Brain Stent Could Cut Odds for a Second Stroke
THURSDAY, Feb. 20, 2020 -- For decades, artery-opening stents have helped prevent heart attacks, and new research suggests they might also help prevent strokes in the brain. In a new study, the self-expanding, intracranial Wingspan brain stent... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 20, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Wearable'Brain Stimulator' May Boost Stroke Recovery
THURSDAY, Feb. 20, 2020 -- A noninvasive magnetic brain stimulation device worn less than an hour a day can increase activity near stroke-injured areas of the brain, a small, preliminary study suggests. Those improvements in brain activity might... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 20, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Dementia care: Characteristic in young adulthood that may indicate your risk in later life
DEMENTIA research has two primary objectives: to find a cure and understand the factors that may heighten your risk of developing brain decline in later life. While the former is yet to be achieved, a number of studies have shed light on the risk factors associated with dementia. A new study highlights another potential risk factor. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Artificial Intelligence Can Help Pick the Best Depression Treatments for You
Seeking out help for depression is hard enough. It doesn’t make things any easier that it can take weeks, months or longer of trying different treatments to find something that works. Doctors typically start patients on antidepressants, but they take at least four weeks to start working, and research has shown that only about 30% respond well to the first drug they’re prescribed. “Right now, treatment selection is purely based on trial and error,” says Dr. Madhukar Trivedi, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. But promising new research published in Febru...
Source: TIME: Health - February 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mandy Oaklander Tags: Uncategorized Artificial Intelligence medicine mental health onetime psychiatry Source Type: news

Intraoperative Ischemic Stroke in Elective Spine Surgery Intraoperative Ischemic Stroke in Elective Spine Surgery
How often do strokes occur during elective spine surgeries, and what strategies may help prevent these events?Spine (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Journal Article Source Type: news

Image of the Day: Big Body, Little Brain
An extinct rodent relative of the capybara appears to have had a smaller brain-to-body ratio than similar species. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 20, 2020 Category: Science Tags: Image of the Day Source Type: news

Out-of-Pocket Costs Impact Neurologic Medication Adherence
THURSDAY, Feb. 20, 2020 -- For patients with certain neurological conditions, increasing out-of-pocket medical costs is associated with lower medication adherence, according to a study published online Feb. 19 in Neurology. Evan L. Reynolds, Ph.D.,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 20, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Dementia care: The characteristic in young adulthood that may indicate your risk in later
DEMENTIA research has two primary objectives: to find a cure and understand the factors that may heighten your risk of developing brain decline in later life. While the former is yet to be achieved, a number of studies have shed light on the risk factors associated with dementia. A new study highlights another potential risk factor. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Quick tips for diabetic foot ulcer wound care
If you have diabetes, you know you're more prone to injury than the average patient. Foot ulcers are especially common for those with diabetes – and can unfortunately lead to hospitalization or infection. In fact, 14 to 24 percent of patients with diabetes who develop a foot ulcer will need an amputation, according to American Podiatric Medical Association. The reason foot ulcers tend to prey on diabetic patients is because the condition causes reduced circulation in the extremities, often leading to neuropathy. This lack of feeling makes it difficult for diabetic patients to recognize the pain before the sore be...
Source: Advanced Tissue - February 20, 2020 Category: Dermatology Authors: AdvancedTissue Tags: diabetic wound care Source Type: news

Research shows new drug helps to preserve brain cells for a time after stroke
After 50 years of research and the testing of over 1,000 drugs, there is new hope for preserving brain cells for a time after stroke. Treating acute ischemic stroke patients with an experimental neuroprotective drug, combined with a surgical procedure to remove the clot improves outcomes as shown by clinical trial results published today in The Lancet. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - February 20, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Stalked by the Fear That Dementia Is Stalking You
Testing for Alzheimer ’s disease and other forms of dementia is hardly foolproof, and could even backfire. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Judith Graham, Kaiser Health News Tags: Alzheimer ' s Disease Families and Family Life Memory Elderly Dementia Genetics and Heredity Anxiety and Stress Living Wills and Health Care Proxies Diet and Nutrition Depression (Mental) Frontotemporal Dementia Brain Nursing H Source Type: news

Patient is woken half-way through brain surgery and asked to play the VIOLIN as surgeons operate
Dagmar Turner, 53, from the Isle of Wight, played the violin so surgeons at King's College Hospital in London could identify and therefore avoid the areas of the brain that are activated while she plays. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can Hearing Aids Help Prevent Dementia?
Research suggests that paying more attention to the “invisible disability” of hearing loss might improve our brains. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kim Tingley Tags: Ears and Hearing Alzheimer ' s Disease Dementia Hearing Aids Brain Source Type: news

Woman Plays Violin During Brain Surgery
Title: Woman Plays Violin During Brain SurgeryCategory: Health NewsCreated: 2/19/2020 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 2/20/2020 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - February 20, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A potential new weapon against deadly brain and soft tissue cancers
(University of Southern California) Researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering have designed a new drug cocktail that kills some types of brain and soft tissue cancers by tricking the cancer cells to behave as if they were starving for their favorite food -- glucose. The researchers' findings were recently published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry and may pave the way for targeted cancer treatments with greater efficacy and less harmful side effects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers say extended antidepressant use creates physical dependence
(American Osteopathic Association) Researchers explain symptoms associated with Antidepressant Discontinuation Syndrome and provide a schedule for tapering various classes of antidepressants. Patients who stop medication without tapering often experience flulike symptoms, insomnia, nausea, imbalance, sensory disturbances often described as electric shocks or 'brain zaps', and hyperarousal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Finding new clues to brain cancer treatment
(Case Western Reserve University) Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Cleveland Clinic new discovered a more accurate way to determine the relative life expectancy of glioblastoma victims and identify who could be candidates for experimental clinical drug trials by blending information from Artificial Intelligence (AI)--in this case, computer image analysis of the initial MRI scans taken of brain cancer patients--and genomic research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists aim to learn how serotonin modulates behavior
(Picower Institute at MIT) A new $1.1 million NIH grant will fund a study spanning many scales, from individual serotonin receptors and neurons to the whole brain and freely moving behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New study supports the safety of varenicline
(Society for the Study of Addiction) A real-world study of over 600,000 adult participants without a history of depression has found that the stop-smoking medication varenicline (marketed as Chantix and Champix) does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular or neuropsychiatric hospitalization compared with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). These findings confirm those of earlier clinical trials, providing further evidence of the safety of varenicline as an aid to stop smoking. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

MD Anderson announces strategic collaboration with Denali Therapeutics to research and develop targeted therapies for neurodegenerative diseases
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) MD Anderson announces a strategic research collaboration with Denali Therapeutics to develop new targeted therapies for Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 20, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Iron in brain shows cognitive decline in people with Parkinson's
(University College London) A cutting-edge MRI technique to detect iron deposits in different brain regions can track declines in thinking, memory and movement in people with Parkinson's disease, finds a new UCL-led study published in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Therapeutic cooling effectively targets site of brain injury
(Children's Hospital Los Angeles) Investigators successfully measure brain temperature in newborn babies undergoing therapeutic cooling, showing that the treatment effectively targets the core of the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Wearable brain stimulation could safely improve motor function after stroke
(American Heart Association) A new, non-invasive wearable magnetic device that stimulates the brain to rewire itself is safe and could improve recovery for stroke survivors. The technology could be a step to help improve motor function after stroke. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Follow-up study suggests brain stents are safe and effective for reducing recurrent stroke risk
(American Heart Association) Placing stents in cholesterol-clogged brain arteries may be an option to reduce the risk of a repeat stroke.However, it is too soon to know if stenting in the brain arteries improves long-term patient outcomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research shows new drug helps to preserve brain cells for a time after stroke
(University of Calgary) After 50 years of research and the testing of over 1,000 drugs, there is new hope for preserving brain cells for a time after stroke. Treating acute ischemic stroke patients with an experimental neuroprotective drug, combined with a surgical procedure to remove the clot improves outcomes as shown by clinical trial results published today in The Lancet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

This study shows how a lack of oxygen during pregnancy can cause schizophrenia
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Experiments with rats indicate that brain cells submitted to several forms of hypoxia underwent alterations to their energy production mechanism. Such condition may affect the fetus in pregnant women who have developed pre-eclampsia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Two grants will fund research into neurotechnology, drug delivery system
(Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology) Hyunjoon (Joon) Kong's group will collaborate on two grants with other researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The National Science Foundation will fund the investigation into how neurons and muscle cells communicate with each other. The Alzheimer's Foundation will support research to develop a drug delivery system that can be used to treat Alzheimer's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers identify novel potential combination therapy for childhood brain tumors
(Write Science Right) Brazilian researchers working in collaboration with Canadian scientists demonstrated that all medulloblastoma tumor subtypes express two stem cell markers: BMI1 and CD133. When they induced DNA chromatin relaxation, tumor cell viability was reduced with down-regulation of BMI1 and CD133. These anti-tumor effects could be potentiated by concurrent inhibition of MAPK/ERK signaling. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 20, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

ARCADIA: Predicting Risk of Atrial Cardiopathy Poststroke ARCADIA: Predicting Risk of Atrial Cardiopathy Poststroke
Preliminary findings from the ongoing ARCADIA study identify several risk factors associated with atrial cardiopathy in recent stroke patients.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - February 20, 2020 Category: Pathology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

ARCADIA: Predicting Risk for Atrial Cardiopathy Poststroke ARCADIA: Predicting Risk for Atrial Cardiopathy Poststroke
Preliminary findings from the ongoing ARCADIA study identify several risk factors associated with atrial cardiopathy in recent stroke patients.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - February 20, 2020 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Babies 'face birth defect risk if their mothers take penicillin alternatives during pregnancy'
Research by University College London said that the risk of heart, brain or genital defects was 55 per cent higher among babies whose mothers took macrolide antibiotics during their pregnancy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bumble bees display cross-modal object recognition between visual and tactile senses
Many animals can associate object shapes with incentives. However, such behavior is possible without storing images of shapes in memory that are accessible to more than one sensory modality. One way to explore whether there are modality-independent internal representations of object shapes is to investigate cross-modal recognition—experiencing an object in one sensory modality and later recognizing it in another. We show that bumble bees trained to discriminate two differently shaped objects (cubes and spheres) using only touch (in darkness) or vision (in light, but barred from touching the objects) could subsequentl...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Solvi, C., Gutierrez Al-Khudhairy, S., Chittka, L. Tags: Evolution, Neuroscience reports Source Type: news

These bees have "seen" that before
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Vignieri, S. Tags: Evolution, Neuroscience twis Source Type: news

Recording waves, reading minds
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: James, C. Tags: Neuroscience books Source Type: news

People often skip neurological meds when out-of-pocket costs rise
(Reuters Health) - When out-of-pocket drug costs rise, patients with common neurological disorders are more likely to forgo their medication, a U.S. study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Why a Brain Doctor Asks About Hormone Replacement Therapy Why a Brain Doctor Asks About Hormone Replacement Therapy
Dr Richard Isaacson on the surprising ways his thinking on this topic has changed in just the past 5 years.Medscape Neurology (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - February 19, 2020 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Commentary Source Type: news

Neuroscientist Phil Haydon Sets Sail to Talk About Epilepsy
After an accident as a teenager, he developed the disorder. He then studied the brain to better understand his own seizures, and now plans to sail around the world to show others with the condition... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 19, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Watch this woman play the violin in the middle of brain surgery
The patient was anxious about losing the motor skills key to her music, so she stayed awake and played for part of her procedure. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Hannah Knowles Source Type: news

British Woman Plays Violin While Doctors Remove Brain Tumor
Dagmar Turner, whose performance was caught on video, said the thought of losing her ability to play was "heart-breaking.” (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 19, 2020 Category: Science Source Type: news

Violinist plays Mahler and Gershwin as surgeons remove brain tumour
A patient at a British hospital played Mahler and Gershwin on the violin while a tumour was removed from her brain so that surgeons could preserve her ability to play music and honour her 40-year passion for the instrument. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Violinist plays Mahler and Gershwin to save her music as surgeons remove brain tumour
A patient at a British hospital played Mahler and Gershwin on the violin while a tumour was removed from her brain so that surgeons could preserve her ability to play music and her 40-year passion for the instrument. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

As Prices Rise for Parkinson's, Alzheimer's Meds, Patients Go Without
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 19, 2020 -- Rising drug costs are hampering the care of patients with debilitating neurological disorders like Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's, a new study finds. Patients are less likely to fill necessary prescriptions as... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 19, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Actrims 2020 actrims 2020
Read clinically focused news coverage of key developments from ACTRIMS 2020Medscape Neurology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Conference Coverage Source Type: news

A Look at Specialty Polymers for Surgical Robots
The surgical robot industry is developing specialized products for neurosurgery, spinal surgery and other medical procedures that require greater precision, flexibility, and control than is possible with conventional techniques. Today, more than 5,000 surgical robots are installed worldwide – and that market is expected to grow at a double-digit rate over the next few years. For the designers of surgical robots, this presents both challenges and opportunities. The healthcare industry has discovered the numerous advantages of robotic surgery. For example, surgeons can benefit from having a higher viewing a...
Source: MDDI - February 19, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Anna Maria Bertasa Tags: Materials Assembly and Automation Source Type: news

ZAP Surgical to Bring World-Class Brain Tumor Treatments to Rural German Hospital
Bonifatius Hospital in Lingen to Be Among the First in Europe to Offer the Latest Advances in Stereotactic Radiosurgery SAN CARLOS, Calif., Feb. 19, 2020 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- ZAP Surgical Systems, Inc. today announced an agreeme... Devices, Oncology, Neurosurgery ZAP Surgical Systems, ZAP-X, stereotactic, radiosurgery, radiotherapy (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - February 19, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Patient plays violin during her brain surgery
Professional musician Dagmar Turner was diagnosed with a large brain tumour in 2013. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

U.K. Patient Plays Violin During Unusual Brain Tumor Surgery
(LONDON) — Surgeons at King’s College Hospital in London removed a brain tumor from a woman who played the violin during the procedure. Doctors for violinist Dagmar Turner, 53, mapped her brain before the surgery to identify areas that were active when she played the instrument and those responsible for controlling language and movement. Doctors then woke her in mid-procedure so she could play to “ensure the surgeons did not damage any crucial areas of the brain that controlled Dagmar’s delicate hand movements,” the hospital said in a statement. “We knew how important the violin is to Da...
Source: TIME: Health - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized health onetime United Kingdom Source Type: news

Researchers find a western-style diet can impair brain function
After a week on a high fat, high added sugar diet, volunteers scored worse on memory testsConsuming a western diet for as little as one week can subtly impair brain function and encourage slim and otherwise healthy young people to overeat, scientists claim.Researchers found that after seven days on a high fat, high added sugar diet, volunteers in their 20s scored worse on memory tests and found junk food more desirable immediately after they had finished a meal.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 19, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Dementia Diets and dieting Nutrition Food Sugar Memory Obesity Diabetes UCL (University College London) Neuroscience Health Life and style Mental health Source Type: news

Hair Testosterone Concentrations and Emotional Reactivity Hair Testosterone Concentrations and Emotional Reactivity
This study investigates the relationship between hair testosterone concentration--an index of long-term cumulative testosterone levels--and emotion processing neuroimaging data.Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Journal Article Source Type: news

Spinal Cord Stimulation for Neuropathic Pain Spinal Cord Stimulation for Neuropathic Pain
Spinal cord stimulation is an option for the management of chronic neuropathic pain, but is the pain relief obtained the result of a placebo effect?Pain (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Journal Article Source Type: news