Effectiveness of travel bans -- readily used during infectious disease outbreaks -- mostly unknown, study finds
(University of Washington) While travel bans are frequently used to stop the spread of an emerging infectious disease, a new University of Washington and Johns Hopkins University study of published research found that the effectiveness of travel bans is mostly unknown. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 13, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Hydropower dams cool rivers in the Mekong River basin, satellites show
(University of Washington) Using 30 years of satellite data, UW researchers discovered that within one year of the opening of a major dam in the Mekong River basin, downstream river temperatures during the dry season dropped by up to 3.6 degrees F (2 degrees C). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Interactive map shows worldwide spread of coronavirus
(University of Washington) University of Washington geographer Bo Zhao has created an interactive map, updated every few hours, of coronavirus cases around the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 10, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How some mammals pause their pregnancies
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Some species of mammals can delay the implantation of their embryos until conditions are better for bearing and rearing offspring. This enigmatic reproductive strategy can help improve the odds of survival. Researchers have found some of the biological mechanisms behind this suspension of embryonic development. Similar reversible dormant states are also found in some cancer tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Increases in minimum wage may not have anticipated positive health effects, study shows
(University of Washington) A new study by researchers at the University of Washington found that increases in minimum wages primarily had no effect on health overall. However, they did find a mix of negative and positive effects associated with the health of certain groups of working-age people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Designer proteins
(ETH Zurich) David Baker, Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Washington to speak at the AAAS 2020 session, 'Synthetic Biology: Digital Design of Living Systems.' Prof. Baker to identify how algorithmic processes such as de novo design, predict protein structures, protein folding mechanisms, and new protein functions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 7, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Beyond Baby Talk: Helping Early Language
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 5, 2020 -- Teaching parents how to talk to their babies could help boost their children's language development, researchers say. The University of Washington study didn't look at so-called baby talk, which typically consists of... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 5, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

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Internationally known early learning researcher Patricia Kuhl, the co-director of the Institute for Learning& Brain Sciences at the University of Washington, shares video from an older experiment to illustrate a baby's preference for motherese, a form of baby talk. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Altruistic babies? Study shows infants are willing to give up food, help others
(University of Washington) New research by the University of Washington's Institute for Learning& Brain Sciences finds that altruism may begin in infancy. In a study of nearly 100 19-month-olds, researchers found that children, even when hungry, gave a tasty snack to a stranger in need. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists discover a 'chemical ear muff' drug that could protect hearing
Scientists at Iowa University and the University of Washington, St Louis, created a chemical compound that blocked receptors responsible for auditory neuron damage in mice. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists listen to whales, walruses, & seals in a changing arctic seascape
(Wildlife Conservation Society) A year-round acoustic study of marine mammals in the northern Bering Sea is providing scientists with a valuable snapshot of an Arctic world already under drastic pressure from climate change, according to WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), Columbia University, Southall Environmental Associates, and the University of Washington. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 3, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Can Face Masks Prevent Coronavirus? Experts Say That Depends
A new coronavirus outbreak, which originated in the Chinese city of Wuhan and has spread throughout Asia and globally, has prompted people around the world to buy medical face masks in hopes of preventing infection. Retailers in the U.S. and across the Internet are running out of antiviral face masks as the number of confirmed cases of the coronavirus (2019-nCoV) now exceeds 9,700 globally. More than 200 people have died from the virus in China, where the majority of the 2019-nCoV cases have been detected. The World Health Organization declared a global health emergency on Thursday as the outbreak continues to spread. As o...
Source: TIME: Health - January 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Infectious Disease onetime Source Type: news

UW's new WE-REACH center to accelerate development of biomedical discoveries
(University of Washington) With $4 million in matching funds from the National Institutes of Health, the University of Washington has created a new integrated center to match biomedical discoveries with the resources needed to bring innovative products to the public and improve health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rethinking land conservation to protect species that will need to move with climate change
(University of Washington) A new study finds that many species of animals and plants likely will need to migrate under climate change, and that conservation efforts will also need to shift to be effective. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rural kids carrying handguns is 'not uncommon' and starts as early as sixth grade
(University of Washington) Roughly one-third of young males and 1 in 10 females in rural communities have carried a handgun, reports a new University of Washington study. And, the study found, many of those rural kids started carrying as early as the sixth grade. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Engineered capillaries model traffic in tiny blood vessels
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) 3D microvessels have been created to observe how red blood cells transit ultra-small blood vessels. They squeeze single-file through microvessels to bring oxygen and nutrients. Red cells burdened with malaria stall, blocking the blood vessel. The platform is expected to have other uses in studies of how microvascular damage occurs in diabetes and sickle cell anemia. They might be further developed to supply blood circulation to organ repair patches or to 3D printed transplants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UW research expands bilingual language program for babies
(University of Washington) A study by the University of Washington's Institute for Learning& Brain Sciences (I-LABS) shows that a bilingual language program for babies can reach more families, and instructors, through online training for teachers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What's in Puget sound? New technique casts a wide net for concerning chemicals
(University of Washington) Using a new 'non-targeted' approach, UW and UW Tacoma researchers screened samples from multiple regions of Puget Sound to look for potentially harmful compounds that might be present. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Community-based counselors help mitigate grief among children orphaned in East Africa
(University of Washington) A first-of-its-kind clinical trial involving more than 600 children in Kenya and Tanzania, in which community members were trained to deliver mental health treatment, showed improvement in participants' trauma-related symptoms up to a year after receiving therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mosquitoes are drawn to flowers as much as people -- and now scientists know why
(University of Washington) Despite their reputation as blood-suckers, mosquitoes actually spent most of their time drinking nectar from flowers. Scientists have identified the chemical cues in flowers that stimulate mosquitoes' sense of smell and draw them in. Their findings show how cues from flowers can stimulate the mosquito brain as much as a warm-blooded host -- information that could help develop less toxic repellents and better traps. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NASA Taps Snowstorm-Chasing Team To Improve Forecasting
NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Lynn McMurdie, a University of Washington professor and principal investigator for IMPACTS, NASA's new project to more accurately predict snowstorms. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - January 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Infants integrate firsthand and social experiences to decide when and how to try
(Arizona State University) Persistence is important to learning and is related to success in school and emotional well-being. A new study of persistence from Arizona State University, the University of Washington and University of Toronto shows that 18-month-old infants made rational inferences about applying effort to problem solving. The infants dynamically integrated information from their own and others' experiences in deciding when and how to try. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sepsis associated with 1 in 5 deaths globally, double previous estimate
(University of Pittsburgh) Twice as many people as previously believed are dying of sepsis worldwide, according to an analysis published today in The Lancet and announced at the Critical Care Reviews annual meeting in Belfast. Among them are a disproportionately high number of children in poor areas. Led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and University of Washington schools of medicine, the study revealed 48.9 million global cases of sepsis in 2017 and 11 million deaths, representing 1 in 5 deaths worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 16, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Moths' flight data helps drones navigate complex environments
(PLOS) The flight navigation strategy of moths can be used to develop programs that help drones to navigate unfamiliar environments, report Ioannis Paschalidis at Boston University, Thomas Daniel at University of Washington, and colleagues, in the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Safety events: 40% of gun owners reported not locking all guns -- even around kids
(University of Washington) Gun owners will go to events to get free devices for locking up their firearms at home, but a survey of nearly 3,000 participants at such events in Washington found that 40% had unlocked guns at home, and the presence of children in the home did not make a difference. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

EHP names Kaufman new editor in chief
The journal announced that Joel Kaufman, from the University of Washington, will take the helm in February. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - January 3, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Northwest Hospital changes name, integrates with UW Medical Center
As of the new year, Northwest Hospital will be the second hospital system of University of Washington Medical Center, a goal the medical center has been working toward for a decade. Northwest Hospital, now known as UW Medical Center – Northwest, affiliated with the UW Medicine health system in 2010. Planning to formerly integrate the two hospital systems began in 2017, with the board of regents approving a proposal in 2018. The current UW Medical Center campus will be known as UW Medical Center… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - January 2, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Megan Campbell Source Type: news

Northwest Hospital changes name, integrates with UW Medical Center
As of the new year, Northwest Hospital will be the second hospital system of University of Washington Medical Center, a goal the medical center has been working toward for a decade. Northwest Hospital, now known as UW Medical Center – Northwest, affiliated with the UW Medicine health system in 2010. Planning to formerly integrate the two hospital systems began in 2017, with the board of regents approving a proposal in 2018. The current UW Medical Center campus will be known as UW Medical Center… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 2, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Megan Campbell Source Type: news

Life could have emerged from lakes with high phosphorus
(University of Washington) Life as we know it requires phosphorus, and lots of it. But phosphorus is scarce. A University of Washington study, published Dec. 30 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reports that certain types of carbonate-rich lakes, which could have formed on early Earth, have the right chemistry to keep phosphorous levels high and available to organisms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 30, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A Football Player ’s Mental Health Struggle Led Him Toward New Ambitions
“I love playing the game of football, but not the other stuff that goes with it,” said Isaiah Woods, now considering a career in design. “I stress myself out way too much.” (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kurt Streeter Tags: Woods, Isaiah (Renfro) Football (College) Depression (Mental) Anxiety and Stress Mental Health and Disorders Portland State University University of Washington Source Type: news

An atomic view of the trigger for the heartbeat
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Tiny pores in heart cells generate electrical signals to initiate each heart beat. Structural studies of these channels provide details on their functions, and also on their malfunction due to different inherited mutations. These include ones behind sudden death in young athletes. Information on the architecture and mechanics of cardiac sodium channels could help develop better diagnostics and medications for life-threatening heart arrhythmia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Co-addiction of meth and opioids hinders treatment
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) A study published in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment found that methamphetamine use was associated with more than twice the risk for dropping out of treatment for opioid-use disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Astronomy fellowship demonstrates measures to dismantle bias, increase diversity in STEM
(University of Washington) Joyce Yen of the University of Washington recently worked with the Heising-Simons Foundation to dismantle bias and promote diversity in a prominent grant that the Foundation awards to postdoctoral researchers in planetary science. Here, Yen shares the many, sometimes counterintuitive ways bias can work against goals toward greater diversity, equity and inclusion in STEM fields. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dr. Nancy Davidson grows the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
In her positions at the SCCA and its partner organizations, the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington, Davidson is at the intersection of treatment, clinical and transnational cancer research. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 5, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

Technique shows how individual cancer cells react to drugs
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) sci-Plex, a new cell-response screening method, pools genetically different cells and shows what happens to individual cells when the sample is treated, such as with cancer drugs. The technology collects information on changes in genetic expression in each labeled cell, providing data useful in exploring mechanisms triggered by drugs or other agents. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 5, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Warmer temperatures will increase arsenic levels in rice, study shows
(University of Washington) UW researchers have found that warmer temperatures, at levels expected under most climate change projections, can lead to higher concentrations of arsenic in rice grains. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

For some corals, meals can come with a side of microplastics
(University of Washington) A new experiment by the University of Washington has found that some corals are more likely to eat microplastics when they are consuming other food, yet microplastics alone are undesirable. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers find clue to preventing addiction relapse
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) A study published in Neuropsychopharmacology reported that relapse can be prevented by controlling cells in a brain region called the nucleus accumbens. The study was conducted among 90 Sprague Dawley rats with genetic diversity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Carpentry Compiler helps woodworkers design objects that they can actually make
(University of Washington) UW researchers have created Carpentry Compiler, a digital tool that allows users to design woodworking projects. Once a project is designed, the tool creates optimized fabrication instructions based on the materials and equipment a user has available. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A method with roots in AI uncovers how humans make choices in groups and social media
(University of Washington) Using a mathematical framework with roots in artificial intelligence and robotics, UW researchers were able to uncover the process for how a person makes choices in groups. And, they also found they were able to predict a person's choice more often than more traditional descriptive methods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Wound healing in mucous tissues could ward off AIDS
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Wound healing in mucous tissues during early infection by Simian Immunodeficiency Virus guards some primate species against developing AIDS, Both HIV and SIV provoke an immune response that injures tissues surrounding the intestine, African green monkeys with SIV quickly repair their mucous tissues. This interrupts the disease course and avoids AIDS onset. Stimulating this response might be a way of treating HIV in people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Wanted: 10,000 Dogs For Largest-Ever Study On Improving Canine Life Expectancy
By Allen Kim, CNN (CNN) — Dog lovers would agree: The lifespan of a dog is far too short. The Dog Aging Project hopes to change that. Researchers are hoping to study a group of 10,000 dogs over the course of 10 years to see whether they can improve the life expectancy of canines and their overall quality of life. Dogs’ lives are six to 12 times shorter than that of humans, according to a study by the Frontiers in Veterinary Science. The researchers, which include teams from the University of Washington School of Medicine and the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Offbeat CNN Dogs talkers Source Type: news

Africa: This Is How Much It Will Cost to Realize the World We Want
[UNFPA] Nairobi, Kenya -It is possible to end preventable maternal deaths, cover all unmet needs for family planning and put a stop to gender-based violence, all within a decade. But it will cost the world a total of $264 billion, according to a joint study by UNFPA and Johns Hopkins University, in collaboration with Victoria University, the University of Washington and Avenir Health. (Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth)
Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth - November 15, 2019 Category: OBGYN Source Type: news

What Could Robotic Surgery Look Like in the Next Decade and Beyond?
The growth expected for robotic surgery is astounding. Allied Markets Research predicts demand could reach $98,737.0 million by 2024. The prospects for such surgery will be examined in the upcoming BIOMEDevice San Jose panel discussion What's Next for Robotic Surgery? to be held December 5. Participants include David Fischel, chairman and CEO at Stereotaxis; John H. Kirk, surgeon at St. Helena Women's Center; Javad Mokhbery, CEO and founder at FUTEK Advanced Sensor Technology; and Scott Thielman, CTO at Product Creation Studio, who will moderate the discussion. Thielman holds a Ph.D. in mechanical e...
Source: MDDI - November 14, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: BIOMEDevice San Jose Design Source Type: news

Skin cancer rates have dropped sharply among teens and millennials, study suggests 
A new study from University of Washington School of Medicine has found that rates of melanoma fell 4% per year among young men and 4.5% among young women from 2005 to 2015. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This is how much it will cost to realize the world we want
Nairobi, KENYA– It is possible to end preventable maternal deaths, cover all unmet needs for family planning and put a stop to gender-based violence, all within a decade. But it will cost the world a total of $264 billion, according to a joint study by UNFPA and Johns Hopkins University, in collaboration with V ictoria University, the University of Washington and Avenir Health. (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - November 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: csantamaria Source Type: news

A new facial analysis method detects genetic syndromes with high precision and specificity
(Universitat Pompeu Fabra - Barcelona) Developed by Araceli Morales, Gemma Piella and Federico Sukno, members of the Department of Information and Communication Technologies, together with researchers from the University of Washington, which they present in a feature in the advanced online edition of Lecture Notes in Computer Science of Oct. 7. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Melanoma rates drop sharply among teens, young adults
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Cases of melanoma among US adolescents and young adults declined markedly from 2006 to 2015 - even as the skin cancer's incidence continued to increase among older adults and the general population during the span, new research shows. The finding, based on national cancer-registry data, suggests that public-health efforts advocating sun protection are changing behaviors among millennials and post-millennials, surmised the investigators from the University of Washington School of Medicine and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 13, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

What Age Is Too Young For Contact Sports? Medical Advice Still Unclear
BOSTON (AP) – New guidance on concussions shows there isn’t enough solid evidence to answer some of parents’ most burning questions about contact sports. That includes what age is safest to start playing them. Pediatric experts in sports medicine, neurology and related fields evaluated and rated three decades of sports concussion-related research. They say recent evidence filled in some blanks. Such as: — Teen girls face higher risks than boys for concussions when playing the same sport by the same rules — Hockey body checking bans reduce concussions in players under 13 — Limiting contac...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Youth Sports Source Type: news

Sending women DIY cervical tests could transform screening uptake
A quarter of women in a University of Washington study sent a test were successfully screened compared with 17 per cent only sent a reminder letter. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news