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Inside the NICU: Shining light on the healing power of touch
Abigail underwent open-heart surgery and received care in Boston Children’s Cardiac Intensive Care Unit Traveling through Boston Children’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), you feel the warmth of natural light and a soothing sense of calm. One mom, leaning delicately over her son’s bedside, caresses his forehead and gently whispers a lullaby. Only a few steps away, a father rests in a chair with his tiny son on his chest. Lifesaving technology fills the 24-bed NICU and a reassuring team of specialized physicians, nurses and Child Life Specialists monitor, treat and embrace their delicate patients. Nea...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 16, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Our Patients’ Stories neonatal intensive care unit NICU Source Type: news

Danny ’s journey to a biventricular heart
The first hint that something wasn’t quite right with Danny Sanchez-Garcia’s heart came at his mom’s six-month prenatal visit. “There was a little blip on the ultrasound, but then it was gone on the next one, so they didn’t think it was anything and I didn’t worry any more about it,” says Danny’s mom, Cynthia. Cynthia was overjoyed when Danny was born at her local hospital seeming perfectly healthy. But as the hospital staff monitored Danny overnight, they noticed his oxygen level was lower than normal and decided to run more tests. His doctors believed the tests pointed to a...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 15, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Biventricular Repair Complex Biventricular Repair Program congenital heart valve program double outlet right ventricle Dr. Christopher Baird Dr. Roger Breitbart ECMO Pulmonary atresia tetra Source Type: news

Volunteers Wanted To Knit Red Hats For Babies
BOSTON (CBS) – The American Heart Association is looking for volunteer knitters to help out a good cause. The organization is teaming up with The Children’s Heart Foundation to mark American Heart Month in February with “Little Hats, Big Hearts.” They’re hoping to give out thousands of red hats to babies to raise awareness about heart health and congenital heart defects. (Image credit: American Heart Association) Volunteers are needed to knit or crochet little red hats. Donations of yarn are also accepted. The American Heart Association website has information on who to contact in participatin...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local American Heart Association Source Type: news

Heart donor appeal for six-week-old Charlie Douthwaite
The family of a six-week-old baby born with "half a heart" make an urgent appeal for donors. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - November 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Essex baby with heart defect died waiting for operation
Iris Day, who was born with a heart defect and Down's syndrome, died on December 2 last year, a week before she was due to have surgery on December 9 at a London hospital. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mother's heartache after cradling her baby as he died
Michaela Holehouse and Timothy O'Keeffe, from Liverpool, found Harvey in bed lifeless and tried to give him CPR. He was born with congenital heart disease but was responding to treatment. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nations without Nationality – An ‘Unseen’ Stark Reality
This report explains the circumstances that have led to them not being recognised as citizens, drawing on discussions with four stateless or formerly stateless minority groups. The findings in this report underscore the critical need for minorities to enjoy the right to nationality.“Imagine being told you don’t belong because of the language you speak, the faith you follow, the customs you practice or the colour of your skin. This is the stark reality for many of the world’s stateless. Discrimination, which can be the root cause of their lack of nationality, pervades their everyday lives – often wit...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Baher Kamal Tags: Crime & Justice Editors' Choice Education Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Migration & Refugees Population Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

All babies in Europe should be screened for heart defects at birth
Only a few countries, including Poland, Ireland and Switzerland, currently recommend universal screening with pulse oximetry Related items fromOnMedica Blood test identifies high-risk lupus pregnancies Newborns screened for four additional genetic conditions Over 600,000 carry ‘sudden death’ gene fault The next generation of prenatal testing: let ’s proceed with caution Experts advise against screening for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - November 8, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Call for Europe-wide screening of babies for heart defects
(University of Birmingham) All babies across Europe should be routinely screened for critical congenital heart defects (CCHD) within 24 hours of their birth, say a group of experts led by a University of Birmingham Professor and Honorary Consultant Neonatologist at Birmingham Women's Hospital. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mindfulness may help mothers cope with stress when their babies have a heart condition
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) Mindfulness may offer an active coping mechanism for mothers faced with the stress of having a newborn diagnosed with congenital heart disease (CHD). Mindfulness, which aims to increase a person's awareness and acceptance of daily experiences, is currently used in a variety of healthcare settings as a potentially effective skill for stress reduction, emotion, affect and attention regulation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Twins with two heads but same torso die in India
The boys, from Maharashtra in western India, were placed on a ventilator. The unnamed babies shared a liver and a pair of limbs but had separate lungs and hearts. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'One-in-a-million' twins with two heads but same torso die
The boys, from Maharashtra in western India, were placed on a ventilator. The unnamed babies shared a liver and a pair of limbs but had separate lungs and hearts. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Say “ Yes! ” Whenever Possible
To celebrate Medical Librarian’s Month we have invited medical librarians in our region to submit some information about who they are and the work that they do as medical librarians. Today we hear from a hospital librarian in Oregon! Judith with Mr. Gross Mouth Who am I? Judith Hayes, MLS Where do I work? Tuality Healthcare in Hillsboro, OR I started work as a medical librarian at Tuality Healthcare in Hillsboro, OR, on April 15, 1994.  Almost 24 years later, I am approaching retirement in just a few short weeks with anticipation and dread. It’s been amazing.  I have loved my job.  It feeds my se...
Source: Dragonfly - October 26, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: News from Network Members Medial L Medical Librarians Month Source Type: news

Courtney ’s story: Piecing together a genetic puzzle
Courtney Whitmore was born 22 years ago with a cleft palate, two clubbed feet and fists that were so tightly clenched they couldn’t be pulled apart. Since Courtney was an otherwise happy and healthy baby, neither her parents nor her doctor saw cause to be concerned about these seemingly unrelated conditions. What they didn’t realize was that these were the first clues to a genetic puzzle that would take ten years to unravel. The next clue came at age 3. “One day my dad and I were playing peekaboo, and suddenly I couldn’t see,” says Courtney. “My parents rushed me to the hospital and the ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 25, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories brain aneurysm Cardiovascular Genetics Program Cerebrovascular Surgery and Interventions Center Dr. Darren Orbach Dr. Lawrence Karlin Dr. Pedro del Nido Dr. Ronald Lacro Loeys-Dietz syndrome Source Type: news

Mom ’s thank you to Dallas nurses caring for cancer tot
Sophie Skiles' cough turned out to be a tumor on her heart 'the size of a baseball'. Mother Shelby penned a note to staff at Children's Medical Center in Dallas who she tells: 'You save our babies'. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for October 13, 2017
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. 10 tips for selecting and managing a medtech development partner There many things to consider when searching for and interacting with a product development firm – and the stakes are high! Most early-stage medical device ...
Source: Mass Device - October 13, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Pregnant women 'should avoid sleeping on back in last trimester'
Conclusion This observational study suggests a mother's sleep position may influence their baby's activity in late pregnancy. Most mothers sleep on their left side, but babies were found to be slightly more likely to be actively awake if women slept on their right side. If they slept on their backs, babies were slightly more likely to be quietly asleep. These are interesting findings, but there are a few points to note: In all maternal sleeping positions, the foetuses were in a state of active sleep more than 80% of the time. Although there was a statistically significant difference in the amount of time babies spent qui...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

Pregnant women should sleep on their side
Researchers  from the University of Auckland found mothers-to-be's sleeping positions have a significant effect on babies' heart rates, with lying on the back making the organ less active. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Melania Trump tours West Virginia infant drug rehab center
First lady Melania Trump has toured a West Virginia drug addiction recovery center for babies in the heart of the nation's opioid epidemic. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - October 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

How fever in early pregnancy can cause birth defects
During the early weeks of pregnancy, having a fever can interfere with the development of the heart and jaw of a baby and cause birth defects, a study finds. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - October 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers uncover new genes linked to congenital heart disease
Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital have discovered new genes associated with congenital heart disease in babies. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Searching for a Doctor at 3,000 Metres High
Celestina of Porcón Alto, a rural region high in the Andes, whose family has lived on the same plot of land for generations. Credit: Andrea Vale/IPSBy Andrea ValePORCÓN, Peru, Oct 6 2017 (IPS)Good healthcare can be hard to get – particularly when one lives on top of a mountain. The road to Porcón in the Cajamarca region of Peru, therefore, is as breathtaking as it is sobering. With every step further into its isolated natural beauty, a group of volunteers sent to deliver healthcare essentials are reminded how long the trek would be in an emergency.After a bus has taken the volunteers as far as it...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Andrea Vale Tags: Development & Aid Featured Headlines Health Inequity Latin America & the Caribbean Population Poverty & SDGs Women's Health Andes diabetes Malnutrition obesity Peru underweight Source Type: news

Vitamin D may prevent asthma worsening for some
Conclusion This review gathers the available trial evidence to address the specific question of whether giving people with asthma vitamin D supplements could have an effect on how many asthma exacerbations they have. The review has many strengths. It only included double-blind trials, where participants and assessors didn't know if people were taking vitamin D or a placebo. Researchers also made careful attempts to gather all relevant data and information on confounding factors, and all but one trial had a low risk of bias. But there are some limitations to bear in mind: With the relatively small number of trials and par...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Source Type: news

How Air Pollution Can Lead To Weight Gain
I just read a study that stunned me. It suggested that the air we breathe is making us fat.   A researcher from Duke University placed two groups of rats in separate chambers. One group was exposed to Beijing’s super toxic air. That city has some of the worst air pollution in the world. The second group breathed filtered air. The two groups ate exactly the same diet. After 19 days, the rats exposed to the air pollution were 18% fatter. Their LDL levels were 50% higher and their triglycerides were 46% higher. This indicates high levels of fat in their blood. To make matters worse, their lungs were 25% heavier...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 3, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Health Weight Loss Source Type: news

Most Women in Prison Are Victims of Domestic Violence. That ’s Nothing New
While the mass incarceration of men has dominated the discussion of policing and prisons over the past few years—and rightly so—there’s been a recent shift in thinking about incarcerated women, and not a moment too soon. According to a report by the Vera Institute, women’s incarceration has increased a startling 14-fold since 1970. Like their male counterparts, these women are also overwhelmingly women of color. Despite the shocking increase in their numbers, however, the specific issues and needs of female prisoners have largely gone ignored. In particular, as National Domestic Violence Awareness M...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Karen L. Cox Tags: Uncategorized Courts Crime Criminal Justice gender Opinion Source Type: news

Why Paying for Nutrition Saves Money on Health Care
The foods we eat play a central role in our health. The epidemics of our time—obesity, heart disease, type 2 diabetes—are intimately tied to unhealthy patterns of eating. But eating healthy is also expensive, making it particularly challenging for the 12% of US households who have to worry whether they can afford enough food each month. For the 41 million Americans living in these households, a common coping strategy is to purchase cheaper, less healthy foods in an effort to make their food budgets last longer. Over time, however, these unhealthy dietary patterns can have a significant impact on a person’...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Hilary K. Seligman, Seth A. Berkowitz and Sanjay Basu Tags: Uncategorized diet Diet/Nutrition food insecurity Food stamps Health Care health care costs Healthy Eating SNAP Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Source Type: news

Baby heart images could help reduce miscarriage, Leeds research suggests
One in 10 miscarriages is believed to be caused by the failure of the baby's heart to form normally. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - September 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can Babies Help Heart Patients?
Umbilical cord stem cells could be a treatment for heart failure, small study suggests (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - September 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Voices: Learning to Breathe
My baby had an extra branch stemming from his heart, constricting his trachea. The surgery that saved him brought another crisis. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: AMY PATUREL Tags: Emergency Medical Treatment Respiratory System Parenting Source Type: news

Can Babies Help Heart Patients?
Title: Can Babies Help Heart Patients?Category: Health NewsCreated: 9/27/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 9/28/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - September 28, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Secrets from inside the womb that could provide clues to miscarriage
(University of Leeds) The major structures of a baby's heart form in just four days, according to new research using the latest imaging techniques. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Can Babies Help Heart Patients?
Umbilical cord stem cells could be a treatment for heart failure, small study suggests (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - September 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heart - Lung Fitness Challenged in Early Full - Term Babies
Researchers found those born at 37 - 38 weeks had higher risk of poorer cardiorespiratory fitness later in life (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - September 27, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Pediatrics, Pulmonology, Obstetrics, News, Source Type: news

Early cesareans raise risk of infant respiratory illness
Babies born in early term are at 57 percent greater risk than those born later to struggle with their heart and respiratory health later in life, says a study from the American Heart Association. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heart-Lung Fitness Challenged in Early Full-Term Babies
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 27, 2017 -- Infants born early in a full-term pregnancy have a higher risk of poor heart-lung fitness later in life, a new study suggests. The study included nearly 800 people in Northern Ireland who were born at full-term (37 to 42... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 27, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Can Babies Help Heart Patients?
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 27, 2017 -- Instead of throwing away the umbilical cord after birth, new research suggests using this medical waste to potentially improve the lives of people with heart failure. With parental permission, doctors used umbilical... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 27, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Jimmy Kimmel Fires Back at Critics Calling Him a Health Care ‘Puppet’
In the wake of Republican backlash over his condemnation of the Graham-Cassidy bill, Jimmy Kimmel has called out critics of his participation in the national health care debate. During Monday’s episode of Live!, the late night host hit back at pundits who suggested that his push against the repeal of Obamacare indicates he is a puppet for the Democratic party. “It would be easy for me to dismiss this as some kind of right-wing hysteria, but he does have a point,” Kimmel said after airing a Fox News clip in which contributor Pete Hegseth argued he was in bed with the Democrats. “I’d like to mak...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Megan McCluskey Tags: Uncategorized Health Care Jimmy Kimmel jimmy kimmel live Late Night Television politics TV Source Type: news

She chose to die so she could have a baby. Now her husband has to bury them both.
Ten days after Nick DeKlyen buried his wife, he returned to Georgetown Cemetery in western Michigan to inter the daughter whom his wife had died to save, a tragic coda for a family confronted with a heart-rending decision five months ago when Carrie DeKlyen discovered she had a tumor. She was diagnosed with an aggressive form of brain cancer that […]Related:Primal screams, blood and burns: What it’s like to survive a lightning strikeShe chose to die so she could give birth. Now her newborn is dead, too.Ivanka Trump reveals struggles with postpartum depression on ‘Dr. Oz’ (S...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - September 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘We Can’t Let Them do This to Our Children.’ Jimmy Kimmel Gives Another Heart-Wrenching Plea on Health Care
As the Senate nears a deadline for a last-ditch effort to repeal Obamacare, television host Jimmy Kimmel stepped up to tell his audience how he believed the new Republican health care plan could hurt them and their families. “This new bill actually does pass the Jimmy Kimmel test,” Kimmel said Tuesday night on his show Jimmy Kimmel Live! “But with this one, your child with a pre-existing condition will get the care he needs, if — and only if —his father is Jimmy Kimmel.” Kimmel’s monologue is his second on health care reform, and comes amidst a push among Senate Republicans for a v...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alana Abramson Tags: Uncategorized Health Care onetime Source Type: news

An Exhaustive List of All the References We Could Find in Mother!
Warning: spoilers for the movie mother! follow. Eliza: So the movie mother! was…something else. Eliana: I am shook. Eliza: I am…confused? Infuriated? Discombobulated? Eliana: I’m coping by Googling as many references as possible: there’s the Genesis story, and I kept thinking about The Giving Tree, which is already depressing for a kids’ book. But this movie takes things to a whole new, bloody level. Eliza: Yeah, and it was nearly impossible to avoid chatter in the ether that the whole thing is a warning about our present path to destroying the environment. Eliana: Yes, the director, Darren...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Eliana Dockterman and Eliza Berman Tags: Uncategorized Jennifer Lawrence movies Source Type: news

This Girl Tr òn: The Forgotten Subject of Vietnam War Photographer Larry Burrows
Larry Burrows was a seasoned veteran of the Vietnam War when, in early 1968, he met 12-year-old Nguyễn Thị Tròn. Operating out of Saigon, the southern Republic of Vietnam’s capital, the photographer had been covering the conflict for LIFE magazine since 1962. He shadowed American troops, documenting ferocious firefights, surviving hours in the air with helicopter-gunship crews, and freeze-framing harrowing moments of bravery and despair, exhaustion, and appalling violence in combat zones. Though much of his best work had been shot in the thick of the action, he had come to be haunted by the trauma visited ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gary Jones/ Suối Đá Tags: Uncategorized Larry Burrows LIFE Magazine photography Vietnam Vietnam War Source Type: news

No change to alcohol guidelines for pregnancy
Conclusion The results of this review found that low-to-moderate alcohol consumption during pregnancy was linked with a slightly increased risk of having a baby small for gestational age. However, there was no evidence for any other links, including any difference in the average birth weight of babies born to drinkers and non-drinkers. There are some important limitations of the research to note: • The evidence still doesn't prove that drinking directly increases the risk of a baby born small for gestational age. Studies were observational and varied widely in accounting for the extensive number of confounding fa...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

Jane Campion on How Top of the Lake Changed Her Opinion on Sex Work
Throughout her career, Jane Campion has wrangled with questions of womanhood and sexuality that many mainstream films and television shows ignore. She has brought her specific style, which melds the breathtaking and the heartbreaking with idiosyncratic humor, to projects like the 1993 Oscar winner The Piano and, more recently, the detective series Top of the Lake. The second season of that show is now underway on SundanceTV as Campion, the first female director to win the Palme d‘Or at Cannes, celebrates her career in a retrospective at the Film Society of Lincoln Center through Sept. 17. Four years after the first s...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Eliana Dockterman Tags: Uncategorized Television Source Type: news

Why a $1,000 iPhone Isn ’t as Crazy as It Sounds
It’s iPhone day, the annual non-holiday where smartphone addicts cozy up to Apple’s keynote to find out what the touchscreen fairies are bringing good little fanboys and girls. If you’re like me, you’ve been waiting with especially bated breath, because your handset is several years old, loses power faster than an overthrown dictator and inexplicably smells like fish tacos. In other words, it’s upgrade time, baby, and we all deserve the latest and greatest. This time around, however, Apple’s top-of-the-line iPhone will probably be more expensive than in years past. In addition to trumpet...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Patrick Pullen Tags: Uncategorized Apple iPhone iPhone 2017 iPhone 8 Tech in Real Life Source Type: news

‘A Kind of Immortality.’ Carl Sagan’s Widow Ann Druyan on Voyager 1’s 40th Anniversary
The greatest conceptual art pieces ever mounted have been on exhibit for nearly 40 years now. The admission is free and the art is first rate, but you’re never going to get a chance to enjoy it — not unless you can figure out a way to travel nearly 13 billion miles from Earth. That’s how far away the Voyager 1 spacecraft, launched 40 years ago on Sept. 5, 1977, currently is, but it won’t hold that position for long; it’s speeding outward all the time at about 38,000 mph, according to NASA. Its sister ship, Voyager 2, launched on August 20, 1977, is almost as far away — more than 10 billi...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized space space 2017 Source Type: news

Get Off The Couch Baby Boomers, Or You May Not Be Able To Later
If you sit too much during middle age — at work and at home — your ability to exercise or even walk in late decades is at risk, a study hints. And, of course, your risk of heart disease climbs, too.(Image credit: Lily Padula for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - September 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Patti Neighmond Source Type: news

Abbott initiates ground-breaking U.S. pivotal study of AMPLATZER device to correct common congenital heart defect in newborns
- 80,000 PRE-TERM BABIES IN THE U.S. ARE BORN WITH A LIFE-THREATENING OPENING IN THEIR HEART EACH YEAR, AND 16,000 OF THEM NEED URGENT TREATMENT TO SURVIVE (Source: Abbott.com)
Source: Abbott.com - August 30, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

A Brighter Future For Babies With Heart Defects
Peter Pastuszko, MD Chief of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Director of Pediatric Cardiovascular Services Mount Sinai Health System (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sanford researcher awarded more than $2 million grant
(Sanford Health/Sanford Research) A scientist at Sanford Research studying lung development and disease in premature babies has received a $2,041,195 grant over five years from the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Peter Vitiello, Ph.D., will study how molecular pathways contribute to lung development and disease in premature babies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

10-minute walk a day app to tackle 'inactivity epidemic'
"Health bosses say 45 per cent of over-16s are so sedentary they do not manage the health-boosting ten-minute walk," the Daily Mail reports. The headline comes after data compiled by Public Health England (the government body tasked with improving the nation's health) found that more than 6.3 million adults aged 40 to 60 failed to achieve just 10 minutes of continuous brisk walking per month. This is of concern as physical inactivity directly contributes to one in six deaths in the UK. Due to this, as part of their ongoing One You campaign, Public Health England (PHE) has launched an app called Active 10, designe...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news