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From 2008 to 2014, Prostate Cancer Testing, Treatment Down
TUESDAY, May 22, 2018 -- Fewer men are being screened for, diagnosed with, and treated for prostate cancer, according to a study published online May 21 in Cancer. James T. Kearns, M.D., from the University of Washington School of Medicine in... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 22, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Early physical therapy benefits low-back pain patients
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Patients with low-back pain are better off seeing a physical therapist first, according to a study of 150,000 insurance claims. The study was published in Health Services Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New guidelines may slightly increase reliability, accuracy of melanoma diagnoses
The BMJScan (at two resolutions) of a category 3 melanoma in situ.FINDINGSIn a new study, researchers have developed updated guidelines for classifying a serious form of skin cancer called invasive melanoma. The American Joint Committee on Cancer, an organization that provides information on “cancer staging,” or the severity of individual cases of cancer, recently updated its guidelines for melanoma. The researchers found that when pathologists used the new guidelines for cases of early stage invasive melanoma, they agreed with an expert-defined diagnosis 10 percent more often.METHODIn the study, researchers re...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 18, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Want to help your child succeed in school? Add language to the math, reading mix
(University of Washington) A University of Washington study finds that a child's language skills in kindergarten can predict his or her future proficiency in other subjects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The first wireless flying robotic insect takes off
(University of Washington) Engineers at the University of Washington have created RoboFly, the first wireless flying robotic insect. RoboFly is slightly heavier than a toothpick and is powered by a laser beam. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NAE Elects Chair, Vice President, and Four Councillors
The National Academy of Engineering has re-elected Gordon R. England, chairman of PFP Cybersecurity, to serve a two-year term as the NAE's chair. The NAE chair works with the NAE president to promote the Academy and its policies to the engineering community and the public. Also re-elected to serve a four-year term as the NAE's vice president is Corale L. Brierley, principal of Brierley Consultancy LLC.Re-elected to a second term as councillor is John L. Anderson, Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering at Illinois Institute of Technology, and newly elected to three-year terms as councillors are Nadine Aubry, dean o...
Source: News from the National Academies - May 14, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Operating on brain gliomas by detecting the 'glow'
(St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center) Research by Barrow Neurological Institute physicians and University of Washington scientists on novel imaging technology for malignant brain tumors was published in the April issue of World Neurosurgery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Stomata -- the plant pores that give us life -- arise thanks to a gene called MUTE
(University of Washington) New research in plants shows that a gene called MUTE is required for the formation of stomata -- the tiny pores that a critical for gas exchange, including releasing the oxygen gas that we breathe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

To treat pain, you need to treat the patient
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) People in chronic pain are some of the most difficult patients to treat. Clinicians and researchers at UW Medicine's Center for Pain Relief found that an in-depth questionnaire can help immensely. Their work to create a pain assessment adaptable to any primary care clinic was recently published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

App allows for crowdsourced exercise plans, which rival trainers in effectiveness
(University of Washington) Researchers at the University of Washington and Seattle University have created CrowdFit, a platform for exercise planning that relies on crowdsourcing from nonexperts to create workout regimens guided by national exercise recommendations and tailored around user schedules and interests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Apps for children should emphasize parent and child choice, researchers say
(University of Washington) Parents don't need to fear their children playing with iPads and other devices, researchers say. Mindful play with an adult, combined with thoughtful design features, can prove beneficial to young developing minds.New research shows that thoughtfully designed content that intentionally supports parent-child interactions facilitated the same kind of play and development as analog toys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Molecule may help tame virulent bacteria and prevent infection
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) University of Washington researchers show that an immune-system generated molecule called nitric oxide inhibits Staphylococcus aureus' transformation from a relatively benign, quiescent colonizing state to its virulent form. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 26, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Community efforts to prevent teen problems have lasting benefits
(University of Washington) A study by the University of Washington finds that a community-based approach to substance-abuse prevention, which can include after-school activities, can affect young people into adulthood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New testing provides better information for parents of children with form of epilepsy
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) New ways of sequencing the human genome mean geneticists and genetic counselors have much more to say to parents who wonder if future children might carry the disease, (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How a New Kind of Autopsy Is Helping in the Fight Against Cancer
After Keith Beck died of bile duct cancer last year, family members said, more than 900 people showed up to pay respects to the popular athletic director at the University of Findlay in northwestern Ohio. Many were former students who recalled acts of kindness during Beck’s nearly 30-year career: $20 given to a kid who was broke, textbooks bought for a student whose parents were going through bankruptcy, a spot cleared to sleep on Beck’s living room floor. But few knew about Beck’s final gesture of generosity. The 59-year-old had agreed to a “rapid autopsy,” a procedure conducted within hours ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JoNel Aleccia / Kaiser Health News Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime Source Type: news

Global Health: Ethicists Call for More Scrutiny of ‘ Human-Challenge ’ Trials
A vaccine study in which subjects are to be deliberately infected with Zika is on pause after ethicists said it had “ insufficient value. ” (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: EMILY BAUMGAERTNER Tags: Zika Virus Vaccination and Immunization Research National Institutes of Health Science (Journal) University of Washington Source Type: news

Screen reader plus keyboard helps blind, low-vision users browse modern webpages
(University of Washington) By using a keyboard for tactile feedback in combination with a screen reader, users were three times more successful at navigating complex modern webpages, like they would encounter in a typical Airbnb booking site. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight Funding applications are due today! Applications for our upcoming round of health information outreach funding are due by 11pm this evening – don’t forget our last funding tip – follow directions for submission. Please note, late applications will not be accepted. We look forward to funding some great projects! NNLM Edit-a-thon: don’t forget to use #citeNLM2018 next week during NNLM’s first Wikipedia Edit-a-thon – we’re adding citations to existing articles on rare diseases! Not sur...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - April 13, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Developmental psychologist receives 2018 Alan T. Waterman Award
(National Science Foundation) The National Science Foundation (NSF) has bestowed the 2018 Alan T. Waterman Award, the nation's highest honor for early career scientists and engineers, on University of Washington (UW) social and developmental psychologist Kristina R. Olson. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Developmental psychologist receives 2018 Alan T. Waterman Award
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has bestowed the 2018 Alan T. Waterman Award, the nation's highest honor for early career scientists and engineers, on University of Washington (UW) social and developmental psychologist Kristina R. Olson. The Waterman Award Committee, an external panel of distinguished scientists and engineers chaired by Gary May, Chancellor of the University of California, Davis, and which includes the leadership of the National Academies of Science and ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=245107&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - April 12, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Peptide-based biogenic dental product may cure cavities
(University of Washington) Researchers at the University of Washington have designed a convenient and natural product that uses proteins to rebuild tooth enamel and treat dental cavities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UW's Kristina Olson wins NSF Waterman Award for studies of children's social development
(University of Washington) The National Science Foundation today named Kristina Olson, University of Washington associate professor of psychology, winner of this year's Alan T. Waterman Award. The Waterman Award is the US government's highest honor for an early career scientist or engineer, recognizing an outstanding scientist under the age of 40. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heart disease crisis in South driven by soaring rate of obesity, poor diet
In a follow-up to their research on overall mortality disparities in the US,a University of Washington study reveals that heart disease killed more people in 12 states in 2016 than in 1990. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

TBI Associated With Increased Risk of Subsequent Dementia
WEDNESDAY, April 11, 2018 -- Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with increased risk of dementia, according to a study published online April 10 in The Lancet Psychiatry. Jesse R. Fann, M.D., from the University of Washington in Seattle, and... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 11, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Study confirms link between traumatic brain injury and dementia
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) The risk of dementia, including Alzheimer's, was significantly higher in people who had experienced a traumatic brain injury (TBI) than with people who had no history of TBI, according to one of the largest studies to date on that association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight Last chance to register! NNLM is offering stipends of up to $500 to support public library staff’s travel and lodging for the Health Information for Public Librarians Symposium at the MLA Annual meeting in Atlanta, GA. First come, first serve! Learn more about eligibility and instructions on how to apply. NNLM MAR will also purchase roundtrip airfare for public library staff from our region (Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania). Please Note: If your application is accepted, NNLM MAR staff will be in touch...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - April 6, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

7 medtech stories we missed this week: April 6, 2018
[Image from unsplash.com]From CHF Solutions’s distribution deal to Guided Therapeutics’s licensing agreement, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but throught were still worth mentioning. 1. CHF inks Spanish distribution deal CHF Solutions announced in an April 5 press release that it has signed a distribution agreement with Dimedix Surgical. The distribution agreement will allow Dimedix Surgical to distribute the CHF’s Aquadex FlexFlow System throughout Spain. The financial terms of the agreement were not disclosed. 2. J&J launches digital surgical training subscription service J&...
Source: Mass Device - April 6, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Catheters Diagnostics Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Hospital Care Imaging Implants Regulatory/Compliance Surgical Ultrasound Urology Asahi Intecc aziyobiologics Biotronik CHF Solutions Inc. dimedixsurgical Guided Therapeut Source Type: news

The blowhole section: if whales make jazz, what about the rest of the animal kingdom?
Scientists are comparing the songs sung by bowhead whales to the music of Thelonious Monk. But from cicada techno to bonobo gabber, they have competition for who ’s top of the popsMove over Thelonious, there ’s a new jazzer in town. Newresearch from the University of Washington shows that unlike humpback whales, which sing similar songs each season in unison (zzz), bowhead whales have a freeform, improvised repertoire that scientists have compared to jazz. Audio recordings of a population in the Arctic between 2010 and 2014 showed that they sang 184 different tunes, a remarkable diversity of song seen only in a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Lucy Jones Tags: Animal behaviour Biology Science Music Culture Source Type: news

University of Washington receives $11 million to fund universal flu vaccine development
The funds come from the Open Philanthropy Project, which is largely funded by Facebook co-founder Dustin Moskovitz and his wife, Cari Tuna. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 4, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

A Tale Of 2 Whale Songs
Oceanographer Kate Stafford of the University of Washington talks about a new study on the differences between the whale songs of bowhead whales and humpback whales. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Studies Link Legal Marijuana With Fewer Opioid Prescriptions
NEW YORK (AP) — Can legalizing marijuana fight the problem of opioid addiction and fatal overdoses? Two new studies in the debate suggest it may. Pot can relieve chronic pain in adults, so advocates for liberalizing marijuana laws have proposed it as a lower-risk alternative to opioids. But some research suggests marijuana may encourage opioid use, and so might make the epidemic worse. The new studies don’t directly assess the effect of legalizing marijuana on opioid addiction and overdose deaths. Instead, they find evidence that legalization may reduce the prescribing of opioids. Over-prescribing is considered...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Dr. Mallika Marshall Legalized Marijuana opioid Recreational Marijuana Source Type: news

DataFlash: Data Indexers
The Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) is “an independent population health research center at UW Medicine, part of the University of Washington, that provides rigorous and comparable measurement of the world’s most important health problems and evaluates the strategies used to address them.” Their mission is to improve the health of the world’s populations by providing the best information on population health, and to do so, IHME enlists the expertise of countless individuals, including researchers, data analysts, data scientists, and thirteen data indexers. What is a data indexer? ...
Source: Dragonfly - April 2, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Ann Madhavan Tags: Data Science Source Type: news

Decade of fossil collecting gives new perspective on Triassic period, emergence of dinosaurs
(University of Washington) A project spanning countries, years and institutions has attempted to reconstruct what the southern end of the world looked like during the Triassic period, 252 to 199 million years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Drop in disease deaths in America - but still hitting poor counties hard
Since 1980, infectious disease deaths in the US have fallen by nearly 20 percent, but the preventable illnesses still hit poor and aging Americans, a University of Washington study reveals. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Promising Male Birth Control Pill Is Safe and Effective, Study Says
The female birth control pill has stood on the market alone for decades. Now, a male birth control pill could be inching closer to reality, according to the results of a small new study presented in Chicago at the annual Endocrine Society meeting. It found that an experimental drug is both safe and effective. Researchers who conducted a month-long trial involving 83 men said the once-daily pill lowered hormone levels similarly to other forms of longer-term contraceptives—without signs of testosterone deficiency or excess. The pill, called dimethandrolone undecanoate, or DMAU, is structured similarly to the female pil...
Source: TIME: Health - March 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Julia Zorthian Tags: Uncategorized Birth Control healthytime onetime Research Source Type: news

Promising Male Birth Control Pill Is Safe and Effective, Study Says
The female birth control pill has stood on the market alone for decades. Now, a male birth control pill could be inching closer to reality, according to the results of a small new study presented in Chicago at the annual Endocrine Society meeting. It found that an experimental drug is both safe and effective. Researchers who conducted a month-long trial involving 83 men said the once-daily pill lowered hormone levels similarly to other forms of longer-term contraceptives—without signs of testosterone deficiency or excess. The pill, called dimethandrolone undecanoate, or DMAU, is structured similarly to the female pil...
Source: TIME: Science - March 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Julia Zorthian Tags: Uncategorized Birth Control healthytime onetime Research Source Type: news

With new 'shuffling' trick, researchers can measure gene activity in single cells
(University of Washington) Researchers at the University of Washington and the Allen Institute for Brain Science have developed a new method to classify and track the multitude of cells in a tissue sample. In a paper published March 15 in the journal Science, the team reports that this new approach -- known as SPLiT-seq -- reliably tracks gene activity in a tissue down to the level of single cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 16, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Bleak maps reveal where hopelessness is driving Americans to death
Maps assembled by the University of Washington illustrate the disparities in deaths of despair in different US regions. Drugs are killing Americans in Appalachia, and violence abounds in the South. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Democratizing science: Making neuroscience experiments easier to share, reproduce
(University of Washington) In a paper published online March 5 in Nature Communications, University of Washington researchers unveiled an open-access browser to display, analyze and share neurological data collected through a type of magnetic resonance imaging study known as diffusion-weighted MRI. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Glaciers in Mongolia's Gobi Desert actually shrank during the last ice age
(University of Washington) High in Mongolia's Gobi Desert, the climate is so dry and cold that glaciers shrank during the last ice age. Dating of rock deposits shows how glaciers in this less-studied region behave very differently as the climate shifts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 6, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Two species of ravens nevermore? New research finds evidence of 'speciation reversal'
(University of Washington) A new study almost 20 years in the making provides some of the strongest evidence yet of the 'speciation reversal' phenomenon -- where two distinct lineages hybridize and eventually merge into one -- in two lineages of common ravens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Largest Chinook salmon disappearing from West Coast
(University of Washington) The largest and oldest Chinook salmon -- fish also known as 'kings' and prized for their exceptional size -- have mostly disappeared along the West Coast, according to a new University of Washington-led study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study suggests new strategy against vascular disease in diabetes
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) A peptide called S597, given to mice with metabolic syndrome, reduced their high blood sugar levels and slowed the growth of lesions in their blood vessel walls. It appears to do so by keeping the production of inflammatory white cells in check. The finding suggest a new approach to explore in research to reduce the high risk of heart attack and stroke in people with diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Following the 2014 Ebola outbreak, signs of recovery for Liberian healthcare system
(PLOS) The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in 2014-2015 disrupted the provision of healthcare in Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia. In a research article published this week in PLOS Medicine, Bradley Wagenaar, of the University of Washington, and colleagues quantify the health system output losses in Liberia during and in the immediate aftermath of the EVD outbreak, and the recovery of the health systems in the two years following. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 20, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Beluga whales dive deeper, longer to find food in Arctic
(University of Washington) Beluga whales that spend summers feeding in the Arctic are diving deeper and longer to find food than in earlier years, when sea ice covered more of the ocean for longer periods, according to a new analysis led by University of Washington researchers (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Healthiest Office Snacks, As Chosen By Nutritionists
(CNN) — When your stomach starts grumbling during a midmorning meeting or when you’re stuck at your desk without a break in sight, what is the most satisfying and healthy snack to grab? To answer this question, I asked 10 nutritionists what their favorite go-to nosh is during a busy workday. Below, their responses. ALMONDS “Almonds are my number one go-to snack when hunger hits between meals. In a study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 1.5 ounces of almonds (about 35 nuts) consumed as a snack daily for four weeks helped to suppress hunger between meals. How? Because the fiber, prot...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local TV Snacks Source Type: news

Tissue paper sensors show promise for health care, entertainment, robotics
(University of Washington) University of Washington engineers have turned tissue paper -- similar to toilet tissue -- into a new kind of wearable sensor that can detect a pulse, a blink of an eye and other human movement. The sensor is light, flexible and inexpensive, with potential applications in health care, entertainment and robotics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus
(University of Washington) In a paper published Feb. 9 in Science Advances, scientists at the University of Washington announced that they have successfully combined two different imaging methods -- a type of lens designed for nanoscale interaction with lightwaves, along with robust computational processing -- to create full-color images. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Wearable Artificial Kidney Could be Game Changer
Most innovations medicine occur by asking one simple question. Is there a better way? Physicians at the Kidney Research Institute of the University of Washington have asked that question about hemodialysis treatments – lengthy procedures that filter a patient’s blood when the kidneys no longer function properly. The institute is developing a wearable artificial kidney that could completely change the paradigm for some of these patients with impaired kidney function. Earlier this week, at MD&M West, Jonathan Himmelfarb, MD, who servers as director of the Kidney Research Institute, spoke about the develo...
Source: MDDI - February 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Medical Device Business Source Type: news

Simple rules can help fishery managers cope with ecological complexity
(University of Washington) A team of ecologists and economists are the first to test whether real-life ecological interactions produce economic benefits for the fishing industry. The results were published online Jan. 29 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news