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Following the 2014 Ebola outbreak, signs of recovery for Liberian healthcare system
(PLOS) The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in 2014-2015 disrupted the provision of healthcare in Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia. In a research article published this week in PLOS Medicine, Bradley Wagenaar, of the University of Washington, and colleagues quantify the health system output losses in Liberia during and in the immediate aftermath of the EVD outbreak, and the recovery of the health systems in the two years following. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 20, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Beluga whales dive deeper, longer to find food in Arctic
(University of Washington) Beluga whales that spend summers feeding in the Arctic are diving deeper and longer to find food than in earlier years, when sea ice covered more of the ocean for longer periods, according to a new analysis led by University of Washington researchers (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Healthiest Office Snacks, As Chosen By Nutritionists
(CNN) — When your stomach starts grumbling during a midmorning meeting or when you’re stuck at your desk without a break in sight, what is the most satisfying and healthy snack to grab? To answer this question, I asked 10 nutritionists what their favorite go-to nosh is during a busy workday. Below, their responses. ALMONDS “Almonds are my number one go-to snack when hunger hits between meals. In a study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 1.5 ounces of almonds (about 35 nuts) consumed as a snack daily for four weeks helped to suppress hunger between meals. How? Because the fiber, prot...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local TV Snacks Source Type: news

Tissue paper sensors show promise for health care, entertainment, robotics
(University of Washington) University of Washington engineers have turned tissue paper -- similar to toilet tissue -- into a new kind of wearable sensor that can detect a pulse, a blink of an eye and other human movement. The sensor is light, flexible and inexpensive, with potential applications in health care, entertainment and robotics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus
(University of Washington) In a paper published Feb. 9 in Science Advances, scientists at the University of Washington announced that they have successfully combined two different imaging methods -- a type of lens designed for nanoscale interaction with lightwaves, along with robust computational processing -- to create full-color images. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Wearable Artificial Kidney Could be Game Changer
Most innovations medicine occur by asking one simple question. Is there a better way? Physicians at the Kidney Research Institute of the University of Washington have asked that question about hemodialysis treatments – lengthy procedures that filter a patient’s blood when the kidneys no longer function properly. The institute is developing a wearable artificial kidney that could completely change the paradigm for some of these patients with impaired kidney function. Earlier this week, at MD&M West, Jonathan Himmelfarb, MD, who servers as director of the Kidney Research Institute, spoke about the develo...
Source: MDDI - February 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Medical Device Business Source Type: news

Simple rules can help fishery managers cope with ecological complexity
(University of Washington) A team of ecologists and economists are the first to test whether real-life ecological interactions produce economic benefits for the fishing industry. The results were published online Jan. 29 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Defibrillators May Do More Harm to Kidney Patients
The chances of being hospitalized for heart failure were 49 percent greater for kidney disease patients with an implanted defibrillator than for those who did not have the device, according to the study by researchers from Kaiser Permanente and the University of Washington. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fruit bat's echolocation may work like sophisticated surveillance sonar
(University of Washington) High-speed recordings of Egyptian fruit bats in flight show that instead of using a primitive form of echolocation, these animals actually use a technique recently developed by humans for surveillance and navigation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 7, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Zika brain damage may go undetected in pregnancy
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Zika virus may cause significant damage to the fetal brain even when the baby's head size is normal, according to a primate study. The damage can be difficult to detect even with sophisticated brain scans. It may also occur from infections during childhood and adolescence. Hard hit are brain regions that generate new brain cells. Fetal brain structures that may be injured include those where neural stem cells play a role in learning and memory. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Reconstructing an ancient lethal weapon
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers reconstructed prehistoric projectiles and points from ancient sites in what is now Alaska and studied the qualities that would make for a lethal hunting weapon. By examining and testing different projectile points, the team has come to a new understanding about the technological choices people made in ancient times. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

University of Washington, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory team up to make the materials of tomorrow
(University of Washington) The Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Washington have announced the creation of the Northwest Institute for Materials Physics, Chemistry and Technology -- or NW IMPACT -- a joint research endeavor to power discoveries and advancements in materials that transform energy, telecommunications, medicine, information technology and other fields. UW President Ana Mari Cauce and PNNL Director Steven Ashby formally launched NW IMPACT during a ceremony Jan. 31 at the PNNL campus in Richland, Wash. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 31, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Arno Motulsky, a Founder of Medical Genetics, Dies at 94
Dr. Motulsky narrowly escaped the Nazis as a teenager and went on to become what one scientist called “ a maestro of human genetics. ” (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DENISE GRADY Tags: Motulsky, Arno Deaths (Obituaries) Genetics and Heredity Cholesterol Holocaust and the Nazi Era Refugees and Displaced Persons University of Washington Source Type: news

Gene therapy using CAR T cells could provide long-term protection against HIV
FINDINGSA UCLA-led research team has created blood-forming stem cells that can carry a gene that allows the body to produce cells that can detect and destroy HIV-infected cells. The blood-forming cells, called hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, or HSPCs, have been engineered to carry chimeric antigen receptor, or CAR, genes that allows the production of immune cells that target cells infected with HIV.After being transplanted into the body, the engineered cells formed immune cells that not only destroyed the infected cells, but also lived for more than two years. This suggests that they have the potential to give peo...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 25, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Vaping Is Addictive And Can Lead Teens To Smoke, Study Finds
CBS Local — A newly released report, compiled by health experts from around the country, has found that e-cigarettes can have a much more negative impact on teens than previous believed. The study claims that teens not only become addicted to vaping but are more likely to pick up smoking because of it. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine released their findings on Jan. 23, citing evidence that e-cigarettes were safer than traditional smoking products, but refused to declare vaping devices completely safe. “When it got down to answering the questions about what the impacts on health are,...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Addiction Chris Melore e-cigarettes Local TV Smoking talkers vaping Source Type: news

Vaping does encourage kids to try tobacco, report finds
The report by the University of Washington issued Tuesday wrestles with the potential pros and cons of the vapor-emitting devices which have been sold in the US for more than a decade. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study shows how fetal infections may cause adult heart disease
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Infants born prematurely are known to have a higher risk of developing heart disease later in life. Now, a study led by researchers at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle shows that, in preterm animal models, inflammation due to infection can disrupt the activity of genes that are crucial for normal development of the heart. The findings point to the importance of developing better ways to prevent or therapeutically target inflammation in the fetus to reduce long-term health problems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

WSU study to test sleep technology in chronic insomnia
(Washington State University) A new, three-year project led by scientists in Washington State University's Sleep and Performance Research Center may soon bring relief to those who toss and turn. In collaboration with the University of Washington, the researchers will test the effectiveness of a novel, low-cost sleep measurement technology with built-in sleep coaching functionality in individuals with chronic insomnia. Insomnia is considered chronic if disrupted sleep occurs at least three nights a week for more than three months. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Small hydroelectric dams increase globally with little research, regulations
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers have published the first major assessment of small hydropower dams around the world -- including their potential for growth -- and highlight the incredibly variability in how dams of varying sizes are categorized, regulated and studied. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Temporary 'bathtub drains' in the ocean concentrate flotsam
(University of Washington) An experiment using hundreds of plastic drifters in the Gulf of Mexico shows that rather than simply spread out, as current calculations would predict, many of them clumped together in a tight cluster. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scale-eating fish adopt clever parasitic methods to survive
(University of Washington) A small group of fishes -- possibly the world's cleverest carnivorous grazers -- feeds on the scales of other fish in the tropics. A team led by biologists at the University of Washington is trying to understand these scale-feeding fish and how this odd diet influences their body evolution and behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A 'touching sight': How babies' brains process touch builds foundations for learning
(University of Washington) A new study from the University of Washington Institute for Learning& Brain Sciences provides one of the first looks inside the infant's brain to show where the sense of touch is processed -- not just when a baby feels a touch to the hand or foot, but when the baby sees an adult's hand or foot being touched, as well. Researchers say these connections help lay the groundwork for the developmental and cognitive skills of imitation and empathy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Biomaterials with 'logic gates' release therapeutics in response to environmental triggers
(University of Washington) Scientists at the University of Washington announced that they have built and tested a new biomaterial-based delivery system -- known as a hydrogel -- that will encase a desired cargo and dissolve to release its freight only when specific physiological conditions are met. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Unexpected environmental source of methane discovered
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Roughly 10 percent of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms contain the genetic code for manufacturing a back-up enzyme, called iron iron-only nitrogenase, to do their job. New research reveals that this enzyme allows these microorganisms to convert nitrogen gas to ammonia and carbon dioxide into methane at the same time. This enzymatic pathway is a previously unknown route for the natural biological production of methane. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nature has more than one way to make methane, say Utah State University biochemists
(Utah State University) Utah State University biochemists, with collaborators from the University of Washington and Montana State University, report a bacterial, iron-only nitrogenase pathway for methane formation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Next PNR Rendezvous is January 17
What does it mean for research to be meaningful? How do metrics help and hinder our understanding of research impact? The next PNR Rendezvous session addresses the history and evolution of meaningful metrics in higher education. Robin Chin Roemer, Head of Instructional Design and Outreach Services at the University of Washington libraries will be our guest presenter.  She will address topics such as the pros and cons of bibliometrics; the rise and risks of altmetrics; tools for tracing researcher impact; and the influence of different venues and disciplines on impact communication. The session is eligible for 1 Medica...
Source: Dragonfly - January 11, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: Training & Education Source Type: news

University of Washington opens state-of-the-art biotech building (Photos)
The $87.8 million Nanoengineering and Sciences Building connects to the existing 90,000-square-foot Molecular Engineering and Sciences Building. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 11, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Casey Coombs Source Type: news

University of Washington opens state-of-the-art biotech building (Photos)
The $87.8 million Nanoengineering and Sciences Building connects to the existing 90,000-square-foot Molecular Engineering and Sciences Building. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - January 11, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Casey Coombs Source Type: news

From the UW eScience Institute: Data Science for Social Good
Are you interested in using data-driven discovery for societal benefit?  The University of Washington eScience Institute, in collaboration with the Cascadia Urban Analytics Cooperative, is excited to announce the summer 2018 Data Science for Social Good (DSSG) program. The program brings together Student Fellows with data and domain researchers to work on focused, collaborative projects for societal benefit. Sixteen DSSG Student Fellows will be selected to work with academic researchers, data scientists, and public stakeholder groups such as government officials, academic researchers, non-profit organiz...
Source: Dragonfly - January 10, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Ann Madhavan Tags: Blog Source Type: news

Imaging technique could be ‘new ballgame’ in drug development
Biochemistry and structural biology are surprisingly — at least to the uninitiated — visual fields. This is especially true in the study of proteins. Scientists like to see the structure of proteins within cells to help them truly understand how they work, how they don’t work or how they can be modified to work as they should. That is, how the y can be targeted with drugs to cure disease.Current methods, however, have their downsides. Many widely used techniques require large amounts of protein for analysis, even though many diseases are caused by proteins that are far from abundant or that are ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 2, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists Are Designing Artisanal Proteins for Your Body
The human body makes tens of thousands of cellular proteins, each for a particular task. Now researchers have learned to create custom versions not found in nature. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARL ZIMMER Tags: Proteins DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid) Genetic Engineering Influenza Immune System David Baker University of Washington Biology and Biochemistry Source Type: news

Promoting self-esteem among African-American girls through racial, cultural connections
(University of Washington) African-American girls who participated in an after-school cultural enrichment program showed greater school engagement, and reported higher confidence, at its conclusion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fish to benefit if large dams adopt new operating approach
(University of Washington) Recognizing that many large dams are here to stay, a University of Washington team is investigating an emerging solution to help achieve freshwater conservation goals by re-envisioning the ways in which water is released by dams. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Synthetic protein packages its own genetic material and evolves
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Scientists have created computationally designed protein assemblies, that display some functions normally associated with living things, in the search for ways to transport therapeutic cargo into specific types of cells without using viruses as vehicles. These encapsulate their own RNA genomes and evolve new traits in complex environments. They are synthetic versions of the protein shells that viruses use to protect and deliver materials. The synthetic proteins evolved better RNA packaging, resistance against degrading enzymes in blood and longer circulation time. (Sou...
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Computational strategies overcome obstacles in peptide therapeutics development
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Recently developed computational strategies could help realize the promise of peptide-based drugs. Researchers were able to sample the diverse landscape of shapes that peptides can form as a guide for designing the next generation of stable, potent, selective drugs. They compiled a library of peptide scaffolds upon which drug candidates might be designed. Their methods also can be used to design additional custom peptides with arbitrary shapes on demand. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genomic blood test predicts survival rates after surgery for advanced heart failure
UCLA HealthDr. Mario DengFINDINGSAn experimental blood test developed at UCLA that uses gene activity data from immune cells was 93 percent accurate in predicting survival rates for people with advanced heart failure who had surgery to implant mechanical circulatory support devices.BACKGROUNDMechanical circulatory support devices, such as ventricular assist devices and temporary total artificial hearts, can be surgically implanted in people with advanced heart failure to help the heart ’s pumping function.But people with advanced heart failure often also suffer from multi-organ dysfunction syndrome, which can lead to...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 14, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Rooftop wiretap aims to learn what crows gossip about at dusk
(University of Washington) An interdisciplinary team is using a covert sound-based approach, worthy of an avian CSI, to study the link between crows' calls and their behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 5, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Living cell membranes can self-sort their components by 'demixing'
(University of Washington) Scientists at the University of Washington show for the first time that the complex distribution of molecules within a membrane of a living yeast cell arises through demixing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 5, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Medical note system could boost patients ’ engagement in their health care
Encouraging patients to help write and add notes to their personal medical charts — a task typically handled only by medical professionals — may help patients feel more involved with their own care and improve relationships with their doctors, a new study has found.Inresearch published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, doctors at UCLA Health and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center found that patients could benefit if they are invited to co-produce medical notes, called “OurNotes,” with their doctors, rather than merely reading them. The practice may also benefit doctors by reducing time spent on ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 2, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

There's a deeper fish in the sea
(University of Washington) A new fish species, the deepest in the ocean, was discovered and named by an international team of researchers. The team published a paper describing the Mariana snailfish this week in the journal Zootaxa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Metabolites altered in chronic kidney disease
(University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio) A new study that included researchers from Norway, the University of Washington, the University of California San Diego and The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (now called UT Health San Antonio ™ ) found that dozens of small molecules called metabolites are altered in this disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Health of people with cystic fibrosis shows positive trends in US and Canada
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Research comparing cystic fibrosis patients in the United States and Canada showed that, although patients' nutritional status and lung function improved in both countries from 1990 to 2013, the US improvement rate was faster. Nutritional status and lung function are related to survival in cystic fibrosis. U.S. improvements may be due to implementation of newborn screening, quality improvement initiatives for the disease and better healthcare access under the Medicaid Children's Health Insurance Program, signed into federal law in 1997. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

‘Barcoding’ Cells in Nematodes Could Bring Advances and New Medical Laboratory Tools for Treatment of Cancer and Other Chronic Diseases
Ongoing research at the University of Washington promises new methods for identifying and cataloging large numbers of cells quickly, which could lead to more individualized treatments in support of precision medicine initiatives Researchers have found a new method for identifying specific cell types by groups, a breakthrough that some experts say could lead to new […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - November 17, 2017 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Management & Operations anatomic pathology Aviv Regev PhD Broad Institute Source Type: news

When to fish: Timing matters for fish that migrate to reproduce
(University of Washington) A new University of Washington study points to yet another human factor that is hampering the ability of fish to reproduce: the timing of our fishing seasons. The study considers how the timing of fishing efforts might disproportionately target certain fish and change the life history patterns of entire populations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What counts as 'nature'? It all depends
(University of Washington) University of Washington psychology professor Peter Kahn describes 'environmental generational amnesia' as the idea that each generation perceives the environment into which it's born, no matter how developed, urbanized or polluted, as the norm. And so what each generation comes to think of as 'nature' is relative, based on what it's exposed to. Kahn argues that more frequent and meaningful interactions with nature can enhance our connection to -- and definition of -- the natural world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How climate change may reshape subalpine wildflower communities
(University of Washington) An unseasonably warm, dry summer in 2015 on Washington state's Mount Rainier caused subalpine wildflowers to change their bloom times and form 'reassembled' communities, with unknown consequences for species interactions among wildflowers, pollinators and other animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 7, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How toxic air clouds mental health
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers have found a link between air pollution and psychological distress. The higher the level of particulates in the air, the UW-led study showed, the greater the impact on mental health.The study is believed to be the first to use a nationally representative survey pool, cross-referenced with pollution data at the census block level, to evaluate the connection between toxic air and mental health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A Conversation with Davis Patterson, PhD
Discussion includes rural health disparities related to access and outcomes, recruitment and retention, and the work of the Rural PREP program, among other things. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - October 31, 2017 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Tenure-track Assistant Professor in Cellular Biology or Cellular Physiology
The University of Washington Tacoma invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor in Cellular Biology or Cellular Physiology in the Division of Sciences and Mathematics within the School of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences (SIAS). This is a full-time position with a nine-month service period. The successful candidate will be an intellectually expansive scholar with a proven record in cellular biology, cellular physiology, or related field, with biomedical applications. They will also have a demonstrated commitment to creating an inclusive classroom and laboratory environment with diverse and underreprese...
Source: AIBS Classifieds - October 30, 2017 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Classifieds Tags: Other Positions Available Source Type: news

Public Libraries Spotlight: Nicolette Warisse Sosulski, Business and Reference Librarian, Portage District Library
Education BA English (Honors), Georgetown University BA Government, Georgetown University MLIS iSchool at the University of Washington How did you become interested in focusing on Health and Wellness? I have always had an interest in biology and health sciences. I roomed with nursing students in college and hung out with pre-meds. I have worked for health insurance programs in both patient and provider customer service, so I needed to learn medical terminology for those positions. In iSchool, I was fortunate enough to be able to enroll in an amazing health reference class. Why is health literacy important in your community...
Source: The Cornflower - October 30, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Bobbi Newman Tags: Public Libraries Public Libraries Spotlight Business and Reference Librarian Nicolette Warisse Sosulski Portage District Library Source Type: news