Using machine learning to predict pediatric brain injury
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) When newborn babies or children with heart or lung distress are struggling to survive, doctors often turn to a form of life support that uses artificial lungs. This treatment, called Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO), has been credited with saving countless lives. But in some cases, it can also lead to long-term brain injury. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SIMPONI ARIA ® (golimumab) Approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for Active Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Extension of Its Active Psoriatic Arthritis Indication in Patients 2 Years of Age and Older
HORSHAM, PA, September 30, 2020 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved SIMPONI ARIA® (golimumab) for patients 2 years of age and older for the treatment of active pJIA and has extended the PsA indication for this same patient population. “This latest FDA approval of SIMPONI ARIA for pediatric use in active pJIA and active PsA not only brings a new option to young patients living with these diseases but also adds to the growing body of evidence for this treatment,” said Mathai Mammen, M.D., Ph.D., Glo...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - September 30, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Poll Finds 1 In 3 Parents Won ’ t Get Children Vaccinated For The Flu This Year
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Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Flu Vaccine Source Type: news

Baby's Heart Rate Reflects Mom's Mental Health
TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2020 -- Babies of mothers with anxiety or depression can have significantly higher heart rates than normal, a new study finds. And this might put them at risk for long-term problems, researchers say. Mother-infant interaction... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 22, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Baby heartbeat reveals the stress of having a depressed or anxious mother
(European College of Neuropsychopharmacology) Scientists have shown that the babies of mothers dealing with anxiety or depression exhibit physiologically stronger signs of stress than babies of healthy mothers, when given a standard stress test. These babies show a significantly increased heart rate, which researchers fear may lead to imprinted emotional stresses as the child grows up (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Congential heart defects: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute
Every year, more than 35-thousand babies, just in the U.S., are born with a congenitial heart defect.  In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, Dr. Joseph Dearani, discusses diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart defects. To listen, click the link below. Congential heart defects (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - September 8, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

What happens when babies with heart defects become adults?
(European Society of Cardiology) More than 90% of babies born with heart defects survive into adulthood. As a result, there are now more adults living with congenital heart disease than children. These adults have a chronic, lifelong condition and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) has produced advice to give the best chance of a normal life. The guidelines are published online today in European Heart Journal, and on the ESC website. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Janssen Announces U.S. FDA Approval of SPRAVATO ® (esketamine) CIII Nasal Spray to Treat Depressive Symptoms in Adults with Major Depressive Disorder with Acute Suicidal Ideation or Behavior
TITUSVILLE, N.J. – (August 3, 2020) – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the supplemental new drug application (sNDA) for SPRAVATO® (esketamine) CIII nasal spray, taken with an oral antidepressant, to treat depressive symptoms in adults with major depressive disorder (MDD) with acute suicidal ideation orbehavior.1 SPRAVATO® is the first and only approved medicine that has been shown to reduce depressive symptoms within 24 hours,1 providing a new option for significant symptom relief until a longer-te...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - August 3, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

What Are Common Fatty Acid Oxidation Metabolic Disorders?
Discussion All cells and particularly their mitochondria need an energy source. Glucose is one of the most common ones, but also fatty acids, lactate, pyruvate, ketones, and amino acids. Fatty acids are formed with a carboxylic acid with a long aliphatic carbon chain usually with even numbers of carbon atoms (usually 4-28 most commonly). Most are unbranched and in foods are usually found in the form of esters. Fatty acids are important energy sources for the heart (50-70%) but also skeletal muscle where resting muscle uses both glucose and fatty acids. During fasting or increased stress fatty acids become a major source o...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - July 27, 2020 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Reports 2020 Second-Quarter Results
New Brunswick, N.J. (July 16, 2020) – Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) today announced results for second-quarter 2020. “Our second quarter results reflect the impact of COVID-19 and the enduring strength of our Pharmaceutical business, where we saw continued growth even in this environment,” said Alex Gorsky, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. “Thanks to the tireless work of our colleagues around the world and our broad range of capabilities, we continue to successfully navigate the external landscape, and we remain focused on advancing the development of a vaccine to help address this pandemic...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - July 16, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q & amp;A podcast: Hypoplastic left heart syndrome
Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a birth defect that affects normal blood flow through the heart. As a baby develops during pregnancy, the left side of the heart does not form correctly. Ava Weitl, now a first grader, was born with HLHS. She had her first heart surgery the day she was born. Now she is part of pioneering research [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 15, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

TREMFYA ® (guselkumab) Approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration as the First Selective Interleukin (IL)-23 Inhibitor for Active Psoriatic Arthritis
HORSHAM, PA, July 14, 2020 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved TREMFYA® (guselkumab) for adult patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA), a chronic progressive disease characterized by painful joints and skin inflammation.[1],[2] TREMFYA is the first treatment approved for active PsA that selectively inhibits interleukin (IL)-23, a naturally occurring cytokine that is involved in normal inflammatory and immune responses associated with the symptoms of PsA. The safety and efficacy of TREMFYA in PsA have b...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - July 14, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Middle-aged people will be more ill and for LONGER than baby boomers, major new study suggests 
Researchers at University College London found today's 40-and 50-somethings were much more likely to be overweight, diabetic or have heart disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Premature Births Tied to Heart Risks in Mothers
Women who delivered prematurely had a decades-long increased risk of coronary heart disease. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nicholas Bakalar Tags: Women and Girls Premature Babies Heart Source Type: news

Janssen Announces Discontinuation of Phase 3 LOTUS Study Evaluating Ustekinumab in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
SPRING HOUSE, PENNSYLVANIA, June 26, 2020 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson announced today its decision to discontinue the Phase 3 LOTUS study of STELARA® (ustekinumab) in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) due to lack of efficacy in SLE.The decision is based on data from a pre-planned interim efficacy analysis. Interim safety findings were consistent with the known safety profile of STELARA, and no new safety signals were identified. Investigators, study participants and health authorities have been informed of the decision. The company intends to thoroughly analyze the totality of...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - June 26, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Children ’ s Robitussin And Dimetapp Cough Medicines Recalled For Potential Overdose Risks
(CNN) — Parents take note: GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare has voluntarily recalled three lots of its children’s cough syrups — Children’s Robitussin Honey Cough and Chest Congestion DM and Children’s Dimetapp Cold and Cough — due to the products having incorrect dosing cups in their packaging. That means parents might accidentally overdose a child by putting too much syrup in the cup. Symptoms of overdose of either product may include impaired coordination, elevated blood pressure, dizziness, seizure, nausea, vomiting, constipation, diarrhea, abdominal pain, hallucinations, among ot...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Consumer Health News CNN Cough Syrup Recall Source Type: news

Wiltshire dad celebrates Father ’ s Day after baby daughter ’ s life-saving heart operation
A Wiltshire dad is preparing to celebrate Father ’ s Day with his daughter – the first since she was born with a serious heart defect. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - June 19, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: ; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, Institutes, Bristol Heart Institute; Press Release Source Type: news

Stakeholders update newborn screening guidelines for critical congenital heart disease
(Children's National Hospital) A distinguished panel of medical experts, state and federal health officials, and congenital heart disease parent advocates published recommended updates to the current American Academy of Pediatrics' protocol for detecting critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) in newborn babies using pulse oximetry. The recommendations appear in the June 2020 issue of Pediatrics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 4, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

' Kangaroo Care' Has Big Health Benefits For Preemies
MONDAY, May 25, 2020 -- Skin-to-skin contact between parents and babies -- often called " kangaroo care " -- provides major benefits to preemies'hearts and brains, Australian researchers say. They assessed 40 babies born about 10 weeks early with an... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 25, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Lockdown babies: Children born during the coronavirus crisis, Children's Commissioner
This briefing paper highlights the need for policymakers to put families with young children, and especially those with newborns, at the heart of coronavirus planning. It shows that the risks to babies and young children can be reduced if the government and services think creatively to find ways to bring vital support to new parents, and takes proactive steps to ensure that different agencies routinely share data on these children – now more important than ever. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - May 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: Any Level Of Drinking, Smoking While Pregnant May Affect Newborn ’ s Brain Development
(CNN) — If you’re stressed or wanting to enjoy virtual happy hour with friends while pregnant, having a glass of wine every so often may seem like a relaxing plan. But that behavior runs counter to a study published Tuesday in the journal JAMA Network Open. Researchers found drinking or smoking of any level while pregnant — from low to high, and even if you quit early — influenced the brain development of the mothers’ newborns. Negative long-term effects of excessive prenatal alcohol or tobacco exposure (or both), increase the risk for multiple adverse outcomes, researchers observed. Prenatal ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Pregnancy Source Type: news

What to Know About Kawasaki Disease, the Pediatric Inflammatory Condition Possibly Linked to COVID-19
Six weeks ago, in the relatively early days of the U.S. COVID-19 outbreak, Dr. Veena Goel Jones, a pediatric hospitalist with Palo Alto Medical Foundation in California, treated a six-month-old baby girl for what she calls “classic Kawasaki disease.” The infant had fever, rash and swelling characteristic of the pediatric inflammatory condition. Jones, who is also an adjunct clinical assistant professor at the Stanford School of Medicine, and her team also tested the girl for COVID-19, mainly out of hospital protocol—”not necessarily because we felt very strongly like she must have the virus,” ...
Source: TIME: Health - May 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

AHA News: How Pregnant Woman's High Blood Pressure Can Change Shape of Baby's Heart
THURSDAY, April 30, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- Mothers who have high blood pressure are more likely to have babies with slightly different-shaped hearts, a finding that could impact future cardiovascular care for those women and their... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 30, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Life, the universe and medicine – part 1
Like everyone, I assume I’ll live forever. Although I often wonder whether anyone would come to my funeral and who would wear black, it never actually occurrs to me that there is an endpoint. It’s almost as if I would come along too to watch proceedings running smoothly and along the lines I wanted. Death was something I thought about, but in a rather abstract, offhand sort of way. It happened, of course I knew I would die at some point, but that point was somewhere out there … way off from here, where I am now. And then I hit a brick wall. The wall consisted of a tiny little bit of blood coughed up in s...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - April 28, 2020 Category: OBGYN Authors: Linda Parkinson-Hardman Tags: Emotional Health Happiness Thought for the day Women's Health my story Source Type: news

Federal Judge Excludes Certain Plaintiff Expert Testimony from Talc Ovarian Cancer Trials, Deeming Them Not Scientifically Sound
NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ – April 27, 2020: Johnson & Johnson (“the Company”) (NYSE: JNJ) today announced that U.S. District Judge Freda L. Wolfson, chief judge of the District of New Jersey, who is presiding over the federal multidistrict litigation (MDL) involving claims that Johnson’s Baby Powder causes ovarian cancer, decided that certain plaintiff expert witnesses did not present scientifically sound evidence to support aspects of their opinions and therefore cannot present these theories before a jury.The Company is pleased the decision did not limit the testimony of any of the Company’s exp...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - April 28, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Janssen Announces Submission of Two Applications to U.S. FDA Seeking Approval of SIMPONI ARIA ® (golimumab) for the Treatment of Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Juvenile Psoriatic Arthritis
HORSHAM, PA, April 24, 2020 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson today announced the submission of two supplemental Biologics License Applications (sBLA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) seeking approval of SIMPONI ARIA® (golimumab) for the treatment of polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pJIA) and juvenile psoriatic arthritis (jPsA), in patients two years of age and older in combination with methotrexate. If approved for these indications, SIMPONI ARIA would be the first anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha biologic agent administered by intravenous infusion av...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - April 24, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Vaccines, Antibodies and Drug Libraries. The Possible COVID-19 Treatments Researchers Are Excited About
In early April, about four months after a new, highly infectious coronavirus was first identified in China, an international group of scientists reported encouraging results from a study of an experimental drug for treating the viral disease known as COVID-19. It was a small study, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, but showed that remdesivir, an unapproved drug that was originally developed to fight Ebola, helped 68% of patients with severe breathing problems due to COVID-19 to improve; 60% of those who relied on a ventilator to breathe and took the drug were able to wean themselves off the machines after 18...
Source: TIME: Health - April 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Up close and personal: The Thomas D ’Hooghe story
While his friends were easing into retirement, Thomas D ’Hooghe MD, 55, was sleepless with excitement at the thought of reinventing himself by jumping from academia to pharma.   It is a move he would recommend to anyone. “It was the best thing I ever did,” says the Vice-President and Head Global Medical Affairs, Fertility at Merck, sitting down with me and sharing his thoughts about passion, purpose, leading people and making a difference.  Origins Working in healthcare was always in his blood. In high school it was never a question; D ’Hooghe would study medicine. It was an id...
Source: EyeForPharma - April 14, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jill Donahue Source Type: news

Up close and personal: The Thomas D ’Hooghe story
While his friends were easing into retirement, Thomas D ’Hooghe MD, 55, was sleepless with excitement at the thought of reinventing himself by jumping from academia to pharma.   It is a move he would recommend to anyone. “It was the best thing I ever did,” says the Vice-President and Head Global Medical Affairs, Fertility at Merck, sitting down with me and sharing his thoughts about passion, purpose, leading people and making a difference.  Origins Working in healthcare was always in his blood. In high school it was never a question; D ’Hooghe would study medicine. It was an id...
Source: EyeForPharma - April 14, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jill Donahue Source Type: news

Up close and personal: The Thomas D ’Hooghe story
While his friends were easing into retirement, Thomas D ’Hooghe MD, 55, was sleepless with excitement at the thought of reinventing himself by jumping from academia to pharma.   It is a move he would recommend to anyone. “It was the best thing I ever did,” says the Vice-President and Head Global Medical Affairs, Fertility at Merck, sitting down with me and sharing his thoughts about passion, purpose, leading people and making a difference.  Origins Working in healthcare was always in his blood. In high school it was never a question; D ’Hooghe would study medicine. It was an id...
Source: EyeForPharma - April 14, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jill Donahue Source Type: news

All Your Coronavirus Questions, Answered
One of the worst symptoms of any plague is uncertainty—who it will strike, when it will end, why it began. Merely understanding a pandemic does not stop it, but an informed public can help curb its impact and slow its spread. It can also provide a certain ease of mind in a decidedly uneasy time. Here are some of the most frequently asked questions about the COVID-19 pandemic from TIME’s readers, along with the best and most current answers science can provide. A note about our sourcing: While there are many, many studies underway investigating COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-19, the novel coronavirus that causes the illn...
Source: TIME: Health - April 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: TIME Staff Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer Source Type: news

Millions of Women Lose Access to Birth Control Due to Coronavirus Lockdowns
(JOHANNESBURG) — The callers were in tears. One by one, women in homes across rural Zimbabwe had a pleading question: When would family planning services return? Lockdowns imposed to curb the coronavirus’ spread have put millions of women in Africa, Asia and elsewhere out of reach of birth control and other sexual and reproductive health needs. Confined to their homes with their husbands and others, they face unwanted pregnancies and little idea of when they can reach the outside world again. In these uncertain times, women “have to lock down their uterus,” Abebe Shibru, Zimbabwe country director fo...
Source: TIME: Health - April 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cara Anna / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk wire Source Type: news

Hugs More Calming for Baby When Given by Mom or Dad
WEDNESDAY, April 8, 2020 -- All hugs are not created equal -- and babies as young as 4 months are proof. Heart rates in infants less than a year old slowed more during a hug than a hold. And the hug had a greater effect when it came from Mom or Dad... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 8, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

AHA News: What Pregnant Women With High Blood Pressure Need to Know About COVID-19
TUESDAY, April 7, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- High blood pressure during pregnancy can put mother and baby at risk during normal circumstances. But with the novel coronavirus spreading rapidly, many are wondering how this highly... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 7, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Results from Expert Delphi Consensus Survey on Treatment of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) with Oral Prostacyclin Pathway Agents (PPAs) Published in CHEST Journal
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA, April 3, 2020 – Actelion Pharmaceuticals US, Inc., a Janssen Pharmaceutical Company of Johnson & Johnson, today announced that CHEST, the official publication of the American College of Chest Physicians, published results from an expert Delphi consensus survey that help provide additional insights for physicians to advance the care of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH).The Prostacyclin International Expert Panel developed the consensus opinions based on common clinical scenarios in which they considered adding oral prostacyclin pathway agents (PPAs), including UPTRAVI®...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - April 3, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Landmark Phase 3 VOYAGER PAD Study of XARELTO ® (rivaroxaban) Plus Aspirin Shows Significant Benefit in Patients with Symptomatic Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) after Lower-Extremity Revascularization
RARITAN, NJ, March 28, 2020 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson today announced the VOYAGER PAD study met its primary efficacy and principal safety endpoints, demonstrating the XARELTO® (rivaroxaban) vascular dose (2.5 mg twice daily) plus aspirin (100 mg once daily) was superior to aspirin alone in reducing the risk of major adverse limb and cardiovascular (CV) events by 15 percent in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD) after lower-extremity revascularization, with similar rates of TIMI[1] major bleeding. VOYAGER PAD is the only study to show a significant benefi...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - March 28, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Can Coronavirus Affect Pregnancy or Newborns? Here ’s What the Experts Say
More than 130 million women give birth around the world each year. During pregnancy, changes in the immune system make women generally more susceptible to respiratory infections. And this year, pregnant women also have to worry about COVID-19, a virus that can affect a person’s lungs and airways. The U.K. government announced on Monday that pregnant women were at an increased risk of severe illness from coronavirus (COVID-19). Speaking at a press conference, Public Health England chief medical officer Chris Whitty said people in the “high risk” category should stay at home for 12 weeks. (That includes pe...
Source: TIME: Health - March 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Madeline Roache Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer Londontime Source Type: news

Janssen Highlights Continued Commitment to Cardiovascular & Metabolic Healthcare Solutions with Late-Breaking Data at the First Fully Virtual American College of Cardiology Scientific Session
RARITAN, N.J., March 20, 2020 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson announced today that it will unveil late-breaking data from its leading cardiovascular and metabolism portfolio during the virtual American College of Cardiology’s 69th Annual Scientific Session together with the World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC) on March 28-30, 2020. Notably, four late-breaking abstracts for XARELTO® (rivaroxaban) will be presented, including data from the Phase 3 VOYAGER PAD study in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD) after lower-extremity revascularization.Click to...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - March 20, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Mexico ’s President Is Resisting Coronavirus Restrictions as the Rest of the World Shuts Down
(MEXICO CITY) — Many countries in Latin America have taken aggressive measures to deal with the coronavirus such as closing their borders, dock and airports to foreigners, declaring states of emergencies and ordering business shutdowns. Mexico, by contrast, has so far taken a “business as usual” attitude. People still crowd street markets picking through piles of fruit and vegetables. Cars and trucks continue to fill the streets and commuters throng subway trains, though the volume of traffic is noticeably lower. President Andrés Manuel López Obrador and his government have said a shutdown o...
Source: TIME: Health - March 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: PETER ORSI / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight Source Type: news

AHA News: How Millennials' Notions on Food Are Changing the Entire System
WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- Like the baby boomers before them, millennials tend to do things their own way, and that's not just a reference to their often-stereotyped love of avocado toast. Surveys have shown the... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 4, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

I thought I knew a lot about how to prevent heart disease. I was surprised by what I didn’t know.
Cardiologists now say “no” to baby aspirin, fish oil and warn that younger women should be aware of greater death risk if they do have a heart attack. Also, beware the switch to daylight saving time. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - February 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Steven Petrow Source Type: news

FDA Approves Non-Statin Drug That Lowers Cholesterol
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — U.S. regulators on Friday approved a new type of cholesterol-lowering drug aimed at millions of people who can’t tolerate — or don’t get enough help from — widely used statin pills like Lipitor and Crestor. The Food and Drug Administration approved Esperion Therapeutics Inc.’s Nexletol for people genetically predisposed to have sky-high cholesterol and people who have heart disease and need to further lower their bad cholesterol. The daily pill is to be taken in conjunction with a healthy diet and the highest statin dose patients can handle, the FDA said. High LDL, o...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston Cholesterol Statins Source Type: news

Common Antibiotics Linked To Increased Risk Of Birth Defects, Study Says
(CNN) — Taking some common antibiotics during the first trimester of pregnancy was linked with higher risk of birth defects, according to a new study. The study, published Wednesday in the medical journal BMJ, found an increased risk of birth defects in the children of women who were prescribed macrolides during the first three months of pregnancy compared to mothers who were prescribed penicillin. Macrolide antibiotics include erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin, and they are used to treat infections, such as pneumonia, bronchitis and urinary, skin and sexually transmitted diseases. They are often prescrib...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Source Type: news

Babies 'face birth defect risk if their mothers take penicillin alternatives during pregnancy'
Research by University College London said that the risk of heart, brain or genital defects was 55 per cent higher among babies whose mothers took macrolide antibiotics during their pregnancy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Small Babies Have High Risk for Heart-Lung Weakness as Adults: Study
Title: Small Babies Have High Risk for Heart-Lung Weakness as Adults: StudyCategory: Health NewsCreated: 2/18/2020 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 2/19/2020 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Kids Health General)
Source: MedicineNet Kids Health General - February 19, 2020 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Small Babies Have High Risk for Heart-Lung Weakness as Adults: Study
TUESDAY, Feb. 18, 2020 -- Being small at birth after a full-term pregnancy could leave you gasping for breath later on in life. Swedish researchers report that babies with low birth weights are more likely to have poor heart-lung... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 18, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Gene therapy treatment for blindness underway
First patients begin promising gene therapy Related items fromOnMedica Gene therapy hopes for AMD Baby born with three-person DNA Myopia could be linked to longer periods spent in education Mexican fish offer clues on heart repair Online resource aims to help GPs spot early signs of degenerative muscle disease (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - February 18, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

AHA News: Baby Born With 'One-of-a-Kind' Heart Receives Transplant
Title: AHA News: Baby Born With 'One-of-a-Kind' Heart Receives TransplantCategory: Health NewsCreated: 2/11/2020 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 2/12/2020 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - February 12, 2020 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Fayer Chronicles Her Journey in Medtech to Improve Women ’s Health
Marissa Fayer, a 20-year medtech executive, entrepreneur, and philanthropist stopped in to speak with MD+DI about the changes she has seen in healthcare and how women have helped shaped the medtech industry. She is the CEO and founder of non-profit HERHealthEQ and the president of advisory firm Fayer Consulting LLC,. MD+DI: You’ve made a tremendous impact in the healthcare industry – but tell me what led you to this field? Also, when you started your career how did the landscape in the profession look? Was it particularly diverse? How has it changed since you first started? Y...
Source: MDDI - February 11, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Business Source Type: news

AHA News: Baby Born With'One-of-a-Kind' Heart Receives Transplant
TUESDAY, Feb. 11, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- When a test showed a dangerous drop in the heart rate of Courtney Agnoli's unborn daughter, the doctor who urgently admitted her to the hospital said, " You aren't leaving here without a... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 11, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news