UW Medicine Researchers Identify Blood Cell Genetic Mutations That Can Disrupt Liquid Biopsy Results
The discovery is yet another factor that must be considered when developing a liquid biopsy test clinical laboratories can use to detect cancer How often do disruptive elements present in Liquid biopsies result in misdiagnoses and unhelpful drug therapies for cancer? Researchers at the University of Washington School of Medicine (UW Medicine) in Seattle wanted […] The post UW Medicine Researchers Identify Blood Cell Genetic Mutations That Can Disrupt Liquid Biopsy Results appeared first on Dark Daily. (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - October 18, 2021 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jillia Schlingman Tags: Digital Pathology Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Resources Laboratory Testing Molecular Diagnostics, Genetic Testing, Whole Gene Sequencing Precision Medicine ACS American Cancer Society ana Source Type: news

How COVID-19 Opened the Door to a New Era in Psychedelic Medicine
From Wall Street to Hollywood, psychedelics are having a cultural moment. For those of us who grew up in the “this is your brain on drugs” era, it’s hard to let go of stigma—and the mental image of an egg sizzling on a hot pan. But as a growing number of states and cities move to decriminalize drugs, and investors flock to an emerging market for psychedelic health care, substances like psilocybin, ketamine and LSD are edging into mainstream culture—and setting the stage for a paradigm shift in modern medicine. Within the next few years, we could see psychedelic therapies prescribed for refract...
Source: TIME: Health - October 13, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dr. Shoshana Ungerleider Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

UW opens $230M Hans Rosling Center for Population Health (Photos)
The University of Washington's newest campus addition, the $230 million Hans Rosling Center for Population Health, is officially open. The 300,000-square-foot building will serve as a hub for students, faculty and researchers to work with local and global partners to address issues such as poverty, equity, access to health care, Covid-19 and the climate crisis. The project was mostly funded by a $210 million donation from the B ill& Melinda Gates Foundation. At the time, it was largest gift ever … (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - October 12, 2021 Category: American Health Authors: Joey Thompson Source Type: news

UW opens $230M Hans Rosling Center for Population Health (Photos)
The University of Washington's newest campus addition, the $230 million Hans Rosling Center for Population Health, is officially open. The 300,000-square-foot building will serve as a hub for students, faculty and researchers to work with local and global partners to address issues such as poverty, equity, access to health care, Covid-19 and the climate crisis. The project was mostly funded by a $210 million donation from the B ill& Melinda Gates Foundation. At the time, it was largest gift ever … (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 12, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Joey Thompson Source Type: news

Concussions and kids: Project co-led by UCLA gets $10 million grant from NIH
A research project co-led by theUCLA Steve Tisch BrainSPORT Programaimed at improving the assessment and treatment of concussions in school-aged children has been awarded $10 million by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, part of the National Institutes of Health.The grant to the Four Corners Youth Consortium, agroup of academic medical centers studying pediatric concussions, will supportConcussion Assessment, Research and Education for Kids, or CARE4Kids, a multisite study that will enroll more than 1,300 children and teens nationwide, including an estimated 240 in Southern California.CARE4Kids re...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 7, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

CDC Panel Outlines Who Should Get Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Booster Shots, And Who Should Wait
In a four-part vote, a Centers for Disease Control (CDC) committee today recommended booster shots of Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine for people 65 years or older, as well as anyone over 50 with certain underlying medical conditions. The committee also recommended allowing people 18- to 49-years-old with underlying medical conditions to receive a booster if they desired, based on individualized decisions about the benefits and risks to them. But in one of its four votes, the committee decided against recommending booster shots for adults working in high-risk settings such as health care and school systems. That vo...
Source: TIME: Health - September 24, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

COVID-19 Is Now the Deadliest Pandemic in American History
COVID-19 has now killed about as many Americans as the 1918-19 Spanish flu pandemic did — approximately 675,000. The U.S. population a century ago was just one-third of what it is today, meaning the flu cut a much bigger, more lethal swath through the country. But the COVID-19 crisis is by any measure a colossal tragedy in its own right, especially given the incredible advances in scientific knowledge since then and the failure to take maximum advantage of the vaccines available this time. “Big pockets of American society — and, worse, their leaders — have thrown this away,” medical historian ...
Source: TIME: Health - September 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carla K. Johnson / Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate wire Source Type: news

Will Doctors Who Are Spreading COVID-19 Misinformation Ever Face Penalty?
Earlier this month, Dr. Rashid Buttar posted on Twitter that COVID-19 “was a planned operation” and shared an article alleging that most people who got vaccinated against the coronavirus would be dead by 2025. His tweets are a recent addition to a steady stream of spurious claims about the COVID-19 vaccines and treatments. Another example is Dr. Sherri Jane Tenpenny’s June testimony, before Ohio state legislators, that the vaccine could cause people to become magnetized. Clips from the hearing went viral on the internet. Earlier in the pandemic, on April 9, 2020, Dr. Joseph Mercola posted a video about wh...
Source: TIME: Health - September 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Victoria Knight / Kaiser Health News Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Managing Symptoms of Long COVID Managing Symptoms of Long COVID
WebMD's Chief Medical Officer, John Whyte, MD, MPH, speaks with Janna Friedly, MD, MPH, a professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at the University of Washington, about managing the symptoms of long COVID and her personal journey of recovery.WebMD (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - September 14, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Infectious Diseases Expert Interview Source Type: news

How to live longer: Six factors to be on your way to become a supercentenarian
SUPERCENTENARIANS live to the age of 110, or even longer - and the frequency of such long longevity is predicted to increase, according to research from the University of Washington. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fine particulate air pollution associated with higher dementia risk
NIEHS-funded researchers from the University of Washington analyzed detailed exposure data from more than 4,000 Seattle-area residents. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - September 2, 2021 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

UW Medicine DENIES life-saving heart transplant to patient because he won’t take heart-damaging COVID vaccines
(Natural News) After a year and half of refusing efficacious treatment to COVID patients, the University of Washington Medical Center refuses to perform life-saving operations if the patient is not vaccinated with COVID spike proteins. UW Medicine is currently denying a 64-year-old patient a life-saving heart transplant because he won’t take the experimental vaccine protocol.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pregnant women are less likely to experience side effects from the COVID-19 vaccine
University of Washington researchers found that pregnant women are less likely to experience side effects from the COVID-19 vaccines than others. Lactating mothers were less likely as well. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

One Of The Most Influential Voices In Vaccine Misinformation Is A Doctor
NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks to researcher at University of Washington, Rachel Moran, about Dr. Joseph Mercola who experts say has been spreading misinformation about COVID-19 and the vaccine. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Three-Quarters of Sexual Assault Survivors Have PTSD
WEDNESDAY, Aug. 4, 2021 -- Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is common and severe following sexual assault, according to a review published online July 19 in Trauma, Violence,& Abuse. Emily R. Dworkin, Ph.D., from University of Washington in... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 4, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

To Save A Huge, 24-Armed Sea Creature, Scientists Become Loving Foster Parents
A mysterious disease is killing off the West Coast's enormous sunflower sea star, so researchers have launched an ambitious effort to breed this species in captivity.(Image credit: Dennis Wise/University of Washington) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Small increases in air pollution from tiny toxic particles can raise the risk of dementia
A small increase in fine particle air pollution raises dementia risk by 16%, University of Washington researchers found using decades' worth of data on air quality and neurological symptoms. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Experts predict that worldwide dementia cases will TRIPLE by 2050 to 152.8 million
Cases of dementia worldwide are expected to increase by 166% over the next 30 years, University of Washington researchers found. Dementia is primarily caused by Alzheimer's. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dementia cases will nearly triple 'to more than 152 million by 2050'
The highest increase in dementia prevalence is projected to be in eastern sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa and the Middle East, report experts at the University of Washington in Seattle. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Up to 60% of COVID-19 cases in the US may have gone undetected, study finds
Up to 60 percent of total COVID-19 cases in the U.S. may have not been detected, according to a study by University of Washington researchers. Idaho was the worst state at detecting cases. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 26, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists model 'true prevalence' of COVID-19 throughout pandemic
(University of Washington) University of Washington scientists have developed a statistical framework that incorporates key COVID-19 data -- such as case counts and deaths due to COVID-19 -- to model the true prevalence of this disease in the United States and individual states. Their approach projects that in the U.S. as many as 60% of COVID-19 cases went undetected as of March 7, 2021, the last date for which the dataset they employed is available. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 26, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Christopher Murray wins IADR Honorary Membership Award
(International& American Associations for Dental Research) The International Association for Dental Research (IADR) announced Christopher Murray, Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, Seattle, USA, as the 2021 recipient of the IADR Honorary Membership Award. Murray was recognized during the Opening Ceremonies of the virtual 99th General Session& Exhibition of the IADR, held in conjunction with the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) and the 45th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), on July 21-24, 2021. (Source:...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

75% of sexual assault survivors have PTSD one month later
(University of Washington School of Medicine/UW Medicine) Researchers want sexual assault survivors to know that it's normal to feel awful right after the assault, but that many will feel better within three months. They created a timeline for recovery based on meta-analysis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Screening often misses endometrial cancer in Black women
In this study using a simulated cohort, TVUS endometrial thickness screening missed over four times more cases of endometrial cancer among Black women versus White women owing to the greater prevalence of fibroids and non-endometrioid histology type that occurs among Black women. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 15, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How Climate Change Science Has Changed Due to COVID-19 Restrictions
In late 2019, expeditioners and guides Hilde Falun and Sunniva Sorby went to Norway’s remote Svalbard archipelago to complete a long-term goal of being the first female team to over winter in the Arctic. But the pair’s planned return home to mainland Norway coincided with the start of the COVID-19 pandemic and pretty quickly they found themselves stranded. There had been plans for a ship carrying friends and family to come and collect them as the ice began to melt in March, but travel restrictions got in the way, and they couldn’t come home until September. So instead, they spent the winter and much of sp...
Source: TIME: Health - July 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Duggan Tags: Uncategorized climate change COVID-19 Source Type: news

How Climate Change Science Has Changed Due to COVID-19 Restrictions
In late 2019, expeditioners and guides Hilde Falun and Sunniva Sorby went to Norway’s remote Svalbard archipelago to complete a long-term goal of being the first female team to over winter in the Arctic. But the pair’s planned return home to mainland Norway coincided with the start of the COVID-19 pandemic and pretty quickly they found themselves stranded. There had been plans for a ship carrying friends and family to come and collect them as the ice began to melt in March, but travel restrictions got in the way, and they couldn’t come home until September. So instead, they spent the winter and much of sp...
Source: TIME: Science - July 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jennifer Duggan Tags: Uncategorized climate change COVID-19 Source Type: news

From 'distress' to 'unscathed' -- mental health of UW students during spring 2020
(University of Washington) To understand how the University of Washington's transition to online-only classes affected college students' mental health in the spring of 2020, UW researchers surveyed 147 UW undergraduates over the 2020 spring quarter. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study model explores impact of police action on population health
(University of Washington) The authors of a new UW-led study write that because law enforcement directly interacts with a large number of people, " policing may be a conspicuous yet not-well understood driver of population health. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

City Heat is Worse if You ’re Not Rich or White. The World’s First Heat Officer Wants to Change That
Jane Gilbert knows she doesn’t get the worst of the sticky heat and humidity that stifles Miami each summer. She lives in Morningside, a coastal suburb of historically preserved art deco and Mediterranean-style single-family homes. Abundant trees shade the streets and a bay breeze cools residents when they leave their air conditioned cars and homes. “I live in a place of privilege and it’s a beautiful area,” says Gilbert, 58, over Zoom in early June, shortly after beginning her job as the world’s first chief heat officer, in Miami Dade county. “But you don’t have to go far to see t...
Source: TIME: Science - July 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ciara Nugent Tags: Uncategorized climate change feature Londontime Source Type: news

Epsilon variant mutations contribute to COVID immune evasion
(University of Washington School of Medicine/UW Medicine) Three mutations in the Epsilon coronavirus spike protein dampen the neutralizing potency of antibodies induced by current vaccines or past COVID infections. The mutations give this coronavirus variant of concern a means to totally evade specific monoclonal antibodies used in clinics and reduce the effectiveness of antibodies from plasma of vaccinated people. The latest molecular exploration of the mutation-remodeled configuration of the coronavirus infection machinery shows that the Epsilon variant relies on an indirect and unusual neutralization-escape strategy. (S...
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 6, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

What Problems are Ciliopathies Associated With?
Discussion Nephronophthisis (NPHP) one cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) usually occurring before age 30 years. NPHP is a non-motile ciliopathy affecting cellular sensing in the renal tubular epithelium. See To Learn More below. The incidence varies according to location with 1:1 million in the US but 1:50,000 in Finland. There are 3 subtypes: Infantile Occurs usually within 1 year of life Enlarged kidneys and severe hypertension In utero can have oligohydramnios problems such as pulmonary hypoplasia, facial dysmorphisms, limb contractures Extra-renal problems include congenital heart disease, liver fibrosis, recur...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - July 5, 2021 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Welcome to Region 5 of the Network of the National Library of Medicine!
Hello, I am Cathy Burroughs, Executive Director of the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) Region 5, and I would like to extend a warm welcome to NNLM Region 5 members!  The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has awarded a new five-year cooperative agreement grant to the University of Washington (UW) Health Sciences Library to serve as the Regional Medical Library (RML) for NNLM Region 5.  This is a *new* region of the NNLM, that reflects a redistributed geography and structure. The RML at the University of Washington now serves members in Alaska, California, Hawaii, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, and...
Source: Dragonfly - July 1, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Cathy Burroughs Tags: News from NNLM Region 5 communication Source Type: news

How long can a person live? The 21st century may see a record-breaker
(University of Washington) A new University of Washington study calculates the probability of living past age 110, which, though rare, likely will increase this century. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Five officers accuse UW Police Department of racism, demand $8 million
New claims of racism have emerged within the University of Washington Police Department. Five Black officers have filed claims for... (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 23, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Help is on the way' for people with psychosis
(University of Washington School of Medicine/UW Medicine) The federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration recently issued a statement calling cognitive behavioral therapy the standard of care for psychosis. " This is being called a 'watershed moment' for advancing care for people with schizophrenia, " said lead author of the statement, a psychologist with the University of Washington School of Medicine. Psychosis is the defining criteria for people diagnosed with schizophrenia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Smartphone camera modified with black lights can detect bacteria that cause acne and dental plaque
A device developed by the University of Washington can detect bacteria in someone's mouth or on their skin. The device could open up the potential for testing for certain conditions at home. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 16, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pandemic-era crowdfunding more common, successful in affluent communities
(University of Washington) A new University of Washington study of requests and donations to the popular crowdfunding site GoFundMe, along with Census data, shows stark inequities in where the money went and how much was donated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 16, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Drug rebates for insurers tied to higher costs for patients, especially the uninsured
(University of Washington) The study found that rebates were associated with increases in out-of-pocket costs for patients by an average of $6 for those with commercial insurance, $13 for Medicare patients and $39 for the uninsured. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Communication technology, study of collective behavior must be 'crisis discipline'
(University of Washington) Social media and other forms of communication technology restructure these interactions in ways that have consequences. Unfortunately, we have little insight into whether these changes will bring about a healthy, sustainable and equitable world. As a result, researchers now say that the study of collective behavior must rise to a " crisis discipline, " just like medicine, conservation and climate science have done, according to a new paper published June 14 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Announces Six Global Winners for the 2021 Women in STEM2D Scholar Awards
New Brunswick, N.J., June 11, 2021 – Johnson & Johnson announced today its prestigious Women in STEM2D (WiSTEM2D) Scholar Award recipients, marking the fifth year since the Awards’ inception. The program recognizes one scholar in each STEM2D discipline: Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, Manufacturing and Design, and provides each recipient with $150,000 in research funding and three years of mentorship from Johnson & Johnson. Six diverse, international female recipients were selected out of a competitive global applicant pool that garnered more than 650 applications from 40 countries. Launched in ...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - June 11, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Endangered blue whales recorded off southwest coast of India
(University of Washington) Underwater recordings show that endangered blue whales are present and singing off the southwest coast of India. This extends the range of a known song type by 1,000 kilometers, into Indian waters. The results suggest that conservation measures should include this region. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 9, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The First Treatment for Alzheimer ’s Disease Is Here
Alzheimer’s disease was first described by Alois Alzheimer in 1906, and now, more than 100 years later, doctors have an effective drug to treat the cognitive disorder. On June 7, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved aducanumab, developed by the U.S.-based biotech Biogen and Japanese pharmaceutical company Eisai. But the drug’s approval comes with a caveat. The FDA is requiring Biogen to conduct an additional placebo controlled study of the drug to verify it’s effectiveness in improving people’s memory and cognitive symptoms. That request stems in large part from the conclusion of an ...
Source: TIME: Health - June 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

UW to require all employees to be vaccinated against Covid-19 by fall
The University of Washington will require all of its employees to be vaccinated against Covid-19 by fall, the university announced Thursday. The notice comes after the university said last month that all students must be vaccinated by the fall term. Many colleges and universities around the country and in Washington state are requiring students and staff to be vaccinated, including Washington State University. UW had about 49,000 emp loyees as of June 2020. “Widespread vaccination is the only… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 4, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Megan Campbell Source Type: news

UW to require all employees to be vaccinated against Covid-19 by fall
The University of Washington will require all of its employees to be vaccinated against Covid-19 by fall, the university announced Thursday. The notice comes after the university said last month that all students must be vaccinated by the fall term. Many colleges and universities around the country and in Washington state are requiring students and staff to be vaccinated, including Washington State University. UW had about 49,000 emp loyees as of June 2020. “Widespread vaccination is the only… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - June 4, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: Megan Campbell Source Type: news

How COVID-19 Is Revolutionizing Health Care Around the World
In 2020 alone, there were at least 3 million deaths from COVID-19, though the true figure is probably 2-3 times higher. In 2021, the COVID-19 pandemic continues to rage on and is likely to last well into 2022 and beyond. For ten weeks in a row, from the first week of February, 2021, new daily cases globally rose, driven in part by virus variants and by many countries ending public health measures too soon. There are still around 600,000 new cases every day. Nations like Brazil, Canada, India, Iran, and Turkey—as well as some U.S. states like Michigan and Minnesota—recently experienced COVID-19 surges that in so...
Source: TIME: Health - June 3, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gavin Yamey and Madhukar Pai Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Medical AI models rely on 'shortcuts' that could lead to misdiagnosis of COVID-19
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers examined multiple models recently put forward as potential tools for accurately detecting COVID-19 from chest X-rays. The team found that, rather than learning genuine medical pathology, these models rely instead on shortcut learning to draw spurious associations between medically irrelevant factors and disease status. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 31, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Long-COVID-19 Patients Are Getting Diagnosed With Little-Known Illnesses Like POTS
The day Dr. Elizabeth Dawson was diagnosed with COVID-19, she awoke feeling as if she had a bad hangover. Four months later, in February 2021, she tested negative for the virus, but her symptoms have only worsened. Dawson is among what Dr. David Goldstein, head of the National Institutes of Health’s Autonomic Medicine Section, called “waves and waves” of “long-haul” COVID patients who remain sick long after testing negative for the virus. A significant percentage are suffering from syndromes that few doctors understand or treat, primarily postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) and ch...
Source: TIME: Health - May 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cindy Loose / Kaiser Health News Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Significant otter helps couples communicate from the heart
(Carnegie Mellon University) A team from Carnegie Mellon University, Snap and the University of Washington built Significant Otter, an app designed primarily for smart watches that allows couples to communicate with each other based on their sensed heart rate. The team presented their work this month at the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Computer-Human Interaction (CHI) Conference. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 26, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19 mortality associated with 2 signs easily measured at home
(University of Washington School of Medicine/UW Medicine) A study of 1,095 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 found that two easily measured signs of health - respiration rate and blood-oxygen saturation - predict higher mortality. This context is lacking in current CDC guidance, which tells people with COVID-19 to seek medical care when they experience symptoms such as " trouble breathing " and " persistent pain or pressure in the chest " - indications that may be absent even when respiration and blood oxygen have reached dangerous levels, the authors say. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 24, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news