Common Weed Killer Glyphosate Increases Cancer Risk By 41%, Study Says
(CNN) — Glyphosate, an herbicide that remains the world’s most ubiquitous weed killer, raises the cancer risk of those exposed to it by 41%, a new analysis says. Researchers from the University of Washington evaluated existing studies into the chemical — found in weed killers including Monsanto’s popular Roundup — and concluded that it significantly increases the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), a cancer of the immune system. “All of the meta-analyses conducted to date, including our own, consistently report the same key finding: exposure to GBHs (glyphosate-based herbicides) are asso...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN weed killer Source Type: news

It doesn't take much for soldiers to feel cared for
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Caring texts sent to active-duty military had important findings in reducing suicide. The results were published Feb. 13 in JAMA Psychiatry along with a podcast with the researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

National Academy of Sciences Elects Home Secretary and Councilors
Susan R. Wessler, distinguished professor of genetics and Neil and Rochelle Campbell Presidential Chair for Innovation in Science Education, University of California, Riverside, has been re-elected as home secretary for the National Academy of Sciences. Wessler will continue to be responsible for the membership activities of the Academy during her third four-year term. In addition, four members have been elected to serve on the Academy's governing Council for three years. All terms begin July 1. The new councilors are:• Patricia Kuhl, co-director of the Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences and the Bezos Family Fo...
Source: News from the National Academies - February 13, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Many Arctic lakes give off less carbon than expected
(University of Washington) New research by the University of Washington and US Geological Survey suggests many lakes in the Arctic pose little threat to global carbon levels, at least for now. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 11, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study: Serious health concerns missed in older adults
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Researchers examined the prevalence and impact of six common symptoms (pain, fatigue, depression, anxiety, breathing difficulty, sleep problems) and found that nearly half of adults ages 65 and older have two or more of these symptoms and one-fourth have three or more. But often clinicians miss these symptoms, and the more serious health issues they portend because patients only talk about one of these symptoms during a visit. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rating riverside corridors -- the 'escape routes' for animals under climate change
(University of Washington) While riverside habitats are known to be important for species migrating under climate change, this is the first study to rank riparian areas as targets for restoration and conservation efforts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Age-Standardized Mortality Rate for Suicide Down Since 1990
THURSDAY, Feb. 7, 2019 -- Since 1990, the age-standardized mortality rate for suicide has decreased worldwide, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in The BMJ. Mohsen Naghavi, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., from the University of Washington in... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 7, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Folliculin mutations disrupt embryo implantation
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) New information is unfolding on the genetic controls of an early turning point in pregnancy -- the changes in an embryo's cells that occur as it prepares to lodge in the wall of the uterus. Understanding what can go wrong with these genetic controls is shedding light on implantation failure, a major cause of human infertility. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Parenting in the age of legal pot: Household rules, conversations help guide teen use
(University of Washington) The legalization of marijuana in Washington state in 2012 gave parents the opportunity for a new teachable moment. Many say that as society has become more permissive, they want information and advice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rise in the number of suicide deaths - despite a huge drop in the global rate
A new study, led by the University of Washington in Seattle, has found that the number of suicides deaths globally increased by 6.7 percent from 765,000 in 1990 to 817,000 in 2016. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Early spring rain boosts methane from thawing permafrost by 30 percent
(University of Washington) A UW-led team has found that early spring rainfall warms up a thawing permafrost bog in Alaska and promotes the growth of plants and methane-producing microbes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 4, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

An unexpected mode of action for an antibody
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Studies of human monoclonal antibodies isolated from survivors of coronavirus-induced severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or Middle-East respiratory syndrome (MERS) are unveiling surprising immune defense tactics against fatal viruses. Atomic and molecular information about the workings of the highly potent antibodies may provide insights to prevent these serious and sometimes deadly lung infections. Currently, no vaccines or specific treatments are available for any of the six coronaviruses that can infect humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 31, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Iguana-sized dinosaur cousin discovered in Antarctica
(University of Washington) Scientists have just discovered a dinosaur relative that lived in Antarctica 250 million years ago. The iguana-sized reptile's genus name, Antarctanax, means 'Antarctic king.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 31, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How a one-hour 'planting party' lifts spirits, builds skills among women in prison
(University of Washington) Exposure to nature, even through a brief gardening activity, can improve well-being among women in prison, a UW Tacoma-led study finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Discovering the Biology Education Research Community
When Sarah Eddy began work on her doctoral thesis, she assumed that her main contribution would relate to her field of study—behavioral ecology and the sexual selection of salamanders—but one of her more significant discoveries had nothing to do with amphibians and everything to do with what was going on in the classroom. As a graduate teaching assistant at Oregon State University, she realized how important it was to her to see students truly improve their learning. "It was in trying to figure out how to help students achieve more that I discovered education research literature," she explained. Many ...
Source: Eye on Education - January 23, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: BioScience Source Type: news

Ambient Air Pollution Exposure Linked to Sleep Apnea
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 -- Ambient air pollution exposure is associated with sleep apnea, according to a study recently published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. Martha E. Billings, M.D., from the University of Washington in... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 23, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

World Health Organization is 'underestimating' how many people will die because of global warming
Experts from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the University of Washington say 'many millions' of people will perish by 2050 because of soaring global temperatures. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Salad, soda and socioeconomic status: Mapping a social determinant of health in Seattle
(University of Washington) Seattle residents who live in waterfront neighborhoods tend to have healthier diets compared to those who live along Interstate-5 and Aurora Avenue, according to new research on social disparities from the University of Washington School of Public Health. The study used local data to model food consumption patterns by city block. Weekly servings of salad and soda served as proxies for diet quality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bike share programs show infrequent helmet use, little disparity among neighborhoods
(University of Washington) People riding free-floating bike share rentals in Seattle are wearing helmets infrequently, according to a new analysis conducted by University of Washington researchers. Only 20 percent of bike share riders wore helmets in the study, while more than 90 percent of cyclists wore helmets while riding their own bikes.Different research on the free-floating bike share systems showed that bikes were usually available in all Seattle neighborhoods across economic, racial and ethnic lines. However, more bikes were located in more-advantaged neighborhoods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Another Device Gets Added to the Peritoneal Dialysis Mix
AWAK Technologies has been granted a breakthrough device designation from FDA for a wearable and ultra-portable peritoneal dialysis (PD) device. The Singapore-based company’s AWAK PD device allows dialysis to be performed "on-the-go", overcoming the challenge of long hours of therapy and connection to large-size dialysis machines, currently faced by renal patients. The company said FDA’s designation was granted after reviewing the results from the First-In-Human safety trial of AWAK PD device, which was successfully completed in October 2018 at the Singapore General Hospital, S...
Source: MDDI - January 11, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Business Source Type: news

At Risk for an Opioid OD? There's an App for That
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 -- Drug users suffering an opioid overdose might soon have access to an unusual lifeline -- a smartphone app. University of Washington researchers have developed an app that can detect when a person's breathing dangerously... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 9, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Scientists design protein that prods cancer-fighting T-cells
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Scientists have created a new protein that mimics a key immune regulatory protein, interleukin 2 (IL-2). IL-2 is a potent anticancer drug, but with toxic side effects. In a paper in the Jan. 10 issue of Nature, the researchers report using computer programs to design a protein that they have shown in animal models to have the same ability to stimulate cancer-fighting T-cells as IL-2, but without triggering harmful side effects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 9, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Long-term breastfeeding sheds light on whether an infant becomes right- or left-handed
(University of Washington) Bottle feeding infants is associated with left-handedness, according to a new study from the University of Washington. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

'DeepSqueak' helps researchers decode rodent chatter
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Two scientists at the University of Washington School of Medicine developed a software program called DeepSqueak, which promotes broad adoption of rodent vocalization research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

GMO houseplant filters carcinogens
Researchers at the University of Washington have genetically modified a common houseplant — pothos ivy or devil’s ivy — to remove chloroform and benzene from the air. (Source: PharmaManufacturing.com)
Source: PharmaManufacturing.com - January 4, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

How economic theory and the Netflix Prize could make research funding more efficient
(University of Washington) In a paper published Jan. 2 in PLOS Biology, two scientists at the University of Washington and North Carolina State University use the economic theory of contests to illustrate how the competitive grant-application system has made the pursuit of research funding inefficient and unsustainable -- and that alternative methods, such as a partial lottery to award grants, could relieve pressure on professors and free up time for research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New global migration estimates show rates steady since 1990, high return migration
(University of Washington) Two University of Washington scientists have unveiled a new statistical method for estimating migration flows between countries. Using the so-called pseudo-Bayes approach, they show that rates of migration are higher than previously thought, but also relatively stable, fluctuating between 1.1 and 1.3 percent of global population from 1990 to 2015. In addition, since 1990 approximately 45 percent of migrants have returned to their home countries, a much higher estimate than other methods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Number of People With Dementia Rose Twofold From 1990 to 2016
FRIDAY, Dec. 21, 2018 -- The number of people living with dementia worldwide more than doubled from 1990 to 2016, according to a study published online Nov. 26 in The Lancet Neurology. Emma Nichols, from the University of Washington in Seattle, and... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - December 21, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Data Flash: Some Reading About Library Responses To Research Mandates
Self-promotion–we all are called upon to do it at some time or another.  And my time has arrived!  This post is to let you know that if you’re interested in reading about research mandates, from funders, institutions and publishers, there’s a new book chapter that’s just been come out, by me and Virginia Commonwealth University’s Research Data Librarian Nina Exner.   The title is “Responding to Change: Reinventing Librarian Identities in the Age of Research Mandates” and it appears in the volume Challenging the “Jacks of All Trades but Masters of None” Li...
Source: Dragonfly - December 21, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Ann Glusker Tags: Data Science News From NNLM PNR change management funders institutions librarian roles publishers research data research mandates Source Type: news

Here ’s the Best Way to Boost Your Immune System
Some people seem to breeze through cold-and-flu season without so much as a sniffle. What’s their secret? Regular exercise is a prime candidate. “If you look at all the lifestyle factors that decrease the number of days you suffer from common cold, being a physically active and fit person is the most important,” says David Nieman, a professor of public health and director of the Human Performance Lab at Appalachian State University. Nieman has spent years examining the effect exercise has on human health and immune function. In one of his studies, he and his colleagues found that 30 minutes of brisk walki...
Source: TIME: Health - December 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

Here's the Best Way to Boost Your Immune System
Some people seem to breeze through cold-and-flu season without so much as a sniffle. What’s their secret? Regular exercise is a prime candidate. “If you look at all the lifestyle factors that decrease the number of days you suffer from common cold, being a physically active and fit person is the most important,” says David Nieman, a professor of public health and director of the Human Performance Lab at Appalachian State University. Nieman has spent years examining the effect exercise has on human health and immune function. In one of his studies, he and his colleagues found that 30 minutes of brisk walki...
Source: TIME: Health - December 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

One-quarter of people around the world at risk for a stroke after age 25, study reveals
A new study from the University of Washington in Seattle found a nearly five-fold difference between the regions with the greatest risk, East Asia, and the lowest risk, sub-Saharan Africa. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Doctors Aren ’t Getting Better at Treating Shooting Victims Even As Gun Deaths Rise
In November, after the American College of Physicians published a position paper on firearms and safety in a medical journal, the National Rifle Association publicly warned doctors to “stay in their lane”. Surgeons around the U.S. responded by posting grisly photos and stories of treating shooting victims—and the hashtag #ThisIsOurLane was born. Now, a new study published in JAMA Surgery finds that people who go to the hospital after being shot die from their injuries just as often as they ever have, despite improvements in survival for other types of trauma victims. The researchers compared the numbers o...
Source: TIME: Health - December 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Belinda Luscombe Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Want cleaner air in your home? Researchers modify common houseplant to remove toxins from your rooms
Air filters don't keep small compounds at bay, according to scientists at University of Washington. Lab tests showed the modified ivy used such compounds in the air as food to grow. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers develop a new houseplant that can clean your home's air
(University of Washington) Researchers at the University of Washington have genetically modified a common houseplant to remove chloroform and benzene from the air around it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Aortica touts FDA clearance to use Medtronic ’ s Valiant Navion in AAA IDE study
Aortica said today that the FDA approved the use of Medtronic‘s (NYSE:MDT) Valiant Navion stent graft system alongside Aortica’s AortaFit in a physician sponsored IDE study. The study, being run by principal investigator Dr. Benjamin Starnes at the University of Washington, will now use the Valiant Navion as a platform for fenestrated endovascular repair together with the AortaFit automated case planning software. “I am excited to bring Medtronic’s Navion into this study. The device architecture incorporates many of the features we feel are important to simplifying fenestrated EVAR and addressi...
Source: Mass Device - December 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Vascular Aortica Medtronic Source Type: news

Opinion: We are in an era of unprecedented hope
Dr. Ramesh Rengan is Professor and Interim Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Associate Member, Clinical Research Division of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and Medical Director at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance Proton Therapy Center. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - December 14, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Dr. Ramesh Rengan Source Type: news

Opinion: We are in an era of unprecedented hope
Dr. Ramesh Rengan is Professor and Interim Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Associate Member, Clinical Research Division of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and Medical Director at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance Proton Therapy Center. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 14, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Dr. Ramesh Rengan Source Type: news

More effective than condoms? Couples test new birth control gel
'The potential of this new gel is huge,' said Dr William Bremner, professor of medicine at the University of Washington's School of Medicine. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Attention, please! Anticipation of touch takes focus, executive skills
(University of Washington) A study by the University of Washington and Temple University examines what happens in children's brains when they anticipate a touch to the hand, and relates this brain activity to the executive functions the child demonstrates on other mental tasks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Teens get more sleep with later school start time, researchers find
(University of Washington) In 2016, Seattle Public Schools pushed back start times for its 18 high schools by 55 minutes. In a paper published Dec. 12 in Science Advances, researchers at the University of Washington and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies announced that, as a result, teens at two Seattle high schools got more sleep on school nights -- a median increase of 34 minutes of sleep each night -- and showed improved attendance and grades. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What social stress in monkeys can tell us about human health
(University of Washington) A new University of Washington-led study examines one key stress-inducing circumstance -- the effects of social hierarchy -- and how cells respond to the hormones that are released in response to that stress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Potential seen for tailoring treatment for acute myeloid leukemia
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Rapid screening of leukemia cells for drug susceptibility and resistance are bringing scientists closer to patient-tailored treatment for acute myeloid leukemia. Research on the differing drug response patterns of leukemia stem cells and blasts may show why some attempts to treat are not successful and why some patients relapse. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers classify Alzheimer's patients in 6 subgroups
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Researchers studying Alzheimer's disease have created an approach to classify patients with Alzheimer's disease, a finding that may open the door for personalized treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Unconscious bias: what is it and can it be eliminated?
Brought to prominence twenty years ago by a controversial test, the concept is now essential to our understanding of racismIn the ranking of taboos, racism and sexism come close to the top of the list. So it is perhaps unsurprising that the concept of unconscious or implicit bias has gripped the popular imagination to a greater degree than any other idea in psychology in recent decades.Spearheaded by a team of social psychologists at the University of Washington and Yale, the Implicit Association Test (IAT) promised to lift the veil on people ’s subconscious attitudes towards others. Upon publishing their landmark pa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Psychology Neuroscience Race UK news Source Type: news

Assistant Professor in Microbiology
The University of Washington Tacoma invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor in Microbiology in the Division of Sciences and Mathematics within the School of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences (SIAS). We seek an individual that shares our institutional values of excellence, community, diversity, innovation and access. This is a full-time position with a nine-month service period. The successful candidate will have a proven record of scholarship in microbiology with biomedical applications. We expect the successful candidate to actively seek extramural support to develop and maintain an excellent res...
Source: AIBS Classifieds - November 29, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Classifieds Tags: Other Positions Available Source Type: news

Marketing Your Interlibrary Loan Service -webinar
Our next PNR Rendezvous webinar is: The Essentials of Marketing Your Interlibrary Loan Service Marketing a new library service is expected. Marketing a service that no one is using is expected. But what about interlibrary loan, which is an existing service that, statistically, patrons are already using? Should a library waste money, resources, and staff time to market interlibrary loan? Yes! Marketing interlibrary loan can teach patrons how to use the service more effectively and can introduce new users to the service. But currently, there is very little literature on the subject. Marketing other library services is writte...
Source: Dragonfly - November 28, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: Resource Sharing & Document Delivery Training & Education Source Type: news

Threatened tropical coral reefs form complex, ancient associations with bacteria
(University of Washington) In a comprehensive study of healthy corals published Nov. 22 in the journal Nature Communications, a team of scientists from the University of Washington Bothell, Pennsylvania State University and Oregon State University report that coral bacteria are a surprisingly diverse bunch -- and that different sections of the coral body can host unique communities of bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 27, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Parents learn, babies talk: How coaching moms and dads improves infants' language skills
(University of Washington) A new study from the University of Washington's Institute for Learning& Brain Sciences (I-LABS) shows that parents who learn how and why to speak 'parentese' can have a direct impact on their children's vocabulary. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news