated, investigators suggest in a new review.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Yum and Yuck: The Psychology Of What We Eat...And What We Spit Out
This week on the Hidden Brain radio show, we dig into the culture and psychology that determines the foods that make us salivate and the scents that make us squirm. (Image credit: Parth Shah) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Shankar Vedantam Source Type: news

This neurosurgeon thinks 'disempowered' doctors need more of a voice
Dr. Fred Williams, a neurosurgeon, recently became president of the Oregon Medical Association. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 13, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

This neurosurgeon thinks 'disempowered' doctors need more of a voice
Dr. Fred Williams, a neurosurgeon, recently became president of the Oregon Medical Association. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 13, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

Mental Health, Sleep Deprivation and Career Stress in EMS and Fire
The human brain is a marvelous, yet complicated system. Researchers spend entire careers studying what makes the brain act or react to certain experiences. A mental health issue stemming from life’s experiences has culturally been seen as a sign of weakness, but actually is part of a very complex architecture that’s unique from person to person. In order to gain an understanding of how stress plays a role in the lives of first responders, we need to start answering some hard questions: What leads to burn-out? What’s associated with PTSD? How is lack of sleep affecting the mental health states of first res...
Source: JEMS Operations - December 13, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Morgan K. Anderson, MPH Tags: Exclusive Articles Resiliency Operations Source Type: news

Mapping the Brain ’ s Genetic Landscape
Scientists have taken a step toward building a computer model of the brain ’ s genome, one that may help clarify the genetic roots of schizophrenia, autism and other disorders. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: BENEDICT CAREY Tags: Mental Health and Disorders Brain Schizophrenia Genetics and Heredity Computers and the Internet Research Autism National Institute of Mental Health Science (Journal) Source Type: news

Crosswords and sudoku may not stop mental decline
(Reuters Health) - - Mental engagement through problem-solving games like crossword puzzles, sudoku and brain teasers may not offset cognitive losses due to age-related dementia, a new study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

In the developing brain, scientists find roots of neuropsychiatric diseases
Yale researchers are part of a multi-institutional team that has just completed the most comprehensive genomic analysis of the human brain ever undertaken. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - December 13, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Cell injections, magnetic chairs and brain implants are among Silicon Valley's ideas for IMMORTALITY
Writing for the Conversation, James Horton and Nicholas Priest from the University of Bath look at whether Silicon Valley's quest for immortality is worth its worrying sacrifices (stock). (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Neanderthal genes could explain the shape of our skulls, study finds
Humans have unusually globular (or round) skulls and brains compared to our ancient ancestors -- including our closest extinct cousins the Neanderthals -- and a new study provides a possible explanation as to why. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - December 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medication Errors Resulting in Death Most Common in Elderly
Most common medication error category was omitted medicine or ingredient (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - December 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Cardiology, Dermatology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Infections, AIDS, Internal Medicine, Allergy, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Nursing, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, ENT, Source Type: news

Dementia Risk Up in Women With Military - Linked Risk Factors
Risk for developing dementia higher for women with TBI, PTSD, and depression (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - December 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Gynecology, Neurology, Psychiatry, Geriatrics, Journal, Source Type: news

Neurosurgery could spread protein linked to Alzheimer's, study finds
Doctors should decontaminate tools more thoroughly as a precaution, say researchersSurgical instruments used in brain operations should be treated to ensure they are not contaminated with proteins linked to Alzheimer ’s disease, according to scientists who found evidence that they may be spread by certain medical procedures.The researchers urged doctors to decontaminate neurosurgical tools more thoroughly as a precautionary measure to reduce the potential risk of spreading abnormal proteins known to build up in the brains of Alzheimer ’s patients.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Alzheimer's Health Neuroscience Medical research Source Type: news

How much do YOU know about meningitis?
The Bristol-based Meningitis Research Foundation has released a quiz to test people's knowledge of the deadly brain infection amid fears of a spike in cases over winter. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High Premature Death Rate for Psychogenic Seizures Troubling High Premature Death Rate for Psychogenic Seizures Troubling
Patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures die at a rate similar to those with epilepsy, which is more than double that of the average population.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

There May Be a Surprising Link Between Depression and Concussions in Kids Who Play Football
For years, studies have found that depression is an all-too-common symptom of concussions. Youth athletes, college athletes and retired NFL players who have suffered brain injuries are all at increased risk of mental illness. A new study, published in The Journal of Pediatrics, flips the relationship between concussions and depression, and asks a different question: Are kids who have depression more at risk of suffering a concussion while playing football? Indeed, according to the new research, children who have been previously diagnosed with depression had a five-fold increased risk of suffering a concussion while playing...
Source: TIME: Health - December 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sean Gregory Tags: Uncategorized Football onetime Source Type: news

Medical News Today: New brain circuit that controls anxiety found
Using genetically modified mice, scientists have uncovered a brain circuit that regulates anxiety and could be a treatment target for related disorders. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Anxiety / Stress Source Type: news

The complexity of neuroinflammation consequent to traumatic brain injury: from research evidence to potential treatments - Morganti-Kossmann MC, Semple BD, Hellewell SC, Bye N, Ziebell JM.
This review recounts the definitions and research evidence supporting the multifaceted roles of neuroinflammation in the injured brain following trauma. We summarise the literature fluctuating from the protective and detrimental properties that cytokines, ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Anger, social support, and suicide risk in U.S. military veterans - Wilks CR, Morland LA, Dillon KH, Mackintosh MA, Blakey SM, Wagner HR, Elbogen EB.
There have been considerable efforts to understand, predict, and reduce suicide among U.S. military veterans. Studies have shown that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depression (MDD), and traumatic brain injury (TBI) increase risk of suicidal b... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Childhood adversities and psychotic symptoms: the potential mediating or moderating role of neurocognition and social cognition - Mansueto G, Schruers K, Cosci F, van Os J.
This study explored the possible mediating/moderating ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Bullying victimization in typically developing and clinical high risk (CHR) adolescents: a multimodal imaging study - Vargas T, Damme KSF, Mittal VA.
BACKGROUND: Bullying has been shown to increase the risk of developing a psychotic disorder. To date, no studies have examined brain behavior relationships within the context of bullying victimization in clinical high-risk (CHR) youth, a group characterize... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Age-dependent differences in the impact of paediatric traumatic brain injury on executive functions: a prospective study using susceptibility-weighted imaging - Resch C, Anderson VA, Beauchamp MH, Crossley L, Hearps SJC, van Heugten CM, Hurks PPM, Ryan NP, Catroppa C.
Childhood and adolescence represent sensitive developmental periods for brain networks implicated in a range of complex skills, including executive functions (EF; inhibitory control, working memory, and cognitive flexibility). As a consequence, these skill... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Scientists find link between Alzheimer’s and surgery
Brain abnormalities associated with the disease could be transmitted, research shows (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - December 13, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Benefits of Medical Cannabis for Epilepsy Time Limited? Benefits of Medical Cannabis for Epilepsy Time Limited?
Patients with treatment-resistant epilepsy can develop a tolerance to cannabis-based therapy, a finding that may have implications for long-term management, new research suggests.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Benefits of Medical Cannabis for Epilepsy Time-Limited? Benefits of Medical Cannabis for Epilepsy Time-Limited?
Patients with treatment-resistant epilepsy can develop a tolerance to cannabis-based therapy, a finding that may have implications for long-term management, new research suggests.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Can Alzheimer's Be Spread? Mouse Study Hints It's Possible
THURSDAY, Dec. 13, 2018 -- A brain protein linked to Alzheimer's disease might potentially be transmitted to people during neurological procedures, a new preliminary study suggests. Genetically engineered lab mice developed amyloid-beta deposits in... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Research on Almost 2,000 Brains Brings Insight Into Mental Illness
THURSDAY, Dec. 13, 2018 -- Researchers say a massive genetic analysis of the human brain has yielded new insights into the underpinnings of psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and autism. Scientists at 15 institutions... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Dementia Risk Up in Women With Military-Linked Risk Factors
THURSDAY, Dec. 13, 2018 -- Women with military-related risk factors have an increased risk for developing dementia, according to a study published online Dec. 11 in Neurology. Kristine Yaffe, M.D., from the San Francisco Veterans Health Care System,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - December 13, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Nursery worker suffers permanent brain freeze after the vital organ slipped into her spinal cord   
Alison Stiles Johnson, 44, of Newcastle, was diagnosed with chiari malformation in December 2016 after initially dismissing her crippling headaches as a side effect of the flu jab. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers confirm excessive screen time can irreversibly harm kids’ brains
(Natural News) Digital devices and other electronics are at the top of many kids’ wish lists this holiday season. If you’re considering upgrading your teenager’s cellphone or getting your preschooler their first tablet, you might want to keep in mind the early results of a groundbreaking study that confirms many parents’ fears about the effects... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

First child in Canada undergoes deep brain stimulation for epilepsy, hospital says
A 9-year-old girl is the first child in Canada to undergo deep brain stimulation for epilepsy after years of suffering up to 150 seizures a day. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - December 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Toronto Source Type: news

AR improves operative view for robotic thyroid surgery
Researchers from South Korea have developed a technique to enhance the safety...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: AR, 3D printing make headway in patient education Virtual reality may help plan, guide glioma resection Augmented reality heightens accuracy of brain procedure Augmented reality guides orthopedic surgery SIR: Holography platform boosts reader confidence for aneurysms (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - December 13, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Four studies by Mount Sinai investigators featured in upcoming special issue of Science
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) Publications reflect Mount Sinai Health System's investment in the exploration of brain genome organization and function. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Neuroscientists uncover sensory switches controlling infanticide and parental behavior
(Sainsbury Wellcome Centre) Many species of mammals have evolved what appear to be paradoxical behaviors towards their young. Like humans, most exhibit nurturing, protective behaviors, and in some circumstances even act as surrogate parents. However, virgin males often engage in infanticide as a strategy to propagate their own genes. How are these conflicting social behaviors controlled? (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In the developing brain, scientists find roots of neuropsychiatric diseases
(Yale University) The most comprehensive genomic analysis of the human brain ever undertaken has revealed new insights into the changes it undergoes through development, how it varies among individuals, and the roots of neuropsychiatric illnesses such as autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

USC researchers discover abundant source for neuronal cells
(University of Southern California) USC researchers seeking a way to study genetic activity associated with psychiatric disorders have discovered an abundant source of human cells -- the nose. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Lancet Neurology: Cannabis-based drug in combination with other anti-spasticity
(The Lancet) Oral spray containing two compounds derived from the cannabis plant reduced spasticity compared with placebo in patients already taking anti-spasticity drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers uncover molecular mechanisms linked to autism and schizophrenia
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) Two UCLA-led studies published in Science have linked DNA changes to their molecular effects in the brain, uncovering new mechanisms for psychiatric diseases. The findings provide a roadmap for developing a new generation of therapies for conditions like autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers identify widespread brain alterations in children with callousness
(Elsevier) Children with elevated levels of callous traits--such as a lack of remorse and disregard for other people's feelings--show widespread differences in brain structure compared with children with lower levels of the traits, according to a new study published in Biological Psychiatry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study investigates treatments for prurigo nodularis
(George Washington University) A team from the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences found emerging treatments, such as neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists, were the most promising against prurigo nodularis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Parents' brain activity 'echoes' their infant's brain activity when they play together
(PLOS) Research shows for the first time that when adults are engaged in joint play together with their infant, the parents' brains show bursts of high-frequency activity, which are linked to their baby's attention patterns and not their own. The study publishes December 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology and was conducted by Dr Sam Wass of the University of East London in collaboration with Dr Victoria Leong (Cambridge University and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore) and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins researchers find the cause of and cure for brain injury associated with gut condition
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Using a mouse model of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have uncovered the molecular causes of the condition and its associated brain injury. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Watching brain cells fire
(Stanford University) Brain scientists have plenty of ways to track the activity of individual neurons in the brain, but they're all invasive. Now, Stanford researchers have found a way to literally watch neurons fire -- no electrodes or chemical modifications required. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UA chemical biologists unearth cause of a rare brain disorder
(University of Arizona Health Sciences) In pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1b, two key biological structures are blocked from binding to one another -- which ultimately stunts critical brain growth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New genetic clues to early-onset form of dementia
(Washington University School of Medicine) In an effort to better understand frontotemporal dementia, an international team of researchers, led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has found that a lone mutation in a single gene that causes an inherited form of the disorder makes it harder for neurons in the brain to communicate with one another, leading to neurodegeneration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Probiotics could help millions of patients suffering from bipolar disorder
(American College of Neuropsychopharmacology) About 3 million people in the US are diagnosed every year with bipolar disorder, a psychiatric condition characterized by dramatic shifts in mood from depression to mania. Currently, the standard treatment includes a combination of psychotherapy and prescription medications such as mood stabilizers and antipsychotics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Vaccine could help address the opioid epidemic
(American College of Neuropsychopharmacology) Synthetic psychoactive drugs have become a serious public health threat in recent years. This is particularly true of the fentanyls, a large family of synthetic opioids, which can be up to 10,000 times more potent than morphine. Synthetic opioids are highly addictive and, because of their potency, often prove fatal: among the roughly 72,000 drug overdose deaths in the US in 2017, some 30,000 were related to synthetic opioids. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news