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Rooftop wiretap aims to learn what crows gossip about at dusk
(University of Washington) An interdisciplinary team is using a covert sound-based approach, worthy of an avian CSI, to study the link between crows' calls and their behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 5, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Living cell membranes can self-sort their components by 'demixing'
(University of Washington) Scientists at the University of Washington show for the first time that the complex distribution of molecules within a membrane of a living yeast cell arises through demixing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 5, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Medical note system could boost patients ’ engagement in their health care
Encouraging patients to help write and add notes to their personal medical charts — a task typically handled only by medical professionals — may help patients feel more involved with their own care and improve relationships with their doctors, a new study has found.Inresearch published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, doctors at UCLA Health and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center found that patients could benefit if they are invited to co-produce medical notes, called “OurNotes,” with their doctors, rather than merely reading them. The practice may also benefit doctors by reducing time spent on ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 2, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

There's a deeper fish in the sea
(University of Washington) A new fish species, the deepest in the ocean, was discovered and named by an international team of researchers. The team published a paper describing the Mariana snailfish this week in the journal Zootaxa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Metabolites altered in chronic kidney disease
(University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio) A new study that included researchers from Norway, the University of Washington, the University of California San Diego and The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (now called UT Health San Antonio ™ ) found that dozens of small molecules called metabolites are altered in this disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Health of people with cystic fibrosis shows positive trends in US and Canada
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Research comparing cystic fibrosis patients in the United States and Canada showed that, although patients' nutritional status and lung function improved in both countries from 1990 to 2013, the US improvement rate was faster. Nutritional status and lung function are related to survival in cystic fibrosis. U.S. improvements may be due to implementation of newborn screening, quality improvement initiatives for the disease and better healthcare access under the Medicaid Children's Health Insurance Program, signed into federal law in 1997. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

‘Barcoding’ Cells in Nematodes Could Bring Advances and New Medical Laboratory Tools for Treatment of Cancer and Other Chronic Diseases
Ongoing research at the University of Washington promises new methods for identifying and cataloging large numbers of cells quickly, which could lead to more individualized treatments in support of precision medicine initiatives Researchers have found a new method for identifying specific cell types by groups, a breakthrough that some experts say could lead to new […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - November 17, 2017 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Management & Operations anatomic pathology Aviv Regev PhD Broad Institute Source Type: news

When to fish: Timing matters for fish that migrate to reproduce
(University of Washington) A new University of Washington study points to yet another human factor that is hampering the ability of fish to reproduce: the timing of our fishing seasons. The study considers how the timing of fishing efforts might disproportionately target certain fish and change the life history patterns of entire populations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What counts as 'nature'? It all depends
(University of Washington) University of Washington psychology professor Peter Kahn describes 'environmental generational amnesia' as the idea that each generation perceives the environment into which it's born, no matter how developed, urbanized or polluted, as the norm. And so what each generation comes to think of as 'nature' is relative, based on what it's exposed to. Kahn argues that more frequent and meaningful interactions with nature can enhance our connection to -- and definition of -- the natural world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How climate change may reshape subalpine wildflower communities
(University of Washington) An unseasonably warm, dry summer in 2015 on Washington state's Mount Rainier caused subalpine wildflowers to change their bloom times and form 'reassembled' communities, with unknown consequences for species interactions among wildflowers, pollinators and other animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 7, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How toxic air clouds mental health
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers have found a link between air pollution and psychological distress. The higher the level of particulates in the air, the UW-led study showed, the greater the impact on mental health.The study is believed to be the first to use a nationally representative survey pool, cross-referenced with pollution data at the census block level, to evaluate the connection between toxic air and mental health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A Conversation with Davis Patterson, PhD
Discussion includes rural health disparities related to access and outcomes, recruitment and retention, and the work of the Rural PREP program, among other things. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - October 31, 2017 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Tenure-track Assistant Professor in Cellular Biology or Cellular Physiology
The University of Washington Tacoma invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor in Cellular Biology or Cellular Physiology in the Division of Sciences and Mathematics within the School of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences (SIAS). This is a full-time position with a nine-month service period. The successful candidate will be an intellectually expansive scholar with a proven record in cellular biology, cellular physiology, or related field, with biomedical applications. They will also have a demonstrated commitment to creating an inclusive classroom and laboratory environment with diverse and underreprese...
Source: AIBS Classifieds - October 30, 2017 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Classifieds Tags: Other Positions Available Source Type: news

Public Libraries Spotlight: Nicolette Warisse Sosulski, Business and Reference Librarian, Portage District Library
Education BA English (Honors), Georgetown University BA Government, Georgetown University MLIS iSchool at the University of Washington How did you become interested in focusing on Health and Wellness? I have always had an interest in biology and health sciences. I roomed with nursing students in college and hung out with pre-meds. I have worked for health insurance programs in both patient and provider customer service, so I needed to learn medical terminology for those positions. In iSchool, I was fortunate enough to be able to enroll in an amazing health reference class. Why is health literacy important in your community...
Source: The Cornflower - October 30, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Bobbi Newman Tags: Public Libraries Public Libraries Spotlight Business and Reference Librarian Nicolette Warisse Sosulski Portage District Library Source Type: news

New genetic variants associated with breast cancer identified
Conclusion This large analysis of data has identified 65 more SNPs associated with an increased risk of developing breast cancer. These variations hadn't previously been associated with overall breast cancer risk. A second, smaller study published at the same time identified another 7 variations specifically associated with an increased risk of oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer, a type of breast cancer that's notoriously hard to treat. In total, these studies bring the number of SNPs associated with breast cancer to about 180. Although these are interesting findings, there are a few points to bear in mind: The vari...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Source Type: news

TOXIC FOOD is killing humanity: One-fifth of global deaths now linked to processed junk food and toxic ingredients
(Natural News) A new study conducted at the Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington (HealthData.org) and published in The Lancet medical journal finds that a shocking 20 percent of global deaths are caused by toxic foods, junk foods, processed foods and harmful food ingredients. In essence, the study reveals that the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fred Hutch researchers engineer complex immunotherapy that may target relapsing leukemia
(Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center) Researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington have developed a novel way to genetically engineer T cells that may be effective for treating and preventing leukemia relapse. The findings provide the basis for launching a first-in-human clinical trial of this new immunotherapy, which relies on engineered T-cell receptors, or TCRs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fred Hutch researchers engineer complex TCR immunotherapy that may target relapsing leukemia
(Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center) Researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington have developed a novel way to genetically engineer T cells that may be effective for treating and preventing leukemia relapse. The findings provide the basis for launching a first-in-human clinical trial of this new immunotherapy, which relies on engineered T-cell receptors, or TCRs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 25, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mountain glaciers shrinking across the West
(University of Washington) A technique using satellites to create twice-yearly elevation maps of US mountain glaciers provides new insight into thinning of glaciers in the lower 48 states. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Integrated Lab-on-a-Chip Uses Smartphone to Quickly Detect Multiple Pathogens
A multidisciplinary group that includes the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Washington at Tacoma has developed a novel platform to diagnose infectious disease at the point-of-care, using a smartphone as the detection instrument in conjunction with a test kit in the format of a credit card. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - October 19, 2017 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Integrated lab-on-a-chip uses smartphone to quickly detect multiple pathogens
(University of Illinois College of Engineering) A multidisciplinary group that includes the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Washington at Tacoma has developed a novel platform to diagnose infectious disease at the point-of-care, using a smartphone as the detection instrument in conjunction with a test kit in the format of a credit card. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Flexible 'skin' can help robots, prosthetics perform everyday tasks by sensing shear force
(University of Washington) UW and UCLA engineers have developed a flexible sensor 'skin' that can be stretched over any part of a robot's body or prosthetic to accurately convey information about shear forces and vibration, which are critical to tasks ranging from cooking an egg to dismantling a bomb. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 17, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Tweeting rage: How immigration policies can polarize public discourse
(University of Washington) In a University of Washington study of tweets in the months before and after the 2010 passage of Arizona's 'show me your papers' law, findings show that the average tweet about Mexican immigrants and Hispanics, in general, became more negative. Assistant Professor of Sociology Rene Flores said the social media data was useful in determining whether people had changed their attitudes about immigrants as a result of the law or whether they had begun behaving differently. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Using Facebook data as a real-time census
(University of Washington) A University of Washington study is believed to be the first to demonstrate how present-day migration statistics can be obtained by compiling the same data that advertisers use to target their audience on Facebook, and by combining that source with information from the Census Bureau. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Autism often associated with multiple new mutations
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Most autism cases are in families with no previous history of the disorder. New mutations, that occur in offspring but not in their parents, might play a role. These mutations have now been found, not just in protein-coding genome areas, but also in regulatory regions. Many are in areas that influence gene activity in the brain's striatum, which coordinates motivation, planning and other aspects of cognition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for October 11, 2017
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. How a smartphone app can detect concussions on the sidelines A new app from the University of Washington could screen for concussions and other traumatic brain injuries from a smartphone. Researchers at the University of Washin...
Source: Mass Device - October 11, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

How a smartphone app can detect concussions on the sidelines
[Image from Dennis Wise/University of Washington]A new app from the University of Washington could screen for concussions and other traumatic brain injuries from a smartphone. Researchers at the University of Washington are currently working to develop a smartphone app that can detect brain injuries when they happen. The app’s goal is to detect the injuries on the sidelines of sports games, on the battlefield or in the home of an elderly person who is prone to falling. The app, known as PupilScreen, is designed to detect changes in how the pupil of the eye reacts to light using a smartphone’s video camera in co...
Source: Mass Device - October 11, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Diagnostics mHealth (Mobile Health) Neurological Patient Monitoring Research & Development concussions mobile app smartphone app University of Washington Source Type: news

Next PNR Rendezvous is about Copyright and Online Learning Resources
“Copyright & Online Learning Resources: It’s Complicated!” is the next PNR Rendezvous session. When: October 18 starting at 1:00pm PT, Noon Alaska, 2:00pm MT Questions about library resources and fair use in online education are expanding from the appropriate use of journal articles and eBooks to published images, video clips and more in faculty-created resources for instruction that our licensing terms often don’t explicitly address. What to do? Join the session as our speaker, Nikki Dettmar, describes ways of supporting the faculty, staff & students of the University of Washington Sch...
Source: Dragonfly - October 10, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: Training & Education copyright online education Source Type: news

Lung deaths and smoking diseases spike among impoverished populations
(Natural News) The number of Americans dying due to a chronic respiratory disease has increased by 30 percent in 34 years mainly among the poverty-stricken populations, according to a report by The Daily Mail. The researchers behind the University of Washington study analyzed the death records for chronic respiratory diseases from 1980 to 2014 from the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Research looks at racial differences in end-of-life care
Researchers at the University of Washington analyzed survey data from the National Health and Aging Trends Study for racial disparities in end-of-life care. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cannabidiol benefits and mechanisms shown in mouse study of Dravet syndrome
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating derivative from cannabis, has been shown to reduce seizures and autism-like behaviors in a mouse model of a genetic disorder, Dravet syndrome. Children with this devastating condition have difficult-to-treat epilepsy, cognitive impairments, and problems with social interactions. The researchers also studied how therapeutic effects of cannabidiol relate to changes in signaling between certain brain neurons. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Innovator of the Month: Blaze Bioscience uses scorpion venom to light up cancer tumors
The technology to help cancer surgeons is the brainchild of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center ’s Jim Olson and his colleagues at Seattle Children’s and the University of Washington. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - October 5, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

Innovator of the Month: Blaze Bioscience uses scorpion venom to light up cancer tumors (Video)
The technology to help cancer surgeons is the brainchild of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center ’s Jim Olson and his colleagues at Seattle Children’s and the University of Washington. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - October 5, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

Innovator of the Month: Blaze Bioscience uses scorpion venom to light up cancer tumors (Video)
The technology to help cancer surgeons is the brainchild of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center ’s Jim Olson and his colleagues at Seattle Children’s and the University of Washington. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 5, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

A win-win for spotted owls and forest management
(University of California - Davis) Remote sensing technology has detected what could be a win for both spotted owls and forestry management, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis, the USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station and the University of Washington. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 4, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Anemia detection could be aided by portable blood analyzer
Researchers from the University of Washington hope to improve anemia detection with a new portable device that can detect hemoglobin levels. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New portable blood analyzer could improve anemia detection worldwide
(American Institute of Physics) To reduce the burden of anemia, health officials need a better picture of the disease's global impact, an understanding made viable by a portable and affordable way to analyze blood. Researchers at the University of Washington developed a device smaller than a toaster that can detect the level of hemoglobin in whole blood samples using optical absorbance. The work is published this week in AIP Advances. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 3, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stanford, MIT and Harvard top the third annual Reuters Top 100 ranking of the most innovative universities
Stanford University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University top the third annual Reuters Top 100 ranking of the world’s most innovative universities. The Reuters Top 100 aims to identify and rank the educational institutions doing the most to advance science, invent new technologies, and power new markets and industries. Compiled in partnership with Clarivate Analytics, the ranking is based on proprietary data and analysis of numerous indicators including patent filings and research paper citations. The most innovative university in the world, for the third consecutive year, is Stanford Univ...
Source: News from STM - September 29, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news

Mini-protein rapid design method opens way to create a new class of drugs
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) A high-speed method has been developed to generate many different, small, stable proteins from scratch, custom-designed to bind to specific therapeutic targets. Protection against infectious diseases, like flu, and antidotes to nerve toxins are but two research goals of this approach. The method rapidly originates thousands of new drug candidates. These computer-designed proteins, which did not previous exist in nature, combine the stability and bioavailability of small molecule drugs with the specificity and potency of larger biologics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectio...
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 27, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UW study finds 30% spike in US lung disease deaths
Researchers at the University of Washington analyzed death records stretching back 34 years from the US Census Bureau. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists unlock mysteries of how Ebola uses people's immune defenses to cause infection
(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) Scientists from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have gained new insight into how the Ebola virus uses the body's natural defenses to speed the rate of infection and unleash its lethal disease, according to a new report in mBio. The study was conducted in collaboration with the University of Washington and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 26, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study reveals 30% spike in US deaths from smoke diseases
Researchers at the University of Washington analyzed death records stretching back 34 years from the US Census Bureau. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Group project? Taking turns, working with friends may improve grades
(University of Washington) A University of Washington-led study of college students has found that the social dynamics of a group, such as whether one person dominates the conversation or whether students work with a friend, affect academic performance. Put simply, the more comfortable students are, the better they do, which yields benefits beyond the classroom. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UW to host $15.6 million NSF-funded center for innovation, education in materials science
(University of Washington) The University of Washington is home to a new national center of excellence for research, education and training in materials science. The Molecular Engineering Materials Center is funded by a $15.6 million, six-year grant from the National Science Foundation as part of its highly competitive Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Wave Glider surfs across stormy Drake Passage in Antarctica
(University of Washington) A hardy ocean drone made a first-ever attempt to surf across Antarctica's stormy Drake Passage gathering data about ocean mixing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The brain at work: Spotting half-hidden objects
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) The human and non-human primate brain is remarkable in recognizing partially hidden objects. A study, conducted during a shape recognition task, shows as more of the shape is hidden, a brain area involved in cognition starts to sends signals to the visual cortex. The findings make the scientists wonder if this communication between different brain areas might be impaired in people with autism or Alzheimer's. Both conditions can cause confusion in cluttered surroundings and problems recognizing objects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UW digital health care spinout gets new CEO
TransformativeMed spun out of the University of Washington in 2011 and works with hospitals around the country to make electronic medical records more user friendly. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - September 15, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

UW digital health care spinout gets new CEO
TransformativeMed spun out of the University of Washington in 2011 and works with hospitals around the country to make electronic medical records more user friendly. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 15, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

Global Burden of Disease: bad diet linked to 1 in 5 deaths
Researchers at the University of Washington said the two extremes of inadequate nutrition in poor communities and unhealthy eating in richer populations kill a fifth of human beings. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

People of color exposed to more pollution than whites
The groundbreaking study led by the University of Washington estimated exposure to outdoor concentrations of a transport-related pollutant in 2000 and 2010, based on neighborhoods. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news