DNA-ROM: New grant aims for memory chips based on DNA
(University of California - Davis) A new grant awarded to UC Davis, the University of Washington and Emory University aims to fuse biology and electrical engineering and to build new types of electronic memory based on DNA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

ASHG honors Mary-Claire King with ASHG Advocacy Award
(American Society of Human Genetics) ASHG has named Mary-Claire King, Ph.D., as the 2018 recipient of the Advocacy Award. Dr. King is American Cancer Society Professor of Medicine and Genome Sciences at the University of Washington in Seattle. This award honors individuals or groups who have exhibited excellence and achievement in applications of human genetics for the common good, in areas such as facilitating public awareness of genetics issues, promoting funding for biomedical research, and integrating genetics into health systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Many Non-Emergency Medicine Trained Physicians in ER Care
FRIDAY, July 13, 2018 -- The emergency medicine workforce comprises many non-emergency medicine trained physicians, according to a study recently published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine. M. Kennedy Hall, M.D., from the University of Washington... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 13, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Keeping kidney stones at bay during space flights
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Ultrasonic repositioning of kidney stones will be tested in emergency department patients at UW Medicine as part of the development of a new medical technology for NASA. Astronauts are prone to kidney stones during space missions. The hope is that pushing stones with an ultrasound tractor beam would offer pain relief and avoid medical complications of urinary backups for astronauts affected in space. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hope for menopausal women: Scientists find how to banish hot flashes
Scientists at the University of Washington have shown we could target a neuron rather than estrogen levels with drugs. Hormone replacement therapy reduces hot flashes but increases stroke risk. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists discover a way to banish hot flashes without raising a woman's stroke risk
Scientists at the University of Washington have shown we could target a neuron rather than estrogen levels with drugs. Hormone replacement therapy reduces hot flashes but increases stroke risk. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Working night shifts drives up the risk of cancer, stroke and heart disease:
A new study from the University of Washington and the University of Surrey has found that working night shift disrupts the peripheral clocks found in your body's tissues such as the liver and pancreas. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pucker up, baby! Lips take center stage in infants' brains, study says
(University of Washington) Researchers used brain imaging to gauge how the hand, foot and lips are represented in the brains of 2-month-olds -- a much younger age than has been studied previously. It is believed to be the first to reveal the greater neurological activity associated with the lips than with other body parts represented in the infant brain. It also indicates how soon infants' brains begin to make sense of their bodies, a first step toward other developmental milestones. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stem cells restore function in primate heart-failure study
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Human stem cells have been successfully used to restore heart function in monkeys with heart failure. The findings suggest that the technique would be effective in heart-failure patients. The cells form new muscle that integrates into the heart so that it pumps vigorously again. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UW professor Daniel Schwartz wins highest US award for STEM mentors
(University of Washington) Daniel Schwartz, University of Washington Boeing-Sutter Professor of Chemical Engineering and Clean Energy Institute Director, received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and the National Science Foundation this week. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 28, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Youth need different approach to type 2 diabetes treatment
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Medicines used to treat diabetes in adults are not as effective in slowing the progression of the disease in youth, a major, multi-institutional study now shows. The findings are disturbing because type 2 diabetes among youth is a growing problem. The researchers point to the need to develop new approaches to treat adolescents with the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

No-shows at radiology can cost a hospital $1 million a year, study says
People who fail to show up for radiology appointments cost hospitals about $1 million per year on average, according to a new study. That’s as much as the cost of a new 3T MR scanner. Most of the no-shows at academic medical centers were for mammography appointments, according to the study, published in Current Problems in Diagnostic Radiology. The study also took into consideration missed appointments for MRI brain scans, CT chest scans, ultrasound abdomen scans, CT head scans and ultrasound breast scans. “Each no-show appointment represents a missed opportunity to deliver appropriate care as well as...
Source: Mass Device - June 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Hospital Care Imaging News Well Research & Development laheyhospitalandmedicalcenter universityofwashingtonatseattle Source Type: news

Why 9 to 5 isn't the only shift that can work for busy families
(University of Washington) A new study from the University of Washington finds that the impacts of parent work schedules on children vary by age and gender, and often reflect which shift a parent works. Rotating shifts -- a schedule that varies day by day or week by week -- can be most problematic for children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

PainTracker: An Online Survey to Underline the Needs of Chronic Pain Patients.  
How do you treat a patient with complex chronic pain in a way that accounts for factors like genetics or their medical histories? For some patients, it is hard to find a treatment that aligns with their individual needs and conditions with the very few options available. The article, “To treat pain, you need to treat the patient” describes how researchers at the University of Washington  Center for Pain Relief created an online form called PainTracker to help determine the effectiveness of the patient’s treatments and improve their quality of life. If you would like to learn more about the PainTracke...
Source: MCR News - June 15, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: liaison Tags: #CC/Academic List #Health Interest List #Health Sciences List #Public/K-12 List PainTracker Source Type: news

UW study shows how instruction changes brain circuitry in
(University of Washington) Using MRI measurements of the brain's neural connections, or 'white matter,' UW researchers have shown that, in struggling readers, the neural circuitry strengthened -- and their reading performance improved -- after just eight weeks of a specialized tutoring program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Antarctica Has Lost More Than 3 Trillion Tons Of Ice In 25 Years
Antarctica's ice is melting faster than was thought, say scientists who recently completed the most exhaustive assessment of the ice sheet to date.(Image credit: Ian Joughin, University of Washington ) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - June 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Merrit Kennedy Source Type: news

Antarctica ’s Ice Is Melting Even Faster, and Scientists Are Deeply Worried
WASHINGTON — The melting of Antarctica is accelerating at an alarming rate, with about 3 trillion tons of ice disappearing since 1992, an international team of ice experts said in a new study. In the last quarter century, the southern-most continent’s ice sheet — a key indicator of climate change — melted into enough water to cover Texas to a depth of nearly 13 feet (4 meters), scientists calculated. All that water made global oceans rise about three-tenths of an inch (7.6 millimeters). From 1992 to 2011, Antarctica lost nearly 84 billion tons of ice a year (76 billion metric tons). From 2012 to 201...
Source: TIME: Science - June 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime Source Type: news

Increase in Global Cancer Incidence, Drop in Death Rates
TUESDAY, June 12, 2018 -- Worldwide, cancer cases increased by 28 percent from 2006 to 2016, according to a study published online June 2 in JAMA Oncology. Christina Fitzmaurice, M.D., M.P.H., from the University of Washington in Seattle, and... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - June 12, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Choice matters: The environmental costs of producing meat, seafood
(University of Washington) A new study appearing online June 11 in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment considers which food type is more environmentally costly to produce: livestock, farmed seafood or wild-caught fish. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 11, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Is It Possible To Eat Too Much Fruit?
Apple co-founder Steve Jobs was, briefly and famously, an ardent fruitarian—meaning he ate a diet composed primarily of fruit, which he believed would cleanse his body of harmful fluids. Just as famously, the actor Ashton Kutcher tried adopting Jobs’s fruit-centric diet, until he ended up in the hospital with an out-of-whack pancreas. So is it bad for your health to eat a lot of fruit? Though a famous study from 1980 argued that based on the evolution of human jaws and teeth, our ancient ancestors used to eat a diet dominated by fruit, there’s not a lot of good evidence for or against fruit-heavy diets fo...
Source: TIME: Health - June 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

Scientists reveal countries with the best and worst cancer rates
The Global Burden of Disease Study, led by the University of Washington, has revealed the countries where the most and fewest people get cancer, and where people are most or least likely to die of it. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The world cancer league tables: Scientists calculate the best and worst performing countries
The Global Burden of Disease Study, led by the University of Washington, has revealed the countries where the most and fewest people get cancer, and where people are most or least likely to die of it. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Global Accessibility Awareness Day 2018
Do you produce any digital content that is consumed by other humans? (I’m guessing yes.) You should, if you don’t already, consider how you can make it more universally usable! If you work for a university, you are likely already required to adhere to these standards or something similar. There are a lot of design techniques and standards in place to help make all sorts of digital content types accessible to people with a great diversity of abilities and disabilities. Earlier this month, I attended some presentations at the University of Washington as part of Global Accessibility Awareness Day (GAAD). Every yea...
Source: Dragonfly - May 31, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Maddie Romansic Tags: Accessibility Blog Technology Source Type: news

Arthritis and asthma sufferers may be up to one-third less likely to develop Parkinson's disease
Researchers from the University of Washington found people who take  corticosteroids, which are commonly prescribed for psoriasis and ulcerative colitis, are 20 percent less at risk of suffering tremors. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sleep apnea mask boosts sexual performance in female sufferers
A new study by the University of Washington the device treated the condition in men and women, but also boosted sexual performance in women. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sleep apnea mask boosts sexual performance and libido in female sufferers
A new study by the University of Washington the device treated the condition in men and women, but also boosted sexual performance in women. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A promising target in the quest for a 1-million-year-old Antarctic ice core
(University of Washington) The oldest ice core so far provides 800,000 years of our planet's climate history. A field survey in Antarctica has pinpointed a location where an entire million years of undisturbed ice might be preserved intact. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

From 2008 to 2014, Prostate Cancer Testing, Treatment Down
TUESDAY, May 22, 2018 -- Fewer men are being screened for, diagnosed with, and treated for prostate cancer, according to a study published online May 21 in Cancer. James T. Kearns, M.D., from the University of Washington School of Medicine in... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 22, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Early physical therapy benefits low-back pain patients
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Patients with low-back pain are better off seeing a physical therapist first, according to a study of 150,000 insurance claims. The study was published in Health Services Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New guidelines may slightly increase reliability, accuracy of melanoma diagnoses
The BMJScan (at two resolutions) of a category 3 melanoma in situ.FINDINGSIn a new study, researchers have developed updated guidelines for classifying a serious form of skin cancer called invasive melanoma. The American Joint Committee on Cancer, an organization that provides information on “cancer staging,” or the severity of individual cases of cancer, recently updated its guidelines for melanoma. The researchers found that when pathologists used the new guidelines for cases of early stage invasive melanoma, they agreed with an expert-defined diagnosis 10 percent more often.METHODIn the study, researchers re...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 18, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Want to help your child succeed in school? Add language to the math, reading mix
(University of Washington) A University of Washington study finds that a child's language skills in kindergarten can predict his or her future proficiency in other subjects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The first wireless flying robotic insect takes off
(University of Washington) Engineers at the University of Washington have created RoboFly, the first wireless flying robotic insect. RoboFly is slightly heavier than a toothpick and is powered by a laser beam. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NAE Elects Chair, Vice President, and Four Councillors
The National Academy of Engineering has re-elected Gordon R. England, chairman of PFP Cybersecurity, to serve a two-year term as the NAE's chair. The NAE chair works with the NAE president to promote the Academy and its policies to the engineering community and the public. Also re-elected to serve a four-year term as the NAE's vice president is Corale L. Brierley, principal of Brierley Consultancy LLC.Re-elected to a second term as councillor is John L. Anderson, Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering at Illinois Institute of Technology, and newly elected to three-year terms as councillors are Nadine Aubry, dean o...
Source: News from the National Academies - May 14, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Operating on brain gliomas by detecting the 'glow'
(St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center) Research by Barrow Neurological Institute physicians and University of Washington scientists on novel imaging technology for malignant brain tumors was published in the April issue of World Neurosurgery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Stomata -- the plant pores that give us life -- arise thanks to a gene called MUTE
(University of Washington) New research in plants shows that a gene called MUTE is required for the formation of stomata -- the tiny pores that a critical for gas exchange, including releasing the oxygen gas that we breathe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

To treat pain, you need to treat the patient
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) People in chronic pain are some of the most difficult patients to treat. Clinicians and researchers at UW Medicine's Center for Pain Relief found that an in-depth questionnaire can help immensely. Their work to create a pain assessment adaptable to any primary care clinic was recently published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

App allows for crowdsourced exercise plans, which rival trainers in effectiveness
(University of Washington) Researchers at the University of Washington and Seattle University have created CrowdFit, a platform for exercise planning that relies on crowdsourcing from nonexperts to create workout regimens guided by national exercise recommendations and tailored around user schedules and interests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Apps for children should emphasize parent and child choice, researchers say
(University of Washington) Parents don't need to fear their children playing with iPads and other devices, researchers say. Mindful play with an adult, combined with thoughtful design features, can prove beneficial to young developing minds.New research shows that thoughtfully designed content that intentionally supports parent-child interactions facilitated the same kind of play and development as analog toys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Molecule may help tame virulent bacteria and prevent infection
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) University of Washington researchers show that an immune-system generated molecule called nitric oxide inhibits Staphylococcus aureus' transformation from a relatively benign, quiescent colonizing state to its virulent form. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 26, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Community efforts to prevent teen problems have lasting benefits
(University of Washington) A study by the University of Washington finds that a community-based approach to substance-abuse prevention, which can include after-school activities, can affect young people into adulthood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New testing provides better information for parents of children with form of epilepsy
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) New ways of sequencing the human genome mean geneticists and genetic counselors have much more to say to parents who wonder if future children might carry the disease, (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How a New Kind of Autopsy Is Helping in the Fight Against Cancer
After Keith Beck died of bile duct cancer last year, family members said, more than 900 people showed up to pay respects to the popular athletic director at the University of Findlay in northwestern Ohio. Many were former students who recalled acts of kindness during Beck’s nearly 30-year career: $20 given to a kid who was broke, textbooks bought for a student whose parents were going through bankruptcy, a spot cleared to sleep on Beck’s living room floor. But few knew about Beck’s final gesture of generosity. The 59-year-old had agreed to a “rapid autopsy,” a procedure conducted within hours ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JoNel Aleccia / Kaiser Health News Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime Source Type: news

Global Health: Ethicists Call for More Scrutiny of ‘ Human-Challenge ’ Trials
A vaccine study in which subjects are to be deliberately infected with Zika is on pause after ethicists said it had “ insufficient value. ” (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: EMILY BAUMGAERTNER Tags: Zika Virus Vaccination and Immunization Research National Institutes of Health Science (Journal) University of Washington Source Type: news

Screen reader plus keyboard helps blind, low-vision users browse modern webpages
(University of Washington) By using a keyboard for tactile feedback in combination with a screen reader, users were three times more successful at navigating complex modern webpages, like they would encounter in a typical Airbnb booking site. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight Funding applications are due today! Applications for our upcoming round of health information outreach funding are due by 11pm this evening – don’t forget our last funding tip – follow directions for submission. Please note, late applications will not be accepted. We look forward to funding some great projects! NNLM Edit-a-thon: don’t forget to use #citeNLM2018 next week during NNLM’s first Wikipedia Edit-a-thon – we’re adding citations to existing articles on rare diseases! Not sur...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - April 13, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Developmental psychologist receives 2018 Alan T. Waterman Award
(National Science Foundation) The National Science Foundation (NSF) has bestowed the 2018 Alan T. Waterman Award, the nation's highest honor for early career scientists and engineers, on University of Washington (UW) social and developmental psychologist Kristina R. Olson. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Developmental psychologist receives 2018 Alan T. Waterman Award
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has bestowed the 2018 Alan T. Waterman Award, the nation's highest honor for early career scientists and engineers, on University of Washington (UW) social and developmental psychologist Kristina R. Olson. The Waterman Award Committee, an external panel of distinguished scientists and engineers chaired by Gary May, Chancellor of the University of California, Davis, and which includes the leadership of the National Academies of Science and ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=245107&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - April 12, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Peptide-based biogenic dental product may cure cavities
(University of Washington) Researchers at the University of Washington have designed a convenient and natural product that uses proteins to rebuild tooth enamel and treat dental cavities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news