An effective way to increase capacity for mental health
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Researchers at UW Medicine found that primary-care physicians and rural clinic staff felt more skilled in delivering mental health care if they used a model known as collaborative care.In the model, primary-care physicians retain primary responsibility to treat behavioral health disorders with the support of two team members: a care manager (e.g., social workers, therapists, nurses) and a consulting psychiatrist. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lessons from coronavirus surveillance testing in Seattle-area homeless shelters
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) A coronavirus surveillance study undertaken at Seattle-area homeless shelters, starting as the pandemic emerged, provides possible community-based strategies for detecting SARS-CoV-2 infections and protecting homeless populations, as well as others in close-living quarters such as prisons, refugee camps and evacuation centers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 15, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

COVID-19 may have been in L.A. as early as last December, UCLA-led study suggests
This study was supported by the UCLA Department of Medicine. (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 10, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Delayed immune responses may make COVID-19 deadly for elderly people
A University of Washington analysis of some 500 nasal swabs from coronavirus testing revealed different sets of immunity-coding genes that don't activate as well in elderly people and men. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Seeing the eye like never before
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) In a big step for ophthalmology, scientists created a method to view the inner workings of the eye and its diseases at the cellular level. Currently, researchers can only see a broad section of the retina. This new technology allows them to zoom into just one part of a cell. In their words, they have accelerated the process for vision restoration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Designed antiviral proteins inhibit SARS-CoV-2 in the lab
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Computer-designed miniproteins have now been shown to protect lab-grown human cells from SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. The lead antiviral candidate rivals the best-known SARS-CoV-2 monoclonal antibodies in its protective actions. The synthetic antiviral candidates were designed to prevent infection by interfering with the mechanism that coronaviruses use to break into and enter cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 9, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Delayed immune responses may drive COVID-19 mortality rates among men and the elderly
(PLOS) COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) infections tend to be more severe among older adults and males, yet the mechanisms underlying increased mortality in these two demographics are unknown. A study published in the open access journal PLOS Biology on September 8, 2020 by Nicole Lieberman and Alexander Greninger at University of Washington and colleagues suggests that varying immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 due to age and sex may depend on viral load and the time-course of infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 8, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How birth control, girls' education can slow population growth
(University of Washington) Education and family planning have long been tied to lower fertility trends. But new research from the University of Washington analyzes those factors to determine, what accelerates a decline in otherwise high-fertility countries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The brain can induce diabetes remission in rodents, but how?
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) In rodents with type 2 diabetes, a single surgical injection of a protein called fibroblast growth factor 1 can restore blood sugar levels to normal for weeks or months. Yet how this growth factor acts in the brain to generate this lasting benefit has been poorly understood. Clarifying how this occurs might lead to more effective diabetes treatments that tap into the brain's inherent potential to ameliorate the condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Evidence of hibernation-like state in Antarctic animal
(Harvard University, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology) Among the many winter survival strategies in the animal world, hibernation is one of the most common. According to new research, this type of adaptation has a long history. In a paper published in the journal Communications Biology, scientists at Harvard University and the University of Washington report evidence of a hibernation-like state in an animal that lived in Antarctica during the Early Triassic, some 250 million years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 27, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study confirms link between influenza, heart complications
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) The link between influenza and serious heart conditions just grew stronger. A CDC study looking at more than 80,000 adult patients hospitalized with flu over eight seasons found that sudden, serious heart complications were common, occurring in 12% of patients, or 1 in 8. The study, published Aug. 25 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, underscores the importance of getting a flu shot early, and the impact of respiratory infections on the heart. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 27, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Terms in Seattle-area rental ads reinforce neighborhood segregation
(University of Washington) A new University of Washington study of Seattle-area rental ads shows how certain words and phrases are common to different neighborhoods, helping to reinforce residential segregation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Failure to 'flatten the curve' may kill more people than we thought
(University of Washington) New research by the University of Minnesota and the University of Washington finds that every six additional ICU beds or seven additional non-ICU beds filled by COVID-19 patients leads to one additional COVID-19 death over the following week. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 24, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

CPR choices of dialysis patients suggest many lack context
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Globally some 2 million people with failed kidneys undergo hemodialysis treatment. Researchers queried 876 dialysis patients about whether, in the event of a cardiac arrest, they would want to be resuscitated. Nearly 85% said they definitely or probably would want CPR. The study's lead author said the findings raise concern that many patients are unaware that their likely outcomes of cardiac arrest, even with resuscitation, are poor, relative to the general population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research finds association between COVID-19 hospital use and mortality
(University of Minnesota) Researchers at the University of Minnesota and University of Washington found a statistical relationship between the number of hospital beds (ICU and non-ICU) occupied by COVID-19 patients in a state and reported mortality. Published today in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, this research is believed to be the first to use actual, state-level data to examine this association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

February lockdown in China caused a drop in some types of air pollution, but not others
(University of Washington) Nitrogen dioxide, which comes from transportation, was half of what would be expected over China in February 2020. Other emissions and cloud properties, however, showed no significant changes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 20, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New 'molecular computers' find the right cells
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) New nanoscale devices, made of synthetic proteins, have been designed to target a therapeutic agent only to cells with a specific, predetermined combinations of cell surface markers. They operate on their own and search out cells they were programmed to find. The hope is that they might guide CAR T cancer therapy, and other treatments where precision is critical, through a sort of molecular beacon. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 20, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

UW team developing model to help lower COVID-19 infections in Seattle, other major cities
(University of Washington) A UW team has received a grant to develop a model that uses local data to generate policy recommendations that could help lower COVID-19 infections in King County, which includes Seattle. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 14, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Systemic racism has consequences for all life in cities
(University of Washington) Social inequalities, specifically racism and classism, are impacting the biodiversity, evolutionary shifts and ecological health of plants and animals in our cities. That's the main finding of a review paper published Aug. 13 in Science led by the University of Washington, with co-authors at the University of California, Berkeley, and University of Michigan. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Test accurately IDs people whose gonorrhea can be cured with simple oral antibiotic
A test designed by UCLA researchers can pinpoint which people with gonorrhea will respond successfully to the inexpensive oral antibiotic ciprofloxacin, which had previously been sidelined over concerns the bacterium that causes the infection was becoming resistant to it.In research published in the peer-reviewed journal Clinical Infectious Diseases,a UCLA-led team found thatof106 subjectsthe test identified as having a strain ofgonorrhea called wild-type gyrA serine, all were cured with a single dose of oral ciprofloxacin. Though the test has been available for three years, this is the first time it has been systematicall...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 13, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Ongoing Duwamish River recovery inspires video series, book
Outreach by University of Washington Superfund Research Program includes a new history of the river and educational videos on safe fishing. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - August 4, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Carl Bergstrom: 'People are using data to bullshit'
The evolutionary biologist on data manipulation, fake news, and the importance of using science as a lie detectorCarl Bergstrom is a professor of evolutionary biology at the University of Washington in Seattle. More than a decade ago he conducted research on the role of government in pandemic planning, and has been a trenchant critic of the current response. He is the co-author with his colleague Jevin D West of a new book,Calling Bullshit: The Art of Scepticism in a Data-Driven World.Your book is very timely in that it suggests the exponential spread of bullshit would eventually crash against fact in spectacular fashion. ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 1, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Tim Adams Tags: Science Science and nature books Coronavirus outbreak Technology Social media Digital media Biology Source Type: news

New studies show how to save parasites and why it's important
(University of Washington) An international group of scientists published a paper, Aug. 1, 2020, in a special edition of the journal Biological Conservation that lays out an ambitious global conservation plan for parasites. A separate paper also found that the responses of parasites to environmental change are likely to be complex, and that a changing world probably will see both outbreaks of some parasites and a total loss of other parasite species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

National Academies publishes guide to help public officials make sense of COVID-19 data
(University of Washington) The National Academies has published a guide to help officials across the country interpret and understand different COVID-19 statistics and data sources as they make decisions about opening and closing schools, businesses and community facilities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

MD Anderson Leads List of Top-Tier Cancer Hospitals
For the sixth consecutive year, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston was named the top Adult Cancer Hospital in America by U.S. News & World Report. Several of the top-tier cancer centers on the list have specialty programs for mesothelioma that contributed to their high ranking. The 2020-21 Best Hospitals for Cancer rankings, announced this week, are part of a broader Best Hospitals Honor Roll done annually by U.S. News & World Report. Top five cancer center rankings also included Memorial Sloan Kettering in New York City; Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota; Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 29, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Fran Mannino Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Specialty Centers Rank on 2020 Best Hospitals List
For the sixth consecutive year, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston was named the top Adult Cancer Hospital in America by U.S. News & World Report. Several of the top-tier cancer centers on the list have specialty programs for mesothelioma that contributed to their high ranking. The 2020-21 Best Hospitals for Cancer rankings, announced this week, are part of a broader Best Hospitals Honor Roll done annually by U.S. News & World Report. Top five cancer center rankings also included Memorial Sloan Kettering in New York City; Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota; Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 29, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Fran Mannino Source Type: news

Study pinpoints women who benefit less from 3D mammograms
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) A new comparison of two breast-screening technologies has found that, for most women, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT, also called 3D mammography) is superior to digital mammography for cancer detection and for reducing recall visits due to unclear or false findings. The study's distinction, though, is in identifying women for whom DBT's advantage is less. Previous evidence had suggested that DBT would generally benefit all women. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 28, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Coronavirus: At-home tests work as well as those in clinics
A new study from University of Washington School of Medicine found that self-swab coronavirus tests were 80% accurate overall, but 95% accurate among those with high viral loads. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Jet aircraft exhaust linked to preterm births
A study from theUCLA Fielding School of Public Health has found that pregnant women exposed to high levels of ultra fine particles from jet airplane exhaust are 14% more likely to have a preterm birth than those exposed to lower levels.The researchers examined exposure among women living near Los Angeles International Airport, in an area that includes neighborhoods in Los Angeles, El Segundo, Hawthorne, Inglewood andseveral other communities inland fromthe airport.“The data suggest that airplane pollution contributes to preterm births above and beyond the main source of air pollutionin this area, which is tra ffic,&...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 22, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

COVID-19 replicating RNA vaccine has robust response in nonhuman primates
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) A replicating RNA vaccine, formulated with a lipid-based nanoparticle emulsion, produces antibodies against the COVID-19 coronavirus in mice and primates with a single immunization. These antibodies potently neutralize the virus in young and old animals. The antibody levels induced are comparable to those in recovered COVID-19 patients. This formulation is shelf-stable, with mass-production and distribution advantages. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 20, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Legal marijuana may be slowing reductions in teen marijuana use, study says
(University of Washington) A longitudinal study of more than 230 teens and young adults in Washington state finds that teens may be more likely to use marijuana following legalization - with the proliferation of stores and increasing adult use of the drug -- than they otherwise would have been. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Doctors motivated by both health, malpractice concerns when ordering additional tests
FINDINGSA UCLA-led studyhas found that dermatopathologists, who specialize in diagnosing skin diseases at the microscopic level, are motivated both by patient safety concerns and by malpractice fears— often simultaneously —when ordering multiple tests and obtaining second opinions, with a higher proportion of these doctors reporting patient safety as a concern.When ordering additional microscopic tests for patients, 90% of the dermatopathologists surveyed cited patient safety as a concern and 71% of them reported malpractice fears. Similarly, when obtaining second reviews from a consulting pathologist or recomm...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 17, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

After Cruise Ships and Nursing Homes, Will Universities Be the Next COVID-19 Tinderboxes?
The fall semester has yet to begin, but student athletes training for the season can already be found on college campuses across the U.S. And so can COVID-19. Since the start of July there have been at least two outbreaks among student athletes, coaches, and staff—with 37 infected at the University of North Carolina (UNC) Chapel Hill and 22 at Boise State. Clusters of infection have been traced to college town bars popular with students. A common misconception is that young people with COVID-19 don’t die and therefore college re-openings pose little risk. Sadly, this isn’t the case. COVID-19 deaths in the...
Source: TIME: Health - July 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katie Mack and Gavin Yamey Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

University of Washington approved to bring physician's assistant program to the Islands
The University of Washington will be opening up an extension campus for its MEDEX Northwest Physician Assistant Program in Kailua-Kona on Hawaii Island, officials with the school announced recently. Onsite classroom instruction for the 17 students in the inaugural cohort of the new MEDEX Kailua-Kona campus will begin Monday, Sept. 14, pending any Covid-19 restrictions. The new campus will educate physician assistants who work throughout the Islands in an effort to address significant health c are… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 16, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Olivia Peterkin Source Type: news

University of Washington approved to bring physician's assistant program to the Islands
The University of Washington will be opening up an extension campus for its MEDEX Northwest Physician Assistant Program in Kailua-Kona on Hawaii Island, officials with the school announced recently. Onsite classroom instruction for the 17 students in the inaugural cohort of the new MEDEX Kailua-Kona campus will begin Monday, Sept. 14, pending any Covid-19 restrictions. The new campus will educate physician assistants who work throughout the Islands in an effort to address significant health c are… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 16, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Olivia Peterkin Source Type: news

Researchers Create A Tiny Camera To Be Carried By Beetles
A research team at the University of Washington has developed a small, lightweight wireless camera that can be carried by beetles. In the future, the device could also allow tiny robots to see. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Global Population Anticipated to Peak in 2064
WEDNESDAY, July 15, 2020 -- The global population is anticipated to peak in 2064 and then decline to year 2100, according to a study published online July 14 in The Lancet. Stein Emil Vollset, Dr.P.H., from the University of Washington in Seattle,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 15, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

A Montana Care Home Refused Free COVID-19 Tests. Now, Nearly Every Resident Has Coronavirus
(BILLINGS, Mont.) — It was meant to be a last line of defense to protect the most vulnerable as the coronavirus spread across the United States: Montana officials offered free testing in May for staff and residents at assisted living and long-term care facilities. But not all of them followed through, according to state data, including a facility in Billings, Montana’s largest city, that cares for people with dementia and other memory problems. The virus has infected almost every resident and killed eight, accounting for almost a quarter of Montana’s 34 confirmed deaths. Thirty-six employees also have tes...
Source: TIME: Health - July 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: MATTHEW BROWN and AMY BETH HANSON / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Montana News Desk wire Source Type: news

America's population will peak at 364 million in 42 years before shrinking 10%
The US population is set to continue to increase as life expectancies grow longer, but after 2062, declining birth rates will drive the population down by 2100, University of Washington scientists predict. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

World population will start SHRINKING in 44 years after peaking at 9.7bn, study claims
Researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle said improving access to contraception and better education and employment for women would mean average birth rates tumble. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

TREMFYA ® (guselkumab) Approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration as the First Selective Interleukin (IL)-23 Inhibitor for Active Psoriatic Arthritis
HORSHAM, PA, July 14, 2020 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved TREMFYA® (guselkumab) for adult patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA), a chronic progressive disease characterized by painful joints and skin inflammation.[1],[2] TREMFYA is the first treatment approved for active PsA that selectively inhibits interleukin (IL)-23, a naturally occurring cytokine that is involved in normal inflammatory and immune responses associated with the symptoms of PsA. The safety and efficacy of TREMFYA in PsA have b...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - July 14, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Coronavirus Outbreaks Linked to Fraternity Houses are a Warning for College Campuses
Recent coronavirus outbreaks have been linked to fraternities at universities in Washington, California and Mississippi, and experts say it’s an example of what’s to come as many colleges reopen for in-person classes beginning in August. At least 136 fraternity house residents and nine other students at the University of Washington in Seattle had tested positive for COVID-19 as of July 10 in what officials called a “Greek Row outbreak.” It “provides lessons for students as they consider their return to campus this fall,” said Dr. Geoffrey Gottlieb, chair of the university’s Advisor...
Source: TIME: Health - July 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katie Reilly Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Education Source Type: news

Op-Ed: My research team makes COVID-19 death projections. Here's why our forecasts often change
My team at the University of Washington makes COVID-19 death projections, which change as more information becomes available. (Source: L.A. Times - Health)
Source: L.A. Times - Health - July 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christopher J.L. Murray Source Type: news

Dissecting fruit flies' varying responses to life-extension diet
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Changes in a few small molecules in a cell's metabolism might indicate whether a calorie-restricted diet will extend, shorten, or not effect lifespan, a fruit fly study shows. Metabolomics may reveal how calorie-restricted diets affect aging, and how genes and environment influence these responses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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Dr. Christopher Murray, director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, explains why a new model has projected that more than 200,000 Americans will die from Covid-19 by November if masks are not universally used. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - July 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

105 University of Washington frat members have coronavirus
Experts say the outbreak is a troubling sign of what may be in store if colleges reopen in the fall. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - July 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nationwide Protests Haven ’t Caused a COVID-19 Spike (So Far.) Here’s What We Can Learn From That
The coronavirus situation in the U.S. is bleak. While states like New York and New Jersey successfully turned the tide, others, like Texas and Arizona, are dealing with worsening outbreaks. At the national level, daily cases are rising daily, well exceeding the previous peak set earlier this year. And even in those few states that have gotten a grip on the pandemic, leaders are rethinking their reopening plans for fear of a relapse. But public health officials have spotted at least one bright spot amid all the discouraging data: the nationwide Black Lives Matter protests, which began after George Floyd’s death at the...
Source: TIME: Health - June 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news

We Have a Cheap, Effective Way to Keep Ourselves Safer From COVID-19. Why Are We Fighting About It?
At long last, we have made a truly game-changing scientific breakthrough in preventing the spread of COVID-19. The impact of this breakthrough seems almost too good to be true. We have found a disease control tool that, when used properly, can dramatically reduce the person-to-person transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Studies have shown that this tool could reduce transmission by somewhere between 50% and 85%. The tool is cheap and remarkably low-tech. You can even make one at home. It has no significant side effects. And with each passing day, the scientific research showing the tool’s effec...
Source: TIME: Health - June 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gavin Yamey Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Coronavirus live news: WHO warns of global oxygen concentrator shortage as cases rise by 1m per week
Texas hospitals near capacity;Dutch brothels to reopen;volunteers receive first doses of experimental vaccine. Follow the latest updatesWHO warns of global oxygen shortageIndia has highest daily rise in casesEU border rules could bar US visitorsSee all our coronavirus coverage4.28amBSTThe death toll from the coronavirus in Latin America is expected to skyrocket to nearly 390,000 by October, with Brazil and Mexico seen accounting for two-thirds of fatalities as other nations in the region contain their outbreaks, the University of Washington said on Wednesday.4.09amBSTHi,Helen Sullivan here. A reminder you can get in touch ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Helen Sullivan Tags: Coronavirus outbreak World news Science Infectious diseases Australia news UK news US news Microbiology Medical research Source Type: news

New U.S. Coronavirus Infections Return to Levels at Peak of Outbreak
(HOUSTON) — A coronavirus resurgence is wiping out two months of progress in the U.S. and sending infections to dire new levels across the South and West, with hospital administrators and health experts warning Wednesday that politicians and a tired-of-being-cooped-up public are letting a disaster unfold. The U.S. recorded a one-day total of 34,700 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, the highest level since late April, when the number peaked at 36,400, according to a count kept by Johns Hopkins University. While newly confirmed infections have been declining steadily in early hot spots such as New York and New Jersey, seve...
Source: TIME: Health - June 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk overnight wire Source Type: news