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Kentucky Accuses Cardinal Health of Contributing to Opioid Epidemic Kentucky Accuses Cardinal Health of Contributing to Opioid Epidemic
Kentucky's attorney general on Monday accused the drug distributor Cardinal Health Inc of contributing to the opioid epidemic by failing to halt or report suspiciously large or frequent orders by pharmacies of prescription painkillers.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Independence to remove cost sharing for opioid addiction treatment Narcan
In its latest move to address the ongoing opioid addiction epidemic, Independence Blue Cross said Tuesday it is removing member cost sharing — effective March 1 — for injectable and nasal spray formulations of naloxone. Naloxone blocks the effects of opioids and reverses an overdose when administered in time. This drug – well-known as brand name Narcan, though it is also sold under other names – has been available in Pennsylvan ia without a written prescription, since October 2015, due to… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 20, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: John George Source Type: news

Zambia cholera epidemic continues to slow as number of deaths declines
LUSAKA (Reuters) - Zambia's cholera epidemic continues to slow with seven deaths recorded over the last month, Health Minister Chitalu Chilufya said on Tuesday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Study of mollusk epidemic could help save endangered sea snail
(University of California - San Diego) Overfishing and environmental change have pushed abalone species on the US west coast to the edge of extinction. Now a fatal disease threatens their recovery. But new research shows that some abalone species may be less susceptible to the disease than others, providing initial data that could help map where abalone could survive and thrive despite the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Management of traumatic brain injury patients - Dash HH, Chavali S.
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been called the 'silent epidemic' of modern times, and is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in children and young adults in both developed and developing nations worldwide. In recent years, the treatment of TBI h... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

WATCH: Increasing number of children killed by flu epidemic
The CDC has an update showing an increase in the number of children who have died due to the flu virus. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

A $17,850 urine test: Industry boom amid opioid epidemic
Urine testing for patients with chronic pain has grown explosively amid the opioid epidemic. It costs billions of dollars annually and has raised concerns that some labs and doctors run urine tests needlessly or charge exorbitant rates to boost profits. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Technical solutions for pulling pollution out of the air are distractions that allow both government and industry to keep polluting
(Natural News) The global air pollution situation has peaked, causing millions to succumb respiratory issues and other health problems. Various countries have attempted to tackle this worldwide epidemic through all kinds of creative means. In Xi’an, China, a tower the size of a small high-rise is said to purify the air around it. In London,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Another risk of fentanyl may be an attraction to junkies – it causes amnesia
(Natural News) Kati Mather, who received the dubious honor of being the “face of the fentanyl addiction epidemic of America” two years ago, once described the drug’s effects as “very powerful…there’s no ride, it’s just BOOM.” And while Mather’s words suggested an explosion of pain relief often reported by regular fentanyl users, her words now... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The 2018 Flu Season Might Finally Be Leveling Off
(NEW YORK) — This nasty flu season, which has been worsening for months, may finally be leveling off. Health officials on Friday said about 1 of every 13 visits to the doctor last week was for fever, cough and other symptoms of the flu. That’s no reason for health officials to celebrate yet: That level is among the highest in a decade. But it’s no worse than last week, and flu activity had been increasing each week since November. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report said the number of states reporting heavy flu patient traffic also held steady at 43. “I thought I was going to die,...
Source: TIME: Health - February 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mike Stobbe, Carla K. Johnson / AP Tags: Uncategorized APH flu healthytime onetime Source Type: news

The media exaggerates negative news. This distortion has consequences | Steven Pinker
Whether or not the world really is getting worse, the nature of news will make us think that it isEvery day the news is filled with stories about war, terrorism, crime, pollution, inequality, drug abuse and oppression. And it ’s not just the headlines we’re talking about; it’s the op-eds and long-form stories as well. Magazine covers warn us of coming anarchies, plagues, epidemics, collapses, and so many “crises” (farm, health, retirement, welfare, energy, deficit) that copywriters have had to escalate to the r edundant “serious crisis.”Whether or not the world really is getting wo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Steven Pinker Tags: Psychology Media Science Source Type: news

Physician Groups Demand Action Now on Gun Violence
The AAFP and four other physician organizations told the President and Congress to take concrete steps to deal with gun violence as a public health epidemic. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - February 16, 2018 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

22 More Kids Died From the Flu Last Week, the CDC Says
Last week brought a dramatic uptick in pediatric flu deaths, with at least 22 more children dying from the virus between Feb. 4 and Feb. 10, according to the CDC. That makes the week the deadliest yet for children this flu season, bringing the total number of pediatric deaths up to 84. Many of those children were otherwise healthy, according to the CDC. The somber statistic fulfills predictions from CDC Acting Director Dr. Anne Schuchat, who said on a call with reporters last week that record-breaking hospitalization rates at the time were likely an indicator of high death rates to come. “The people who are likely to...
Source: TIME: Health - February 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Global Health: Lassa Fever Erupts in Nigeria
The disease, carried by rodents, is sometimes mild but can lead to hemorrhagic fever and death. W.H.O. has sent additional staff to help contain the outbreak. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Tags: Lassa Fever Rodents Epidemics Protective Clothing and Gear World Health Organization Nigeria Africa Source Type: news

Dayton health experts to discuss future of health care
The health care scene in Dayton is under stress — from the closing of Good Sam Hospital to an opioid epidemic — and now more than ever we need to focus on what the future holds.  Dayton Business Journal Editor-in-Chief Caleb Stephens will moderate a panel discussion with some of the top health care industry leaders in the Dayton region as w e explore the future of health care locally.  The Future of Health Care will be held Thursday, Feb. 22 from 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. at Sinclair Community… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - February 16, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: DBJ Staff Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight Member Highlights: North Pocono Public Library, Moscow, PA – learn about this library’s community education series designed to address difficult life planning decisions. Is your organization working on a similar project? Tell us about it! NNLM MAR is always interested in learning about health outreach activities that are happening in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey and Delaware. Weekly Funding Tips: Funding Tip 1- Talk it through – through mid-April, NNLM MAR will offer weekly tips for members who inten...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - February 16, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Dr. Sanjay Gupta: The epidemic of gun violence is treatable
As a doctor who works at an international news network, I often see the worst stories of all. In Iraq and Afghanistan, the horrific realities of the battlefield are funneled and concentrated in the medical tents where I have reported for more than a decade. I have seen patients infected with Ebola in West Africa who dehydrate to death, with no treatment in sight. There are other stories I still can't talk about. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Maker of highly addictive OxyContin says it will stop incentivizing doctors to push its deadly drugs
(Natural News) The opioid crisis has reached epidemic proportions in this country, with the number of deaths quadrupling since 2000, and around 115 people dying from overdoses each day. President Trump has declared the opioid crisis a national health emergency, and high schools across the country have started stocking up on the drug Narcan to... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How to Prevent the Flu: 4 Flu Prevention Tips
by Kathleen Fifield, AARP, February 14, 2018|Comments: 0. Washing hands to avoid flu germs. Alex Raths/Getty Images. The physical friction of rubbing your hands together for at least 20 seconds at a time helps fend off the flu. With hospitalizations now surpassing those seen in 2009's swine flu epidemic, experts report  ... (Source: AARP.org News)
Source: AARP.org News - February 16, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

This Year ’s Flu Shot Only Worked a Third of the Time, CDC Says
Early estimates suggest the flu shot only worked about a third of the time this year. Between Nov. 2 and Feb. 3, total vaccine effectiveness was estimated at 36%, according to a report released Thursday by the CDC. When broken down by strain, however, efficacy varied widely. H3N2, the dominant strain circulating this flu season, is notoriously more virulent and less receptive to vaccination than other types of influenza. True to form, vaccine effectiveness against this strain was low this year — approximately 25%, according to the CDC report. (That’s actually better than experts originally feared, based on tren...
Source: TIME: Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

CDC Estimates This Year ’s Flu Vaccine Is Only 36 Percent Effective
Early estimates suggest the flu shot only worked about a third of the time this year. Between Nov. 2 and Feb. 3, total vaccine effectiveness was estimated at 36%, according to a report released Thursday by the CDC. When broken down by strain, however, efficacy varied widely. H3N2, the dominant strain circulating this flu season, is notoriously more virulent and less receptive to vaccination than other types of influenza. True to form, vaccine effectiveness against this strain was low this year — approximately 25%, according to the CDC report. (That’s actually better than experts originally feared, based on tren...
Source: TIME: Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

SAMHSA Publishes Guidance on Clinical Best Practices Using Medication-Assisted Treatment to Combat the Opioid Epidemic
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) published the Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 63,"Medications for Opioid Use Disorder", to serve as guidance for healthcare professionals treating patients with opioid use disorder using medication-assisted treatment. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - February 15, 2018 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

How to Prevent the Flu: 4 Flu Prevention Tips
by Kathleen Fifield, AARP, February 14, 2018|Comments: 0. Washing hands to avoid flu germs. Alex Raths/Getty Images. The physical friction of rubbing your hands together for at least 20 seconds at a time helps fend off the flu. With hospitalizations now surpassing those seen in 2009's swine flu epidemic, experts report  ... (Source: AARP.org News)
Source: AARP.org News - February 14, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Treating the youngest opioid patients
Trying to cope with the rising numbers of affected infants, hospitals around the United States are taking a scattershot approach to treating the opioid epidemic's youngest patients. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Fewer Scientists Are Studying Insects. Here ’s Why That’s So Dangerous
In the summer of 2016, Jerome Goddard, a medical entomologist in Mississippi, received an email from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with a desperate ask. The agency was conducting an “urgent” search for insect scientists around the U.S. who could take up to a six-month paid leave from work to help the CDC fight the Zika outbreak in the U.S., and possibly respond to areas with local transmission if needed. “That’s how bad it is—they need to borrow someone,” says Goddard, an extension professor of medical entomology at Mississippi State University. “We can&...
Source: TIME: Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news

Aetna gives $1M grant to N.C. coalition to combat opioid epidemic
The North Carolina Harm Reduction Coalition (NCHRC) is the first recipient of new funding from the Aetna Foundation to address the ongoing opioid epidemic in the U.S. NCHRC will receive a $1 million grant over two years, part of a $6 million national program, from the Aetna Foundation for its Rural Opioid Overdose Prevention Project. Dr. Garth Graham, president of the Aetna Foundation and vice president of Community Health for Aetna, says that NCHRC's focus on rural communities and the need for… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 14, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jennifer Henderson Source Type: news

A Potentially Powerful New Antibiotic Is Discovered in Dirt
The world is facing an epidemic of infections that no longer respond well to the drugs used to treat them—also known as super bugs. In the United States, an estimated 2 million Americans are diagnosed each year with an infection that doesn’t respond to antibiotics, and 23,000 will die from those infections. But New York and New Jersey researchers published a new paper in the journal Nature Microbiology about their hopeful discovery: a potentially new class of antibiotic that they found in dirt. In the lab, the researchers used a method to extract, clone and sequence DNA from soil samples to see if there are gen...
Source: TIME: Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news

Doctors Struggle to Treat Youngest Victims of Opioid Epidemic
CHICAGO (AP) — Two babies, born 15 months apart to the same young woman overcoming opioid addiction. Two very different treatments. Sarah Sherbert's first child was whisked away to a hospital special-care nursery for two weeks of treatment for withdrawal from doctor-prescribed methadone that her mother continued to use during her pregnancy. Nurses hesitated to let Sherbert hold the girl and hovered nervously when she visited to breast-feed. Born just 15 months later and 30 miles away at a different South Carolina hospital, Sherbert's second child was started on medicine even before he showed any withdrawal symptoms a...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - February 14, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Doctors Struggle to Treat Youngest Victims of Opioid Epidemic
CHICAGO (AP) — Two babies, born 15 months apart to the same young woman overcoming opioid addiction. Two very different treatments. Sarah Sherbert's first child was whisked away to a hospital special-care nursery for two weeks of treatment for withdrawal from doctor-prescribed methadone that her mother continued to use during her pregnancy. Nurses hesitated to let Sherbert hold the girl and hovered nervously when she visited to breast-feed. Born just 15 months later and 30 miles away at a different South Carolina hospital, Sherbert's second child was started on medicine even before he showed any withdrawal symptoms a...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - February 14, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

‘It’s a National Problem.’ How Hospitals Are Treating Opioid Addiction’s Youngest Sufferers
(CHICAGO) — Two babies, born 15 months apart to the same young woman overcoming opioid addiction. Two very different treatments.Sarah Sherbert’s first child was whisked away to a hospital special-care nursery for two weeks of treatment for withdrawal from doctor-prescribed methadone that her mother continued to use during her pregnancy. Nurses hesitated to let Sherbert hold the girl and hovered nervously when she visited to breast-feed. Born just 15 months later and 30 miles away at a different South Carolina hospital, Sherbert’s second child was started on medicine even before he showed any withdrawal sy...
Source: TIME: Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lindsey Tanner / AP Tags: Uncategorized APH Drugs healthytime onetime Source Type: news

National Partners' Response to the Opioid Epidemic and Infectious Diseases: Part 1- State Government Perspectives
February 22, 2018 3:00-4:30pm ET. More information can be foundhere. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - February 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

National Partners' Response to the Opioid Epidemic and Infectious Diseases: Part 2-Health Policy Perspectives
March 8, 2018 3:00-4:30pm ET. More information can be foundhere. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - February 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mass. public safety, public health agencies collaborate to address the opioid epidemic
(Boston Medical Center) A new study shows that public health and public safety agencies established local, collaborative programs in Massachusetts to connect overdose survivors and their personal networks with addiction treatment, harm reduction, and other community support services following a non-fatal overdose. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chemicals In Food Wrappers Are Linked to Weight Gain
Chemicals known as perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)—used frequently in fast-food wrappers and other products for their oil- and water-repellant properties—have been linked to hormone disruption, immune dysfunction, high cholesterol and even cancer. Now, a new study suggests that exposure to the chemicals could make it harder to keep weight off after dieting. The study, published in PLOS Medicine, found that levels of PFAS in the blood were linked to greater weight gain in a group of people who had recently shed pounds, especially among the women. Another finding may hint at why: People with higher blood levels ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Environmental Chemicals Found in Non-Stick Pans Are Linked to Weight Gain
Chemicals known as perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)—used frequently in fast-food wrappers and other products for their oil- and water-repellant properties—have been linked to hormone disruption, immune dysfunction, high cholesterol and even cancer. Now, a new study suggests that exposure to the chemicals could make it harder to keep weight off after dieting. The study, published in PLOS Medicine, found that levels of PFAS in the blood were linked to greater weight gain in a group of people who had recently shed pounds, especially among the women. Another finding may hint at why: People with higher blood levels ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Opioid Epidemic Practical Toolkit: Helping Faith and Community Leaders Bring Hope and Healing to Our Communities
This toolkit, developed by the HHS Center for Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships, contains practical steps your organization can take to bring hope and healing to the millions suffering the consequences of opioid abuse disorder. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - February 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ohio 50+ Voters
AARP commissioned a survey in Ohio to gauge the views of voters ages 50+ on a range of issues affecting their state. Key findings include the following: Ohio voters ages 50+ say that the drug epidemic represents the most important issue facing their state. Division in America is a top concern among Ohio voters ages 50+. (Source: AARP.org News)
Source: AARP.org News - February 13, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Aetna Foundation to Support States in Fight Against the Opioid Epidemic
The Aetna Foundation announced that it will provide grants totaling $6 million to fund projects combating the opioid epidemic. These will be projects that state and local leaders have identified as promising. The first $1 million grant will be awarded to the North Carolina Harm Reduction Coalition's (NCHRC) Rural Opioid Overdose Prevention Project, which distributes naloxone and provides education in five rural North Carolina counties. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - February 13, 2018 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Opioid makers gave $10M to advocacy groups amid epidemic
A report by U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill finds that drugmakers with the biggest-selling opioid painkillers contributed $10 million over six years to outside groups that could help spread their message (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Obesity crisis: Eating slowly could tackle UK weight epidemic
BRITAIN ’S obesity crisis could be tackled if people started eating more slowly, according to new research. In a wide ranging study, scientists found consuming meals slowly could hold the key to losing weight - along with cutting out after dinner snacks and not eating two hours before bedtime. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bad Flu Season Has Americans Drinking Orange Juice Again
BOSTON (CBS) – American battling the flu have been on the hunt for Vitamin C. Consumers bought nearly 39 million gallons of orange juice in January. That’s the first time in almost five years that there’s been a year-over-year increase in orange juice sales, The Wall Street Journal reports. Analysts expect the orange juice surge to end after flu season. The Associated Press reported that this flu season is now as bad as the swine flu epidemic nine years ago. Some doctors say it’s the worst they’ve seen in decades. (Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire)
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Flu Local TV Orange Juice Source Type: news

Anti-obesity programmes in schools ‘unlikely’ to halt epidemic
School-based programmes aimed at preventing obesity in children are unlikely to have much impact on the childhood obesity epidemic, suggest latest UK trial results. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - February 12, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

New Report Sheds Light on Opioid Industry's Role in Epidemic
WASHINGTON (AP) — Companies selling some of the most lucrative prescription painkillers funneled millions of dollars to advocacy groups that in turn promoted the medications' use, according to a report released Monday by a U.S. senator. The investigation by Missouri's Sen. Claire McCaskill sheds light on the opioid industry's ability to shape public opinion and raises questions about its role in an overdose epidemic that has claimed hundreds of thousands of American lives. Representatives of some of the drugmakers named in the report said they did not set conditions on how the money was to be spent or force the group...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - February 12, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Matthew Perrone and Geoff Mulvihill, Associated Press Tags: News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

New Report Sheds Light on Opioid Industry's Role in Epidemic
WASHINGTON (AP) — Companies selling some of the most lucrative prescription painkillers funneled millions of dollars to advocacy groups that in turn promoted the medications' use, according to a report released Monday by a U.S. senator. The investigation by Missouri's Sen. Claire McCaskill sheds light on the opioid industry's ability to shape public opinion and raises questions about its role in an overdose epidemic that has claimed hundreds of thousands of American lives. Representatives of some of the drugmakers named in the report said they did not set conditions on how the money was to be spent or force the group...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - February 12, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Matthew Perrone and Geoff Mulvihill, Associated Press Tags: News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Personal Health: A Perfect Storm for Broken Bones
Untreated osteoporosis could spawn an epidemic of bone fractures, hospital and nursing home admissions, even premature deaths. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JANE E. BRODY Tags: Bisphosphonates (Drugs) Bone Fractures Bones Osteoporosis Hips Elderly Fosamax (Drug) Source Type: news

Kenya:Millions of Kenyans Saved By U.S. Anti-Aids Initiative
[Nation] The United States has poured more than $5.5 billion into Kenya over the past 15 years in an effort to control the HIV/Aids epidemic. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 12, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Health Highlights: Feb. 12, 2018
Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: Opioid Maker Stops Marketing the Painkillers to Doctors Faced with lawsuits and blame for contributing to the United States'opioid epidemic,... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

OxyContin maker Purdue says it will stop marketing opioids to U.S. doctors
The maker of the powerful painkiller OxyContin said it will stop marketing opioid drugs to doctors, bowing to a key demand of lawsuits that blame the company for helping trigger the current drug abuse epidemic. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - February 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

This Year ’s Flu Is Now as Bad as the 2009 Swine Flu Epidemic, CDC Says
(NEW YORK) — The flu has further tightened its grip on the U.S. This season is now as bad as the swine flu epidemic nine years ago. A government report out Friday shows 1 of every 13 visits to the doctor last week was for fever, cough and other symptoms of the flu. That ties the highest level seen in the U.S. during swine flu in 2009. And it surpasses every winter flu season since 2003, when the government changed the way it measures flu. “I wish that there were better news this week, but almost everything we’re looking at is bad news,” said Dr. Anne Schuchat, acting director of the Centers for Dise...
Source: TIME: Health - February 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mike Stobbe / AP Tags: Uncategorized APH flu healthytime onetime Source Type: news

This Year ’s Flu Is Now as Bad as the 2009 Swine Flu Epidemic, CDC Says
(NEW YORK) — The flu has further tightened its grip on the U.S. This season is now as bad as the swine flu epidemic nine years ago. A government report out Friday shows 1 of every 13 visits to the doctor last week was for fever, cough and other symptoms of the flu. That ties the highest level seen in the U.S. during swine flu in 2009. And it surpasses every winter flu season since 2003, when the government changed the way it measures flu. “I wish that there were better news this week, but almost everything we’re looking at is bad news,” said Dr. Anne Schuchat, acting director of the Centers for Dise...
Source: TIME: Science - February 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mike Stobbe / AP Tags: Uncategorized APH flu healthytime onetime Source Type: news