Americans Fighting the Opioid Crisis in Their Own Backyards

Credit: New York Times article, Jan. 19, 2016. The United States is in the midst of an opioid overdose epidemic. The rates of opioid addiction, babies born addicted to opioids, and overdoses have skyrocketed in the past decade. No population has been hit harder than rural communities. Many of these communities are in states with historically low levels of funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIGMS’ Institutional Development Award (IDeA) program builds research capacities in these states by supporting basic, clinical, and translational research, as well as faculty development and infrastructure improvements. IDeA-funded programs in many states have begun prioritizing research focused on reducing the burden of opioid addiction. Below is a snapshot of three of these programs, and how they are working to help their communities: Vermont Center on Behavior and Health Because there are generally fewer treatment resources in rural areas compared to larger cities, it can take longer for people addicted to opioids in rural settings to get the care they need. The Vermont Center on Behavior and Health works to address this need and its major implications. “One very disconcerting trend we’re seeing with this recent crisis is that opioid-addicted individuals are being placed on wait lists lasting months to a year without any kind of treatment,” says Vermont Center on Behavior and Health director Stephen Higgins. “And it’s very unlikely ...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Pharmacology Medicines Opioids Pain Source Type: blogs

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Publication date: December 2019Source: Molecular Genetics and Metabolism Reports, Volume 21Author(s): Felix-Julian Campos-Garcia, Oscar F. Chacon-Camacho, Silvina Contreras-Capetillo, Marisa Cruz-Aguilar, Carolina E. Medina-Escobedo, Claudia M. Moreno-Graciano, Agustín Rodas, Luz del Alba Herrera-Perez, Juan C. ZentenoAbstractBiallelic mutations of the GCDH gene result in Glutaric Aciduria type 1 (GA1; OMIM #231670), an uncommon autosomal recessive inborn error caused by the deficiency of glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (CCDH), a mitochondrial matrix protein involved in the degradation of l-lysine, L-hydroxylysine, and L...
Source: Molecular Genetics and Metabolism Reports - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Publication date: November 2019Source: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, Volume 74Author(s): Trond Kongsvik, Øyvind Dahl, Ingunn Marie Holmen, Trine ThorvaldsenAbstractFew studies have explored the potential connection between safety climate and health issues. However, some recent research findings indicate that a poor safety climate can be considered a stressor that may be associated with physical symptoms and musculoskeletal complaints. This link is further explored in the present study on the basis of a questionnaire study of 446 sharp-end workers in the Norwegian aquaculture industry. The analysis ...
Source: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics - Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research
Publication date: December 2019Source: Journal of Transport &Health, Volume 15Author(s): Lake Sagaris, Daniel LanfrancoAbstractAn abundant literature has examined the usefulness of “safe routes to school” programs to increase active transport (mainly walking and cycling) and with it levels of physical activity, hence health. To date, these have been applied mainly in the Global North, where they are supported by national networks and government.Conditions in developing countries differ. While the obesity epidemic is rife, the sustainability trio of walk-bike-bus/Metro account for high percentages (66% or mo...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research
Publication date: September 2019Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 26, Issue 5Author(s): Sharon Maynard, Grace Guerrier, Margaret DuffyPregnancy is an altered immunologic state in which hormonal changes impact the immune system to enable maternal tolerance of the fetus. These hormonal and immunologic changes may affect disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus. Conversely, lupus nephritis and its complications may adversely impact pregnancy. Systemic lupus erythematosus increases the risk of pre-eclampsia and its complications, including preterm birth and intrauterine growth restriction. Comorbiditie...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: September 2019Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 26, Issue 5Author(s): Tiffany Wong, Simin GoralLupus nephritis (LN) is the cause of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) for 1.9% of the ESKD population in the United States. Although the incidence rates of ESKD from LN stopped rising in recent years, racial disparities in waiting time, pre-emptive kidney transplant, and transplant outcomes still exist. Patients with LN who progress to ESKD tend to be female, of African ancestry, and young. Kidney transplantation is safe in this population and associated with a substantial survival benefit, prima...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
This article considers explanations for the challenge in recruiting schools for surveys ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
BACKGROUND: Violence and other adversities commonly co-occur, yet are usually investigated individually. The primary objectives of this paper are to investigate: (i) the relationship between maternal exposure to violence (including childhood abuse and inti...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
On April 20, 1999, two active shooters attacked Columbine High School. This attack became a catalyst that changed the manner in which law enforcement prepared for similar attacks at schools and other locations. Departments across the United States develope...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
This study examined chronic illnesses, sensory and memory problems, and injury characteristics that were associated with ED visits and hospitalizat...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news
Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of unintentional injury deaths for children in the United States. Child safety seats are effective in reducing the rate and severity of injury for children. Families seen in an emergency department (ED) outside of ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news
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