‘She’s Clearly Reacting to a Loss’: Experts Say Killer Whale Carrying Her Dead Calf for 17 Days May Actually Be Grieving
A mother orca whale is still carrying the body of her calf 17 days after it died, in what some experts say may be an unprecedented testament to the strength of the species’ familial bonds. The whale, known as Tahlequah or J35, is one of just 75 Southern Resident killer whales left in the ocean, and her calf — which died minutes after it was born last month — was the group’s first live birth since 2015. Tahlequah has been spotted in waters off the Pacific Northwest multiple times over the past two weeks, often pushing her calf’s corpse through the water or swimming with it balancing on her fore...
Source: TIME: Science - August 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime Wildlife Source Type: news

AHA: Little'Kemp the Warrior' Battles Heart Defect
TUESDAY, Aug. 7, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Despite a nerve-racking pregnancy and delivery, Bevin and Scott Reinen described the moment that they finally got to meet their baby boy as " euphoric. " Four days after his birth, the couple sat... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

AHA: Heart Problem Forced Her Baby to Be Delivered Early. Then Came a Steeper Challenge.
THURSDAY, Aug. 2, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- One night after work, on her way up three flights of stairs to her apartment, Kayde Wolf paused on every landing to catch her breath. In her 20s, fit and healthy, she didn't understand what was... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Obesity Could Create Heart Issues in Pregnancy
Preeclampsia can put both mother and baby at risk, according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Obesity is a known risk factor for preeclampsia. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - August 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'I was just screaming': Mother claims doctors gave her an emergency c-section WITHOUT anesthesia  
When Delfina Mota's blood pressure dropped and doctors couldn't find her baby's heart beat while she was in labor, the team at the California hospital cut her open without anesthesia, her suit claims. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

No Time to Slow Down While HIV/AIDS is Threatening a New Generation
Credit: UNICEFBy Dr Chewe LuoAMSTERDAM, Jul 27 2018 (IPS)As the 22nd International AIDS Conference wraps up in Amsterdam, I can’t help but reflect on how far we have come on this journey with the AIDS epidemic. When I first qualified as a pediatrician in Zambia some 30 years ago, Southern Africa was only just awakening to the magnitude of the AIDS crisis starting to play out in the region. Some governments famously refused to acknowledge the severity of the epidemic and questioned even the existence of HIV and its connection to AIDS.Zambia had its moment of shocked awareness when the 30 year-old son of President Kenn...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Dr Chewe Luo Tags: Africa Development & Aid Editors' Choice Education Featured Headlines Health Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Women's Health Source Type: news

Women and older people under-represented in drug trials for heart disease
(University of Montreal) In the US, it's estimated the number of people aged 65 and older will double over the next 30 years. With the first baby boomers now turning 73, the demand for cardiac care is expected to skyrocket, not just in the US but elsewhere as well. Even though they have more cardiovascular problems, fewer women and people over 65 are recruited for randomized clinical trials than men and younger people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Four-month-old baby undergoes life-saving open-heart surgery after doctors dismissed him three times
Four-month-old Carter Hornshaw, of Leeds, spent six hours under the knife after being diagnosed with the rare heart condition ALCAPA syndrome. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Baby's cardiovascular health compromised by gestational diabetes
A new study in theAmerican Journal of Physiology-Cell Physiology reports that gestational diabetes may increase the risk of heart disease in babies.Medical Xpress (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - July 20, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Why Dogs and Humans Love Each Other More Than Anyone Else
This is excerpted from TIME How Dogs Think: Inside the Canine Mind, now available at retailers and on Amazon. You speak dog better than you think you do. You may not be fluent; that would require actually being a dog. But if you went to live in a dogs-only world, you’d be pretty good at understanding what they’re saying. You can tell a nervous yip from a menacing growl, a bark that says hello from a bark that says get lost. You can read the body language that says happy, that says sad, that says tired, that says scared, that says Please, please, please play with me right now! Think that’s not a big deal?...
Source: TIME: Science - July 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime psychology Source Type: news

Florida Hospital Celebration Health breaks ground on $88M expansion
Florida Hospital's campus in the Disney-created Celebration community today broke ground on a new $88 million, five-story patient tower that's expected to open by early 2020. The 174,224-square foot expansion at Florida Hospital Celebration Health will include an expanded mother-baby unit and a progressive care unit, which is a "step down" from the intensive care unit. The new tower also will house expanded cardiac services, along with open-heart procedures at the 237- bed Celebration Health for… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - July 19, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Ryan Lynch Source Type: news

Teach Your Children Well — About Substance Abuse
“Teach your children well,” a Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young classic encourages. Children are impressionable, like sponges that soak up whatever liquid they are immersed in. Some parents say they’d rather have their teens drink at home than elsewhere, where they’re in danger of driving impaired. Many parents minimize or dismiss the dangers, rationalizing that because they survived their youth, particularly if they grew up in the more freewheeling 1960s and ’70s, their children will survive as well. But this attitude has the opposite effect of the intended one. “Parental attitudes favo...
Source: Psych Central - July 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Addictions Alcoholism Parenting Substance Abuse Source Type: news

Diabetes during pregnancy may increase baby's heart disease risk
(American Physiological Society) Gestational diabetes may increase the risk of blood vessel dysfunction and heart disease in offspring by altering a smooth muscle protein responsible for blood vessel network formation. Understanding of the protein's function in fetal cells may improve early detection of disease in children. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology -- Cell Physiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Children's Hospital Colorado, Mayo Clinic announce congenital heart defect collaboration
(Children's Hospital Colorado) Mayo Clinic and Children's Colorado are collaborating to provide solutions for patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, a rare and complex form of congenital heart disease in which the left side of the heart is severely underdeveloped. The collaboration includes collecting cord blood to be stored at Mayo Clinic. When heart surgery is performed, Children's Colorado surgeons will inject the baby's own stem cells back into the heart muscle to make it stronger. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

High HbA1c in Type 1 Diabetes Ups Risk of Heart Defects in Baby High HbA1c in Type 1 Diabetes Ups Risk of Heart Defects in Baby
Among liveborn infants of mothers with type 1 diabetes, increasingly worse glycemic control in the periconceptional period was associated with progressively increased risk of major cardiac defects.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - July 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Sudan:Baby Girl Born With Heart Outside Chest
[SudaNow] For a baby to be born with a deformed, missing or abnormal limb, that is not news. But the news is when a baby is born with its heart outside the chest. (Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth)
Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth - July 16, 2018 Category: OBGYN Source Type: news

When It Comes to Breastfeeding, This Is Why Women Never Feel Like They ’re Right
There may be nobody as vulnerable to manipulation as a mother worried about her child’s health. The question of whether we’re doing right by our kids cuts straight to the maternal heart. The problem is that in this age of marketing vs. activism, we’re overwhelmed and paralyzed by the debates about what’s best. It’s not surprising, then, that there was an uproar when the New York Times reported on July 8 that the Trump Administration had tried to dilute a resolution at the World Health Assembly this spring that called on all nations to “protect, promote and support breastfeeding.” T...
Source: TIME: Health - July 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susanna Schrobsdorff Tags: Uncategorized breast milk breastfeeding Trump Administration WHO Source Type: news

Mitochondrial Infusions Given to Babies with Heart Damage
Among 11 infants treated to date, most survived and their heart function improved. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - July 10, 2018 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

the healing edge: Dying Organs Restored to Life in Novel Experiments
An unusual transplant may revive tissues thought to be hopelessly damaged, including the heart and brain. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GINA KOLATA Tags: Transplants Babies and Infants Heart Mitochondria Surgery and Surgeons Tissue (Human) Deaths (Fatalities) Boston Children's Hospital Source Type: news

Stunning turnaround by a formerly addicted mom whose baby was adopted by a police officer
The words that saved Crystal Champ's life were delivered like a spear into the heart. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - July 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heart problems more likely in babies of type-1 diabetes mothers
Mothers who suffer from type-1 diabetes are at increased risk of having babies with heart defects, a study inThe BMJ shows.Medical Xpress (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - July 6, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

High blood pressure in pregnancy linked to mother's heart function
Pregnant women who develop high blood pressure, or have small babies, may have hearts that pump less blood with each beat. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - July 6, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, International; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Population Health Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Morning Break: Stolen Babies; Binge Drinkers' Hearts; Airplane-Cancer Link
(MedPage Today) -- Health news and commentary from around the Web gathered by the MedPage Today staff (Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry)
Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry - June 27, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news

The Real Scientific History Behind the Jurassic Park Dinosaurs
The Jurassic Park franchise — including Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, in theaters Friday, almost exactly 25 years after the first movie came out in 1993 — is obviously entirely fictional, so you don’t have to worry that the dinos are coming to get you. But that doesn’t mean there’s not something real at its heart: the story was in fact inspired by important changes in the scientific world. And, over the course of the franchise, though they might not get everything right, the filmmakers have incorporated some expert advice on how to make the dinosaurs in the movie the most realistic depiction...
Source: TIME: Science - June 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Olivia B. Waxman Tags: Uncategorized Science Source Type: news

This UChicago grad is building a 'Fitbit for fetuses'
About a year and a half ago, Tony Zhang and his wife experienced one of the worst tragedies a family could suffer. While in utero, their baby boy died of a heart condition, and they had no idea why. “It was the 26th week [of pregnancy] and we went into the OBGYN’s office for the regular [appointment],” Zhang said. “But both the doctor nor the nurse could find the heartbeat of my baby. But he was completely fine four weeks before.” The loss was unimaginably difficult to process, and Zhang… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - June 20, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Katherine Davis Source Type: news

The molecules that energize babies' hearts
(Hokkaido University) A metabolic process that provides heart muscle with energy fails to mature in newborns with thickened heart walls, according to a Japan-Canada research team. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Babies with heart defect test new stem cell treatment
"The diagnosis is devastating and you look for anything that's going to give you hope" (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - June 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

U.S. Babies, Toddlers Eat Way Too Much Added Sugar, Study Finds
BOSTON, MA (CBS Local) – It’s well-known that Americans consume too much sugar. In fact, that affinity for the sweet stuff starts as early as infancy. Some babies are consuming added sugar that exceeds maximum levels recommended for adults, according to a new report from U.S. researchers. The Details: A new study says U.S. children are consuming too much added sugar Researchers say 85 percent of infants are eating more sugar than recommended Added sugar has been linked to obesity, heart disease, and high blood pressure Eating foods with added sugar can influence a child’s food choices later in life...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Local TV Sugar talkers Source Type: news

CDC: Toddlers In US Eating Too Much Sugar
BOSTON (CBS) – Toddlers in the United States are eating too much sugar according to a new study conducted by the Center for Disease Control. In fact, in some cases, babies are consuming more added sugar than the maximum amount recommended for adults. All sugars are essentially handled the same in the body but sugar found in fruit and milk, for example, is accompanied by fiber and other nutrients. Sugars added to soda or candy or processed foods are usually just that, sugar. Researchers at the CDC wanted to study the sugar intake of kids under two. They found that 60-percent were consuming added sugar before their fir...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Watch Listen Dr. Mallika Marshall HealthWatch Sugar Source Type: news

Fish Oil May Protect the Youngest Hearts
FRIDAY, June 8, 2018 -- Omega-3 fatty acids -- good fats found in fish -- can boost the heart health of adults, but a new study suggests that babies might also stand to benefit from them. In the study from Australia, infants were given a daily fish... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 8, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Kenya:Actress Wilbroda - HIV+ House Help Breastfed My Baby to Calm Him
[Nairobi News] Actress Jacky Nyaminde, popularly known as Wilbroda, has given a heart wrenching narration of how her HIV positive nanny used to breastfeed her baby to soothe him. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - June 4, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Baby's life saved by five-minute heart test
A five-minute heart test saved the life of a baby born at Daisy Hill Hospital in Newry. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AHA: Aspirin May Help Some Pregnant Women Avoid Preeclampsia
FRIDAY, May 25, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- A daily dose of aspirin could help pregnant women in the first stage of high blood pressure avoid a condition that puts both mother and baby in danger, according to a new study. New guidelines... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 25, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Weekend Recipe: A Matcha Breakfast Bowl With Kiwi
One of the reasons that I love matcha so much is that it’s both energizing and calming at the same time. This green powder has become an integral part of my daily morning ritual, but instead of drinking matcha all the time, I also like to mix it up and create fun breakfast bowls with it. These only take a few minutes to make, and have become my go-to meals in the AM, especially when I’m pressed for time. So if you’ve only used matcha in tea, smoothies or ice cream, I strongly suggest trying it in a bowl. Adding in some of your favorite fruits, such as kiwis, will only make it tastier and more nutritious. ...
Source: TIME: Health - May 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Teresa Cutter — The Healthy Chef Tags: Uncategorized Food Source Type: news

EMS: So Much More than Lights and Siren
When I first became an emergency medical technician, I thought being on an ambulance would be constant excitement: driving with lights and sirens to rescue injured victims of traffic crashes, delivering babies in people’s homes, taking men and women with strokes and heart attacks quickly to the hospital. I soon learned that not every 911 call involved a life-threatening emergency requiring rapid transport. A nursing home resident fell and needed stitches. A child’s fever spiked, causing a seizure. A teenager broke his leg trying to score the winning run. Emergency medical services (EMS) providers do much more t...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - May 24, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Heidi King Tags: News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

EMS: So Much More than Lights and Siren
When I first became an emergency medical technician, I thought being on an ambulance would be constant excitement: driving with lights and sirens to rescue injured victims of traffic crashes, delivering babies in people’s homes, taking men and women with strokes and heart attacks quickly to the hospital. I soon learned that not every 911 call involved a life-threatening emergency requiring rapid transport. A nursing home resident fell and needed stitches. A child’s fever spiked, causing a seizure. A teenager broke his leg trying to score the winning run. Emergency medical services (EMS) providers do much more t...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - May 24, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Heidi King Tags: News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

EMS: So Much More than Lights and Siren
When I first became an emergency medical technician, I thought being on an ambulance would be constant excitement: driving with lights and sirens to rescue injured victims of traffic crashes, delivering babies in people’s homes, taking men and women with strokes and heart attacks quickly to the hospital. I soon learned that not every 911 call involved a life-threatening emergency requiring rapid transport. A nursing home resident fell and needed stitches. A child’s fever spiked, causing a seizure. A teenager broke his leg trying to score the winning run. Emergency medical services (EMS) providers do much more t...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - May 24, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Heidi King Tags: News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Orajel and Other Teething Medicines Are Not Safe for Babies, FDA Warns
(WASHINGTON) — Federal health officials warned parents Wednesday about the dangers of teething remedies that contain a popular numbing ingredient and asked manufacturers to stop selling their products intended for babies and toddlers. The Food and Drug Administration said that various gels and creams containing the drug benzocaine can cause rare but deadly side effects in children, especially those 2 years and younger. The agency has been warning about the products for a decade but said reports of illnesses and deaths have continued. Now, it wants teething products off the market, noting there is little evidence they...
Source: TIME: Health - May 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Perrone / AP Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Nox Medical touts win in ongoing patent spat with Natus Medical
Nox Medical today touted a win in an ongoing patent spat with Natus Medical (Nasdaq: BABY) over patents related to biometric connectors. The Iceland-based company said that a jury in the US District Court for the District of Delaware upheld the validity of Nox’s patent for biometric connectors it uses on its disposable RIP belts. The jury also awarded the company damages for infringement from Natus after finding that Natus willfully infringed upon one of Nox’s patents. Nox touted the win as the third against Natus in relation to the RIP belt biometric connectors, and said that it will “cont...
Source: Mass Device - May 21, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Legal News Patent Infringement Natus Medical Inc. noxmedical Source Type: news

Lab-confirmed prenatal exposure to Zika is linked to cardiac defects in infants
In this study, researchers performed echocardiograms in infants with laboratory confirmation of in utero exposure to Zika to investigate a potential link between prenatal Zika exposure and congenital heart defects.METHODThe researchers performed cardiac echocardiograms in infants born in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from November 2015 to January 2017. All infants were infected with the Zika virus during their mothers ’ pregnancy, as confirmed by laboratory tests.IMPACTWomen infected by Zika during pregnancy were 10 times more likely than the general population to give birth to infants with major cardiac defects. The resea...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Much policy on newborn blood spot screening ignores evidence
Many national recommendations on screening are not based on evidence of key benefits and harms, say researchers Related items fromOnMedica Experts advise against screening for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy All babies in Europe should be screened for heart defects at birth The next generation of prenatal testing: let ’s proceed with caution Antenatal flu drugs not linked to newborn risks (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - May 10, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Frozen embryo transfer versus fresh embryo transfer: What's riskier?
(Teratology Society) Large for gestational age babies and congenital heart defects (CHD) are just two of several risks needing further examination in the emerging field of assisted reproductive technology, according to the editors of a special issue on in-vitro fertilization in Birth Defects Research. The special issue focuses on continued research regarding several aspects of the in-vitro fertilization (IVF) procedure that clearly call for more answers surrounding safety outcomes for the resulting children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

4 Trends Advancing Medtech
For the past 20 years, the Medical Design Excellence Awards have celebrated medical products that improve the quality and accessibility of healthcare. Our finalists this year carry on this tradition, while also keeping in step with today’s high-tech digital and consumer trends. With the help of our esteemed jurors, we have identified four key trends in this year’s group of finalists: risk reduction; faster, more-efficient healthcare delivery; the influence of the Internet of Things; and the consumerization of healthcare. We’ve been tracking a few of these trends in past awards programs, so they’re n...
Source: MDDI - April 27, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: MD & M East (New York) Design Source Type: news

Why People Are Obsessed With the Royals, According to Psychologists
By now, you likely know that Prince William and Kate Middleton had their third child, joining older siblings George and Charlotte. You likely also know that Prince Harry is set to marry American actor Meghan Markle next month. Perhaps you even know that the royal wedding will be held at St. George’s Chapel, and will include a lemon- and elderflower-flavored cake and a teenage cellist. In short: The royals have infiltrated our collective consciousness. The question is, why? “We’re social animals,” says Dr. Frank Farley, a professor and psychologist at Temple University and a former American Psycholog...
Source: TIME: Health - April 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime royals Source Type: news

The Deep End of the Pool: A Reflection on the EMS Educator ’s Role in Teaching Emotional Coping Skills
My heart is in my stomach and there’s a lump in my throat. I just clicked the “end” button on my phone after receiving a call from a recent EMT student of mine. He called to tell me that he’s been using the training that I taught him in class. There was a hitch in his voice and a gravelly bottom to his tone. “I got dumped in the deep end of the pool,” he told me. I was surprised to hear from him because he had just called me the previous week to tell me about his first day off of orientation. He’d run a 3-year-old cardiac arrest on his very first day, and he wanted to talk about it...
Source: JEMS Operations - April 25, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Julia Smith, RN, EMT Tags: Training Operations Source Type: news

First toddler to receive world's smallest heart valve 3 years ago
Sadie Rutenberg, three, was born with a life-threatening heart defect in Seattle, Washington, in November 2014. At six months old she became the first baby to receive an experimental heart valve. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news