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Lab-confirmed prenatal exposure to Zika is linked to cardiac defects in infants
In this study, researchers performed echocardiograms in infants with laboratory confirmation of in utero exposure to Zika to investigate a potential link between prenatal Zika exposure and congenital heart defects.METHODThe researchers performed cardiac echocardiograms in infants born in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from November 2015 to January 2017. All infants were infected with the Zika virus during their mothers ’ pregnancy, as confirmed by laboratory tests.IMPACTWomen infected by Zika during pregnancy were 10 times more likely than the general population to give birth to infants with major cardiac defects. The resea...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Much policy on newborn blood spot screening ignores evidence
Many national recommendations on screening are not based on evidence of key benefits and harms, say researchers Related items fromOnMedica Experts advise against screening for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy All babies in Europe should be screened for heart defects at birth The next generation of prenatal testing: let ’s proceed with caution Antenatal flu drugs not linked to newborn risks (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - May 10, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Frozen embryo transfer versus fresh embryo transfer: What's riskier?
(Teratology Society) Large for gestational age babies and congenital heart defects (CHD) are just two of several risks needing further examination in the emerging field of assisted reproductive technology, according to the editors of a special issue on in-vitro fertilization in Birth Defects Research. The special issue focuses on continued research regarding several aspects of the in-vitro fertilization (IVF) procedure that clearly call for more answers surrounding safety outcomes for the resulting children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

4 Trends Advancing Medtech
For the past 20 years, the Medical Design Excellence Awards have celebrated medical products that improve the quality and accessibility of healthcare. Our finalists this year carry on this tradition, while also keeping in step with today’s high-tech digital and consumer trends. With the help of our esteemed jurors, we have identified four key trends in this year’s group of finalists: risk reduction; faster, more-efficient healthcare delivery; the influence of the Internet of Things; and the consumerization of healthcare. We’ve been tracking a few of these trends in past awards programs, so they’re n...
Source: MDDI - April 27, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: MD & M East (New York) Design Source Type: news

Why People Are Obsessed With the Royals, According to Psychologists
By now, you likely know that Prince William and Kate Middleton had their third child, joining older siblings George and Charlotte. You likely also know that Prince Harry is set to marry American actor Meghan Markle next month. Perhaps you even know that the royal wedding will be held at St. George’s Chapel, and will include a lemon- and elderflower-flavored cake and a teenage cellist. In short: The royals have infiltrated our collective consciousness. The question is, why? “We’re social animals,” says Dr. Frank Farley, a professor and psychologist at Temple University and a former American Psycholog...
Source: TIME: Health - April 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime royals Source Type: news

The Deep End of the Pool: A Reflection on the EMS Educator ’s Role in Teaching Emotional Coping Skills
My heart is in my stomach and there’s a lump in my throat. I just clicked the “end” button on my phone after receiving a call from a recent EMT student of mine. He called to tell me that he’s been using the training that I taught him in class. There was a hitch in his voice and a gravelly bottom to his tone. “I got dumped in the deep end of the pool,” he told me. I was surprised to hear from him because he had just called me the previous week to tell me about his first day off of orientation. He’d run a 3-year-old cardiac arrest on his very first day, and he wanted to talk about it...
Source: JEMS Operations - April 25, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Julia Smith, RN, EMT Tags: Training Operations Source Type: news

First toddler to receive world's smallest heart valve 3 years ago
Sadie Rutenberg, three, was born with a life-threatening heart defect in Seattle, Washington, in November 2014. At six months old she became the first baby to receive an experimental heart valve. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Minute: Long-term health risks of gestational diabetes
Gestational diabetes?happens when a woman's?body can?t make enough insulin during pregnancy. Most women with gestational diabetes deliver healthy babies; however, there are risks of future complications. Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke, according to a?recent study? Dr. Margaret Dow, an OB-GYN at Mayo Clinic, says,"Cardiovascular risk is quite [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - April 13, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Weekend Recipe: Salmon Burgers With a Side of Sweet Potato Fries
Salmon burgers are probably one of my favourite meals to make at home. I often serve them with oven roasted sweet potatoes or a salad made from baby romaine lettuce and avocado mayonnaise that’s created by blending avocado with a little lemon, garlic, olive oil, water and sea salt. What I love about this recipe is that any leftovers can be enjoyed the next day. These burgers make a quick and easy, portable meal for lunchboxes, picnics and entertaining. Try them over steamed brown rice with a splash of wheat free tamari or over a massaged kale salad. They keep well in the fridge for up to three days. This recipe is fr...
Source: TIME: Health - April 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Teresa Cutter — The Healthy Chef Tags: Uncategorized Cooking Food Source Type: news

Talcum Powder Lawsuit: J & J, Imerys to Pay $80M in Punitive Damages
Johnson & Johnson and talc supplier Imerys SA must pay an additional $80 million in punitive damages to a man who said he developed mesothelioma after using asbestos-contaminated talcum powder, a New Jersey state court jury ruled Wednesday. The court has awarded $117 million in total damages in the case. Last week, a New Brunswick, New Jersey, jury ordered J&J and Imerys to pay $37 million in compensatory damages to plaintiff Stephen Lanzo III and his wife. It was the first trial loss for J&J over allegations that its talc-based products contain deadly asbestos. Last year, a Los Angeles Superior Court ruled in...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - April 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Angola:Siamese Babies Die After Unviable Separation
[ANGOP] Luanda -The Siamese babies, who were hospitalized at the David Bernardino Pediatric Hospital, died Sunday, 8 April six days after the medical team announced the impossibility of separation surgery for sharing the same heart and liver, said Tuesday, a hospital source. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 11, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Angola:Conjoined Babies Die After Unviable Separation
[ANGOP] Luanda -The Siamese babies, who were hospitalized at the David Bernardino Pediatric Hospital, died Sunday, 8 April six days after the medical team announced the impossibility of separation surgery for sharing the same heart and liver, said Tuesday, a hospital source. (Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth)
Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth - April 11, 2018 Category: OBGYN Source Type: news

Girl thriving after becoming first to get world's smallest mechanical heart valve
A little girl who became the first baby to undergo surgery to connect a miniature, mechanical heart valve in a medical trial is thriving as the FDA approves the valve. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - April 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

UCLA research could be first step toward healing the hearts of children with Duchenne
After a progressive weakening of the muscles takes away their motor skills, and then their abilities to stand and walk, most males with Duchenne muscular dystrophy die of heart and respiratory failure in their 20s.Now, researchers at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA are pursuing a cutting-edge way to stop heart disease in patients with Duchenne, which affects one in 5,000 male babies born in the United States. Their work, which is supported by a David Geffen School of Medicine Seed Grant, is just one of a number of projects underway at the medical school in which interdisciplinary groups of UCLA researchers are p...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 6, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Helping Patients Learn Healthy Habits
What if we told you we could improve health outcomes for more than 50% of patients and save the US healthcare system up to $289bn a year?That ’s the averagecost of nonadherence to prescribed medications, or in layman ’s terms, not taking your meds. Fixing this epidemic could not only save billions of dollars but, with around 125,000 deaths a year in the US due to failure to follow doctor’s orders, it could save thousands of lives too.Better lifestyle decisions can solve many of our personal health problems; eating healthily, regular exercise, taking your pills, are all positive behaviors that contribute t...
Source: EyeForPharma - April 5, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Steve Peretz and Meg Donchak Source Type: news

WATCH: Mothers of babies with heart defects may have their own heart health risks
Dr. Jennifer Ashton discusses what to know about the new study that warns mothers may have a higher risk of their own heart problems as well and what symptoms women should watch out for. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - April 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

Mothers of babies with heart defects may have long-term heart health risks
A new study says that the mothers of babies with heart problems may have a higher risk of their own heart health issues. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - April 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Mom's heart risk higher when baby has heart defect
(Reuters Health) - Mothers of babies with heart defects are themselves at higher-than-average risk for being hospitalized with heart disease later in life, researchers say. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

WATCH: Almost 1 in 100 babies are born with a heart condition, study finds
Dr. Jennifer Ashton discusses what to know about the new study that warns mothers may have a higher risk of their own heart problems as well and what symptoms women should watch out for. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - April 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

WATCH: Moms whose babies have heart defects may have long-term heart health risks
A new study says moms of babies with heart health issues may have a higher risk of their own heart problems. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - April 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Baby's Heart Defects May Signal Heart Risk for Mom, Too (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- CV hospitalization, MI, HF, other risks for women seen up to 25 years later (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - April 2, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Baby's Heart Defects Tied to Mom's Heart Trouble
The study is the first to link newborn heart defects to heart disease in moms. And experts said the reasons for the findings are unclear. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - April 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cardiac Defects in Baby Tied to Later Heart Trouble in Moms
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - April 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Cardiology, Gynecology, Obstetrics, Psychiatry, News, Source Type: news

Cardiac Defects in Baby Tied to Later Heart Trouble in Moms
MONDAY, April 2, 2018 -- Women who have a baby with a congenital heart defect may face a heightened risk of heart disease years later, a large study suggests. Researchers found that among more than 1 million women, those who'd given birth to a baby... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Cardiac Defects in Baby Tied to Later Heart Trouble in Moms
Title: Cardiac Defects in Baby Tied to Later Heart Trouble in MomsCategory: Health NewsCreated: 4/2/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 4/2/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - April 2, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

California Coffee Shops Will Warn Customers About This Possibly Cancer-Causing Chemical. Here ’s What to Know About It
A judge ruled on Thursday that coffee sellers in California should post warnings about a potentially cancer-causing chemical found in the beverage. The chemical, acrylamide, is produced during the coffee bean roasting process, as well as when sugars and amino acids found in other foods are cooked at high temperatures. It’s one of 65 chemicals included in a California law that requires businesses to warn consumers if they may be exposed to substances associated with cancer, birth defects or other reproductive issues. While the decision — which at this point is just a preliminary ruling, and may still be challeng...
Source: TIME: Health - March 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Cancer onetime Source Type: news

Low birthweight in newborns linked to high levels of protein that protects placenta from cell damage
FINDINGSUCLA scientists have discovered higher levels of a protein called humanin in the placenta tissue of women who give birth to severely underweight infants. Humanin plays a role in breaking down carbohydrates and delivering nutrients to organs and muscle. The researchers suspect that levels of humanin rise to protect the fetus when the placenta fails, which is a common cause of babies being born at a below-normal weights.BACKGROUNDUp to 10 percent of pregnancies are affected by intrauterine growth restriction, which typically causes full-term newborns to weigh less than 5 1/2 pounds at delivery. The condition heighten...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 30, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Utah mom buries month-old daughter born with four heart defects
Markie Ostler, 27, learned her unborn daughter had four heart defects halfway through her pregnancy. One month after she was born on November 6 in Lehi, Utah, baby Everly's heart stopped. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why Some'Preemies' Grow Up to Have Weaker Hearts
FRIDAY, March 23, 2018 -- The hearts of adults who were premature babies pump less blood during exercise than adults who were full-term babies, a small study finds. That might help explain why some people born prematurely are at greater risk for... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Hidden Cancers Uncovered With Glowing Dyes
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — It was an ordinary surgery to remove a tumor — until doctors turned off the lights and the patient’s chest started to glow. A spot over his heart shined purplish pink. Another shimmered in a lung. They were hidden cancers revealed by fluorescent dye, an advance that soon may transform how hundreds of thousands of operations are done each year. Surgery has long been the best way to cure cancer. If the disease recurs, it’s usually because stray tumor cells were left behind or others lurked undetected. Yet there’s no good way for surgeons to tell what is cancer and what is not...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Cancer Dr. Mallika Marshall Local TV TumorGlow Source Type: news

Families Are Heartbroken After Losing Embryos in IVF Clinic ’s Freezer Failure: “I Don’t Think You Can Fix This”
Betty Jacobs first heard about the freezer problem on Thursday, March 8, when she scrolled through her Facebook news feed. That day, a local Ohio paper had published an article about temperature changes at University Hospitals Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital, where Jacobs underwent IVF and had her twins in 2016. Because of these temperature changes — which had occurred the previous Saturday — more than 2,000 frozen eggs and embryos were potentially damaged and unviable. Jacobs had two embryos frozen in their storage facilities, but was reassured when the news report said that the hospital had notif...
Source: TIME: Health - March 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized fertility healthytime Source Type: news

Lung cancer, premature babies – now smoking could also cause THIS
SMOKING is not only bad for the lungs and heart, it can also damage your hearing, research suggests. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - March 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Abbott Proves That Size Does Matter
Abbott churned out an impressive number of new products last year, and our 2017 Medtech Company of the Year doesn't appear to be slowing down any. This week FDA approved Abbott's new pediatric mechanical heart valve, which is the first device of its kind that is small enough to be used in newborns and infants. Learn about the latest trends in medical device R&D and product development at BIOMEDevice Boston, April 18-19, 2018. Use promo code "MDDI" for 20% off conference registration and free expo access. Previously, surgeons could only use a range of larger-sized valves to replace a pediatric heart valve, Abb...
Source: MDDI - March 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Cardiovascular Source Type: news

Abbott wins FDA nod for pediatric Masters Series mechanical heart valve
Abbott (NYSE:ABT) subsidiary St. Jude Medical won expanded FDA approval today for its Masters Series mechanical heart valve, now cleared in a 15mm size, which the FDA said is the smallest mechanical heart valve approved in the world. The company’s Masters series mechanical heart valve is a rotatable, bileaflet valve designed for implantation in the aortic or mitral position and consists of two semi-circular discs that open and close in response to blood pressure changes during the heart beat, according to an FDA release. The newly approved 15mm version of the device clears the valve for use in pediatric pat...
Source: Mass Device - March 6, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiac Implants Cardiovascular Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Replacement Heart Valves Abbott stjudemedical Source Type: news

Need To Check Your Blood Pressure? Just Take a Selfie!
We all know the importance of blood pressure monitoring, but few people actually keep a cuff and pump around the house. Some people stop off at the blood pressure booth at the grocery store every now and then, but what if checking your blood pressure was as simple as taking a selfie? That’s what a group of researchers from GE are trying to achieve with their new app that uses a special algorithm to analyze video footage from your face and hands taken from a smartphone camera. The new technology involves capturing a short 5 to 10-second video of your face and hands that will allow an algorithm to observe and analyze b...
Source: MDDI - March 1, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kristopher Sturgis Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

Breastfeeding may have long-term heart health benefits for some moms
(American College of Cardiology) Women with normal blood pressure during pregnancy and who breastfed their babies for at least six months following birth had better markers of cardiovascular health years later compared to women who never breastfed, based on research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session. The same benefits were not observed in women who had high blood pressure during pregnancy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Baby is given a handmade heart after theirs fails to grow
Baby girl Macy from Glasgow was born with half a heart and only expected to survive for a week. She is now thriving at 10-months-old, thanks to doctors who built her a 'handmade heart' (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Baby's heart fails to develop in womb
Baby girl Macy from Glasgow was born with half a heart and only expected to survive for a week. She is now thriving at 10-months-old, thanks to doctors who built her a 'handmade heart' (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Baby born with heart outside her chest is turning three
Kieran Veitz, two, underwent an extensive surgery when she was just minutes old. Today is her parents describer her as a hard-headed, stubborn toddler well on her way to a normal childhood. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Melbourne baby has five heart surgeries in one week
Bonnie Novak, now nearly 10 months old, was diagnosed with an enlarged heart. Her mum Krystal took her baby to the doctor after noticing her pupils were different sizes. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Children's Hospital Colorado doctors complete first-ever EXIT to ventricular pacing
(Children's Hospital Colorado) Researchers at Children's Hospital Colorado completed the first-ever EXIT (Ex Utero Intrapartum Treatment) to ventricular pacing procedure. The patient, a 36-week fetus with complete atrioventricular block and cardiac dysfunction, was at high risk of pre-term death. While attached to its mother via umbilical cord, the baby received a temporary pacemaker, which stabilized its dangerously low and irregular heart rate and ensured enough blood flow from the heart to the rest of its body for delivery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Incredible pictures of baby who had open heart surgery
Aimee Roberts, from Keynsham, Somerset, waited anxiously for six hours as little Leo was taken into surgery. She revealed she had 'never cried so much' as when she handed her son over. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Here's to a Healthy Pregnancy
THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 -- Take good prenatal care of yourself and not only will you have a healthier baby, you'll also lower his or her risk of type 2 diabetes, obesity and heart disease later in life. First, you'll want to monitor your weight... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 15, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

A complicated heart: Facing my baby's mortality before his life began
My son's only chance at life would be surgery on his walnut-size heart just 48 hours after he was born. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/New Brunswick Source Type: news

Drugs, Alcohol and Suicide Are Causing Life Expectancy in America to Drop Dramatically
U.S. life expectancy has decreased for the second year in a row, and an editorial in the BMJ points to three contributing factors: drugs, alcohol and suicides, particularly among middle-age white Americans and those living in rural communities. The authors of the paper paint a bleak picture of the problems facing much of the United States today, but the authors say that policies that bolster the middle-class can help reverse the trend. The recent drop in life expectancy is alarming, the editorial states, “because life expectancy has risen for much of the past century in developed countries, including in the U.S.&rdqu...
Source: TIME: Health - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Coffee in California May Soon Come with a Cancer Warning
Despite its long list of health benefits, coffee in California may soon come with a consumer warning about cancer. A lawsuit first filed by the Council for Education and Research on Toxics in 2010 seeks to require coffee sellers, including Starbucks, BP, Gloria Jean’s and 7-Eleven, to warn customers about the ingestion of acrylamide, a possibly cancer-causing chemical that’s produced when coffee beans are roasted. Under California’s Proposition 65, businesses are required to notify customers if their products contain any of 65 chemicals, including acrylamide, that are linked with cancer, birth defects or ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Cancer Coffee Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime toxins Source Type: news

A first birthday made possible by cardiac tumor surgery
Today is Oliver Cameron’s first birthday and he and his parents have a lot to celebrate. After a year of uncertainty, they will be enjoying a quiet dinner with family at their home in Wantage, a town in Oxfordshire, England. “Having him home and healthy is the best present ever,” says his mom, Lydia. She and her husband, Tim, are looking forward to some quiet time alone with Oliver and their family after spending much of the last year fighting for his life. Oliver was born with a large, non-cancerous tumor, called a cardiac fibroma, inside his heart. It was so rare that only a handful of doctors in the U....
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 31, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories cardiac fibroma Cardiac Tumor Program Dr. Pedro del Nido Dr. Tal Geva Source Type: news

People Are Sleeping in 20-Minute Bursts To Boost Productivity. But Is It Safe?
About a third of Americans don’t get enough sleep. But there’s a small group of people actively trying to spend less time in bed, not more: polyphasic sleepers. Part productivity hack, part science experiment, polyphasic sleep is rumored to have fueled great minds, including those of Leonardo da Vinci and Nikola Tesla. The odd sleeping habit has now caught on among Silicon Valley types eager to milk as many productive hours from the day as possible, and has spurred books, an active Reddit community and even a Polyphasic Sleep Society. Here’s what to know about the unorthodox sleep practice. What is polyp...
Source: TIME: Health - January 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime how much sleep do you need how much sleep should i get is polyphasic sleep healthy is polyphasic sleep safe onetime Polyphasic sleep cycles Polyphasic sleep schedule Polyphasic sleep studies sleep deprivation Source Type: news

Adhesive Considerations for Direct-Skin Wearable Medical Technologies
In addition to caring for the sick, today’s medical providers are also heavily focused on prevention, patient education, and health and wellness strategies. As part of this newer approach to healthcare, providers are implementing ways to deliver additional care options that are both easily accessible and more affordable. Of these, one of the fastest growing and most widely adopted is wearable medical technologies. Wearable medical technologies not only provide support for care related to acute and chronic medical conditions, but also for disease prevention and lifestyle choices. They can monitor health, remind patien...
Source: MDDI - January 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Janet Page Tags: MD & M West (Anaheim) Adhesives Source Type: news

Nursing baby is good for mom too: Breastfeeding found to reduce risk of heart attack, stroke later in life
(Natural News) Many studies have proven time and again that breastfeeding has many long-term and short-term benefits for infants, but did you know that it can also benefit mothers? In a recent study, researchers analyzed data from 289, 573 mothers in China who breastfed their babies. Based on the results, at least 10 percent of... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news