Johnson & Johnson Announces Six Global Winners for the 2021 Women in STEM2D Scholar Awards
New Brunswick, N.J., June 11, 2021 – Johnson & Johnson announced today its prestigious Women in STEM2D (WiSTEM2D) Scholar Award recipients, marking the fifth year since the Awards’ inception. The program recognizes one scholar in each STEM2D discipline: Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, Manufacturing and Design, and provides each recipient with $150,000 in research funding and three years of mentorship from Johnson & Johnson. Six diverse, international female recipients were selected out of a competitive global applicant pool that garnered more than 650 applications from 40 countries. Launched in ...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - June 11, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Endangered blue whales recorded off southwest coast of India
(University of Washington) Underwater recordings show that endangered blue whales are present and singing off the southwest coast of India. This extends the range of a known song type by 1,000 kilometers, into Indian waters. The results suggest that conservation measures should include this region. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 9, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The First Treatment for Alzheimer ’s Disease Is Here
Alzheimer’s disease was first described by Alois Alzheimer in 1906, and now, more than 100 years later, doctors have an effective drug to treat the cognitive disorder. On June 7, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved aducanumab, developed by the U.S.-based biotech Biogen and Japanese pharmaceutical company Eisai. But the drug’s approval comes with a caveat. The FDA is requiring Biogen to conduct an additional placebo controlled study of the drug to verify it’s effectiveness in improving people’s memory and cognitive symptoms. That request stems in large part from the conclusion of an ...
Source: TIME: Health - June 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

UW to require all employees to be vaccinated against Covid-19 by fall
The University of Washington will require all of its employees to be vaccinated against Covid-19 by fall, the university announced Thursday. The notice comes after the university said last month that all students must be vaccinated by the fall term. Many colleges and universities around the country and in Washington state are requiring students and staff to be vaccinated, including Washington State University. UW had about 49,000 emp loyees as of June 2020. “Widespread vaccination is the only… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 4, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Megan Campbell Source Type: news

UW to require all employees to be vaccinated against Covid-19 by fall
The University of Washington will require all of its employees to be vaccinated against Covid-19 by fall, the university announced Thursday. The notice comes after the university said last month that all students must be vaccinated by the fall term. Many colleges and universities around the country and in Washington state are requiring students and staff to be vaccinated, including Washington State University. UW had about 49,000 emp loyees as of June 2020. “Widespread vaccination is the only… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - June 4, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: Megan Campbell Source Type: news

How COVID-19 Is Revolutionizing Health Care Around the World
In 2020 alone, there were at least 3 million deaths from COVID-19, though the true figure is probably 2-3 times higher. In 2021, the COVID-19 pandemic continues to rage on and is likely to last well into 2022 and beyond. For ten weeks in a row, from the first week of February, 2021, new daily cases globally rose, driven in part by virus variants and by many countries ending public health measures too soon. There are still around 600,000 new cases every day. Nations like Brazil, Canada, India, Iran, and Turkey—as well as some U.S. states like Michigan and Minnesota—recently experienced COVID-19 surges that in so...
Source: TIME: Health - June 3, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gavin Yamey and Madhukar Pai Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Medical AI models rely on 'shortcuts' that could lead to misdiagnosis of COVID-19
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers examined multiple models recently put forward as potential tools for accurately detecting COVID-19 from chest X-rays. The team found that, rather than learning genuine medical pathology, these models rely instead on shortcut learning to draw spurious associations between medically irrelevant factors and disease status. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 31, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Long-COVID-19 Patients Are Getting Diagnosed With Little-Known Illnesses Like POTS
The day Dr. Elizabeth Dawson was diagnosed with COVID-19, she awoke feeling as if she had a bad hangover. Four months later, in February 2021, she tested negative for the virus, but her symptoms have only worsened. Dawson is among what Dr. David Goldstein, head of the National Institutes of Health’s Autonomic Medicine Section, called “waves and waves” of “long-haul” COVID patients who remain sick long after testing negative for the virus. A significant percentage are suffering from syndromes that few doctors understand or treat, primarily postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) and ch...
Source: TIME: Health - May 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cindy Loose / Kaiser Health News Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Significant otter helps couples communicate from the heart
(Carnegie Mellon University) A team from Carnegie Mellon University, Snap and the University of Washington built Significant Otter, an app designed primarily for smart watches that allows couples to communicate with each other based on their sensed heart rate. The team presented their work this month at the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Computer-Human Interaction (CHI) Conference. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 26, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19 mortality associated with 2 signs easily measured at home
(University of Washington School of Medicine/UW Medicine) A study of 1,095 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 found that two easily measured signs of health - respiration rate and blood-oxygen saturation - predict higher mortality. This context is lacking in current CDC guidance, which tells people with COVID-19 to seek medical care when they experience symptoms such as " trouble breathing " and " persistent pain or pressure in the chest " - indications that may be absent even when respiration and blood oxygen have reached dangerous levels, the authors say. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 24, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Built environments don't play expected role in weight gain
(University of Washington) People don't gain or lose weight because they live near a fast-food restaurant or supermarket, according to a new study led by the University of Washington. And, living in a more " walkable " , dense neighborhood likely only has a small impact on weight. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pandemic paleo: A wayward skull, at-home fossil analyses, a first for Antarctic amphibians
(University of Washington) Researchers at the University of Washington have discovered the first fossil evidence of an ancient amphibian, Micropholis stowi, from Antarctica. Micropholis lived in the Early Triassic, shortly after Earth's largest mass extinction. It was previously known only from fossils in South Africa, and its presence in Antarctica has implications for how amphibians adapted to high-latitude regions in this dynamic period of Earth's history. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

When Battling Covid-19 Becomes a National Policy Disaster
The COVID-19 vaccine administered through the COVAX Facility. Credit: PAHO/Karen GonzálezBy Darini Rajasingham-SenanayakeCOLOMBO, Sri Lanka, May 19 2021 (IPS) We went to the Kanatte cemetery, Sri Lanka’s largest, where most of us, residents of the capital city, would end up sooner or later. But it was deserted, and so we had time for a leisurely chat with some of the helpful staff there, albeit after admiring some of the grave sites and remaining beautiful trees. As good social scientists and medical anthropologists, we were on a mission to do some qualitative research and cross-check Covid-19 quantitative da...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 19, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Darini Rajasingham-Senanayake Tags: Aid Development & Aid Editors' Choice Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

India ’s COVID-19 Disaster May Be Turning Into an Even Bigger Global Crisis
High in the thin air of the Mount Everest Base Camp in Nepal, Sherpas and climbers used to walk freely from one group of tents to another, holding gatherings, singing and dancing. Now the Sherpas who escort climbers to the summit have a new job: enforcing unofficial social-distancing rules. “Climbing Everest is always a matter of life and death,” says Phunuru Sherpa. “But this year the risk has been doubled due to COVID.” Already, dozens of people with suspected COVID-19 have been evacuated by helicopter. The outbreak reflects a broader one across Nepal, which shares a long, porous border with India...
Source: TIME: Health - May 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Londontime Magazine South Asia Source Type: news

Study: Researchers use eel-like protein to control brain
(University of Washington School of Medicine/UW Medicine) Researchers successfully used a protein called parapinopsin to turn off brain circuits. This protein is found in lamprey - an ancient lineage of jawless fish similar to eel. This could eventually lead to turning off unwanted behaviors like addiction and depression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CDC Reviewing Higher COVID-19 Death Toll From Independent Group: Walensky CDC Reviewing Higher COVID-19 Death Toll From Independent Group: Walensky
The US CDC is reviewing an estimate of global COVID-19 deaths from the University of Washington that is more than double the official count to determine if the CDC figures should be revised, CDC Director Rochelle Walensky has said.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 10, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

New Study Estimates More Than 900,000 People Have Died Of COVID-19 In U.S.
The total, estimated by researchers at the University of Washington, is 57% higher than the official death toll. Worldwide, they said, COVID-19 deaths are nearing 7 million, twice the official total.(Image credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Becky Sullivan Source Type: news

New class of drug gives hope to some ovarian cancer patients
(University of Washington School of Medicine/UW Medicine) The study provides insights into how the cancers resist treatments, and which patients may benefit from treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 3, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Pregnant women with COVID-19 face high mortality rate
(University of Washington School of Medicine/UW Medicine) In a worldwide study of 2,100 pregnant women, those who contracted COVID-19 during pregnancy were 20 times more likely to die than those who did not contract the virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 22, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A growing problem of 'deepfake geography': How AI falsifies satellite images
(University of Washington) Using satellite photos of three cities and drawing upon methods used to manipulate video and audio files, a team of researchers led by the University of Washington set out to identify new ways of detecting fake satellite photos and warn of the dangers of falsified geospatial data. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How lessons from past emergencies could improve the pandemic response
(University of Washington) The federal government, in its response to the COVID-19 pandemic, could learn from how the nation responded to Hurricane Katrina, 9/11 and the H1N1 swine flu, a new study found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 20, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Using engineering methods to track the imperceptible movements of stony corals
(University of Washington) A new study led by University of Washington researchers borrowed image-analysis methods from engineering to spot the minute movements of a stony coral. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 20, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UW researchers studying how to make online arguments productive
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers worked with almost 260 people to understand online disagreements and to develop potential design interventions that could make these discussions more productive and centered around relationship-building. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 19, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pause on J & J Vaccination in U.S. Continues as CDC Committee Asks for More Data
After federal health agencies in the U.S. recommended a temporary halt on using the Johnson & Johnson-Janssen COVID-19 vaccine, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on April 14 convened a 13-member Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) to review the six reports of unusual blood clots occurring in people vaccinated with the shot. The ACIP sets policies for how any approved or, in the case of COVID-19, authorized, vaccines are to be used—when and how the shots should be given and to which age groups. After the meeting, the CDC said it would continue to recommend the pause. The committ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

PNR Weekly Digest: April 13, 2021
Items regarding COVID-19 information are indicated with an * In the Dragonfly: NLM Awards 2021-2026 Regional Medical Library Cooperative Agreements The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has awarded a new five-year cooperative agreement grant to the University of Washington (UW) Health Sciences Library to lead the NNLM Regional Medical Library (RML) Region 5 serving a six-state region including Alaska, California, Hawaii, Nevada, Oregon, Washington and U.S. Territories and Freely Associated States. Region 5 is part of the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM), which will include 7 Regional Medical Libraries (R...
Source: Dragonfly - April 13, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: PNR Weekly Digest Source Type: news

NLM Awards 2021-2026 Regional Medical Library Cooperative Agreements
The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has awarded a new five-year cooperative agreement grant to the University of Washington (UW) Health Sciences Library to lead the NNLM Regional Medical Library (RML) Region 5 serving a six-state region including Alaska, California, Hawaii, Nevada, Oregon, Washington and U.S. Territories and Freely Associated States. Region 5 is part of the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM), which will include 7 Regional Medical Libraries (RMLs) as of May 1, 2021. The core mission of the NNLM is to improve access to the highest level of evidence-based health information, with ...
Source: Dragonfly - April 12, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Cathy Burroughs Tags: News From NNLM PNR Source Type: news

Can Storytelling Help Overcome Vaccine Hesitancy? Can Storytelling Help Overcome Vaccine Hesitancy?
WebMD's Chief Medical Officer, John Whyte, MD, speaks with Vin Gupta, MD, Affiliate Assistant Professor, Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), University of Washington, about addressing COVID-19 vaccination and treatment hesitancy.WebMD (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care Expert Interview Source Type: news

Chronic sinus inflammation appears to alter brain activity
(University of Washington School of Medicine/UW Medicine) The millions of people who have chronic sinusitis deal not only with stuffy noses and headaches, they also commonly struggle to focus and experience depression and other symptoms that implicate the brain's involvement in their illness. New research links sinus inflammation with alterations in brain activity, specifically with the neural networks that modulate cognition, introspection and response to external stimuli. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UW ’s Institute for Protein Design spinout raises $100M for vaccine development
Icosavax Inc., a life sciences spinout from the University of Washington, closed a $100 million Series B financing round, the biotech announced Wednesday. Icosavax, which was formed in 2018 after it emerged from the university’s Institute for Protein Design, makes vaccines using “self-assembling” virus-like particle technology developed at the institute, CEO Adam Simpson said. The company will use the money to support Icosavax’s clinical trials for its respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 7, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Megan Campbell Source Type: news

UW ’s Institute for Protein Design spinout raises $100M for vaccine development
Icosavax Inc., a life sciences spinout from the University of Washington, closed a $100 million Series B financing round, the biotech announced Wednesday. Icosavax, which was formed in 2018 after it emerged from the university’s Institute for Protein Design, makes vaccines using “self-assembling” virus-like particle technology developed at the institute, CEO Adam Simpson said. The company will use the money to support Icosavax’s clinical trials for its respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 7, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Megan Campbell Source Type: news

UW spinout Icosavax raises $100M for vaccine development
Icosavax Inc., a life sciences spinout from the University of Washington, closed a $100 million Series B financing round, the biotech announced Wednesday. Icosavax, which was formed in 2018 after it emerged from the university’s Institute for Protein Design, makes vaccines using “self-assembling” virus-like particle technology developed at the institute, CEO Adam Simpson said. The company will use the money to support Icosavax’s clinical trials for its respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 7, 2021 Category: American Health Authors: Megan Campbell Source Type: news

Study finds pandemic lockdowns hit women, black, Hispanic and poor Americans hardest
A new study, from the University of Washington and Harvard, for every 10% reduction in mobility due to pandemic lockdowns, there were higher odds of poor outcomes. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NIDCR's Spring 2021 E-Newsletter
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. NIDCR's Spring 2021 E-Newsletter In this issue: NIDCR News Funding Opportunities & Related Notices NIH/HHS News Subscribe to NICDR News Science Advances   Grantee News   NIDCR News NIDCR & NIH Stand Against Structural Racism NIDCR Director Rena D’Souza, DDS, MS, PhD, said in a statement that there is no place for structural racism in biomedical research, echoing remarks from NIH Director Francis Collins, MD, PhD, in his announcement of a new NIH ...
Source: NIDCR Science News - April 7, 2021 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Perinatal patients, nurses explain how hospital pandemic policies failed them
(University of Washington) With a lethal, airborne virus spreading fast, hospitals had to change how they treated patients and policies for how caregivers provided that treatment. But for maternity patients and nurses some of those changes had negative outcomes, according to a new University of Washington study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

US News Ranks Top Medical School Programs by Specialty US News Ranks Top Medical School Programs by Specialty
The University of Washington in Seattle is the best medical school for primary care, while Harvard ranks number-one in research, according to the magazine's latest rankings.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Med Students News Source Type: news

Significant vaccine distrust found among incarcerated populations, increasing risks
(University of Washington) Fewer than half of inmates in jails and prisons surveyed in a study by the CDC and University of Washington said they would accept a COVID-19 vaccine, while the majority either said they wanted to wait before getting the vaccine or would refuse one. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 1, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New method uses device cameras to measure pulse, breathing rate and could help telehealth
(University of Washington) A University of Washington-led team has developed a method that uses the camera on a person's smartphone or computer to take their pulse and breathing rate from a real-time video of their face. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Thicker-leaved tropical plants may flourish as CO2 rises, which could be good for climate
(University of Washington) As carbon dioxide continues to rise, multiple changes in the leaves of tropical plants may help these ecosystems perform better under climate change than previous studies had suggested. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 31, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nanoparticle flu vaccine blocks seasonal and pandemic strains
(University of Washington School of Medicine/UW Medicine) Experimental flu shots have now been developed that protect animals from a wide variety of season and pandemic influenza strains. The vaccine candidate is being advanced toward clinical testing. If proven safe and effective, these next-generation influenza vaccines could replace seasonal options by protecting against more strains that current vaccines don't adequately cover. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 24, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Emily Levesque: How Have Telescopes Transformed Our Understanding Of The Universe?
Astronomers once gazed at the night sky and charted the stars using their naked eyes. Astrophysicist Emily Levesque describes how generations of telescopes have unlocked the wonders of the universe.(Image credit: dennis wise drwise@uw.edu/Dennis Wise / University of Washington) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NPR/TED Staff Source Type: news

Targeting a new antibody supersite key to COVID immunity
(University of Washington School of Medicine/UW Medicine) Scientists are learning that a lesser-studied region on the pandemic coronavirus is recognized by COVID-19 infection-fighting antibodies. These antibodies were identified in blood samples from previously infected patients, and were found to potently prevent the virus from infecting cells. The research holds clues to human immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 and to certain virus variants whose mutations might be providing an escape strategy from these defenses. Findings about this antibody supersite might also suggest ideas for new antivirals and vaccine designs. (Source:...
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 18, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Could leak in blood-brain barrier be cause of poor memory?
(University of Washington School of Medicine/UW Medicine) One of the keys to having a healthy brain at any age is having a healthy blood-brain barrier, a complex interface of blood vessels that run through the brain. Researchers reviewed more than 150 articles to look at what happens to the blood-brain barrier as we age. For one, it leaks. And second, we lose cells called pericytes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 18, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Phase 3 Data Show First-in-Class TREMFYA ® (guselkumab) Achieved Complete Skin Clearance and Favorable Joint Efficacy in Adult Patients with Active Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Through Two Years
SPRING HOUSE, PENNSYLVANIA, March 16, 2021 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson today announced long-term data from the Phase 3 DISCOVER-2a study showing that the skin clearance, joint symptom relief, and safety of TREMFYA® (guselkumab) previously demonstrated through 24 weeks and one year (Week 52) in adults with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) continued through two years (Week 112).1,2 These findings also confirmed that the robust efficacy TREMFYA demonstrated in patients at Week 24 on physical function, physical aspects of health-related quality of life, and resolution of enthesitis...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - March 16, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Mindfulness program in campus dorms, groups improved students' mental health
(University of Washington) Amid a growing mental health crisis among teens and young adults nationwide, a pilot program teaching mindfulness and coping techniques to students at the University of Washington has helped lower stress and improve emotional well-being. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Large computer language models carry environmental, social risks
(University of Washington) Computer engineers at the world's largest companies and universities are using machines to scan through tomes of written material. The goal? Teach these machines the gift of language. Do that, some even claim, and computers will be able to mimic the human brain.But this impressive compute capability comes with real costs, including perpetuating racism and causing significant environmental damage, according to a new paper, " On the Dangers of Stochastic Parrots: Can Language Models Be Too Big? ? " (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Helpful behavior during pandemic tied to recognizing common humanity
(University of Washington) A new University of Washington study finds that an identification with all humanity, as opposed to identification with a geographic area like a country or town, predicts whether someone will engage in " prosocial " behaviors particular to the pandemic, such as donating extra masks or coming to the aid of a sick person. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The end of hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for COVID-19
(University of Washington School of Medicine/UW Medicine) A year ago, infectious disease doctor Christine Johnston was leading a study on the use of hydroxychloroquine for the treatment of people with COVID-19. A year later, her team published results that showed the drug -- once a political football -- had no effect. Johnston talks about lessons learned under the world spotlight. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 9, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Proof-of-concept system turns smart speakers into contactless heart rhythm monitors
Smart speakers  such as the Amazon Echo or the Google Nest can be used to monitor heart rhythms without physical contact as effectively as an electrocardiogram, according to research from the University of Washington published in Communications Biology. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - March 9, 2021 Category: Information Technology Tags: Digital Health, Emerging Technologies, Technology Source Type: news

Inaugural AFAR-Sagol Network GerOmic Awards announced
(American Federation for Aging Research) The American Federation for Aging Research (AFAR) is pleased to announce the recipients of the inaugural Sagol Network GerOmic Award for Junior Faculty: Simone Sidoli, PhD, Assistant Professor, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and Oscar Vivas, PhD, Research Assistant Professor, University of Washington. Established in 2020, the Sagol Network GerOmic Award for Junior Faculty provides up to $100,000 for a one- to two-year award to junior faculty (MDs and PhDs) to conduct aging-related -Omics research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 8, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Can't solve a riddle? The answer might lie in knowing what doesn't work
(University of Washington) With the help of about 200 human puzzle-takers, a computer model and functional MRI images, University of Washington researchers have learned more about the processes of reasoning and decision making, pinpointing the brain pathway that springs into action when problem-solving goes south. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 4, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news