New study supports the safety of varenicline
(Society for the Study of Addiction) A real-world study of over 600,000 adult participants without a history of depression has found that the stop-smoking medication varenicline (marketed as Chantix and Champix) does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular or neuropsychiatric hospitalization compared with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). These findings confirm those of earlier clinical trials, providing further evidence of the safety of varenicline as an aid to stop smoking. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

MD Anderson announces strategic collaboration with Denali Therapeutics to research and develop targeted therapies for neurodegenerative diseases
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) MD Anderson announces a strategic research collaboration with Denali Therapeutics to develop new targeted therapies for Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 20, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Iron in brain shows cognitive decline in people with Parkinson's
(University College London) A cutting-edge MRI technique to detect iron deposits in different brain regions can track declines in thinking, memory and movement in people with Parkinson's disease, finds a new UCL-led study published in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Therapeutic cooling effectively targets site of brain injury
(Children's Hospital Los Angeles) Investigators successfully measure brain temperature in newborn babies undergoing therapeutic cooling, showing that the treatment effectively targets the core of the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Wearable brain stimulation could safely improve motor function after stroke
(American Heart Association) A new, non-invasive wearable magnetic device that stimulates the brain to rewire itself is safe and could improve recovery for stroke survivors. The technology could be a step to help improve motor function after stroke. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Follow-up study suggests brain stents are safe and effective for reducing recurrent stroke risk
(American Heart Association) Placing stents in cholesterol-clogged brain arteries may be an option to reduce the risk of a repeat stroke.However, it is too soon to know if stenting in the brain arteries improves long-term patient outcomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research shows new drug helps to preserve brain cells for a time after stroke
(University of Calgary) After 50 years of research and the testing of over 1,000 drugs, there is new hope for preserving brain cells for a time after stroke. Treating acute ischemic stroke patients with an experimental neuroprotective drug, combined with a surgical procedure to remove the clot improves outcomes as shown by clinical trial results published today in The Lancet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

This study shows how a lack of oxygen during pregnancy can cause schizophrenia
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Experiments with rats indicate that brain cells submitted to several forms of hypoxia underwent alterations to their energy production mechanism. Such condition may affect the fetus in pregnant women who have developed pre-eclampsia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Two grants will fund research into neurotechnology, drug delivery system
(Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology) Hyunjoon (Joon) Kong's group will collaborate on two grants with other researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The National Science Foundation will fund the investigation into how neurons and muscle cells communicate with each other. The Alzheimer's Foundation will support research to develop a drug delivery system that can be used to treat Alzheimer's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers identify novel potential combination therapy for childhood brain tumors
(Write Science Right) Brazilian researchers working in collaboration with Canadian scientists demonstrated that all medulloblastoma tumor subtypes express two stem cell markers: BMI1 and CD133. When they induced DNA chromatin relaxation, tumor cell viability was reduced with down-regulation of BMI1 and CD133. These anti-tumor effects could be potentiated by concurrent inhibition of MAPK/ERK signaling. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 20, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

ARCADIA: Predicting Risk of Atrial Cardiopathy Poststroke ARCADIA: Predicting Risk of Atrial Cardiopathy Poststroke
Preliminary findings from the ongoing ARCADIA study identify several risk factors associated with atrial cardiopathy in recent stroke patients.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - February 20, 2020 Category: Pathology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

ARCADIA: Predicting Risk for Atrial Cardiopathy Poststroke ARCADIA: Predicting Risk for Atrial Cardiopathy Poststroke
Preliminary findings from the ongoing ARCADIA study identify several risk factors associated with atrial cardiopathy in recent stroke patients.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - February 20, 2020 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Babies 'face birth defect risk if their mothers take penicillin alternatives during pregnancy'
Research by University College London said that the risk of heart, brain or genital defects was 55 per cent higher among babies whose mothers took macrolide antibiotics during their pregnancy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bumble bees display cross-modal object recognition between visual and tactile senses
Many animals can associate object shapes with incentives. However, such behavior is possible without storing images of shapes in memory that are accessible to more than one sensory modality. One way to explore whether there are modality-independent internal representations of object shapes is to investigate cross-modal recognition—experiencing an object in one sensory modality and later recognizing it in another. We show that bumble bees trained to discriminate two differently shaped objects (cubes and spheres) using only touch (in darkness) or vision (in light, but barred from touching the objects) could subsequentl...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Solvi, C., Gutierrez Al-Khudhairy, S., Chittka, L. Tags: Evolution, Neuroscience reports Source Type: news

These bees have "seen" that before
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Vignieri, S. Tags: Evolution, Neuroscience twis Source Type: news

Recording waves, reading minds
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: James, C. Tags: Neuroscience books Source Type: news

People often skip neurological meds when out-of-pocket costs rise
(Reuters Health) - When out-of-pocket drug costs rise, patients with common neurological disorders are more likely to forgo their medication, a U.S. study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Why a Brain Doctor Asks About Hormone Replacement Therapy Why a Brain Doctor Asks About Hormone Replacement Therapy
Dr Richard Isaacson on the surprising ways his thinking on this topic has changed in just the past 5 years.Medscape Neurology (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - February 19, 2020 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Commentary Source Type: news

Neuroscientist Phil Haydon Sets Sail to Talk About Epilepsy
After an accident as a teenager, he developed the disorder. He then studied the brain to better understand his own seizures, and now plans to sail around the world to show others with the condition... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 19, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Watch this woman play the violin in the middle of brain surgery
The patient was anxious about losing the motor skills key to her music, so she stayed awake and played for part of her procedure. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Hannah Knowles Source Type: news

British Woman Plays Violin While Doctors Remove Brain Tumor
Dagmar Turner, whose performance was caught on video, said the thought of losing her ability to play was "heart-breaking.” (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 19, 2020 Category: Science Source Type: news

Violinist plays Mahler and Gershwin as surgeons remove brain tumour
A patient at a British hospital played Mahler and Gershwin on the violin while a tumour was removed from her brain so that surgeons could preserve her ability to play music and honour her 40-year passion for the instrument. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Violinist plays Mahler and Gershwin to save her music as surgeons remove brain tumour
A patient at a British hospital played Mahler and Gershwin on the violin while a tumour was removed from her brain so that surgeons could preserve her ability to play music and her 40-year passion for the instrument. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

As Prices Rise for Parkinson's, Alzheimer's Meds, Patients Go Without
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 19, 2020 -- Rising drug costs are hampering the care of patients with debilitating neurological disorders like Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's, a new study finds. Patients are less likely to fill necessary prescriptions as... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 19, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Actrims 2020 actrims 2020
Read clinically focused news coverage of key developments from ACTRIMS 2020Medscape Neurology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Conference Coverage Source Type: news

A Look at Specialty Polymers for Surgical Robots
The surgical robot industry is developing specialized products for neurosurgery, spinal surgery and other medical procedures that require greater precision, flexibility, and control than is possible with conventional techniques. Today, more than 5,000 surgical robots are installed worldwide – and that market is expected to grow at a double-digit rate over the next few years. For the designers of surgical robots, this presents both challenges and opportunities. The healthcare industry has discovered the numerous advantages of robotic surgery. For example, surgeons can benefit from having a higher viewing a...
Source: MDDI - February 19, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Anna Maria Bertasa Tags: Materials Assembly and Automation Source Type: news

ZAP Surgical to Bring World-Class Brain Tumor Treatments to Rural German Hospital
Bonifatius Hospital in Lingen to Be Among the First in Europe to Offer the Latest Advances in Stereotactic Radiosurgery SAN CARLOS, Calif., Feb. 19, 2020 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- ZAP Surgical Systems, Inc. today announced an agreeme... Devices, Oncology, Neurosurgery ZAP Surgical Systems, ZAP-X, stereotactic, radiosurgery, radiotherapy (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - February 19, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Patient plays violin during her brain surgery
Professional musician Dagmar Turner was diagnosed with a large brain tumour in 2013. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

U.K. Patient Plays Violin During Unusual Brain Tumor Surgery
(LONDON) — Surgeons at King’s College Hospital in London removed a brain tumor from a woman who played the violin during the procedure. Doctors for violinist Dagmar Turner, 53, mapped her brain before the surgery to identify areas that were active when she played the instrument and those responsible for controlling language and movement. Doctors then woke her in mid-procedure so she could play to “ensure the surgeons did not damage any crucial areas of the brain that controlled Dagmar’s delicate hand movements,” the hospital said in a statement. “We knew how important the violin is to Da...
Source: TIME: Health - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized health onetime United Kingdom Source Type: news

Researchers find a western-style diet can impair brain function
After a week on a high fat, high added sugar diet, volunteers scored worse on memory testsConsuming a western diet for as little as one week can subtly impair brain function and encourage slim and otherwise healthy young people to overeat, scientists claim.Researchers found that after seven days on a high fat, high added sugar diet, volunteers in their 20s scored worse on memory tests and found junk food more desirable immediately after they had finished a meal.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 19, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Dementia Diets and dieting Nutrition Food Sugar Memory Obesity Diabetes UCL (University College London) Neuroscience Health Life and style Mental health Source Type: news

Hair Testosterone Concentrations and Emotional Reactivity Hair Testosterone Concentrations and Emotional Reactivity
This study investigates the relationship between hair testosterone concentration--an index of long-term cumulative testosterone levels--and emotion processing neuroimaging data.Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Journal Article Source Type: news

Spinal Cord Stimulation for Neuropathic Pain Spinal Cord Stimulation for Neuropathic Pain
Spinal cord stimulation is an option for the management of chronic neuropathic pain, but is the pain relief obtained the result of a placebo effect?Pain (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Journal Article Source Type: news

Nigeria: Senate Moves to Check Medical Brain Drain in Nigeria
[Vanguard] The Senate has begun moves to check the rising emigration of medical and health professionals from Nigeria to developed countries . (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 19, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

What birdsong tells us about brain cells and learning
(University of Chicago) New research by neuroscientists at the University of Chicago uses a unique model -- the intricate mating songs of birds -- to show how the intrinsic properties of neurons are closely tied to the complex processes of learning. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tumor blood vessel detection by a gripping force feedback system
(Kanazawa University) Avoiding unnecessary bleeding during neuroendoscopic surgeries is crucial. When blood vessel location in a tumor cannot be visually confirmed, unintentional damage to the vessel and subsequent bleeding may occur. We propose a method for tumor blood vessel detection using a surgical robot system equipped with a force sensor in the gripper. Using this method, pulsation of a simulated artery inside a simulated tumor was detected by the force sensor, displayed as a gripping force wave. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 19, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Machine learning identifies personalized brain networks in children
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Machine learning is helping Penn Medicine researchers identify the size and shape of brain networks in individual children, which may be useful for understanding psychiatric disorders. In a new study published in the journal Neuron, a multidisciplinary team showed how brain networks unique to each child can predict cognition. The study is the first to show that functional neuroanatomy can vary greatly among kids, and is refined during development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain measurements can reveal success of alcohol risk messages
(University of Konstanz) By studying how our brains 'synchronise' during shared experiences, social neuroscientists at the University of Konstanz show if alcohol risk messages catch on in an audience and lead to a reduction in drinking. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Antidote to pain and negativity? Let it be
(Yale University) Merely a brief introduction to mindfulness helps people deal with physical pain and negative emotions, a new study by researchers at Yale, Columbia, and Dartmouth shows. The effect of mindfulness was so pronounced, they found, that even when participants were subjected to high heat on their forearm, their brain responded as if it was experiencing normal temperature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Altered potassium levels in neurons may cause mood swings in bipolar disorder
(Salk Institute) A sweeping new set of findings by Salk researchers reveals previously unknown details explaining why some neurons in bipolar patients swing between being overly or under excited. The researchers used experimental and computational techniques to describe how variations in potassium and sodium currents in the brain cells of people with bipolar disorder may help to further explain why some patients respond to lithium and others do not. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A new model of the worm C. elegans to progress in the study of a rare disease
(IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute) he IDIBELL Neurometabolic Diseases group, with international collaboration, has identified a model of chromosome X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (x-ALD) in the earthworm C. elegans, this is a rare disorder of the nervous system with no treatment available. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

One week of unhealthy eating could 'damage a part of the brain which normally stops us eating MORE'
Fast food may impair the hippocampus, a part of the brain which stops us gorging on food when we are full, a study by Macquarie University in Australia suggests. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

ACTRIMS Forum 2020 Puts Spotlight on'Networks in MS'ACTRIMS Forum 2020 Puts Spotlight on'Networks in MS '
The meeting brings together MS experts, practitioners, and trainees alike for 3 days of learning and networking.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines)
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - February 19, 2020 Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

The War Against Artificial Intelligence And Mass Unemployment – Do...
Martin Brison, Editor of brain supplement site 'BrainPillReviews.com' writes that as Artificial intelligence brings automation to a number of industries, it will devastate the job market as we...(PRWeb February 19, 2020)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/the_war_against_artificial_intelligence_and_mass_unemployment_do_nootropic_brain_supplements_hold_the_answer/prweb16916396.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - February 19, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

President Proposes Cuts at NSF
The President has proposed a 6.5 percent cut to the National Science Foundation (NSF) in fiscal year (FY) 2021. The science agency is slated to receive $7.7 billion, which is $537 million below the FY 2020 level enacted by Congress. According to the budget proposal, NSF will continue to invest in its Big Ideas and Convergence Accelerator, providing support for “bold inquiries into the frontiers of science and engineering” in order “to break down the silos of conventional scientific research funded by NSF to embrace the cross-disciplinary and dynamic nature of the science of the future.” Among th...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 18, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

NIH Slated for 7 percent Budget Cut
The President has proposed a $38.7 billion budget for the National Institutes of Health in fiscal year (FY) 2021. This translates to a $3 billion or 7 percent cut in the agency’s funding compared to FY 2020. The NIH budget request includes a $50 million initiative to use artificial intelligence (AI) to develop a better understanding of the causes of chronic diseases and to identify early treatments. This plan is in line with the Administration’s “Industries of the Future” effort, which supports using and developing AI across sectors. The budget would provide $50 million for the Childhood Cancer ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 18, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Pediatric MOG-Antibody-Associated Syndromes Include Encephalitis Pediatric MOG-Antibody-Associated Syndromes Include Encephalitis
Pediatric myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-antibody-associated syndromes should be expanded beyond demyelinating syndromes to include encephalitis, according to a multicenter study.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines)
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - February 18, 2020 Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Simulated aeromedical evacuation in a polytrauma rat model - Arnaud F, Pappas G, Maudlin-Jeronimo E, Goforth C.
BACKGROUND: Hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury can be lethal if left unattended. The transportation of severely wounded combat casualties from the battlefield to higher level of care via aeromedical evacuation (AE) may result in unintended compli... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

New Device for Intracranial Aneurysm Approved in Europe New Device for Intracranial Aneurysm Approved in Europe
Cerus Endovascular has announced that it has received European CE Mark approval for its lead product, the Contour Neurovascular System, for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms.International Approvals (Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines - February 18, 2020 Category: Radiology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Alert Source Type: news

Brain Imaging Offers New Insight Into Antisocial Behavior Brain Imaging Offers New Insight Into Antisocial Behavior
Antisocial behavior that starts in childhood and persists into adulthood is associated with structural brain differences involving reduced surface area and cortical thickness.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape FamilyMedicine Headlines)
Source: Medscape FamilyMedicine Headlines - February 18, 2020 Category: Primary Care Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news

Maximal Resection of Glioblastomas May Up Survival
Maximal resection of contrast - enhanced tumor linked to increased overall survival across all subgroups (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - February 18, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Neurology, Oncology, Pathology, Radiology, Surgery, Journal, Source Type: news