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Could Aspirin Sub for Heparin to Prevent Cancer-Associated Thrombosis?
(MedPage Today) -- Pilot study suggests safety and feasibility, supporting a larger trial (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - January 8, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

What COMPASS and RE-DUAL Mean for Aspirin and Triple Therapy What COMPASS and RE-DUAL Mean for Aspirin and Triple Therapy
Drs Cohen and O'Donoghue review new data from the COMPASS and RE-DUAL PCI trials and potential strategies for patients who need anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy.theheart.org on Medscape (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - January 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Commentary Source Type: news

High-Dose Aspirin Preferred for Kawasaki's (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Low doses raise risk of IVIG resistance (Source: MedPage Today Pediatrics)
Source: MedPage Today Pediatrics - January 3, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Equagesic (Meprobamate and Aspirin) - updated on RxList
(Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs)
Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs - December 29, 2017 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Regular Aspirin Use May Slow COPD Progression (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Analysis showed 50% reduction in emphysema progression (Source: MedPage Today Allergy)
Source: MedPage Today Allergy - December 23, 2017 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: news

Gingko biloba may help boost memory and function after stroke
The herbal extract Gingko biloba may help stroke patients recover better than just taking aspirin, according to Chinese researchers. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - December 22, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Your NEJM Group Today: Date Night with the EHR / Low-Dose Aspirin & Intracranial Bleeding / California FM Opportunity
Take a look at today's offering from NEJM Group: NEJM Catalyst: Infographic: Date Night with the Electronic Health Record: Two experts urge individuals and organizations... (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - December 22, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Gingko biloba May Protect Cognition in Stroke Patients Gingko biloba May Protect Cognition in Stroke Patients
In a small randomized trial, the herbal extract as an adjunct to aspirin showed less cognitive decline vs aspirin alone in patients with ischemic stroke and was safe.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Stroke: This herbal extract could improve brain function
Those who have experienced ischemic stroke may benefit from taking a combination of ginkgo biloba extract and aspirin, a new study suggests. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Herbal supplement boosts memory in stroke survivors
Researchers from Nanjing University in China found ginkgo bilboa improves stroke sufferers' attention, reflexes and language skills in as little as 12 weeks when taken with aspirin, which thins the blood. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ginkgo Biloba Use After Stroke Tied to Less Cognitive Decline
Ginkgo biloba extract plus aspirin is associated with less cognitive decline following stroke, compared with aspirin alone, according to a study in Stroke and Vascular... (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - December 19, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Supplement boosts memory in stroke survivors
Researchers from Nanjing University in China found ginkgo bilboa improves stroke sufferers' attention, reflexes and language skills in as little as 12 weeks when taken with aspirin, which thins the blood. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Aspirin, NSAIDs and Prospective Risk of HER2+ Breast Cancer Aspirin, NSAIDs and Prospective Risk of HER2+ Breast Cancer
Does aspirin or ibuprofen reduce risk of HER2+ breast cancer?Breast Cancer Research (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - December 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Journal Article Source Type: news

11.12.17: Not intended for U.S. and UK Media
Bayer's rivaroxaban submitted to U.S. FDA for approval in patients with coronary and/or peripheral artery diseaseThe rivaroxaban vascular dose, 2.5 mg twice daily plus aspirin 100 mg once daily, demonstrated a 24% reduction in the combined risk of stroke, cardiovascular death and heart attack / The application for marketing approval is based on the COMPASS studymehr ... (Source: Bayer IR Newsfeed: Events)
Source: Bayer IR Newsfeed: Events - December 10, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Diabetes drug and aspirin boosts cancer drug effectiveness
Metformin may slow breast cancer growth, a study by the University of Saskatchewan in Canada found. Adding aspirin to a cancer drug could help combat pancreatic, lung and colorectal cancers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Statins, Aspirin Grossly Underused in HIV: US Study Statins, Aspirin Grossly Underused in HIV: US Study
There could be many reasons too few with indications are getting the drugs, including but not limited to poor cross-specialty communication and the changing needs of an aging HIVMedscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - December 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Aspirin may strengthen anti-cancer drugs
Aspirin in conjunction with Sorafenib — an anti-cancer drug —increases its ability to destroy malignant cells in some difficult-to-treat cancers. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Adding Rivaroxaban to Aspirin Cuts Costs in Secondary Prevention Adding Rivaroxaban to Aspirin Cuts Costs in Secondary Prevention
That seemed true combining low-dose rivaroxaban and aspirin in the COMPASS trial vs giving aspirin alone, particularly for patients with PAD or extensive atherosclerosis rather than simply CAD.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

PRECISION: Aspirin Undermines Safety Profile of Celecoxib PRECISION: Aspirin Undermines Safety Profile of Celecoxib
Further analysis from PRECISION shows that although celecoxib may be safer than naproxen or ibuprofen, adding aspirin may undermine that safety advantage.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Sensitivity and Specificity as Guides to Clinical Decision Making
From headache to helping hand Many of us get headaches and go cross-eyed when we see statistical concepts like sensitivity and specificity in print. Usually, these appear in articles about a diagnostic test's ability to tell you when a condition or disease state is present (i.e., sensitivity) or, conversely, to tell you when that condition or disease state isn't there (i.e., specificity). An initial 12-lead ECG, for example, has a sensitivity of about 68% for diagnosing an acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). That means that a little more than two-thirds of patients who eventually rule-in for MIs are...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - December 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neal Richmond, MD Tags: Patient Care Columns Source Type: news

Heart Patients Help Doctors Determine Best Aspirin Dose in New Clinical Trial
Treatment TermsHeart Author Tim Pittman Overview Doctors have known for decades that taking aspirin can reduce the risk for future heart attacks and strokes in people with cardiovascular disease. What is less clear is which dose is best. Participants in a new kind of clinical trial are helping them find out. Content Blocks Section Header Image/Videoaspirinclinicaltrial.jpg Section Features Images/Media Text Content Section Header Image/Video2017_williamking_aspirin_080.jpg Section Features Images/Media Text Content Section Features Images/Media Text Content CTA ButtonThe Adaptable Aspirin Study CTA Header...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - November 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dg62 at duke.edu Source Type: news

Nurses play key role in major primary care trial on aspirin use
Research nurses have been credited with playing a key role in recruiting patients to take part in what is believed to be the largest drug trial of its kind ever to take place in the UK. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - November 28, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Aspirin link to cerebral palsy in babies
Newborns were almost two-and-a-half times more likely to have the incurable condition if their mothers took aspirin and 50 per cent more likely if they took paracetamol, a (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Babies likely to get cerebral palsy if mother has aspirin
Newborns were almost two-and-a-half times more likely to have the incurable condition if their mothers took aspirin and 50 per cent more likely if they took paracetamol, a (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Under Affordable Care Act, Americans have had more preventive care for heart health, UCLA study finds
By reducing out-of-pocket costs for preventive treatment, the Affordable Care Act appears to have encouraged more people to have health screenings related to their cardiovascular health,a UCLA study found. Comparing figures from 2006 through 2013, researchers found that more people were screened for diabetes, high cholesterol, cigarette use and high blood pressure — all risk factors for heart disease — after the ACA was implemented than before.But the research, published in the peer-reviewed American Journal of Managed Care, also revealed a disparity between men and women in one key area. Although more men who ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 23, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

HIV-positive adults are under-treated for cardiovascular problems compared to those without HIV
This study provides evidence that U.S. policymakers and professional societies should focus on improving the quality of the cardiovascular care that people who are HIV-positive receive.AUTHORSStudy authors are Dr. Joseph Ladapo, Dr. Adam Richards, Cassandra DeWitt, Nina Harawa, Steven Shoptaw, Dr. William Cunningham and Dr. John Mafi, all of UCLA. Mafi is also associated with Rand Corporation.JOURNALThestudy is published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.FUNDINGGrants from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, and National Institute of Men...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 22, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Self-Inflicted Injuries Surge Among Tween & Early Teen Girls
By Susan Scutti, CNN (CNN) — Emergency room visits for non-fatal, self-inflicted injuries surged in recent years among US girls and young women, especially those between the ages of 10 and 14, according to a new study. However, rates of self-harm among boys and young men between the ages of 10 and 24 remained stable throughout the years 2001 through 2015, the researchers said. “Suicide is preventable,” said Melissa C. Mercado, lead author of the study published Tuesday in JAMA and a behavioral scientist at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “These findings underscore the need for the...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Suicide Source Type: news

HIV-positive adults receive inferior cardiovascular care compared with those without HIV
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) People with both HIV and risk factors for heart disease and stroke were less likely to be treated with cholesterol-lowering statin drugs and aspirin than patients without HIV. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cadagan: Humor and tenacity after a stroke
Most parents try to discourage their children from indulging in humor about bodily functions like burping. But for Daniel and Lori Hooley, a simple smirk in response to a belch was the sign they needed that their daughter, Cadagan, was going to be okay. It was 2012 and 7-year-old Cadagan was asleep, tucked into bed for the night. Around 11 p.m., she suddenly awoke — but it wasn’t because of a nightmare or a late-night request for a glass of water. Instead, she seemed limp and couldn’t focus. Then she began throwing up. Born with an extremely rare genetic disorder called trisomy 12p, the little girl had al...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 20, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Cameron Trenor Dr. Laura Lehman Dr. Michael Rivkin stroke Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center vasculitis Source Type: news

FDA Drug Safety Communication: FDA strengthens warning that non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause heart attacks or strokes
[FDA strengthens warning that non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause heart attacks or strokes (FDA Drug Safety Communication). Based on FDA ’s comprehensive review of new safety information, the agency is requiring updates to the drug labels of all prescription NSAIDs. Widely used to treat pain and fever from many different long- and short-term medical conditions such as arthritis, menstrual cramps, headaches, colds, and the flu, NSAI Ds are available by prescription and OTC. Examples of NSAIDs include ibuprofen, naproxen, diclofenac, and celecoxib. (Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation...
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - November 16, 2017 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Computer program finds new uses for old drugs
(Case Western Reserve University) Researchers at the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have developed a computer program to find new indications for old drugs. The computer program, called DrugPredict, matches existing data about FDA-approved drugs to diseases, and predicts potential drug efficacy. In a recent study published in Oncogene, the researchers successfully translated DrugPredict results into the laboratory, and showed common pain medications--like aspirin--can kill patient-derived epithelial ovarian cancer cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 16, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

POISE-2: PCI Patients May Benefit From Perioperative Aspirin POISE-2: PCI Patients May Benefit From Perioperative Aspirin
A subgroup analysis of the POISE-2 trial suggests patients with a prior PCI may benefit from perioperative aspirin for subsequent noncardiac surgeries.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Is Low-Dose Aspirin Right for You After Surgery?
Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Blood Clots, Surgery (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - November 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is Low-Dose Aspirin Right for You After Surgery?
Title: Is Low-Dose Aspirin Right for You After Surgery?Category: Health NewsCreated: 11/14/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 11/15/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - November 15, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Is Low-Dose Aspirin Right for You After Surgery?
TUESDAY, Nov. 14, 2017 -- Each year, millions of American heart patients go " under the knife " for various kinds of surgery. Often they're told to take a low-dose aspirin, to help lower their odds for a post-op blood clot. But does that practice... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 14, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Perioperative Aspirin Might Benefit Patients with Prior PCI
Perioperative aspirin seems beneficial for high-risk patients undergoing noncardiac surgery who've previously undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), according to a subanalysis from the POISE... (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - November 14, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Aspirin can prevent heart attacks after noncardiac surgery in patients with prior PCI
(University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine& Dentistry) A Canadian-led study has found that perioperative aspirin can prevent heart-related complications after major noncardiac surgery in patients with previous percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) such as an angioplasty or stent. The study found that for every 1,000 patients with PCI, giving them aspirin at the time of noncardiac surgery would prevent 59 heart attacks and cause eight major bleeding events. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Low-Dose Aspirin Use and Cognitive Function in Older Age Low-Dose Aspirin Use and Cognitive Function in Older Age
Might low-dose aspirin, with its anti-inflammatory properties, have a favorable effect on cognition in the elderly?Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Journal Article Source Type: news

DACAB: Ticagrelor Plus Aspirin Improves CABG Graft Patency DACAB: Ticagrelor Plus Aspirin Improves CABG Graft Patency
Results showed dual therapy with aspirin and ticagrelor resulted in improved patency of saphenous vein grafts vs either agent alone, but the data are unlikely to change practice yet, observers say.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Speed makes a difference when using clot-stabilising drug in severe bleeding
Immediate treatment with clot-stabilising drug can reduce risk of death due to blood loss by 70% Related items fromOnMedica Heavy menstrual bleeding Bleeding risk with long-term aspirin increases substantially with age Direct oral anticoagulants as safe as warfarin after VTE Include pregnant women in studies, urge researchers (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - November 8, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Aspirin May Improve Exercise Endurance in MS Aspirin May Improve Exercise Endurance in MS
A small pilot study suggests aspirin may be an'easy, economical'treatment to minimize overheating with exertion and allow patients with multiple sclerosis to get the benefits of exercise.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Bayer submits application for marketing approval of rivaroxaban for patients with coronary or peripheral artery disease to European Medicines Agency (for specialized target groups only)
The rivaroxaban vascular dose, 2.5 mg twice daily plus aspirin 100 mg once daily, demonstrated a 24% reduction in the combined risk of stroke, cardiovascular death and heart attack / The application for marketing approval is based on the COMPASS study / If approved, the rivaroxaban vascular dose, 2.5 mg twice daily plus aspirin low dose once daily, will be the only non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC) indicated for this patient population (Source: Bayer Company News)
Source: Bayer Company News - November 6, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

06.11.17: Not intended for U.S. and UK Media
Bayer submits application for marketing approval of rivaroxaban for patients with coronary or peripheral artery disease to European Medicines AgencyThe rivaroxaban vascular dose, 2.5 mg twice daily plus aspirin 100 mg once daily, demonstrated a 24% reduction in the combined risk of stroke, cardiovascular death and heart attack (1) / The application for marketing approval is based on the COMPASS study / If approved, the rivaroxaban vascular dose, 2.5 mg twice daily plus aspirin low dose once daily, will be the only non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC) indicated for this patient populationmehr ... (Source: Baye...
Source: Bayer IR Newsfeed: Events - November 5, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Morning Rounds: Aspirin risks, effects of space travel on the brain
CBS News medical contributor Dr. David Agus joins "CBS This Morning: Saturday" to discuss new research about the risks of long-term aspirin use, a study about the potential effects of space travel on the human brain and why it might be a good idea to add more spicy food to your diet. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - November 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Aspirin: the tonic for good health
IF EVER a form of medication deserved the term “wonder drug” it’s aspirin. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - November 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

PFA - 100 - Measured Aspirin Resistance Linked to CV Events
Strong correlation between aspirin resistance, CV events at 5 - year follow - up in aspirin - treated patients (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - October 31, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gynecology, Internal Medicine, Neurology, Nursing, Pathology, Pharmacy, Pulmonology, Journal, Source Type: news

Long-Term Aspirin Use May Reduce Cancer Risk, Study Finds
A large-scale study of aspirin users found a link between taking aspirin long-term and significant risk reduction for multiple types of cancer. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - October 31, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: David DiSalvo, Contributor Source Type: news

Aspirin 'cuts risk of cancer by up to half'
A trial involving more than half a million people found long-term aspirin users cut their risk of liver and oesophageal cancer by almost half, while their odds of getting bowel cancer fell by a quarter. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Aspirin slashes risk of gastrointestinal cancer
A large-scale study finds that regular, long-term use of aspirin may be able to prevent the development of different gastrointestinal cancers. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Aspirin can HALVE risk of some deadly cancers, a study has found
AN ASPIRIN a day can halve the risk of developing some cancers, a major study suggests. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news