A nutty solution for improving brain health
(University of South Australia) Long-term, high nut consumption could be the key to better cognitive health in older people according to new research from the University of South Australia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

StemExpress Announces New Distribution Partnerships & amp;nbsp
To continue meeting the needs of clients around the world, StemExpress announces the expansion of its global distribution network to include the Asia Pacific and Australia, adding to their existing... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 18, 2019 Category: Science Tags: The Scientist The Marketplace Source Type: news

Sir Freddie the ram's 50-year-old frozen sperm used to produce offspring
Australian researchers believe it is the oldest viable stored semen of any species in the worldDecades after his 1960s heyday, Sir Freddie the ram has sired offspring from beyond the grave in what researchers believe is a project that shows the world ’s oldest viable stored semen.A team at the University of Sydney has defrosted Sir Freddie ’s 50-year-old semen and that of three other rams and successfully impregnanted it in 34 merino ewes.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Lisa Martin Tags: Science Animals Australia news New South Wales Reproduction Biology Source Type: news

Australian study links breastfeeding with lower risk of heart disease
(University of Sydney) Mothers who breastfeed their babies have a lower risk of developing or dying from heart disease than those who don't breastfeed, finds new research from the University of Sydney, Australia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hepatitis B virus sheds light on ancient human population movements into Australia
(University of Melbourne) Australian researchers have used hepatitis B virus genome sequences to deduce that the mainland Aboriginal population separated from other early humans at least 59,000 years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Expansion of transposable elements offers clue to genetic paradox
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) A research group led by Professor GUO Yalong from the Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with SONG Ge, and Sureshkumar Balasubramanian from the School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Australia, has revealed that transposable element insertions could potentially help species with limited genetic variation adapt to novel environments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Anti-gun nuts would rather see the New Zealand massacre DOUBLED in size, than watch a would-be victim defend the innocent with a handgun
(Natural News) Almost immediately after global news headlines started claiming that an Australian man had murdered several dozen Muslims while they were worshiping inside their mosques in New Zealand, Democrat Alexandria Occasional-Cortex (A.O.C.) from New York began running her mouth in condemnation of people’s “thoughts and prayers” about the incident, while simultaneously blaming the National... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Report: Boston Scientific looks to lure Irish expats from Australia to fill its roster
In an effort to fill open positions at its Galway, Ireland-based facilities, Boston Scientific (NYSE:BSX) is offering to cover relocation costs for expatriated residents that left for positions in Australia, according to a Connacht Tribune report. The residents left Galway for Australia during the recent recession, according to the report, leaving a shortage of skilled workers in Ireland. Due to the shortage, the Marlborough, Mass.-based company has begun head hunting in Australia, looking for senior quality and manufacturing engineers and to fill R&D roles, according to the Connacht Tribune. Boston Scientific is ...
Source: Mass Device - March 15, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Boston Scientific Source Type: news

The Guardian view on language: the flesh made word | Editorial
Teeth and tongues make the sounds of our speech, but our humanity makes its meaningsBabies have an astonishing talent that adults entirely lose. By the age of one, they can recognise the significant noises in the babble around them and group them into a language. When we have lost this capacity as adults, it becomes enormously difficult to distinguish betweensounds that are glaringly different to a native speaker. It all sounds Greek to us, or, as the Greeks would have it, barbarous. This is because the range of possible sounds that humans use to convey meaning may be as high as 2,000, but few languages use more than 100 a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Language Languages Evolution Children Biology Science UK news Australia news Source Type: news

Developing the core body of knowledge for the generalist OHS professional - Pryor P.
Historically, the lack of a defined body of knowledge was identified as inhibiting OHS professional education, the quality of OHS advice and recognition of the profession. In 2009, an Australian OHS regulator recognized the issue and provided funding for t... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

The impact of alcohol restriction on hospital and emergency department service utilizations in two remote towns in the Kimberley Region of Western Australia - Sun W, Jian L, Xiao J, Akesson G, Somerford P.
Background: In a remote region of Western Australia, Kimberley, residents have nearly twice the State average per capita consumption of alcohol, four and a half times the level of alcohol-related hospitalizations and nearly three times the level of ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Over 40 Killed in Attack on Two Mosques in New Zealand
CHRISTCHURCH, New Zealand (AP) — At least 49 people were killed in mass shootings at two mosques full of worshippers attending Friday prayers on what the prime minister called "one of New Zealand's darkest days." One man was arrested and charged with murder in what appeared to be a carefully planned racist attack. Police also defused explosive devices in a car. Two other people were being held in custody and police said they were trying to determine how they might be involved. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said the events in Christchurch represented "an extraordinary and unprecedented act of violence,&...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - March 15, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: International Major Incidents News Terrorism & Active Shooter Source Type: news

Australia medical device regulators prepare Brexit contingency plans
By Stewart Eisenhart, Emergo Group The Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) has developed measures to minimize potential negative market impacts of the UK’s Brexit withdrawal from the European Union. Get the full story here at the Emergo Group’s blog. The opinions expressed in this blog post are the author’s only and do not necessarily reflect those of MassDevice.com or its employees. The post Australia medical device regulators prepare Brexit contingency plans appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - March 15, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Blog Emergo Group Source Type: news

Cause and incidence of injuries experienced by children in remote Cape York Indigenous communities - West C, Fitts MS, Rouen C, Muller R, Clough AR.
This study aimed to investigate: (1) the causes of injury to children within three remote Indigenous communities of Cape York, Australia; (2) di... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

FDA approves BD ’ s Venovo venous stent
Becton Dickinson & Co. (NYSE:BDX) said today that the FDA granted pre-market approval for its Venovo stent for treating iliofemoral venous occlusive disease. Franklin Lakes, N.J.-based BD touted Venovo as the first on the U.S. market approved to treat obstructed blood flow in the iliac and femoral veins. “The FDA pre-market approval of the Venovo venous stent represents a significant advance for interventionalists treating iliofemoral venous occlusive disease, an under-recognized condition,” peripheral intervention president Steve Williamson said in prepared remarks. “We designed the Venovo venou...
Source: Mass Device - March 14, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Featured Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Stents bectondickinson Source Type: news

Using 3D models to reduce side effects of radiotherapy
(University of South Australia) The debilitating side effects of radiotherapy could soon be a thing of the past thanks to a breakthrough by University of South Australia (UniSA) and Harvard University researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 14, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A 20-year analysis of compressed gas diving-related deaths in Tasmania, Australia - Ascencio-Lane JC, Smart D, Lippmann J.
This study reviews diving deaths that occurred in Tasmanian waters over a 20-year period. METHODS: Detailed analysis was undertaken of deaths that occurred from 01 January 1995 to 31 December 2014. The cases were collated from numerou... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Admedus wins CE Mark for CardioCel 3D, VascuCel products
Admedus (ASX:AHZ)  has won CE Mark approval in the European Union for its CardioCel 3D and VascuCel products which use its proprietary Adapt tissue technology, according to a report from ProactiveInvestors. The Australian company plans to begin the first stage of a commercial launch of the devices in the region later this month, according to the report. “After our initial positive experience with Adapt we are excited to have the choice of these 3D shaped products that will produce better reconstructions for complex aortic arch repair surgeries,” Dr. Tomasz Mroczek said, according to ProactiveInvestors...
Source: Mass Device - March 12, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Regenerative Medicine Regulatory/Compliance Admedus Ltd. Source Type: news

Study suggests that eating peanuts instead of junk food can lead to better eating habits
(Natural News) Snacking can be a healthy habit, but it most often just leads to weight gain, especially if you’re snacking on the wrong foods like junk foods. Instead of junk foods, researchers from the University of South Australia, University of Adelaide, and the University of Newcastle in Australia recommend eating peanuts because it leads to... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Are Self-Sterilizing Microneedles Key to Safer Vaccines?
Researchers at the University of South Australia may have found a way to make vaccinations safer. The team developed a microneedle patch loaded with antibacterial silver nanoparticles to provide a sterilization mechanism. "Injections are one of the most common healthcare procedures used for vaccinations and curative care around the world," said Krasimir Vasilev, the lead researcher and a professor at the university's school of engineering. "But up to 40% of injections are given with improperly sterilized syringes and needles, placing millions of people at risk of contracting a range of illnesses or diseases....
Source: MDDI - March 12, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: R & D Source Type: news

A doctor has revealed what you REALLY need to pay attention to when it comes to your period
There is still a lot of mystery surrounding what is considered a 'normal period' so FEMAIL spoke to Australian general practitioner Dr Dasha Fielder to explain all of the details. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Do psychosocial job stressors influence mental health service use? Evidence from an Australian cohort - Milner A, Petrie D, Lamontagne AD, Butterworth P.
OBJECTIVES: There is strong evidence of a relationship between psychosocial job stressors and mental health at the population level. There has been no longitudinal research on whether the experience of job stressors is also associated with greater mental h... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Easier nicotine vaping product access likely to improve health and reduce health costs
(University of Melbourne) Easier access to e-cigarettes containing nicotine is highly likely to lead to health gains and cost savings in the health sector, Australian and New Zealand researchers have found. The research modeled what would happen if the number of people in New Zealand who vape increased due to greater access to nicotine-containing e-cigarettes compared to current patterns of use. Researchers say the results are applicable to Australia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SECRETS OF AN A-LIST BODY: This week, how to get a torso like Hollywood actor Hugh Jackman
Hugh Jackman continues to live up to his action-man image - as he proved recently by revealing a toned torso on the beach in Australia. Here's how you can replicate his fit physique. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sudden natural death behind the wheel: Review of driver deaths and fitness to drive assessment history in Victoria, Australia 2012-2013 - Brodie LR, Odell M, Ranson D, Young C, Kitching F, Ibrahim JE.
This study reviews the circumstances and medical causes of death of motor vehicle drivers who died in circumstances of sudden illness whilst behind the wheel in Victoria, Australia 2012-13. The driver's fitness to drive assessment history was also examined... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Sleep for heart health: investigating the relationship between work day sleep, days off sleep, and cardiovascular risk in Australian train drivers - Chapman J, Naweed A, Wilson C, Dorrian J.
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in train drivers is associated with health conditions that can result in sudden incapacity. Drivers are at high risk on several CVD risk factors with research suggesting that sleep may predict CVD risk, however this relati... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news

British couple stranded in Singapore need £140,000 to bring their premature baby home
Chloe Wilkinson, 30, went into labour after just 24 weeks of being pregnant while travelling back from Australia with her partner, Patraic Walsh-Kavanagh. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hospital cleaning trial cuts infections
(Queensland University of Technology) Queensland University of Technology researchers have led a major trial of boosted hospital cleaning practices across 11 Australian hospitals that focused on 'touch points' in wards, and found significant reductions in healthcare-associated infections, with associated cost benefits. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Announcing the ISN World Congress of Nephrology 2019
(International Society of Nephrology) The upcoming ISN World Congress of Nephrology (WCN) will focus on the issues of glomerulonephritis and integrated end-stage kidney disease. Plenary sessions and forum discussions will also focus on topics relevant to nephrology around the world and across Asia Pacific. Organized by the International Society of Nephrology (ISN), co-hosted by the Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology and the Australian New Zealand Society of Nephrology, the meeting will take place in Melbourne, Australia from April 12 to 15, 2019. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'A big jump': People might have lived in Australia twice as long as we thought | Paul Daley
The result of 11 years of research suggests that human habitation could stretch to 120,000 yearsExtensive archaeological research in southern Victoria has again raised the prospect that people have lived in Australia for 120,000 years – twice as long as the broadly accepted period of human continental habitation.The research, with its contentious potential implications for Indigenous habitation of the continent that came to be Australia, has been presented to theRoyal Society of Victoria by a group of academics includingJim Bowler, the eminent 88-year-old geologist who in 1969 and 1974 discovered the bones of Mungo L...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Paul Daley Tags: Anthropology Archaeology Indigenous Australians Evolution Science Biology Source Type: news

'It's scary': motor neurone disease spikes sevenfold in rural NSW
In centres like Griffith and Wagga Wagga, locals fear there may be something in the waterAs a child, Tania Magoci spent every weekend at Lake Wyangan near Griffith, waterskiing, swimming and boating with her family.She and her siblings would use the serpentine concrete outlet into the lake as a slippery slide. In summer, the slime from algal blooms exacerbated by the run-off from the nearby farms made it more fun to slide down the chicanes.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Gabrielle Chan Tags: Motor neurone disease Health New South Wales election 2019 Australia news New South Wales politics Rural Australia Medical research Water Source Type: news

Road user behaviour, attitudes and crashes: a survey of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia - Cullen P, Hunter K, Clapham K, Senserrick T, Rogers K, Harrison JE, Ivers RQ.
This study aimed to describe road user behaviour, attitudes and crashes in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in four urban, regional and remote communities located in New South Wales (NSW) and South Australia (SA). METHODS: Fa... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Secret safety warnings on medicines: a case study of information access requests - Torka M, Mintzes B, Bhasale A, Fabbri A, Perry L, Lexchin J.
PURPOSE: There has been less attention to the transparency of postmarket evidence of harmful effects of medicines than of premarket clinical trial data. This is a case study of requests for Australian "direct health professional communications" (DHPCs). Th... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

Who are the most-cited scholars in Asian Criminology compared with Australia, New Zealand, North America, and Europe? - Farrington DP, Cohn EG, Iratzoqui A.
Asian criminology is a fast-growing area of criminological research, but its influence on the international criminological landscape is largely unknown. The current article examines scholarly influence by studying citations in four international criminolog... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

Making A Mark: Ancient Tonga Tattoo Tools May Illustrate Birth Of Polynesian Body Art
Australian researchers used carbon dating to determine the tattoo tools from Tonga are around 2,700 years old.(Image credit: Jack Fox/Australian National University) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amy Held Source Type: news

New gene hunt reveals potential breast cancer treatment target
(University of Queensland) Australian and US researchers have developed a way to discover elusive cancer-promoting genes, already identifying one that appears to promote aggressive breast cancers.The University of Queensland and Albert Einstein College of Medicine team developed a statistical approach to reveal many previously hard-to-find genes that contribute to cancer. UQ Australian Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology Associate Professor Jess Mar said the majority of 'oncogenes' identified to date were in most patients with a particular cancer type. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Conjoined twins return home after lifesaving surgery in Australia
Two Bhutanese conjoined twins who traveled to Australia to be separated have returned home this week, completing a nearly 12,000-mile round trip to receive the life-saving surgery. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A physiological understanding of organismal responses to fire - Stawski C, Doty AC.
Devastation of both natural and human habitats due to wildfires is becoming an increasingly prevalent global issue. Fire-adapted and fire-prone regions, such as California and parts of Australia, are experiencing more frequent and increasingly destructive ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Relative risk of suicide following exposure to recent stressors, Victoria, Australia - Clapperton A, Newstead S, Bugeja L, Pirkis J.
This study aimed to identify stressors over-represented in the 12 months prior to death among 553 Victorian adults who died by suicide. METHODS: Age- and sex-specific suicide rates and relative risks of suicide were calculated using nume... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Suicide and Self-Harm Source Type: news

Monthly Shots of HIV Drugs Are as Effective as Daily Pills, 2 Big Studies Show
SEATTLE (AP) — Monthly shots of HIV drugs worked as well as daily pills to control the virus that causes AIDS in two large international tests, researchers reported Thursday. If approved by regulators in the United States and Europe, the shots would be a new option for people with HIV and could help some stay on treatment. Instead of having to remember to take pills, patients instead could get injections from a doctor or nurse each month. “Some people will be thrilled” at the convenience, said Mitchell Warren, executive director of AVAC, an AIDS advocacy group. Condoms remain the most widely available and...
Source: TIME: Health - March 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARLA K. JOHNSON / AP Tags: Uncategorized AIDS/HIV anti hiv drugs onetime Source Type: news

The 187 countries where you can NOT drink tap water because it's not safe 
Tap water is safest in the developed world: UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Europe, US and Japan. Conversely, places such as Central America, Africa, Asia and the Middle East are deemed high-risk. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Epidemiology of hospitalised traumatic brain injury in the state of New South Wales, Australia: a population-based study - Pozzato I, Tate RL, Rosenkoetter U, Cameron ID.
OBJECTIVE: To describe the population-based incidence and epidemiological characteristics of hospitalised traumatic brain injury (TBI) in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. METHODS: One-year statewide hospital admission data from the NSW Department ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Hot and bothered? Associations between temperature and crime in Australia - Stevens HR, Beggs PJ, Graham PL, Chang HC.
This study used both temporal and spatial models to inves... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Environmental Issues, Climate, Geophysics Source Type: news

An Israeli Spacecraft Took a Selfie With Earth on Its Way to the Moon
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — An Israeli spacecraft has taken the ultimate selfie on its roundabout journey to the moon. Organizers for the privately funded mission released the photo Tuesday, 1 ½ weeks after its launch. It shows the spacecraft Beresheet, Hebrew for Genesis, orbiting some 23,300 miles (37,600 kilometers) away, with the entire Earth as the stunning Apollo-style backdrop. Australia easily stands out. A plaque reads: “Small Country, Big Dreams” and “The people of Israel live.” The spacecraft is shooting for a moon landing April 11. It rocketed from Cape Canaveral, Florida, on F...
Source: TIME: Science - March 6, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Marcia Dunn / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight space Source Type: news

Drinking water after exercise could actually CAUSE cramps – not prevent them
Researchers at Edith Cowan University in Perth, Australia, tested the effects of drinking pure water or electrolyte drinks after exercise and how susceptible it makes people to muscle cramp. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A cluster analysis of sleep quality, self-care behaviors, and mental health risk in Australian university students - Di Benedetto M, Towt CJ, Jackson ML.
This study examined what clusters of self-care behaviors (SCB) were associa... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

The emergency department response to women experiencing intimate partner violence: insights from interviews with clinicians in Australia - Dawson AJ, Rossiter C, Doab A, Romero B, Fitzpatrick L, Fry M.
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Emergency departments are essential providers of compassionate, immediate treatment and referral for women experiencing intimate partner violence. Intimate partner violence, largely perpetrated by men against women, exerts a subs... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Exercise Might Slow Colon Cancer's Advance
TUESDAY, March 5, 2019 -- Exercise has countless benefits, even in small doses. And new research suggests the payoffs might extend to colon cancer patients. Short sessions of intense exercise may slow the growth of colon cancer, Australian... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 5, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Mother shares her five tips on organising your medicine cabinet
An Australian mother-of-two has shared how she overhauled her medicine cabinet and transformed it into a perfectly organised space. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A silver lining like no other
(University of South Australia) New technology from the University of South Australia is revolutionizing safe vaccination practices through antibacterial, silver-loaded dissolvable microneedle patches, which not only sterilize the injection site to inhibit the growth of bacteria, but also physically dissolve after administration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 5, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news