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Study reveals 30% spike in US deaths from smoke diseases
Researchers at the University of Washington analyzed death records stretching back 34 years from the US Census Bureau. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Group project? Taking turns, working with friends may improve grades
(University of Washington) A University of Washington-led study of college students has found that the social dynamics of a group, such as whether one person dominates the conversation or whether students work with a friend, affect academic performance. Put simply, the more comfortable students are, the better they do, which yields benefits beyond the classroom. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Wave Glider surfs across stormy Drake Passage in Antarctica
(University of Washington) A hardy ocean drone made a first-ever attempt to surf across Antarctica's stormy Drake Passage gathering data about ocean mixing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The brain at work: Spotting half-hidden objects
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) The human and non-human primate brain is remarkable in recognizing partially hidden objects. A study, conducted during a shape recognition task, shows as more of the shape is hidden, a brain area involved in cognition starts to sends signals to the visual cortex. The findings make the scientists wonder if this communication between different brain areas might be impaired in people with autism or Alzheimer's. Both conditions can cause confusion in cluttered surroundings and problems recognizing objects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UW digital health care spinout gets new CEO
TransformativeMed spun out of the University of Washington in 2011 and works with hospitals around the country to make electronic medical records more user friendly. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - September 15, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

UW digital health care spinout gets new CEO
TransformativeMed spun out of the University of Washington in 2011 and works with hospitals around the country to make electronic medical records more user friendly. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 15, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

Global Burden of Disease: bad diet linked to 1 in 5 deaths
Researchers at the University of Washington said the two extremes of inadequate nutrition in poor communities and unhealthy eating in richer populations kill a fifth of human beings. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

People of color exposed to more pollution than whites
The groundbreaking study led by the University of Washington estimated exposure to outdoor concentrations of a transport-related pollutant in 2000 and 2010, based on neighborhoods. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

People of color exposed to more pollution from cars, trucks, power plants over 10 years
(University of Washington) A new nationwide study finds that the US made little progress from 2000 to 2010 in reducing relative disparities between people of color and whites in exposure to harmful air pollution emitted by cars, trucks and other combustion sources. It found disparities in NO2 exposure were larger by race and ethnicity than by income, age or education, and that those inequities persisted across the decade. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Device used to close small hole in heart may protect against recurrent stroke
A device used to close a small hole in the heart may benefit certain stroke patients by providing an extra layer of protection for those facing years of ongoing stroke risk, according to the results of a large clinical trial led by UCLA researchers.“It is a major new treatment option for some people,” said Dr. Jeffrey Saver, director of theUCLA Comprehensive Stroke Center and lead author of the study. However, he added, “Using the device is going to have to be a considered clinical decision between the doctor and the patient about who’s the right person to get it.”Thefindings appear in the Sep...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 14, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Global Mesothelioma Deaths Remain High Despite Poor Data
An estimated 38,400 people around the world will die this year from mesothelioma cancer, according to a report recently published in Occupational & Environmental Medicine. The estimation by the international peer-reviewed journal included 230 countries. Data used for the study came from the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Mortality Database and extrapolated information based on gender- and age-specific death rates. “The global burden of mesothelioma is real,” Dr. Ken Takahashi, director of Asbestos Diseases Research Institute, University of Sydney Gate 3, Australia, told Asbestos.com. “It is v...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 13, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Tags: Asbestos Diseases Research Institute asbestos-related lung cancer Australia mesothelioma Bangladesh Dr. Christina Fitzmaurice Dr. Ken Takahashi Global Burden of Disease Mesothelioma death rate mesothelioma latency period mesothelioma uni Source Type: news

Offhand comments can expose underlying racism, UW study finds
(University of Washington) A study of microaggressions -- everyday exchanges that can offend racial and ethnic minorities -- draw upon stereotypes and are linked with racism and prejudice. The University of Washington-led research suggests that whites who are more likely to deliver microaggressions are also more likely to harbor some degree of negative feeling toward blacks, whether they know it or not. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Climate change challenges the survival of fish across the world
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers have published the first analysis looking at how vulnerable the world's freshwater and marine fishes are to climate change. Their paper, appearing online Sept. 11 in Nature Climate Change, used physiological data to predict how nearly 3,000 fish species living in oceans and rivers will respond to warming water temperatures in different regions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 13, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Read and Write With Your  Kids
1. Read and write with your kids. It pays long-term dividends. By Kim Eckart at the University of Washington 2. Could we engineer the atmosphere to prevent future hurricanes? By Jolene Creighton in Futurism 3. Do big data companies have too much power? By Jathan Sadowski in the Guardian 4. We’re going to need more lithium. By Jessica Shankleman, Tom Biesheuvel, Joe Ryan, and Dave Merrill at Bloomberg Businessweek 5. Video games could strengthen aging brains. By Anna Vlasits in Wired The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C. (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: The Aspen Institute Tags: Uncategorized data companies Five Best Ideas Hurricanes Innovation lithium reading Video Games Source Type: news

MD Anderson Retains Top Spot for Cancer Care
U.S. News & World Report ranked the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston the No. 1 cancer care hospital in America for the third consecutive year. MD Anderson has been a leader in the treatment of pleural mesothelioma, a contributing factor in maintaining its top billing on the rankings. Memorial Sloan Kettering in New York and Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, were No. 2 and No. 3, respectively, in the 2017-18 Best Hospitals for Cancer  listing. U.S. News & World Report — a global authority in hospital care — has published the rankings annually for 28 years, helping patients make tough health c...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 6, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Tags: Barnes-Jewis Hospital best mesothelioma cancer centers Cardiology Cleveland Clinic Gastroenterology H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute heart surgery Johns Hopkins Massachusetts General Hospital Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic- Source Type: news

PupilScreen Aims to Allow Parents, Coaches, Medics to Detect Concussion, TBIs with a Phone
University of Washington researchers are developing the first smartphone app that is capable of objectively detecting concussion and other traumatic brain injuries in the field: on the sidelines of a sports game, on a battlefield or in the home of an elderly person prone to falls. PupilScreen can detect changes in a pupil's response to light using a smartphone's video camera and deep learning tools (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - September 6, 2017 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

PupilScreen aims to allow parents, coaches, medics to detect concussion, TBIs with a phone
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers are developing a smartphone app that is capable of objectively detecting concussion and other traumatic brain injuries in the field, which could provide a new level of screening for athletes and accident victims. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

HealthWatch: Cancer-Detecting App; First-Time Dads Getting Older
BOSTON (CBS) — Pancreatic cancer usually has a poor prognosis, often because it’s caught too late, but could your smartphone one day give you an early warning? Researchers at the University of Washington are developing the BiliScreen app, which will allow people to screen themselves for pancreatic cancer and other diseases by snapping a selfie. The Biliscreen app in use. (WBZ-TV) One of the earliest signs of pancreatic cancer, and other conditions like hepatitis, is jaundice or yellowing of the eyes, which is caused by a build-up of a pigment called bilirubin in the blood. This BiliScreen app uses the smartphon...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Fathers HealthWatch Mallika Marshall Pancreatic Cancer Source Type: news

Racism on college campuses is rooted in the small things people say and do
(Springer) While overt and blatant expressions of prejudice seem to have declined on American university campuses over the last few decades, racism is still evident in the small things that white students say and do. This is true for those who think that minorities are too sensitive about race issues, says Jonathan Kanter of the University of Washington in the US. He is the lead author of a study in Springer's journal Race and Social Problems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Digital health news briefs for 8/29/17
University of Washington app aims to detect pancreatic cancer early   (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - August 29, 2017 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

New App Uses Smartphone Selfies to Screen for Pancreatic Cancer
Pancreatic cancer has one of the worst prognoses - with a five-year survival rate of 9 percent - in part because there are no telltale symptoms or non-invasive screening tools to catch a tumor before it spreads. Now, University of Washington researchers have developed an app that could allow people to easily screen for pancreatic cancer and other diseases - by snapping a smartphone selfie. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - August 29, 2017 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

App uses smartphone selfies to screen for pancreatic cancer
Researchers at the University of Washington have developed an app that could allow people to screen for pancreatic cancer by using a smartphone selfie. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - August 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New app uses smartphone selfies to screen for pancreatic cancer
(University of Washington) A new app from University of Washington researchers could lead to earlier detection of pancreatic cancer simply by snapping a smartphone selfie. The disease kills 90 percent of patients within five years, in part because there are no telltale symptoms or non-invasive screening tools to catch a tumor before it spreads. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

CYBER BIOLOGY: Scientists use biological DNA to hack a computer system in world's first biology-to-silicon hacking demonstration
(Natural News) In something along the lines of an early warning, researchers at the Seattle-based University of Washington claim that they can hack into a computer with a small strand of DNA. The experts presented their findings about a potential DNA malware infection experiment at last week’s 26th USENIX Security Symposium in Vancouver. The Daily Mail summarized the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Leprosy hijacks immune system, similar to autoimmune diseases
Leprosy hijacks the immune system, turning an important repair mechanism into one that causes potentially irreparable damage to our nerve cells, UCLA researchers have discovered. The new findings,published online today in the journal  Cell, suggest that leprosy shares underlying characteristics with some autoimmune diseases.Courtesy of Cressida MadiganCressida Madigan“We discovered that the mechanism of nerve damage in leprosy is very similar to what happens in diseases like multiple sclerosis,” said Cressida Madigan, a postdoctoral research fellow at UCLA and first author of the paper. “That means w...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 25, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

LGB older adults suffer more chronic health conditions than heterosexuals, study finds
(University of Washington) A University of Washington study finds that lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) older adults were found to be in poorer health than heterosexuals, specifically in terms of higher rates of cardiovascular disease, weakened immune system and low back or neck pain. They also were at greater risk of some adverse health behaviors such as smoking and excessive drinking. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers unlock cheesemaking secret
(University of Queensland) Researchers say their new knowledge on the inner workings of a bacterium has important implications for Australia's billion dollar cheese industry.University of Queensland School of Agriculture and Food Sciences researcher Associate Professor Mark Turner said a discovery by a UQ, Columbia University and University of Washington research group had explained the regulation of an enzyme in the bacterium Lactococcus, which is used as a starter culture in cheese production. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 17, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Modern genetic sequencing tools give clearer picture of how corals are related
(University of Washington) As corals face threats from ocean warming, a new study uses the latest genetic-sequencing tools to help unravel the relationships between three similar-looking corals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 16, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for August 15, 2017
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. How Consensus Orthopedics added smarts to orthopedic devices Consensus Orthopedics made headlines with its TracPatch this year. So how did an ortho company get a digital product to market? Let’s face it, orthopedic device...
Source: Mass Device - August 15, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Google acquires smartphone health dx startup Senosis Health
Google has acquired Seattle-based digital health startup Senosis Health for an undisclosed amount, according to a report from Geekwire. Senosis Health was founded by University of Washington computer scientist Shwetak Patel, aiming to use smartphones as patient monitoring devices, collecting health metrics and providing services such as diagnosing pulmonary function, hemoglobin counts and other critical health information, according to the report. Patel has sold previous startup ventures to major companies including Belkin International and Sears, GeekWire reported. The company produces a number of smartphone applica...
Source: Mass Device - August 15, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Diagnostics Mergers & Acquisitions mHealth (Mobile Health) Alphabet google Source Type: news

Dental Therapists Mean Better Outcomes for Alaska Native Communities, Study Finds
Children and adults had lower rates of tooth extractions and more preventive care in Alaska Native communities served frequently by dental health aide therapists than residents in communities not receiving these services, according to a new study released by the University of Washington. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - August 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Probiotics help poplar trees clean up toxins in Superfund sites
(University of Washington) Researchers from the University of Washington and several small companies have conducted the first large-scale experiment on a Superfund site using poplar trees fortified with a probiotic -- or natural microbe -- to clean up groundwater contaminated with trichloroethylene, or TCE. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How head-on collisions of DNA protein machines stop replication
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Head-on collisions between the protein machines that crawl along chromosomes can disrupt DNA replication and boost gene mutation rates. This may be one of the ways bacteria control their evolution by accelerating mutations in key genes when coping with new conditions. Some mutations may help bacteria survive hostile environments, resist antibiotics or fend off immune attacks (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 14, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers: Hackers Could Encode Human DNA With Malicious Software
University of Washington researchers say malware could be encoded into DNA strands. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to researcher Karl Koscher about the findings and what they mean for gene sequencing. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hacking a computer using DNA is now a reality, researchers claim
Sci-fi becomes reality as University of Washington lab uses strands of DNA to hack into a computer, but experts say there ’s no cause for concernResearchers from the University of Washington say they have successfully hacked into a computer using custom strands of DNA for the first time.Akin to something from the pages of science fiction, the researchers used the life-encoding molecule to attack and take over a computer, using strands of DNA to transmit a computer virus from the biological to the digital realm.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 11, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Samuel Gibbs Tags: Hacking Data and computer security Technology Science Source Type: news

Air pollution confirmed to have multi-generational damaging effect on future offspring
(Natural News) An animal study published online on The FASEB Journal revealed that in utero exposure to air pollutants such as diesel exhaust may alter DNA and gene expressions, which in turn may raise the risk of developing heart failure in adulthood. To carry out the study, a team of researchers at the University of Washington School of... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

DNA sequencing tools lack robust protections against cybersecurity risks
(University of Washington) A new study analyzing the security hygiene of common, open-source DNA processing programs finds evidence of poor computer security practices used throughout the field. In a scientific first, the UW team also demonstrated it is possible to compromise a computer system with a malicious computer code stored in synthetic DNA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 10, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Harvard study finds bad weather does not worsen conditions
A study led by scientists at the University of Washington found that damp and cold weather may actually help symptoms of arthritis. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

“ Calling BS in the Age of Big Data ” , next PNR Rendezvous
Our digital worlds are inundated with misinformation, data manipulations and outright lies. In this webinar session, we will look at common pitfalls specifically around information visualization. Our presenter, Jevin West, will have us examine different ways that information can be misrepresented with figures and graphs. “Calling BS in the Age of Big Data” will build upon several lectures given in the Calling BS class at the University of Washington.  Presenter: Jevin West Assistant Professor, Information School, University of Washington. He is one of the chief architects of the new Data Science curri...
Source: Dragonfly - August 9, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: Data Health Literacy/Consumer Health Training & Education Source Type: news

Persistent Identifiers
Have your researchers or other patrons ever asked you how to create a “permanent,” persistent, or long-lasting  link to a webpage, data set, article, file, dissertation, or even a physical object? While there are several online options, two tools/services used by the University of Washington Libraries are listed below. Perma.cc is a free, online tool built by Harvard’s Library Innovation Lab and supported by libraries and institutions across the country. It allows users to create a link to online content, such as a webpage, that will always be accessible, regardless of what happens to the original so...
Source: Dragonfly - August 9, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Ann Madhavan Tags: Data Technology Source Type: news

Mental illness, suicide and violence creating lost generation in the Middle East
(Springer) There has been a sharp increase in non-communicable diseases and mental health conditions such as depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Depression and anxiety disorders were the most common mental conditions, according to a study led by Ali Mokdad of the University of Washington in the US. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Carrying excess weight? People may assume you're American
Researchers from the University of Washington found people assume that overweight Asian people live in the US legally, unlike those with a healthy BMI. This demonstrates they are naturalized citizens. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Overweight Asian-Americans Are Seen as More ‘ American, ’ Study Finds
Assumptions about how much Asians and Americans weigh appears to influence perceptions of national identity. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NIRAJ CHOKSHI Tags: Asian-Americans Weight Research United States Psychological Science (Journal) University of Washington Sapna Cheryan Race and Ethnicity Source Type: news

Weighing the benefits of incidental habitat protection
(Ecological Society of America) University of Washington researchers compared land that had come under incidental protection through regulations, to land acquired for conservation during the same 25-year span (1990-2015), in Washington State.   Lawler's talk, on Wednesday, Aug. 9, is part of a session on Conservation Planning, Policy, and Theory at the Ecological Society of America's 2017 Annual Meeting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ancient DNA analysis reveals Minoan and Mycenaean origins
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) DNA analysis of archaeological remains has revealed that Ancient Minoans and Mycenaens were genetically similar with both peoples descending from early Neolithic farmers. They likely migrated from Anatolia to Greece and Crete thousands of years before the Bronze Age. Modern Greeks are largely descendants of the Mycenaeans, the study found.The Minoan civilization flourished on Crete beginning in the third millennium B.C.E. and was advanced artistically and technologically. The Minoans were also the first literate people of Europe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heavier Asian Americans seen as 'more American,' study says
(University of Washington) A University of Washington-led study has found that for Asian Americans, those who appear heavier not only are perceived to be more 'American,' but also may be subject to less prejudice directed at foreigners than Asian Americans who are thin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

7 ways neurostimulation could make our lives better
  [Image from dierk schaefer on Flickr]Neurostimulation is being used for a lot of different things that go beyond motor disorders and diseases. Neurostimulation is used to stimulate certain parts of the brain’s nervous system. It can be invasive with implants or it can be non-invasive with electrode-filled caps and ear clips. The neurostimulation market was worth an estimated $1.9 billion in 2016 and expected to double to almost $4 billion by 2025, according to a ReportBuyer analysis. The continuously growing range of applications and updates in the technology are contributing to the fast growth. From devices t...
Source: Mass Device - July 27, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Neurological Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Pain Management Research & Development Cleveland Clinic Hartford Healthcare Massachusetts Institute of Technology Medtronic Northwestern University University of Washington Source Type: news

Even babies can tell who's the boss, UW research says
(University of Washington) Social dominance, and the dynamic it creates, may be so naturally ingrained, University of Washington researchers say, that toddlers as young as 17 months old not only can perceive who is dominant, but also anticipate that the dominant person will receive more rewards. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Snoring link to Alzheimer ’s disease unproven
Conclusion This relatively large cross-sectional analysis has found a link between certain measures of breathing problems during sleep and poorer cognitive function in middle-aged to older adults. The strengths of this study include its size and use of a prospective sleep study to assess whether people had sleep apnoea or other problems with breathing during sleep. The use of standard cognitive tests is also a strength. However, the study does have its limitations: The study did have mixed findings – while certain measures of problems with breathing during sleep (e.g. oxygen levels) were associated with cognitive o...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

Artifacts suggest humans arrived in Australia earlier than thought
(University of Washington) A team of researchers, including a faculty member and seven students from the University of Washington, has found and dated artifacts in northern Australia that indicate humans arrived there about 65,000 years ago -- more than 10,000 years earlier than previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news