Finding Cuddle Partners
In Conscious Growth Club, there was a recent discussion about finding cuddle partners – i.e. someone to physically cuddle with when you want – so I thought I’d turn what I shared about this into a blog post with some tips on finding cuddle partners. Obviously this will be more useful when you’re not under a virus lockdown. 😉 Basically what I shared in CGC was a list of tips for increasing the chances of finding a cuddle partner. Here’s a refined version of that: Hang out with cuddle-friendly and touch-friendly people more often. Spend more time around the hugger types. This helps a lo...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - April 6, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Emotions Lifestyle Relationships Source Type: blogs

Rejuvenation of Immune Function is One of the More Important Outcomes to Engineer through the Treatment of Aging
One would hope that it does not require an ongoing pandemic and related hysteria to point out that old people have poorly functioning immune systems, and thus suffer disproportionately the burden of infectious disease. But perhaps it does. The 2017-2018 seasonal influenza, a modestly more severe occurrence of something that happens every year, killed something like 60,000 people in the US alone, with little notice or comment. There is nothing so terrible that it won't be accepted - ignored, even - if it is normal. Floodgates of funding for infectious disease research and development have been opened in response to C...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

The Drink That Ages Your Brain (M)
'Older' brains show more signs of damage relative to other people of the same age. → Support PsyBlog for just $5 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - April 6, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Brain Health subscribers-only Source Type: blogs

Overcoming Your Former Self: Small Steps Toward Higher Self-Esteem
You're reading Overcoming Your Former Self: Small Steps Toward Higher Self-Esteem, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. When analyzing the driving factor behind your decisions, there is one common denominator that many people overlook: self-esteem. Self-esteem is a reflection of your perceived value. If you do not have a positive self-image, your motivation to achieve great things diminishes. Because of this, it is important to work on empowering yourself to better actionize your goals. People suffering fro...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - April 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Finn Pierson Tags: confidence featured psychology self-improvement self esteem self improvement Source Type: blogs

Neuropathologist Matija Snuderl featured in major journal discussing the use of artificial intelligence in cancer diagnostics
Dr. Matija Snuderl, neuropathologist and molecular pathologist at  New York University Langone Health, was featured ina recent article appearing inNature (March 26, 2020, Vol 579, p S14-S16). The article, which addresses the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in cancer diagnostics, opens with Dr. Snuderl experiencing a moment that many of us neuropathologists have had wherein we hesitate before signing out a case because of a feeling that something might be just a bit different about a particular specimen. That feeling prompts us to do something else (run more ancillary testing, get a consult, sleep on it and ta...
Source: neuropathology blog - April 5, 2020 Category: Radiology Tags: neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 6th 2020
This study delves into the mechanisms by which a short period of fasting can accelerate wound healing. Fasting triggers many of the same cellular stress responses, such as upregulated autophagy, as occur during the practice of calorie restriction. It isn't exactly the same, however, so it is always worth asking whether any specific biochemistry observed in either case does in fact occur in both situations. In particular, the period of refeeding following fasting appears to have beneficial effects that are distinct from those that occur while food is restricted. Multiple forms of therapeutic fasting have been repor...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 5, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Neurology -Radiology Integrated learning -DAMS Medicine Unplugged - Brain Abscess
Presenting an integrated Neuroradiology Clinical discussion starting with evaluation of patient and discussion of the Radiological findings and treatment.Famous Radiology Blog http://www.sumerdoc.blogspot.com TeleRad Providers at www.teleradproviders.com Mail us at sales@teleradproviders.com (Source: Sumer's Radiology Site)
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - April 5, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: April 4, 2020
This week’s Psychology Around the Net offers tips on keeping your sanity when working from home, the dangers of getting your news from social media platforms, how to use mindfulness to reduce procrastination, and more. How to Focus On Your Work When All You Can Think About Is COVID-19: Five Simple Steps: Work can provide a productive and much needed distraction, but how are you supposed to work when all you can focus on is the latest coronavirus headline? 21 Tips to Survive Working From Home: On that note, whether you’re newly working from home amid the COVID-19 pandemic or you normally work from home but now...
Source: World of Psychology - April 4, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Psychology Around the Net Children coronavirus COVID-19 life skills Mindfulness Procrastination Siblings social media Social Skills Source Type: blogs

Inhibition of ATM Kinase Reduces Cellular Senescence and SASP in Progeroid Mice
Progeroid mice with DNA repair deficiencies exhibit an accelerated formation of senescent cells and manifestation of age-related conditions. This class of animal model has been used in research relating to cellular senescence in order to cost-effectively demonstrate that targeted removal of senescent cells is beneficial. However, one still needs to be careful when drawing conclusions based on their peculiar biochemistry. Progeria of this nature is quite unlike normal aging at the detail level. Cells become senescent in response to reaching the Hayflick limit, tissue injury, molecular damage, or a toxic environment. ...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 3, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Virtual care for surgical subspecialties
As a 4th-year neurosurgery resident, I ’ve tried to sink my heels into every aspect of neurosurgical care in order to harness the skills, the knowledge, and the confidence to know that I’ll be ready to provide exceptional care to my own patients at the end of seven years of training. If you asked me before […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 3, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/randaline-barnett-and-carolyn-quinsey" rel="tag" > Randaline Barnett, MD and Carolyn Quinsey, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions COVID-19 coronavirus Infectious Disease Neurosurgery Source Type: blogs

“ Essential Oncology ” : The COVID Challenge
By CHADI NABHAN MD, MBA, FACP One harsh Chicago winter, I remember calling a patient to cancel his appointment because we had deemed it too risky for patients to come in for routine visits—a major snowstorm made us rethink all non-essential appointments. Mr. Z was scheduled for his 3-month follow-up for an aggressive brain lymphoma that was diagnosed the prior year, during which he endured several rounds of intense chemotherapy. His discontent in hearing that his appointment was canceled was palpable; he confessed that he was very much looking forward to the visit so that he could greet the nurses, front-desk sta...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Hospitals Medical Practice Physicians Chadi Nabhan Clinical Trials coronavirus drug dosing Oncology Pandemic Source Type: blogs

Fasting Accelerates Wound Healing in Mice
This study delves into the mechanisms by which a short period of fasting can accelerate wound healing. Fasting triggers many of the same cellular stress responses, such as upregulated autophagy, as occur during the practice of calorie restriction. It isn't exactly the same, however, so it is always worth asking whether any specific biochemistry observed in either case does in fact occur in both situations. In particular, the period of refeeding following fasting appears to have beneficial effects that are distinct from those that occur while food is restricted. Multiple forms of therapeutic fasting have been repor...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 3, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Swear Words And Psychedelics: The Week ’s Best Psychology Links
Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web Psycholinguists have taken a scientific approach to the creation of new swear words, reports Neuroskeptic at Discover Magazine. Researchers identified the ideal words to pair with profanities in order to come up with colourful new insults. Sticking -pig or -mouth to the end of your favoured swear word will probably have the desired effect, according to the work, while adding -newspaper or -fireplace could leave your insult falling flat. The sense of smell is arguably the least appreciated of all our senses. But despite this “anti-olfactor...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - April 3, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Weekly links Source Type: blogs

How Workers Can Protect Themselves from Unsafe Working Conditions
Conclusion By taking the steps to protect yourself above, you will not only be safe at work, you’ll also feel better knowing that you are looking after your coworkers. It takes some courage to stand up for yourself but it’s worth everyone’s safety and well-being.  Which of these tips did you find the most useful? Share your thoughts in the comments below.  You've read How Workers Can Protect Themselves from Unsafe Working Conditions, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you've enjoyed this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. (Source:...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - April 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Erin Falconer Tags: career featured health and fitness self-improvement success coronavirus covid_19 safety workplace Source Type: blogs

Tease your brain with these eight fun riddles
__ Q: My first thought after congratulating myself on being so clever about something? A: “How can I have been so dumb about that for so long!” Q: Who is harder to forgive than anyone, for truly dumb behaviour? A:  Oneself Q: How can you tell that a man is sure he is respected, even revered, by his peers? A: When expressing himself, he always uses “We”, “You”, & “They” — rarely “I”! Q: Why did the café customer drop his sugar into the ashtray? A: Because earlier at breakfast he had spread butter on his trousers. Q: What is the surest way to a...
Source: SharpBrains - April 2, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Keith Perreur-Lloyd Tags: Brain Teasers Education & Lifelong Learning brain-teaser riddles tease your brain Source Type: blogs

The Longevity 2020 Online Conference, to be Held April 27th to May 1st 2020
All of the longevity industry and gerontology conferences in coming months have been cancelled or rescheduled as a result of the present mix of COVID-19 pandemic and hysteria. An equal mix of both, perhaps. The best data to date puts the mortality rate at 0.66% or so, meaning about six yearly flu seasons worth of risk, and even that number is most likely still overstating the risk, as it misses the presently unknown count of infections that result in only minor symptoms. An article from earlier in the month on the uncertainties in all published numbers remains one of the more sane pieces written on the topic. Still,...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 2, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

3D Printed Brain Implants Using Conductive Polymer Ink
Conductive polymers are a fascinating category of materials that are particularly exciting for biomedicine because of their flexibility, conductivity, and biocompatibility. Existing conducting polymers, though, can only be applied to other materials using traditional methods that are not suitable for 3D printing. Now, researchers at MIT have developed an impressive conducting polymer ink that can be used to print flexible volumetric devices to allow for close integration of electronics with the human body. As an example, the researchers were able to create a flexible neural probe that can sense the activity of neurons ...
Source: Medgadget - April 2, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Materials Neurology Neurosurgery Source Type: blogs

BiWaze Cough System Receives FDA Clearance to Help Clear Secretions
ABM Respiratory Care, a company with offices in USA, Singapore, and India, announced that it has received FDA 510(k) clearance to market its BiWaze Cough System, a device for removing secretions in patients who are unable to cough or clear secretions effectively. The BiWaze Cough System consists of a touch-screen device connected to a non-invasive suctioning mask. It is a portable alternative to the invasive and more involved process of upper airway suctioning. The system also provides high frequency oscillations, between 5-20 Hz, to break up thick secretions and facilitate their removal from the lungs. The touc...
Source: Medgadget - April 2, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Cici Zhou Tags: Cardiology Medicine Neurology Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Low-carb diets: Only the START to regain health and lose weight
While a low-carb diet is an excellent choice to achieve goals such as weight loss, stacking the odds in favor of reversing type 2 diabetes and fatty liver, and beginning the process of reversing skin rashes and autoimmune diseases, you don’t want to make the mistake of ending your efforts at diet alone. Regardless of the variety of low-carb diet you choose—Atkins, paleo, keto, Wheat Belly, Undoctored, etc.—failure to add several components, especially prebiotic fibers that nourish bowel flora, can limit or even undo all of your health benefits. You can further your success by also addressing common nutri...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 2, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Open grain-free microbiota prebiotic Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Recognizing and treating depression may help improve heart health
Depression affects about 20% of Americans in their lifetime, and is one of the leading causes of disability. The rates of depression are even higher in those with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Depression affects 38% of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery, and the risk of depression is three times as high in patients who have experienced a heart attack compared with the general population. Depression also makes it much more likely that CVD patients will be readmitted to the hospital and report heart-related symptoms. Yet much of the time, symptoms of depression in those with CVD go unrecognized. And as ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alyson Kelley-Hedgepeth, MD Tags: Anxiety and Depression Health Heart Health Source Type: blogs

Debating the Direction of Causation Between Physical Decline and Cognitive Decline in Aging
Researchers here suggest that the direction of causation between physical decline and cognitive decline is largely the opposite of the present consensus. Most of the evidence of recent decades points to physical decline, and associated lack of activity, having a negative impact the brain. Certainly there are any number of studies showing exercise to have a beneficial effect on cognitive function. Here, however, researchers propose that declines in cognitive function lead the declines in physical function in aging. Someone dies somewhere in the world every 10 seconds owing to physical inactivity - 3.2 million peopl...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 2, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Older adults and medical marijuana: Reduced stigma and increased use
This study is consistent with other research, as well as with reports from physicians who recommend cannabis in their daily practices. What might be behind this trend? A confluence of factors seems to be responsible, including the decrease in stigma associated with cannabis use and the increased interest in the use of medical marijuana by older patients. Stigma is a complicated issue, but most would agree that the stigma associated with cannabis use is lessening, especially for medical cannabis. In a recent poll, 94% of Americans voiced support for legal access to medical marijuana, and most states have approved some form ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Peter Grinspoon, MD Tags: Health Healthy Aging Marijuana Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Move, Nourish, Connect, Be: Four daily habits to protect our mental well-being while sheltering in place
__ It’s a crazy time. Here in the California, we are sheltering-in-place, leaving the house only for essentials like groceries and medical care. And while we’re all (appropriately) focused on caring for the physical health of ourselves, our families, our communities, and society at large, our mental, emotional, and social health needs are quickly emerging as profoundly important, as well. I’m executive director of Open Source Wellness, which brings people together to learn and practice the behaviors that generate human health and well-being. Our core idea is that community is a form of medicine. And ...
Source: SharpBrains - April 1, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Science Center Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness behavioral pharmacy coronavirus outbreak emotional mental mental health mental hygiene mental well being physical-health psychologist shelter in place social Source Type: blogs

How Personality Type Can Explain Why We ’ve Been Panic-Buying Toilet Paper
For some of us, panic-buying all the goods in the supermarket is logical, for others? Not so much. Were you one of the people sitting at home watching the news and scrolling through social media observing the panic-buying of toilet paper with incredulity or were you one of the people out in the stores stocking up? Both of these patterns of behavior are rational in their own ways, but if (like me) you were the former, observing the chaos with confusion, you have probably been stuck on the question, why? What makes some people more prone to panic-buying antics than others? And why toilet paper of all things? I can’t ...
Source: World of Psychology - April 1, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Elaine Mead Tags: Anxiety and Panic Personality coronavirus COVID-19 hoarding toilet paper pandemic Source Type: blogs

Finding Flow to Escape Stuck-at-Home Captivity!
You're reading Finding Flow to Escape Stuck-at-Home Captivity!, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. "I kind of entered a flow state. I’ve been there before while climbing. You are not thinking ahead. You are just thinking about what is in front of you each second." Aron Ralston            Feeling isolated or penned in like most of your fellow humans? While you can’t host a party or travel in this era of social dista...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - April 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Erin Falconer Tags: featured motivation philosophy productivity tips psychology self-improvement coronavirus covid_19 flow flow states pickthebrain Source Type: blogs

Understanding other brains
Alan Towers wrote an instructive, poignant comment about the difficulty that he had understanding that his schizophrenic son could not be EXPECTED to “make sense”, if sense was defined by the standards that applied for Alan, or for the wider society. Because so many people who live with psychotic illness or substantial neurological impairment require that their affected loved ones operate by THEIR rules and THEIR logical constructs and world view, they often abandon their children, relatives and friends as uncorrectible and irrecoverable, as lost souls. I’ve had a conversation about this subject with a nu...
Source: On the Brain by Dr. Michael Merzenich, Ph.D. - April 1, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Dr. Merzenich Tags: Aging and the Brain Alzheimer’s Autism Origins, Treatments Brain Fitness BrainHQ Cognitive Impairment in Children Cognitive impairments Posit Science Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, et alia Source Type: blogs

ASC Specks in the Inflammatory Microglial Response to Amyloid- β Aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease
The Alzheimer's disease research community is nowadays ever more strongly considering chronic inflammation in the brain as a vital part of the progression of the condition. In the amyloid cascade hypothesis, a slow aggregation of amyloid-β over decades (for reasons that are debated) causes ever greater inflammatory dysfunction in microglia, the immune cells of the brain responsible for clearing up metabolic waste such as protein aggregates. That inflammation in turn sets the stage for tau aggregation to take place to a significant degree, causing cell death and severe neural dysfunction. Today's open access res...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 31, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Lonnie and Carrie ’ s Wheat Belly journey
“ Living the Wheat Belly and Undoctored lifestyle will not rid our lives of all adversity. But it can make you stronger, more optimistic, and resilient. Here is Lonnie and Carrie’s story: “One year ago today, my life changed in unthinkable ways. I discovered the Wheat Belly 10-Day Grain Detox book and read it during my kids’ spring break. I had dabbled in the ‘paleo’ diet world a bit over the last five years with inconsistent success and had some idea about how good I felt when eliminating grains… “But the protocols in this book seemed to go further then just diet, like addr...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 31, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Open Depression grain-free Inflammation undoctored Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Will these five NeuroRights help harness emerging neurotechnologies for the common good?
__ Data for Good: Biological Scientist, DSI Member Rafael Yuste on the Ethical Development of Neurotechnology (Columbia University release): “Brain-computer interfaces may soon have the power to decode people’s thoughts and interfere with their mental activity. Even now the interfaces, or BCIs, which link brains directly to digital networks, are helping brain-impaired patients and amputees perform simple motor tasks such as moving a cursor, controlling a motorized wheelchair, or directing a robotic arm. And noninvasive BCI’s that can understand words we want to type and place them onto screens are being d...
Source: SharpBrains - March 31, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology Algorithmic Bias Brain-Computer Interfaces free-will Mental Augmentation mental privacy neurorights neurotechnologies Neurotechnology oath Personal Identity Rafael Yuste techn Source Type: blogs

The National Academies Press | Items in Cart
https://www.nap.edu/catalog/25703/brain-health-across-the-life-span-proceedings-of-a-workshop https://cart.nap.edu/cart/cart.php?list=fs&action=buy%20it&record_id=25703&isbn=0-309-67261-9 -- *********************************************** Kevin S. McGrew,  PhD Educational Psychologist Director Institute for Applied Psychometrics (IAP) www.themindhub.com ************************************************ (Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner))
Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner) - March 31, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: blogs

Transcending Maslow ’s hierarchy of needs via Maslow’s own research on Peak Experiences
Heaven, so to speak, lies waiting for us through life, ready to step into for a time and to enjoy before we have to come back to our ordinary life of striving. And once we have been in it, we can remember it forever, and feed ourselves on this memory and be sustained in times of stress. —Abraham Maslow, Toward a Psychology of Being (1962) After completing Motivation and Personality in 1954, Maslow turned his attention to a particular characteristic of self-actualizing people that long fascinated him. Many of the self-actualizing people he studied tended to sound like traditional mystics, describing unusual moments of...
Source: SharpBrains - March 31, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Scott Barry Kaufman Tags: Author Speaks Series Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning hierarchy of needs Maslow Peak Experiences self-actualization Transcend Source Type: blogs

Dreams Aren ’t Just Visual: We Often Hear Voices And Other Sounds Too
By Emma Young “At least since the philosophers of ancient Greece, scholars have pointed out the analogy between madness (psychosis) and dreaming…” So begins a new paper, published in PLoS One, that seems to shore up that analogy. Dreams and psychotic hallucinations do have things in common. They both feature perceptual sensations that seem real, but which are conjured up by our brains. However, there are also differences. While dreams are known to be highly visual, psychotic hallucinations are primarily auditory. They generally involve hearing things that aren’t real rather than seeing things ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - March 31, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Perception Psychosis Sleep and dreaming Source Type: blogs

Mesenchymal Stem Cell Extracellular Vesicles in Regenerative Medicine
Mesenchymal stem cell therapies vary widely in their ability to influence regeneration, though they fairly reliably reduce chronic inflammation in older patients. One challenge is that there is no standard on what constitutes a mesenchymal stem cell; it is a category so broad as to be almost meaningless. Further, two clinics performing what is ostensibly the same protocol using cells from the same source can produce widely divergent outcomes. In most cases, near all transplanted cells die, and the benefits obtained for the patient derive from signaling produced by the stem cells in the short period of survival following tr...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 31, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Genetic Variants Associated with Risk of Hypertension and Obesity also Correlate with Reduced Life Expectancy
Identification of genetic variants associated with specific conditions has been a going concern for some time, but the creation of large national databases of genetic and biometric data in a number of countries has greatly expanded this area of study. In today's research materials, scientists demonstrate one way in which this can be used, as a confirmation of the importance of hypertension and obesity in present variations in human life expectancy. People with genetic variants that increase the odds of suffering either of these conditions tend to live shorter lives, something that also shows up in standard epidemiological ...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 30, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Bipolar & Substance Abuse Disorders: A Complex Diagnosis that Demands Integrated Medical & Psychological Care
The word “bipolar” has become colloquially associated with anything that changes rapidly or is unpredictable: the weather, technology, sports teams, politics, or even a teenager’s attitude. But for roughly 46 million people worldwide, being “bipolar” is far more serious than typical unpredictability, mood swings, or temperamental behavior. And, when bipolar disorder is complicated by substance use disorder (SUD), the situation can become incredibly dangerous for the individual and those around them. Recognizing the symptoms of bipolar and the complicating factors of substance use disorder is c...
Source: World of Psychology - March 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marlon Rollins Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Bipolar Recovery Substance Abuse Addiction Recovery Bipolar Disorder Detox Dual Diagnosis World Bipolar Day Source Type: blogs

The Music That Boosts Mental Energy (M)
How to use music to give your brain a boost. → Support PsyBlog for just $5 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - March 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Boost Brain Power Music subscribers-only Source Type: blogs

Have a headache? The top 7 triggers
“Headaches aren’t welcome here” — that’s the sign you have hanging on your brain’s front door, but the pain is barging right in. You can chalk it up to stress from world events or something you ate or drank, and you might be right. But there are a number of common triggers for migraines, tension headaches, or cluster headaches. The faster you identify them, the quicker you can boot headache pain off the property. What are the triggers for your headaches? Take note of your circumstances when a headache starts. Keep a diary to track the day, time, symptoms, and circumstances surrounding th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Heidi Godman Tags: Headache Health Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Gold Nanoparticles Help Uncover Fine Structure of Amyloid Fibrils
A team of scientists, based at Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL) with collaborators at Ulm University in Germany, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia in Italy, and MIT, have developed custom nanoparticles for high-resolution detection of amyloid fibrils, those associated with Alzheimer’s and Parkinon’s. The newly developed technology enables researchers to investigate the specific fibril architectures in deceased patients who had amyloid-based diseases, allowing rapid high-resolution imaging of fibrils. Many diseases, including Alzheimers, Parkinson’s, and others, are associated...
Source: Medgadget - March 30, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Siavash Parkhideh Tags: Materials Medicine Nanomedicine Neurology Neurosurgery Radiology Source Type: blogs

The FDA clears Somryst, Pear ’s digital therapeutic to treat chronic insomnia
__ Pear gets FDA clearance for insomnia therapeutic (MedCity News): “Pear Therapeutics received marketing authorization for its third product — a digital therapeutic intended to treat chronic insomnia. Called Somryst, the app is available by prescription only. It consists of a nine-week program that includes cognitive behavioral therapy and restricting sleep to a limited window of time … The company’s submission included data from two randomized controlled trials, including a study of 1,100 adults reporting chronic insomnia that used Somryst for nine weeks. They saw a significant reduction in insom...
Source: SharpBrains - March 30, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology chronic insomnia cognitive-behavioral-therapy depression digital therapeutic FDA Pear Therapeutics precertification Somryst Source Type: blogs

Impaired Autophagy in the Aging of Stem Cell Populations
The cellular housekeeping mechanisms of autophagy act to recycle proteins and structures within the cell. Upregulation of autophagy appears to be a crucial part of the reason why the response to mild stresses - such as heat, cold, lack of nutrients, and toxins - can actually improve cell and tissue function. Certainly the practice of calorie restriction relies upon functional autophagy in order to extend healthy life span. Researchers here note that autophagy is important in the maintenance of the many stem cell populations throughout the body that are required for ongoing tissue maintenance. The characteristic impairment ...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 30, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

How To Stop Measuring Yourself By Comparing with Others
You're reading How To Stop Measuring Yourself By Comparing with Others, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Do you think a hike in your salary would make you happy? You believe so, don't you? But hold on to that thought. There is more to it than just the percentage increase. For 2 years, I observed a team of people. They exhibited a peculiar behavior after annual hike announcements. During the first year, the market was not performing well. As a result, the hike percentages were low for all the team member...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - March 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Maxim Dsouza Tags: featured productivity tips psychology relationships self-improvement success career comparison Source Type: blogs

One Gemini Celebrates Another
One of most truly useless pieces of information lodged in my brain is my zodiac sign; not once in my life have I had any interest in it.   But, given the available draws, it isn't too bad, as it's also the name of perhaps the most underappreciated engineering project of the second half of the 20th Century: Project GeminiRead more » (Source: Omics! Omics!)
Source: Omics! Omics! - March 30, 2020 Category: Bioinformatics Authors: Keith Robison Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 30th 2020
This study, for the first time, shows that transplantation of non-autologous mitochondria from healthy skeletal muscle cells into normal cardiomyocytes leads to short-term improvement of bioenergetics indicating "supercharged" state. However, over time these improved effects disappear, which suggests transplantation of mitochondria may have a potential application in settings where there is an acute stress. Outlining Some of the Science Behind Partial Reprogramming at Turn.bio https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/03/outlining-some-of-the-science-behind-partial-reprogramming-at-turn-bio/ Tur...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 29, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Oxford Uehiro Prize in Practical Ethics: If Doctors Could Administer a Treatment That Would Move a Patient From a Vegetative State to a Minimally Conscious One, Should They Do So?
This essay was the runner up in the graduate category of the 6th Annual Oxford Uehiro Prize in Practical Ethics. Written by University of Oxford student Matthew Minehan. INTRODUCTION Sally is a healthy young woman who suffers catastrophic brain trauma. Over many months, her doctors subject her to functional Magnetic Resonance Imagining (fMRI) scans and […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Ethics Health Care Neuroethics medical ethics Oxford Uehiro Prize in Practical Ethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Breaking bad news to patients when they are alone
Today, we got called on a patient in the ICU who recently had a new brain mass removed surgically. The specimen came back positive for an aggressive brain tumor known as glioblastoma multiforme. We discussed his diagnosis and prognosis with him at bedside alone, with his wife and daughter on speakerphone given visitor restrictions due […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 27, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/azam-j-farooqui" rel="tag" > Azam J. Farooqui, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions COVID-19 coronavirus Infectious Disease Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Macrophages as Both Friends and Foes in Age-Related Diseases
Macrophages are cells of the innate immune system, found throughout the body, and which play a great many roles beyond the obvious ones of defending against invading pathogens. They destroy cancerous and senescent cells, ingest molecular waste and debris between cells, and participate in the processes of tissue regeneration and maintenance, to pick a few examples. Further, the immune system of the brain includes an analogous population of cells known as microglia, which additionally take on supporting roles essential to the proper functioning of neurons and their synaptic connections. Chronic inflammation is importa...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 27, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Strategies to promote better sleep in these uncertain times
These are unprecedented times. Given the real and tangible threat of the coronavirus pandemic on personal, community, and societal levels, it is normal to experience anxiety and sleep problems. Sleep is a reversible state marked by a loss of consciousness to our surroundings, and as members of the animal kingdom, our brains have evolved to respond to dangers by increasing vigilance and attention — in other words, our brains are protecting us, and by doing so it’s harder for us to ignore our surroundings. Despite the threat of the coronavirus and its rapid and pervasive disruption to our daily lives, many of us ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Suzanne Bertisch, MD, MPH Tags: Health Sleep Stress Source Type: blogs

Study: Moderate lifetime drinking may lead to lower Alzheimer-related beta amyloid deposits in the brain
Conclusions: In this study, we observed in middle- and old-aged individuals with neither dementia nor alcohol-related disorders that moderate lifetime alcohol intake was associated with lower cerebral AB deposition compared to a lifetime history of not drinking. Moderate lifetime alcohol intake may have a beneficial influence on AD by reducing pathological amyloid deposition rather than amyloid-independent neurodegeneration or cerebrovascular injury. The Study in Context: Report: 35% of worldwide dementia cases could be prevented by modifying these 9 modifiable risk factors Study: Drinking up to 5–8 glasses of wine...
Source: SharpBrains - March 27, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Alzheimer-disease Alzheimers beer beta amyloid deposits brain protein dementia hard liquor mental acuity moderate drinking MRI neurodegeneration PET wine Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 308
Dr Mark Corden Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 308 Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 307 - Just when you thought your brain could unwind The medical trivia FFFF (Source: Life in the Fast Lane)
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dr Mark Corden Tags: FFFF Black Death coronavirus covid19 Dabbing doffing donning Italy Mary Mallon Quarantine Spanish flu Typhoid Typhoid Mary Source Type: blogs