Australian study links breastfeeding with lower risk of heart disease
(University of Sydney) Mothers who breastfeed their babies have a lower risk of developing or dying from heart disease than those who don't breastfeed, finds new research from the University of Sydney, Australia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Key to successful care of pregnant women in heart failure? Team-based care, study finds
(Intermountain Medical Center) Any time a pregnant woman presents in heart failure there are risks to both mother and baby. What does it take to protect the mother and her growing baby for the best possible outcome? According to clinicians at Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City, the key to survival is a multidisciplinary team-based approach, involving cardiac and maternal/fetal/newborn specialists -- who normally don't work together -- to team up to successfully save mom and baby. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

I ’ve frozen my eggs, but women shouldn’t have to solve the ‘baby bust’ alone | Dearbhail McDonald
We are having fewer children and living longer than ever before – we need to talk about the fertility crisisIt ’s a long road from playing with baby dolls as a small child, fighting with your twin sister over the name of your future first born, to being sedated and wheeled into an operating theatre for your eggs to be retrieved and frozen. That’s where I found myself a few years ago. A woman in her mid-3 0s, highly educated with a successful and rewarding media career, injecting herself daily with a bespoke cocktail of hormones, and parting with thousands of pounds in a heart-wrenching bid to preserve her...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Dearbhail McDonald Tags: Population World news Reproduction Ageing Biology Science Fertility problems Health Society Source Type: news

PICU nurse adopts patient she cared for in between his two heart surgeries
An Illinois nurse has taken care of babies in intensive care for over 30 years and that prepared her for an even bigger job – becoming a mom to one of her patients. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - March 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tiny wireless sensors could revolutionize how premature babies are monitored
Tiny wireless skin sensors are being tested to monitor stroke recovery and breathing disorders, but they could also help babies who are born prematurely, according to a new study in the journal Science. The skin-like silicon patches attach to the chest and foot proved just as reliable as traditional electrodes for tracking babies' heart and respiration rates, temperature, blood pressure and blood-oxygen level. Dr. Jon LaPook reports. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - March 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Congenital heart babies more likely to develop heart conditions as adults
A baby with a heart defect is 13 times more likely to develop heart failure or atrial fibrillation as it ages, even with a heart-healthy lifestyle, according to a study published Thursday. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Children's Mercy program's 'good problem' — it works, but needs more money
After Children's Mercy launched its Cardiac High Acuity Monitoring Program (CHAMP) in 2014, an app that uses telemedicine to monitor infants with a life-threatening heart defect, the goal was anything but modest: create a research database to help clinicians work together toward reducing the infant mortality rate. The CHAMP Multi-Site Registry is a live database of more than 300 babies who have used or are currently using the app. The system uses predictive analytics to help providers view the registry… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 21, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Lily Lieberman Source Type: news

Climate Change Could Raise Risk of Congenital Heart Defects Climate Change Could Raise Risk of Congenital Heart Defects
More babies could be born with heart defects in the future as global warming puts pregnant women at greater risk of exposure to dangerously high temperatures, new research suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Here ’ s how a new Abbott device is making a difference among neonatal infants
[Image courtesy of Abbott]A recent CBS News report provided a real-life example of how Abbott’s Piccolo occluder is making a difference among neonatal infants with a congenital heart defect called patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Irie and Judah Felkner are now healthy, growing 18-month-olds. But when Irie was born early at just 1 pound 13 ounces, she had a life-threatening PDA that left her mom Crissa Felkner scared that they weren’t going to bring her home. “We saw that Irie’s heart was enlarging in size and more and more fluid was collecting in her lungs,” Dr. Aimee Armstr...
Source: Mass Device - February 19, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Business/Financial News Cardiovascular Catheters Featured News Well Abbott Source Type: news

Climate change could raise risk of congenital heart defects
(Reuters Health) - More babies could be born with heart defects in the future as global warming puts pregnant women at greater risk of exposure to dangerously high temperatures, new research suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Common Yeast Infection Pill Tied to Miscarriage
Research suggests that use of the drug greatly raises a pregnant woman's odd for miscarriage, as well as the odds that her baby will have a heart defect. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Roma the Movie: The Hidden Drama of Domestic Workers
By Jan LundiusSTOCKHOLM / ROME, Feb 18 2019 (IPS)Roma, a 2018 Mexican film written and directed by Alfonso Cuarón, is currently on a triumphal journey through the world. It won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival, the best director and best foreign language film at the Golden Globe Awards, best director and best picture at the Critics´ Choice Awards, best film, best direction and best cinematography at the British Academy Film Awards. Furthermore, Roma has a record high ten nominations for the upcoming Academy Awards (The Oscars). Not at all bad for a black-and-white movie, which appears to have been d...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - February 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jan Lundius Tags: Arts Crime & Justice Education Featured Global Headlines Health Inequity Labour TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Parents of sick babies 'forced to quit work'
Parents of sick babies need more paternity and maternity leave says charity Related items fromOnMedica Life expectancy gap continues to widen England falling behind on child health Child health should be election priority say experts and public UK lagging behind peers on child health NHS lagging on preventing cancer and heart deaths (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - February 18, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

FDA approves device to treat heart defect in tiniest babies
Smaller than a pea, the device from Abbott can be implanted in premature babies weighing as little as 2 pounds (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - February 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Uganda: Heart Treatment and its Massive Potential
[Observer] There are approximately 1.5 million babies born in Uganda every year. That isn't news since Uganda has one of the fastest-growing populations in the world. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 14, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Vapotherm launches Precision Flow Hi-VNI respiratory device
Vapotherm said today that it launched its next-gen Precision Flow Hi-VNI system intended to relieve respiratory stress in spontaneously breathing patients. The Exeter, N.H.-based company touted that the next-gen device features improvements to both its software and hardware intended to improve reliability. The Precision Flow Hi-VNI system is designed to deliver maskless noninvasive ventilation to patients who are spontaneously breathing to relieve respiratory distress including hypercapnia, hypoxemia and dyspnea, Vapotherm said. The company’s Precision Flow devices are intended to provide high-velocity heated, humidi...
Source: Mass Device - February 13, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Respiratory Vapotherm Source Type: news

He Ate a'Pot Lollipop' -- and a Heart Attack Soon Followed
MONDAY, Feb. 11, 2019 -- If you're an aging baby boomer who thinks you can handle today's potent marijuana " edibles, " the case of a man who had a heart attack after eating a pot lollipop should give you pause. The 70-year-old patient had been... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 11, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Millennials Getting More Obesity-Related Cancers, Study Finds
This study shows the incidence of cancer associated with obesity has been rising dramatically in groups of individuals born in more recent decades,” said MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Dr. George Chang, who was not associated with the analysis. However, Chang warns against overgeneralizing on the basis of an epidemiological study. “The study was not set up to establish causation,” Chang said. “We know there are many factors that are associated with both obesity and cancer, such as lack of exercise and poor diet. How much each of those factors contribute to cancer is less clear.” Obesity is ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Cancer CNN Millennials Source Type: news

Viewers left 'heart-broken' after newborn baby dies in moving NHS documentary
Casey-Jack, a newborn baby, needed heart surgery at Alder Hey Children's Hospital in Liverpool soon after he was born with a hole in his heart and an underdeveloped artery. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UC Davis Children's Hospital joins genome sequencing pilot program
UC Davis Children ’s Hospital is the latest hospital in the state to join a pilot program aimed at genetic testing for critically ill newborns. The project, dubbed "Project Baby Bear," is part of a $2 million program through Medi-Cal, California’s health insurance program for low-income residents. Infants unde r 1 year of age who are hospitalized and suspected of having a genetic or genomic disorder — such as heart defects or immunodeficiencies — will be eligible for the program. The program… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 31, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Felicia Alvarez Source Type: news

UC Davis Children's Hospital joins genome sequencing pilot program
UC Davis Children ’s Hospital is the latest hospital in the state to join a pilot program aimed at genetic testing for critically ill newborns. The project, dubbed "Project Baby Bear," is part of a $2 million program through Medi-Cal, California’s health insurance program for low-income residents. Infants unde r 1 year of age who are hospitalized and suspected of having a genetic or genomic disorder — such as heart defects or immunodeficiencies — will be eligible for the program. The program… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 31, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Felicia Alvarez Source Type: news

Climate Change Could Bring More Infant Heart Defects: Study
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30, 2019 -- Climate change could lead to more U.S. babies born with congenital heart defects, researchers say. Specifically, they concluded that hotter temperatures may lead to as many as 7,000 additional cases between 2025 and 2035... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 30, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Climate change 'will increase the number of children born with heart defects'
Researchers at the University of Albany, New York, claim thousands more babies could be born with congenital heart defects because excessive heat carries a higher risk of damaging foetuses. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Climate change could hurt babies' hearts
Heat and pregnancy do not mix. High temps don't just make a pregnant woman uncomfortable, the heat can actually hurt the health of her baby -- and with climate change, this will probably become a bigger problem. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - January 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: Rock Yourself To Sleep In An Adult Cradle For Better Rest
(CNN) — Insomniacs may need to return to their earliest remedies for a good night’s sleep: A bed that gently rocks like a cradle helped a small group of adults sleep better and longer, a study published Thursday in Current Biology found. Add to that, a night tucked into the adult-cradle also improved their memories. “Compared to a night spent on a stationary bed, our subjects fell asleep faster and spent more time in deep sleep,” Laurence Bayer, senior author of the study and a senior researcher and biologist at the University of Geneva, wrote in an email. Less time falling asleep, more time spent i...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Offbeat CNN Local TV Sleep Source Type: news

'Fourth Trimester' Problems Can Have Long-Term Effects On A Mom's Health
A woman's health issues related to pregnancy don't always end at the baby's birth. Scientists say complications from childbirth, such as hypertension or diabetes, increase her risk of heart disease.(Image credit: Mirko Pradelli/EyeEm/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - January 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lauren Bavis Source Type: news

'4th Trimester' Problems Can Have Long-Term Effects On A Mom's Health
A woman's health issues related to pregnancy don't always end at the baby's birth. Scientists say complications from childbirth, such as hypertension or diabetes, increase her risk of heart disease.(Image credit: Mirko Pradelli/EyeEm/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - January 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lauren Bavis Source Type: news

England rugby stars lead heart-warming campaign for boy, 10, with cancer
Harry Banks, from Bedfordshire, was diagnosed in 2012 with neuroblastoma, a rare cancer which develops from specialised cells left behind from a baby's development in the womb. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

3-week-old baby in urgent need of new heart dies
Carter Cookson, the three-week-old baby who urgently needed a new heart, passed away on January 19 after a donor was not found in time. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - January 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Carter Cookson: Baby who needed new heart dies
His parents, who lost their first son in 2013, say Carter Cookson has "gained his angel wings". (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - January 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Time is running out' for three-week-old baby with days to find a heart
Without a heart transplant, three-week-old Carter Cookson has just days to live. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - January 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Devastated parents of a baby boy with a heart defect issue urgent plea
Doctors at Newcastle's Freeman Hospital have now broken the news to Sarah, 44, and Chris Cookson, 40, that their son Carter has just days to live. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Abbott Finally Pulls the Trigger on Cephea Acquisition
It was only a matter of time before Abbott Laboratories exercised its option to acquire Cephea Valve Technologies, a company it first invested in back in 2015. The Abbott Park, IL-based company announced on Wednesday it would acquire the mitral valve maker for an undisclosed sum. Cephea's technology is being developed to provide an option for people whose diseased mitral valves need to be replaced. The artificial valve is designed to be delivered through a vein in the leg, forgoing the need for open-heart surgery. Replacement of the diseased mitral valve restores normal blood flow through the heart. "The acquisition o...
Source: MDDI - January 17, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Cardiovascular Business Source Type: news

AHA: Infection as a Baby Led to Heart Valve Surgery for Teen
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (American Heart Association) -- In middle school, Prince Pratt used to get short of breath walking between classes, walking up the stairs or when exercising. And he was gaining weight. His father, Reggie, simply thought his... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 16, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Baby gets hearing aids, can't stop giggling
The baby's infectious laughter has melted hearts across the country (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - January 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA approves new closure device for heart defect in premature babies
One out of 10 of all babies are born premature. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - January 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

FDA Approves Abbott & #039;s Device for Treating Premies with an Opening in Their Hearts
Born at 27 weeks, twin babies Irie and Judah Felkner of Columbus, Ohio, were both fighting for their lives in the neonatal intensive care unit when an echocardiogram revealed Irie had a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) that required immediate treatment. "The doctor thought Abbott's Amplatzer Piccolo device was the best solution for Irie, and after learning more about the procedure we decided to move forward," said Crissa Felkner, Irie's mother. "You have to live it to fully appreciate what that device did for our daughter. Three days after the procedure, she was making great progress and is now a normal toddle...
Source: MDDI - January 14, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Business Source Type: news

Abbott wins FDA approval for Amplatzer Piccolo occluder for neonates
The FDA granted pre-market approval for the Amplatzer Piccolo occluder made by Abbott (NYSE:ABT) to treat a congenital heart defect in neonatal infants as small as two pounds, the company said today. The Chicago-area healthcare giant said Amplatzer Piccolo is a transcatheter, self-expanding, wire mesh device that’s inserted via the aortic or pulmonary artery to close a hole in the heart known as patent ductus arteriosus. “Piccolo is a critical advancement in the standard of care for the most vulnerable of premature babies who may not be able to undergo surgery to repair their hearts,” structural...
Source: Mass Device - January 14, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Cardiac Implants Featured Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Pediatrics Abbott Source Type: news

FDA Approves World's First Device for Treatment of Premature Babies and Newborns with an Opening in Their Hearts (a Common Congenital Defect)
- First and only minimally invasive, transcatheter treatment specifically approved for premature babies with a patent ductus, a life-threatening opening in their heart (Source: Abbott.com)
Source: Abbott.com - January 14, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Epigenetic change causes fruit fly babies to inherit diet-induced heart disease
(Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute) Scientists from Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have identified an epigenetic marker and two genes that caused heart failure in the children and grandchildren of fruit flies with high-fat-diet-induced heart dysfunction. Reversing the epigenetic modification or over-expressing the two genes protected subsequent generations from the negative heart effects of their parents' diet. The study was published in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What Are Potential Complications of Large for Gestational Birthweight?
Discussion Infant size at birth is determined mainly by genetics, but also pregnancy and environmental factors. Large for gestational age (LGA) is defined as a mean weight> 2 standard deviations above the weight for gestational age or above the 90th percentile on growth charts (or ~4000 g on WHO growth charts). Macrosomia is a term used for a term infant who is> 4000g. Risk factors for LGA infants includes: Male infant Maternal Genetic disposition Hispanic ethnicity Diabetic Multiparity or grand parity Obesity History of previous LGA infant Prenatal ultrasound is very helpful for antenatal management. First tri...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - January 14, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Ohio ’s Statewide Rescue Task Force Initiative
A normal day at work is abruptly changed when you are informed of an active shooter incident (ASI) at a school in a cozy, normally peaceful suburb. The initial report indicates that there are at least three adults and four children injured as you scramble to activate mutual aid and secure the manpower and medical resources for care of these patients with the possibility of more victims. Seventeen years later, shots ring out the high school of another serenely peaceful suburb. The gunman’s shower of bullets leaves three students dead, one paralyzed, and another injured with a guarded chance for a full recovery. As you...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 10, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Carol A. Cunningham, MD, FAAEM, FAEMS Tags: Exclusive Articles Terrorism & Active Shooter Operations Source Type: news

Bone adhesive dev Launchpad Medical raises $9m | Medtech Funding Roundup
Launchpad Medical has raised $8.5 million in a new round of equity financing, according to recently posted SEC filings. The Lowell, Mass.-based medtech company is developing the Tetranite injectable, synthetic adhesive solution intended for bone repair. Tetranite is bioresorbable and is designed to provide instant adhesive capabilities to treat fractured bone and to stabilize metal hardware in compromised bone, according to the company’s website. The company is looking to raise an additional $1 million in the round, which would bring the total raised to $9.5 million. The round was joined by 71 unnamed investors, acco...
Source: Mass Device - January 10, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Featured Wall Street Beat ALung Technologies Inc. babyscripts BioCardia conextionsmedical Conventus Orthopaedics cynerio decisionsciencesmedical Jarvik Heart launchpadmedical Leviticus Cardio royalphilips Source Type: news

AHA: Breastfeeding May Help a Mom's Heart
THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (American Heart Association) -- Studies have long touted the benefits of breastfeeding for infants, including stronger immune systems and lower risk for asthma, obesity and Type 2 diabetes. But babies aren't the only ones... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 10, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

PM's pledge to baby Carter Cookson needing heart transplant
Carter Cookson has been given five weeks to live unless he receives a new heart. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - January 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Almost 1 in 10 newborn babies have a genetic disorder that could be treated
The unprecedented gene testing program in Boston found that 9.4 percent were at risk of a wide range of disorders that may not have been otherwise detected - including heart conditions. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How a DNA Testing Kit Revealed a Family Secret Hidden for 54 Years
One evening in the winter of 2016, my husband mentioned that he was sending away for one of those commercial DNA-testing kits. He asked if I wanted him to order me one as well. I could easily have said no. I wasn’t curious about my ancestry. I knew where I came from–Eastern European Ashkenazi Jews on both my parents’ sides. Instead, I said yes. Why not? It seemed like a game–like those personality tests people often take online. The results, when I received them a few months later, changed everything I had ever understood about myself. I was only half Eastern European Ashkenazi, as it turned out. A ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dani Shapiro Tags: Uncategorized Viewpoint Source Type: news

An Experimental Procedure Could Help More Families Have Healthy Babies. But It ’s Not Allowed in the U.S.
When Noah Shulman was born a few days after Christmas 2016, his parents Kristelle and Evan had no reason to worry about him. The pregnancy went smoothly, and so did the birth. But within a few days of taking his first breath, Noah began to struggle. He wasn’t feeding, so he started losing weight. He was also lethargic. Several pediatricians reassured the Shulmans that they were probably just overly sensitive to Noah’s symptoms because Kristelle is a nurse and Evan is a physician assistant–a case of first-time-parent-white-coat syndrome. “They kind of dismissed us as neurotic parents,” says Eva...
Source: TIME: Science - January 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized fertility Research Source Type: news