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Certain older adults don't get to the hospital soon enough when experiencing a heart attack
(Wiley) For individuals experiencing a heart attack, delays in getting to the hospital can have life-threatening consequences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Saving hearts after heart attacks: Overexpression of a gene enhances repair of dead muscle
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) University of Alabama at Birmingham biomedical engineers report a significant advance in efforts to repair a damaged heart after a heart attack, using grafted heart-muscle cells to create a repair patch. The key was overexpressing a gene that activates the cell-cycle of the grafted muscle cells, so they grow and divide more than control grafted cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 17, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Papers of note in Science Translational Medicine 9 (411)
This week’s articles describe ways to potentially prevent heart failure after myocardial infarction and treat the autoimmune disease plaque psoriasis. (Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment)
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - October 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ferrarelli, L. K. Tags: STKE Editors ' Choice Source Type: news

Healthy lifestyle reduces heart attack, stroke risk after gestational diabetes, NIH study shows
Study confirms the links between gestational diabetes and cardiovascular disease found by other studies. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - October 16, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Men's heart attack risk starts one decade earlier
Researchers from the University Heart Center in Hamburg found men are more likely to suffer from an irregular, abnormally fast heartbeat at a younger age, which increases their risk of a heart attack. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Aspirin habits unchanged by recommendations from U.S. doctors
(Reuters Health) - U.S. guidelines urging more adults who never had a heart attack or stroke to take a daily aspirin may not have convinced people to take these pills, a recent study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - October 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

European task force: Docs should favor drug-eluting stents over bioresorbable scaffolds
Physicians should not use bioresorbable scaffolds in place of current-generation drug-eluting stents, according to a report from the European Society of Cardiology and European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Inventions. The ECS/EAPCI report says that as long as concerns remain about the increased risk of myocardial infarction and scaffold thrombosis linked with bioresorbable scaffolds, physicians should favor using drug-eluting stents. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post European task force: Docs should favor drug-eluting stents over bioresorbable scaffolds appeared firs...
Source: Mass Device - October 12, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Drug-Device Combinations Drug-Eluting Stents Pharmaceuticals Research & Development Wall Street Beat Abbott Biotronik Boston Scientific Elixir Medical Corp. Reva Medical Inc. Source Type: news

What Matters in Medtech Now?
With a new administration comes a new direction. That begs the question—with changes at federal agencies and proposed tax reform, is the medtech industry seeing a shift in priorities? Any Adjustments for Value-Based Care? After years of championing value-based care, CMS now plans to pull back on its bundled payment experiments. It issued a proposed rule in August that would allow many hospitals to take part voluntarily in its Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) program, instead of being required to participate. That program was initially the first of its kind in making participation in the bundled payment ...
Source: MDDI - October 11, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Marie Thibault Tags: Medical Device Business Source Type: news

Research shows tai chi may be promising cardiac rehab exercise
Research shows that tai chi could be effective as an alternative exercise option for patients who decline cardiac rehabilitation after a heart attack. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tai Chi helps heart attack patients to recover
Used for more than 1,000 years, Tai Chi could help to form part of the essential care that all heart attack patients require, Brown University experts believe. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Marital ups and downs affect heart health
Blood fats and blood pressure link - in men Related items fromOnMedica Modifying cardiovascular risks and lipid modification Cholesterol – monitoring lipid levels and assessing cardiovascular risk Never too old to benefit from CVD prevention Heart attack and stroke risk higher with shingles Stress linked to mortality in CHD patients (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - October 10, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

A rocky marriage raises men's risk of heart attack
Men in a rocky marriage are at greater risk of having a heart attack - but women are unaffected, according researchers based at the universities of Bristol and Glasgow. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heart attack risk slashed by eating THIS 85p food every day
EATING avocados, sold ripe and ready to eat for just 85p in Tesco, and spinach could reduce the risk of heart attack, researchers have found. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nigeria: Lettuce 'Cure' for Depression, Stroke, Thromboembolism
[Guardian] Can eating meals rich in lettuce provide relief from anxiety, depression, chronic pain, sleeplessness, indigestion, lack of appetite, blood clots, heart attack, stroke and thromboembolism? CHUKWUMA MUANYA (Assistant Editor) writes. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - October 6, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Thailand ’s physical activity drive is improving health by addressing NCDs
In 2011, when she was 64, Umpun, from Thailand ’s northern Angthong Municipality, was diagnosed with high levels of cholesterol and the dietary fat triglyceride. This raised the threat of suffering from a cardiovascular disease, Thailand’s – and the world’s – leading cause of death, including of people aged under 70. “My doctor advised me to start physical activity and change my diet, and after I started exercising I later found that my triglycerides and cholesterol level had decreased,” says Umpun, now 70 and a village health volunteer. “I enjoyed very much this physical act...
Source: WHO Feature Stories - October 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: cardiovascular disease [subject], cardiovascular disease, heart attack, heart attacks, cvd, heart diseases, heart disease, high blood pressure, hypertension, diet [subject], healthy diet, physical activity [subject], exercise, movement, Feature [doctype], Source Type: news

As much as 2.6% of your DNA is from Neanderthals. This is what it's doing
Modern humans are a little more Neanderthal than we thought.A highly detailed genetic analysis of a Neanderthal woman who lived about 52,000 years ago suggests that our extinct evolutionary cousins still influence our risk of having a heart attack, developing an eating disorder and suffering from... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Second U.S. jury finds AbbVie misrepresented risks of AndroGel
(Reuters) - A U.S. jury on Thursday ordered AbbVie Inc to pay more than $140 million to a man who claimed the company misrepresented the risks of its testosterone replacement drug AndroGel, causing him to suffer a heart attack, the plaintiff's lawyer said in a statement. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

AbbVie hit with $140 million verdict in AndroGel trial: lawyer
(Reuters) - A U.S. jury on Thursday ordered AbbVie Inc to pay more than $140 million to a man who claimed the company misrepresented the risks of its testosterone replacement drug AndroGel, causing him to suffer a heart attack, the plaintiff's lawyer said in an emailed statement. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

New shot for men and women
Today I want to tell you about a quick, painless procedure that will put the spontaneity back into your sex life. And you don’t have to take a pill and then wait 30 minutes or more… I’m talking about platelet-rich plasma, or PRP for short. I’ve used PRP in my patients to heal sports injuries, aching joints and surgical wounds. It’s better than a facelift to smooth fine lines and wrinkles. But PRP also works if you’re having trouble in the bedroom. More than a third of men suffer from sexual dysfunction. And 40% of women do too. I’m talking about everything from erectile dysfuncti...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Anti-Aging Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: news

Godly gift for arthritis pain
Big Pharma is at it again… Creating and selling a drug that causes thousands of heart attacks and strokes each year. In 2015, the FDA asked drug makers to strengthen their warning labels. Since then, most have listed their dangerous side effects on the bottle. But one manufacturer thought they didn’t have to warn people about their dangerous drug. They marketed their product as a “unique” breakthrough. They even published studies promising it was “safe for long-term use.” 1 The drug is a 7-year-old arthritis drug called Actemra. It’s made by the Swiss pharmaceutical company Roche....
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news

Potassium health benefits: Eating THESE foods can help prevent heart attack or stroke
EATING an extra banana or avocado a day can prevent a heart attack or stroke by protecting against hardening of the arteries, according to research published today. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Big Data Could Help Prevent One Fatal Heart Attack Every 40 Seconds
According to the American Heart Association approximately 2,200 Americans die of cardiovascular disease each day, an average of one death every 40 seconds. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - October 5, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Reenita Das, Contributor Source Type: news

Drugs, money and your heart
I was really excited to see a recent headline that said heart doctors should discuss herbal medicines with their patients. The recommendation came from a study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.1 I thought this was a real breakthrough. I thought it meant cardiologists had finally seen the light… Boy, was I wrong… The article said doctors should learn about herbal medicines so they could STOP their patients from using them. You see, supplement use is at an all-time high. About 70% of Americans take them. That’s a lot of people. And Big Pharma would love to capture that market. So they...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Cathy Card Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news

Pfizer to FDA: Ban side effect warnings  
Big Pharma won’t be satisfied until every American adult — and even some kids — are taking one of their dangerous statin drugs. And they’ve resorted to desperate measures to achieve that goal. Here’s what’s going on… As you probably know, one of the most common side effects of taking statins is muscle pain. I see this all the time at my clinic when new patients come to see me. And if you or someone you know takes these drugs, you’ve probably seen it, too… But a new study claims that people only get statin side effects like muscle pain if they know they’re taking...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Cathy Card Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news

Surviving Heart Attack Often Means Leaving Job Behind
Title: Surviving Heart Attack Often Means Leaving Job BehindCategory: Health NewsCreated: 10/4/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 10/5/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - October 5, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

African power plant relieves migraine
I treat a lot of different kinds of chronic pain at my clinic. The patients most desperate for relief are the migraine sufferers. If you get migraines, you know they can knock you out for days at a time. The World Health Organization says migraines are to blame for more lost years of healthy life than multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, ovarian cancer and tuberculosis combined.1 But mainstream medicine knows very little about the cause of migraines or how to treat them. Most doctors prescribe Imitrex. That’s a drug to help relieve headaches, pain, nausea, and sensitivity to light and sound.  But Imitrex can actually ...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Randall Hall Tags: Brain Health Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: news

This diet advice could kill you
The American Heart Association says sodium in salt raises blood pressure. They say it increases the risk for heart disease and stroke.  But the latest science says otherwise… A British review of 34 clinical trials showed that cutting down on salt reduced blood pressure only slightly for people with hypertension.1  And a new study in The Lancet found that some low-salt diets could put you at GREATER risk of heart disease and death.2 Researchers analyzed data from 133,118 people. They wanted to see if there was a link between high sodium and heart attack, stroke and death The results were startling. People...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Randall Hall Tags: Health Heart Health Men's Health Nutrition Women's Health Source Type: news

Is Watching Sports Bad for Your Health? Here ’s What New Research Says
Watching a sports match can stress your heart just as much as playing in the game itself, suggests a small new study in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology. Researchers found that people’s pulses increased by 75% when they watched a hockey game on television and by 110% when watching one in person—equivalent to the cardiac stress of vigorous exercise. Previous studies have linked watching sporting events to an increased risk of heart attack and sudden death among spectators, especially for people with existing coronary artery disease. The new research involved 20 adults living in Montreal who had no history of h...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized are sports good for you cardiovascular disease Exercise Exercise/Fitness health benefits hockey healthytime heart attack heart rate spectator sports Source Type: news

Heart attack warning: Excitement of watching SPORT could put you at risk
SPORTS fans are being warned about the dangers of watching live sport after scientists discovered the excitement of their team scoring or conceding goals could be enough trigger a heart attack or stroke, new research warns. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

“Quackery” that saves lives
I’m used to being a target of mainstream medicine. I can’t even count the number of times I’ve been called a “quack.”  Let me give you just one example… For decades I’ve been treating my patients with a proven therapy. The FDA approved it way back in 1953. I use it to help my patients detox from mercury, lead, cadmium and other heavy metals. In fact, more than 100,000 people get this therapy every year in the U.S. But mainstream doctors still laugh at the idea of this treatment and think it’s pure bunk. I’m talking about intravenous (IV) chelation. Even though I...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Randall Hall Tags: Anti-Aging Health Heart Health Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: news

Fried foods? Use THIS oil.
You’ve probably heard some very confusing advice about which cooking oils are best for your health. Almost every time you read an article or watch a health show on TV, someone is recommending some good-for-you grease that’s somehow better, less cancer-causing, more antioxidant-rich, less (or sometimes more) fatty than the last. The problem begins with doctors and nutritionists — and Big Food — who like to classify cooking oils by categories of fat, claiming that one category is “good” and another is “bad.” Don’t listen to them. We already know that mainstream medicine a...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 4, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Nutrition Cancer cooking fat food oil Source Type: news

Return to Work After MI Doesn't Always Last (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- One in four end up leaving jobs during the year following a heart attack (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - October 4, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Heart Attack Survivors Often Leave Job Behind
Danish research suggests more support needed for workers (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Surviving Heart Attack Often Means Leaving Job Behind
Danish research suggests more support needed for workers Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Heart Attack (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Surviving Heart Attack Often Means Leaving Job Behind
WEDNESDAY, Oct. 4, 2017 -- Recovering from a heart attack can be a long, painful process, and now a new study finds that almost one-quarter of those patients who returned to work ultimately left their jobs over the following year. The findings... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - October 4, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Use of High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin in Suspected MI Use of High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin in Suspected MI
Review the key principles underlying the safe and effective use of hs-cTn assays in enabling rapid and safe rule-out and rule-in of patients presenting in the ED with suspected myocardial infarction.Journal of the American College of Cardiology (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - October 4, 2017 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

One in 4 people leave work a year after a heart attack, Danish study finds
(American Heart Association) One in four people in Denmark who suffer a heart attack leave their jobs within a year of returning to work.Heart attack survivors with diabetes, heart failure, depression and lower educational and income levels were the most likely to not be working a year after their heart attack. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Watch the Final Moments of Tom Petty ’s Last Ever Live Show
Tom Petty had some final words for his audience in Los Angeles, California as he closed out the last concert of a world tour. “I wanna thank you for 40 years of a really great time,” he said. One week later the rock legend would be dead, after suffering cardiac arrest in the early morning of Oct. 2. He was 66. On Sept 25, Petty and his band the Heartbreakers finished a three-night stint at the Hollywood Bowl as part of their 40th anniversary tour. YouTube user Kim Roberts caught footage of the band’s encore, the hit songs ‘You Wreck Me’ and ‘American Girl’. “My tears are fall...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized Music Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers tom petty death tom petty heart attack Source Type: news

Blood Thinners Can Come With Dangerous Side Effects
TUESDAY, Oct. 3, 2017 -- Blood-thinning drugs can save your life by preventing a heart attack or stroke caused by artery-blocking blood clots. But these are powerful drugs, and a pair of new studies detail side effects people need to understand... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - October 3, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Tom Petty Died of Cardiac Arrest. What Does That Mean?
This article originally appeared on Health.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sarah Klein / Health.com Tags: Uncategorized famous tom petty songs healthytime Heart Disease how did tom petty die Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers tom petty cardiac arrest tom petty death tom petty death how tom petty heart attack Source Type: news

Coronary CT Angiography vs. Stress Testing: Meta-Analysis Offers Mixed Results (FREE)
By Amy Orciari Herman Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD In patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD), coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is associated with lower risk for myocardial infarction — but no … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - October 2, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Janssen Submits Supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) to U.S. FDA Seeking New Indication for INVOKANA ® (canagliflozin) to Reduce the Risk of Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events (MACE) Based on Landmark CANVAS Program
Filing includes data on the combined risk reduction of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction and stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes (Source: Johnson and Johnson)
Source: Johnson and Johnson - October 2, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New drug protects heart from cardiac rupture after myocardial infarction
(Kumamoto University) There are currently many kinds of drugs for heart failure. Among them, the new drug LCZ696 is recommended by US guidelines as a first-line treatment for chronic heart failure. LCZ696 is better than conventional drugs at reducing cardiac death and hospitalization due to heart failure. Now, Japanese researchers have revealed that LCZ696 can prevent cardiac rupture and heart failure following acute myocardial infarction which is one of the causes of chronic heart failure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Trial Begins for Two Women Accused of Murdering Kim Jong Nam
(SHAH ALAM, Malaysia) — The trial of two women accused of poisoning the estranged half brother of North Korea’s ruler is scheduled to begin Monday in Malaysia’s High Court, nearly eight months after the brazen airport assassination. Siti Aisyah of Indonesia and Doan Thi Huong of Vietnam are suspected of smearing Kim Jong Nam’s face with the banned VX nerve agent on Feb. 13 at a crowded airport terminal in Kuala Lumpur, killing him within about 20 minutes. The women say they thought they were playing a harmless prank for a hidden-camera show. The women are the only suspects in custody in a killing th...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Eileen Ng / AP Tags: Uncategorized kim jong nam Malaysia North Korea onetime Source Type: news

Two Women Accused of Murdering Kim Jong Nam Plead Not Guilty
(SHAH ALAM, Malaysia) — Two women accused of fatally poisoning the estranged half brother of North Korea’s ruler pleaded not guilty as their trial began Monday in Malaysia’s High Court, nearly eight months after the brazen airport assassination that sparked a diplomatic standoff. Siti Aisyah of Indonesia and Doan Thi Huong of Vietnam are suspected of smearing Kim Jong Nam’s face with the banned VX nerve agent on Feb. 13 at a crowded airport terminal in Kuala Lumpur, killing him within about 20 minutes. The women say they thought they were playing a harmless prank for a hidden-camera show. After ask...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Eileen Ng / AP Tags: Uncategorized kim jong nam Malaysia North Korea onetime Source Type: news

Sharing Mayo Clinic: Cardiology nurse and heart attack survivor says, 'Listen to your body'
After surviving a heart attack of her own, cardiology nurse Kristin O'Meara has a clear and important message for women: "Listen to your body." Kristin O'Meara's story, she says, is one of denial. It began with searing?chest pain, a serious symptom Kristin understands well from three decades as a cardiology nurse at?Mayo Clinic. But when [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - October 1, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Stopping aspirin therapy may raise heart attack, stroke risk
(Reuters Health) - Stopping low-dose aspirin therapy without good reason raises the likelihood of heart attack or stroke by nearly 40 percent, a large Swedish study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Heart attack symptoms: Three things to do if YOU or someone else is suffering
HEART attacks require immediate medical attention - here are three things to do if you, or someone else, is suffering. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Meditation May Help Against Heart Disease, Says American Heart Association
For the first time, the American Heart Association (AHA) is issuing a statement on the effects of meditation on the heart. AHA experts reviewed dozens studies analyzing eight different types of meditation and their effects on various heart disease risk factors and outcomes, from heart attack to blood pressure, stress, atherosclerosis and smoking cessation. Overall, the studies are encouraging, says Dr. Glenn Levine, chair of the AHA and American College of Cardiology task force on clinical practice guidelines. But the data isn’t conclusive enough to justify a recommendation for or against meditation in reducing heart...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized American Heart Association does meditation lower heart disease risk health benefits of meditation heart disease risk factors how to relieve stress and anxiety meditation and heart disease mindfulness meditation risk factors f Source Type: news