The role of neck musculature in traumatic brain injuries in older adults: implications from sports medicine - Wood TA, Morrison S, Sosnoff JJ.
Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are common and serious injuries to older adults. The majority of TBIs in older adults are sustained when the head impacts the ground or other surface during a fall. While several non-modifiable risk factors have been identif... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Monarch Becomes the 1st FDA-Cleared Device for ADHD
The Monarch external Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation (eTNS) System made history last week after it became the first device to win a nod from FDA to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It should be noted the technology has had CE mark since 2015. Monarch was developed by NeuroSigma and is indicated to help treat 7 to 12-year-olds suffering from ADHD. What makes this de novo clearance from FDA so significant is that typically pharmaceutical solutions are used to treat patients suffering from the neurological disorder. Monarch is about the size of a cellphone. The device generates a low-level electrical pulse ...
Source: MDDI - April 22, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

Neurelis Announces Completion of Senior Management Team Buildout to Support the Anticipated Commercial Launch of VALTOCO(TM)
Neurelis' lead product candidate for seizures, VALTOCO™ (diazepam nasal spray), currently under FDA review Company's team members are all seasoned pharmaceutical industry executives with vast experience in CNS and epilepsy SAN DIEGO, April 22, 2019 -... Biopharmaceuticals, Drug Delivery, Neurology, Personnel Neurelis, VALTOCO, diazepam, epilepsy (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - April 22, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Deaf children across England able to HEAR again thanks to new NHS op
DEAF children across England are being given the power of hearing, thanks to pioneering brain surgery available on the NHS. Under-fives who struggle to use conventional hearing aids or implants because their cochlear or auditory nerves have failed to develop will be eligible for auditory brainstem implants . (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Objective classification of mTBI using machine learning on a combination of frontopolar electroencephalography measurements and self-reported symptoms - McNerney MW, Hobday T, Cole B, Ganong R, Winans N, Matthews D, Hood J, Lane S.
BACKGROUND: The reliable diagnosis of a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a pervasive problem in sports and in the military. The frequency and severity of each occurrence, while difficult to quantify, may impact long term cognitive function and quality... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

The incidence and management of moderate to severe head injury - Maegele M, Lefering R, Sakowitz O, Kopp MA, Schwab JM, Steudel WI, Unterberg A, Hoffmann R, Uhl E, Marzi I.
BACKGROUND: The comprehensive expansion of the Trauma Register of the German Trauma Society (Deutsche Gesellschaft f ür Unfallchirurgie; TR-DGU) now enables, for the first time, studies on traumatic brain injury (TBI) with special attention to care process... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: TBI Source Type: news

A review of the role of auditory evoked potentials in mild traumatic brain injury assessment - Washnik NJ, Anjum J, Lundgren K, Phillips S.
Around 75% to 90% of people who experience a traumatic brain injury (TBI) are classified as having a mild TBI (mTBI). The term mTBI is synonymous with concussion or mild head injury (MHI) and is characterized by symptoms of headache, nausea, dizziness, and... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Backward walking observational training improves gait ability in patients with chronic stroke: randomised controlled pilot study - Moon Y, Bae Y.
Backward walking has a positive effect on gait ability. Action observational training is an effective treatment method for stroke neurological disorders. This randomised comparator-controlled pilot study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of backward walkin... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Multi-cue event information fusion for pedestrian detection with neuromorphic vision sensors - Chen G, Cao H, Ye C, Zhang Z, Liu X, Mo X, Qu Z, Conradt J, R öhrbein F, Knoll A.
Neuromorphic vision sensors are bio-inspired cameras that naturally capture the dynamics of a scene with ultra-low latency, filtering out redundant information with low power consumption. Few works are addressing the object detection with this sensor. In t... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Prevention of traumatic brain injury-related death using the brain-gut axis - Khan U, Ding Y.
[Abstract unavailable] Language: en... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

FDA Approves First Medical Device To Treat ADHD In Children
(CNN) — The first medical device to treat childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, was OK’d Friday by the US Food and Drug Administration. Designated for children ages 7 to 12 who are not currently on medication for the disorder, the device delivers a low-level electrical pulse to the parts of the brain responsible for ADHD symptoms. “This new device offers a safe, non-drug option for treatment of ADHD in pediatric patients through the use of mild nerve stimulation, a first of its kind,” Carlos Peña, director of the Division of Neurological and Physical Medicine Devices in...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN ADHD Source Type: news

Racial Variation in Stroke Risk Among Women by Risk Factors Racial Variation in Stroke Risk Among Women by Risk Factors
Do stroke risk factors influence stroke risk in women differently across racial groups?Stroke (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Journal Article Source Type: news

Image of the Day: Multicolor Brain
A newly developed imaging technology visualizes entire mouse brains in two and three dimensions using multicolor fluorescence microscopy. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 22, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Image of the Day Source Type: news

The Woman Who Nearly Died Ten Times To Defeat Depression
A new book tells the story of the extreme lengths one woman went to overcome her treatment-resistant depression – participating in an experimental therapy that brought her to near-brain death multiple times. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - April 22, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: David DiSalvo, Contributor Source Type: news

New insight into how obesity, insulin resistance can impair cognition
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) Obesity can break down our protective blood brain barrier resulting in problems with learning and memory, scientists report. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FEFU scientists are developing brand-new method to heal brain cancer
(Far Eastern Federal University) Scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) in cooperation with colleagues from Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center (Moscow), Switzerland, and Sweden for the first time studied proteins, which constitute WNT signaling pathway of the cancer stem cells of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM CD133+ CSCs), one of the most aggressive brain tumors. Researchers revealed a number of proteins, which are potential targets to attack during complex antitumor therapy. A related article was published in Oncology Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Neurobiology and Chemistry of Pain and Addiction Symposium
(University of Arizona Health Sciences) April 24, 2019 in Tucson, Arizona: World-renowned neurobiologists and leaders in chemistry will discuss the brain circuits underlying acute and chronic pain, reward, motivation and addiction, as well as the development of chemical probes as potential novel therapies. The symposium is co-sponsored by the University of Arizona College of Medicine -- Tucson Department of Pharmacology and Interim Dean Irving Kron, M.D. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brains of blind people adapt to sharpen sense of hearing, study shows
(University of Washington) Research from the University of Washington uses functional MRI to identify two differences in the brains of blind individuals -- differences that might be responsible for their abilities to make better use of auditory information. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain regions linked to memory and emotion help humans navigate smell
(University of Pennsylvania) Using varying combinations of banana and pine scents, University of Pennsylvania professor Jay Gottfried discovered that three key brain regions help humans navigate from one odor to the next. The work points to the existence of a grid-like hexagonal architecture in the olfactory brain, similar to mapping configurations previously found to support spatial navigation in animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How blindness shapes sound processing
(Society for Neuroscience) Adults who lost their vision at an early age have more refined auditory cortex responses to simple sounds than sighted individuals, according to new neuroimaging research published in JNeurosci. The study is among the first to investigate the effects of early blindness on this brain region, which may contribute to superior hearing in the blind. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Microglia, immune cells of the central nervous system, shown to regulate neuroinflammation
(Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary) A research team at Massachusetts Eye and Ear has shown that microglia, the immune cells of the central nervous system -- including the retina -- serve as 'gatekeepers' of neuroinflammation. Uveitis is one of the leading causes of blindness.In the study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), researchers describe for the first time a role for microglia in directing the initiation of autoimmune uveitis by orchestrating the inflammatory response within the retina. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Neuroscientists reverse some behavioral symptoms of Williams syndrome
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) In a study of mice, MIT neuroscientists have found that impaired myelination underlies the hypersociability seen in patients with Williams syndrome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hope for those with Huntington's – podcast
Robin McKie, the Observer ’s science and environment editor, discusses an innovative drug that may soon offer ways to fight Huntington’s disease, while Mark Newnham describes being diagnosed with the inherited condition. Plus: Peter Beaumont describes his trip to the Costa Rican cloud forest, at threat from climate chang eForMark Newnham and thousands of others who havebeen told they have inherited Huntington ’s disease, the future would appear bleak, a prospect of inexorable physical and mental decline. But scientists believe they areclosing in on a treatment to control its worst effects.Anushka Asthana ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Anushka Asthana with Robin McKie, Mark Newnham and Peter Beaumont, produced by Amy Walker, Brenna Daldorph, Ammar Kalia, Elizabeth Cassin and Eloise Stevens; executive producers Phil Maynard and Nicole Jackson Tags: Huntington's disease Science Climate change Costa Rica Medical research Source Type: news

Thirst regulates motivated behavior through modulation of brainwide neural population dynamics
Physiological needs produce motivational drives, such as thirst and hunger, that regulate behaviors essential to survival. Hypothalamic neurons sense these needs and must coordinate relevant brainwide neuronal activity to produce the appropriate behavior. We studied dynamics from ~24,000 neurons in 34 brain regions during thirst-motivated choice behavior in 21 mice as they consumed water and became sated. Water-predicting sensory cues elicited activity that rapidly spread throughout the brain of thirsty animals. These dynamics were gated by a brainwide mode of population activity that encoded motivational state. After sati...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Allen, W. E., Chen, M. Z., Pichamoorthy, N., Tien, R. H., Pachitariu, M., Luo, L., Deisseroth, K. Tags: Neuroscience r-articles Source Type: news

Spontaneous behaviors drive multidimensional, brainwide activity
Neuronal populations in sensory cortex produce variable responses to sensory stimuli and exhibit intricate spontaneous activity even without external sensory input. Cortical variability and spontaneous activity have been variously proposed to represent random noise, recall of prior experience, or encoding of ongoing behavioral and cognitive variables. Recording more than 10,000 neurons in mouse visual cortex, we observed that spontaneous activity reliably encoded a high-dimensional latent state, which was partially related to the mouse’s ongoing behavior and was represented not just in visual cortex but also across t...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Stringer, C., Pachitariu, M., Steinmetz, N., Reddy, C. B., Carandini, M., Harris, K. D. Tags: Neuroscience r-articles Source Type: news

Adam Pearson neurofibromatosis: What is the genetic disorder? Signs and symptoms revealed
ADAM PEARSON is appearing on BBC ’s Pointless this afternoon, as the British actor joins hosts Alexander Armstrong and Richard Osman. Pearson has the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis, but what is it, and what are the signs and symptoms? (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: MS: High-strength MRI may predict disease progression
New research suggests that a powerful MRI scanner may help predict the progression of multiple sclerosis by analyzing cortical lesions on the brain. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Multiple Sclerosis Source Type: news

The revival of pigs ’ brains inspires hopes – and fears | Kenan Malik
Scientists at Yale may not have found an answer to eternal life but they have advanced the frontiers of neuroscienceA team of neuroscientists at Yale School of Medicine, led by Nenad Sestan, last week reported that they had managed torevive brains from pigs that had been decapitated in an abattoir four hours earlier.Well, “revive” in the sense of getting certain neurons to fire. This was no “brain in a vat” experiment. The brains were neither alive nor possessed consciousness.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Kenan Malik Tags: Neuroscience Medical research UK news Source Type: news

The profoundly deaf girl who found her voice after brain surgery
Leia was born profoundly deaf but pioneering surgery and therapy has enabled her to hear sounds. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - April 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

I tried to save my brother whose early death made me the person I am
There was no relief from grieving my brother – until I realised an important lessonWhen my older brother Jerry became ill with Aids in the 1980s, he was working as a psychologist in New York and I was living in a small cottage in Berkeley, California, with the man who is now my husband. I would phone Jerry every evening and fly in once a month to help him clean his apartment and stock up on food, as well as to discuss his treatments with his doctors and HIV researchers. On one occasion, while he was recovering from a parasitic infection that had caused lesions in his brain and given him dementia, he took my hand and ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Richard Zimler Tags: Death and dying Family Life and style Psychology Science Health & wellbeing Source Type: news

Parkinson’s disease - three of the best diet swaps to prevent symptoms
PARKINSON ’S disease symptoms include slow movement, tremors and muscle stiffness. You could lower your risk of the neurodegenerative brain condition’s signs by adding this cheap snack to your daily diet. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientific Meeting » The NIMH Director ’ s Innovation Speaker Series - Seven Years and One-Hundred MRI-Dogs
On May 2, 2019, Dr. Gregory Berns presents “ Seven Years and One-Hundred MRI-Dogs: Awake Unrestrained fMRI in Dogs Reveals Common Neurobiology and Implications for Human Health and Disease ” as part of the NIMH Director ’ s Innovation Speaker Series. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - April 20, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

FDA OKs first medical device to treat ADHD in children
The first medical device to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, was approved Friday by the Food and Drug Administration. Instead of medication, the device delivers a low-level electrical stimulation to the parts of the brain that regulate emotion, behavior and attention. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - April 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Predictors of working alliance in cognitive behaviour therapy adapted for traumatic brain injury - Zelencich L, Kazantzis N, Wong D, McKenzie D, Downing M, Ponsford J.
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) has the strongest preliminary support for treatment of depression and anxiety following traumatic brain injury (TBI). TBI associated cognitive impairments may pose an obstacle to development of a strong working alliance, o... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Program and Other Evaluations, Effectiveness Studies Source Type: news

Modelling the influence of age on neurologic outcome and quality of life one year after traumatic brain injury: a prospective multicenter cohort study - Bouzat P, Ageron FX, Thomas M, Vallot C, Hautefeuille S, Schilte C, Payen JF.
After traumatic brain injury (TBI), the relationship between age and outcome at one-year, including quality of life, has been poorly explored. The aim of our study was to describe this relationship in a cohort of TBI patients in a regional trauma system. C... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Neurotoxicity associated with traumatic brain injury, blast, chemical, heavy metal and quinoline drug exposure - Marshall TM, Dardia GP, Colvin KL, Nevin R, Macrellis J.
Chronic, excessive exposure, and accumulation of neurotoxic agents such as heavy metals (lead, mercury, cadmium), mefloquine (Lariam), and food additives such as monosodium glutamate and aspartame cause neurotoxicity and brain damage. This chemical-induced... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Effects of childhood maltreatment on social cognition and brain functional connectivity in borderline personality disorder patients - Duque-Alarc ón X, Alcalá-Lozano R, González-Olvera JJ, Garza-Villarreal EA, Pellicer F.
Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a chronic condition characterized by high levels of impulsivity, affective instability, and difficulty to establish and manage interpersonal relationships. However, little is known about its etiology and neurobiolog... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Models of sustained attention - Esterman M, Rothlein D.
Attention is not constant, but fluctuates from moment-to-moment. Multiple neurocognitive factors contribute to these fluctuations, acting to help us get 'in the zone' as well as pulling us away from this optimal and fleeting state. Models of arousal, mind ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news

Lead toxicity due to ingestion of lead-contaminated opium in a patient presenting with motor neuropathy and upper limb paresis: a case report - Mirzaei SMM, Akbari A, Mehrpour O, Zamani N.
We report a 64-year-old m... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Medical University of South Carolina graduate wins NIH Director's Early Independence Award
(Medical University of South Carolina) Jasper Heinsbroek, Ph.D., who recently received his doctorate from the Medical University of South Carolina, has been awarded the NIH Director's Early Independence Award. The award will enable him to bypass traditional postdoctoral training and begin an independent research career. His research involves identifying novel brain circuits underlying relapse in addiction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Increased Screen Time in Preschool Tied to Worse Inattention
Odds increased for reporting clinically significant externalizing problems, inattention problems (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - April 20, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Family Medicine, Neurology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Journal, Source Type: news

In Childhood Epilepsy, Scalp Spike Ripples Predict Seizure Risk Better Than Spikes In Childhood Epilepsy, Scalp Spike Ripples Predict Seizure Risk Better Than Spikes
In children with epilepsy, recorded scalp spike ripples are better than spikes at predicting seizure risk, according to new findings.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Finally, a Wearable Neuromodulation Device for Overactive Bladder
As a urogynecology surgeon, Alexandra Haessler, MD, has seen firsthand the limitations of current overactive bladder (OAB) therapies. Aside from medication, the current gold standard for OAB is Medtronic's InterStim, an implantable sacral neuromodulation device that is FDA approved for the treatment of OAB as well as chronic fecal incontinence, and non-obstructive urinary retention. Haessler told MD+DI that the InterStim device works very well but it's an expensive treatment and access is limited because only a few subspecialists in any one metropolitan area are truly qualified to deliver the therapy. The InterStim is not ...
Source: MDDI - April 19, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Business Source Type: news

National Hand Hygiene Initiative Successful in Australia
Overall hand hygiene compliance increased from 2009 to 2017; associated drop seen in HA - SAB incidence (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - April 19, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Cardiology, Dermatology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Infections, AIDS, Internal Medicine, Allergy, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Nursing, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, ENT, Source Type: news

Loan Forgiveness, Educational Debt May Affect Practice Patterns
Graduates with loan forgiveness/repayment program more likely to enter primary care fields (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - April 19, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Cardiology, Dermatology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Infections, AIDS, Internal Medicine, Allergy, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, ENT, Pathology Source Type: news

Housework could keep brain young, research suggests
Even light exertions can slow down ageing of the brain, activity-tracker data indicatesEven light activity such as household chores might help to keep the brain young, researchers say, adding to a growing body of evidence that, when it comes to exercise, every little bit helps.The findings mirror upcoming guidance from the UK chief medical officers, andexisting US guidelines, which say light activity or very short bouts of exercise are beneficial to health – even if it is just a minute or two at a time – countering the previous view that there was a threshold that must be reached before there were benefits.Cont...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Science Mental health Society World news Dementia Ageing Source Type: news

Two-and-a-half hours of exercise a week 'improves mental fitness'
Researchers from Boston University said every extra hour of exercise on top of the recommended 250-minute weekly average could wipe an extra year off someone's brain age. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brain'Pacemaker' Remodels Neural Networks to Stop Seizures Brain'Pacemaker' Remodels Neural Networks to Stop Seizures
Closed-loop brain stimulation appears to reduce focal seizures via indirect changes to neural networks over time, rather than through direct, acute suppression of ictal activity, as previously thought.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - April 19, 2019 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

E-Cigarettes by Laura Uselding, MD
Laura Uselding, MDE-cigarettes are the MOST COMMON tobacco product used by adolescents. According tothe 2018 Monitoring the Future (MTF) survey conducted by the University of Michigan, the prevalence of vaping increased by approximately 1.3 million teens from 2017 to 2018. It found that 37% of 12th graders and 10% of 8th graders reported using e-cigarettes in the last 12 months.  The use of e-cigarettes is likely putting a new generation of teens at risk of nicotine dependence. Here are some important things to know about e-cigarettes: E-cigarettes are electronic devices that heat a liquid containi...
Source: Pediatric Health Associates - April 19, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

MedImmune spinoff scores breakthrough status for rare autoimmune disease treatment
Viela Bio Inc. has earned a breakthrough therapy designation from the Food and Drug Administration for a product to treat neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, a life-threatening autoimmune disease that impacts the central nervous system. The FDA granted breakthrough status to the company’s candidate, inebilizumab, following positive results from a pivotal study that was “the largest monotherapy study ever conducted in NMOSD,” said Dr. Jorn Drappa, chief medical officer and head of research… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 19, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news