App May Help Parents Diagnose Ear Infections At Home
BOSTON (CBS) – What if you could diagnose your child’s ear infection in the comfort of your own home? Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a smartphone app that may be able help. An ear infection usually begins with fluid buildup behind the eardrum, which then becomes contaminated with bacteria, causing pain and often fever. Sometimes fluid builds up and doesn’t cause pain but can impair hearing and affect language development. Now, researchers have created a smartphone app that can detect fluid behind the eardrum by sending a series of chirps through a small paper funnel into the ea...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Ear Infections University of Washington Source Type: news

Children describe technology that gives them a sense of ambiguity as 'creepy'
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers have defined for the first time what children mean when they say technology is 'creepy.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

From counseling to the commissary, how the private sector shapes 'offender-funded justice'
(University of Washington) An article by University of Washington sociology professor Alexes Harris focuses on the role of the private sector in collecting court-imposed fines and fees. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nursing home cameras aim to protect the vulnerable but present ethical dilemmas
(University of Washington) With reports of crimes against nursing home residents gaining media attention around the country, seven states have passed laws regulating the use of cameras in care facilities. An assistant professor in the University of Washington School of Social Work outlines the list of legal and moral issues that surveillance raises. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Suicidal thoughts? Therapy-oriented website can help
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Mental health researchers behind the website nowmattersnow.org have demonstrated that the site could be beneficial in decreasing suicidal thoughts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chemical records in teeth confirm elusive Alaska lake seals are one of a kind
(University of Washington) Lifelong chemical records stored in the canine teeth of an elusive group of seals show that the seals remain in freshwater their entire lives and are likely a distinct population from their relatives in the ocean. Their home territory, Iliamna Lake, is in the heart of the proposed Pebble Mine project. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lines blurring between human herpes simplex viruses
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) The herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) that commonly infects the mouth, is continuing to mix with the genital herpes virus (HSV-2) to create new, different recombinant versions. Genital co-infection with both viruses could create opportunities for the viruses to recombine. This ability of the viruses to recombine poses problems for vaccine development, due to the risk of a live vaccine for genital herpes mixing with HSV-1 to form an infectious recombinant. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 30, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Flowering plants, new teeth and no dinosaurs: New study sheds light on the rise of mammals
(University of Washington) A new study has identified three factors critical in the rise of mammal communities since they first emerged during the Age of Dinosaurs: the rise of flowering plants; the evolution of tribosphenic molars in mammals; and the extinction of non-avian dinosaurs, which reduced competition between mammals and other vertebrates in terrestrial ecosystems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 30, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Brains of blind people adapt to sharpen sense of hearing, study shows
(University of Washington) Research from the University of Washington uses functional MRI to identify two differences in the brains of blind individuals -- differences that might be responsible for their abilities to make better use of auditory information. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Project Sidewalk helps users map accessibility around Seattle and other cities
(University of Washington) UW researchers have led the development of Project Sidewalk, an online crowdsourcing game that lets anyone with an internet connection use Google Street View to virtually explore neighborhoods and label curb ramps, missing or rough sidewalks, obstacles and more. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mindful body awareness training during treatment for drug addiction helps prevent relapse
(University of Washington) A novel type of body awareness training helps women recover from drug addiction, according to new research from the University of Washington. People in the study made marked improvement, and many improvements lasted for a year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Violence affects 60% of teen relationships and 150 young people were killed by partners in 13 years
Between 2003 and 2016, 150 people 18 and under - mostly non-white girls - were killed by people they had dated or who wanted to date them, a disturbing new University of Washington study reveals. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Many Older Adults Keep Guns Unlocked, Loaded at Home
MONDAY, April 15, 2019 -- Many older adults, including those who are mentally impaired, don't lock up their guns and ammo, University of Washington researchers report. Almost 39% of the more than 4,400 seniors they surveyed in Washington state said... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 15, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

90% of teens killed by an intimate partner are girls
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Intimate partner homicide among teens does occur and 90% of the victims are girls, according to a new study in JAMA Pediatrics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Healing glove reaches major milestone, earns national recognition
(University of Texas at Arlington) The revolutionary bioengineered healing glove created by researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington Research Institute (UTARI) and the University of Washington has completed another key step on the road toward commercialization. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Testing how well water disinfectants damage antibiotic resistance genes
(University of Washington) A UW team tested how well current water and wastewater disinfecting methods affect antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial DNA. While these methods work well to deter bacterial growth, they had varied success in either degrading or deactivating a representative antibiotic resistance gene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 8, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Poor Diets Are Linked to 20% of All Deaths Worldwide, Study Says. But These Foods Could Help
If people around the world cleaned up their eating habits, it could potentially prevent one in five deaths globally, according to a new research review published in The Lancet. And the key to eating more healthfully isn’t depriving yourself, the research suggests — it’s adding more healthy foods. The sweeping review — which analyzed nearly 20 years of dietary data from 195 countries, alongside epidemiological studies about nutrition-related health risks and benefits — estimates that poor diets killed 11 million people around the world in 2017, mostly by contributing to cardiovascular disease a...
Source: TIME: Health - April 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

New VR technology lets doctors travel through patients' blood vessels
Researchers at the University of Washington developed catheters with electromagnetic sensors to render the insides of blood vessels into a virtual reality landscape for radiological surgeons. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Air quality agencies can breathe easier about current emissions regulations
(University of Washington) A University of Washington-led study provides a fuller picture of the relationship between nitrogen oxides -- the tailpipe-generated particles at the center of the Volkswagen scandal, also known as NOx, -- and PM2.5, the microscopic particles that can lodge in lungs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New tool maps a key food source for grizzly bears: huckleberries
(University of Washington) Researchers have developed a new approach to map huckleberry distribution across Glacier National Park that uses publicly available satellite imagery. Tracking where huckleberry plants live can help biologists predict where grizzly bears will also be found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 26, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A New Male Birth Control Pill is Being Tested. Here ’s What to Know
A second male birth control pill succeeded in preliminary testing, suggesting that a new form of contraception may eventually exist. The new pill, which works similarly to female contraception, passed initial safety tests and produced hormone responses consistent with effective birth control in 30 men, according to research presented by the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute and the University of Washington at the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting. (The study has not yet been published in a peer-reviewed journal.) It’s early days for the drug — which has not yet been submitted for approval by the ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Sex/Relationships Source Type: news

Male birth control pill is declared safe
Researchers at the University of Washington and Los Angeles Biomed Institute found that the second birth control pill for men causes minimal side effects like acne and head aches and is safe. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Discrimination, PTSD may lead to high preterm-birth rates among African-American women
(University of Washington) African-American women are nearly twice as likely to give birth prematurely as white women. Amelia Gavin, an associate professor in the University of Washington School of Social Work, connects preterm birth to racial discrimination via PTSD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 25, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Hundreds of bubble streams link biology, seismology off Washington's coast
(University of Washington) The first survey of methane vent sites off Washington's coast finds 1,778 bubble columns, with most located along a north-south band that is in line with a geologic fault. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Medical students open the envelopes to their futures on Match Day
You could cut the tension with a scalpel inside UCLA ’s Geffen Hall and across town atCharles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science.It was Match Day 2019 and 150  David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA fourth-year students, along with 25 of their counterparts at Drew University, who were watching via simulcast, were about to learn which hospital has accepted them for residency, or advanced training in their chosen specialty.At precisely 9 a.m., the doctors-to-be poured outside and, surrounded by friends and families, nervously ripped open their acceptance envelopes. Screams and peals of laughter split the ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 16, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Japanese don't have health problems of a 65-year-old until they are 76 (how does your country fare?)
Researchers at University of Washington evaluated how fast people get health problems of a 65-year-old. A 30-year gap separates countries with the highest and lowest ages. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How to train your robot (to feed you dinner)
(University of Washington) Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a robotic system that can feed people who need someone to help them eat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dr. Matt Kaeberlein to present at the 6th Aging Research for Drug Discovery Forum Basel
(InSilico Medicine, Inc.) Insilico Medicine, a Rockville-based company developing the end-to-end drug discovery pipeline utilizing the next generation artificial intelligence, announces the presentation of Matt Kaeberlein, Ph.D., Department of Pathology, University of Washington, at 6th Aging Research, Drug Discovery, and AI Forum during the Basel Life Congress, Sept, 10-12, 2019, Basel, Switzerland. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When coyote parents get used to humans, their offspring become bolder, too
(University of Washington) When coyote parents are habituated to humans, their offspring are more habituated, too -- potentially leading to negative interactions between coyotes and humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Report: FDA hiding millions of adverse event reports from docs, public
The FDA is hiding millions of medical device adverse event and malfunction reports from the public, according to a new report from Kaiser Health News. Since 2016, at least 1.1 million such reports have been ingested into the FDA’s “alternative summary reporting” repository, a system inaccessible to the public and so obscure that former agency head Dr. Robert Califf said he’d “never heard anything about it,” according to the report. The summary reporting repository was originally created as an alternative for issues “well-known and well-documented with the FDA” and covers appr...
Source: Mass Device - March 7, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Featured Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Source Type: news

Computer-designed vaccine elicits potent antibodies against RSV
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) A first-of-its-kind nanoparticle vaccine candidate for respiratory syncytial virus, a major cause of infant mortality worldwide, has been developed through computer design. Animal tests suggest the vaccine could provide potent, durable protection against RSV. The vaccine is being further developed for possible clinical trials. The nanoparticle platform will also be used to design potential vaccines for AIDS, hepatitis C and cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 7, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Genetics Society of America grants 2019 Elizabeth W. Jones Award to Bruce Weir
(Genetics Society of America) Bruce Weir, PhD, of the University of Washington in Seattle is the recipient of the 2019 Genetics Society of America (GSA) Elizabeth W. Jones Award for Excellence in Education, in recognition of his work training thousands of researchers in the rigorous use of statistical analysis methods for genetic and genomic data. The Jones Award recognizes individuals or groups that have had a significant, sustained impact on genetics education at any level. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Return of the wolves: How deer escape tactics help save their lives
(University of Washington) As gray wolves return to Washington state, a new study finds that one species of deer is changing its behavior to spend more time away from roads, at higher elevations and in rockier landscapes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 27, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Public Health Approach to the Opioid Crisis
Source: University of Washington, Northwest Center for Public Health Practice (NWCPH). Published: 2/26/2019. This one-hour webinar explores how public health professionals can take a lead in preventing opioid misuse. Participants will explore how to apply systems thinking methods to analyze the opioid crisis; examine public health ’s role in addressing substance misuse and addiction at the community versus the client or clinical level; and review how to apply a comprehensive, cross-sector approach to the opioid crisis at the local and state levels. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disa...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Predicting how forests in the western US will respond to changing climate
(Carnegie Institution for Science) On the mountain slopes of the western United States, climate can play a major role in determining which tree communities will thrive in the harshest conditions, according to new work from Carnegie's Leander Anderegg and University of Washington's Janneke Hille Ris Lambers. Their findings are an important step in understanding how forest growth will respond to a climate altered by human activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 25, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Spain Tops Italy as World ’s Healthiest Country While U.S. Falls: Report
Maybe it’s something in the gazpacho or paella, as Spain just surpassed Italy to become the world’s healthiest country. That’s according to the 2019 edition of the Bloomberg Healthiest Country Index, which ranks 169 economies according to factors that contribute to overall health. Spain placed sixth in the previous gauge, published in 2017. Four additional European nations were among the top 10 in 2019: Iceland (third place), Switzerland (fifth), Sweden (sixth) and Norway (ninth). Japan was the healthiest Asian nation, jumping three places from the 2017 survey into fourth and replacing Singapore, which dr...
Source: TIME: Health - February 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lee Miller and Wei Lu / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized onetime Spain Source Type: news

UCLA ’s Johnese Spisso named one of top women leaders by Modern Healthcare magazine
Johnese Spisso, president of UCLA Health and CEO of UCLA Hospital System, was honored by Modern Healthcare as one of 2019 ’s Top 25 Women Leaders. The program recognizes leading female health care executives who are influencing policy and care delivery models across the country.“This is a remarkable honor, one I am pleased to share with so many inspiring women,” said Spisso, who is also associate vice chancellor of UCLA Health Sciences. “Closing the leadership gap, whether in health care or any area, is gaining momentum for women across our nation.”A nationally recognized academic health care ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 20, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Common Weed Killer Glyphosate Increases Cancer Risk By 41%, Study Says
(CNN) — Glyphosate, an herbicide that remains the world’s most ubiquitous weed killer, raises the cancer risk of those exposed to it by 41%, a new analysis says. Researchers from the University of Washington evaluated existing studies into the chemical — found in weed killers including Monsanto’s popular Roundup — and concluded that it significantly increases the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), a cancer of the immune system. “All of the meta-analyses conducted to date, including our own, consistently report the same key finding: exposure to GBHs (glyphosate-based herbicides) are asso...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN weed killer Source Type: news

It doesn't take much for soldiers to feel cared for
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Caring texts sent to active-duty military had important findings in reducing suicide. The results were published Feb. 13 in JAMA Psychiatry along with a podcast with the researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

National Academy of Sciences Elects Home Secretary and Councilors
Susan R. Wessler, distinguished professor of genetics and Neil and Rochelle Campbell Presidential Chair for Innovation in Science Education, University of California, Riverside, has been re-elected as home secretary for the National Academy of Sciences. Wessler will continue to be responsible for the membership activities of the Academy during her third four-year term. In addition, four members have been elected to serve on the Academy's governing Council for three years. All terms begin July 1. The new councilors are:• Patricia Kuhl, co-director of the Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences and the Bezos Family Fo...
Source: News from the National Academies - February 13, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Many Arctic lakes give off less carbon than expected
(University of Washington) New research by the University of Washington and US Geological Survey suggests many lakes in the Arctic pose little threat to global carbon levels, at least for now. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 11, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study: Serious health concerns missed in older adults
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Researchers examined the prevalence and impact of six common symptoms (pain, fatigue, depression, anxiety, breathing difficulty, sleep problems) and found that nearly half of adults ages 65 and older have two or more of these symptoms and one-fourth have three or more. But often clinicians miss these symptoms, and the more serious health issues they portend because patients only talk about one of these symptoms during a visit. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rating riverside corridors -- the 'escape routes' for animals under climate change
(University of Washington) While riverside habitats are known to be important for species migrating under climate change, this is the first study to rank riparian areas as targets for restoration and conservation efforts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Age-Standardized Mortality Rate for Suicide Down Since 1990
THURSDAY, Feb. 7, 2019 -- Since 1990, the age-standardized mortality rate for suicide has decreased worldwide, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in The BMJ. Mohsen Naghavi, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., from the University of Washington in... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 7, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Folliculin mutations disrupt embryo implantation
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) New information is unfolding on the genetic controls of an early turning point in pregnancy -- the changes in an embryo's cells that occur as it prepares to lodge in the wall of the uterus. Understanding what can go wrong with these genetic controls is shedding light on implantation failure, a major cause of human infertility. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Parenting in the age of legal pot: Household rules, conversations help guide teen use
(University of Washington) The legalization of marijuana in Washington state in 2012 gave parents the opportunity for a new teachable moment. Many say that as society has become more permissive, they want information and advice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rise in the number of suicide deaths - despite a huge drop in the global rate
A new study, led by the University of Washington in Seattle, has found that the number of suicides deaths globally increased by 6.7 percent from 765,000 in 1990 to 817,000 in 2016. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Early spring rain boosts methane from thawing permafrost by 30 percent
(University of Washington) A UW-led team has found that early spring rainfall warms up a thawing permafrost bog in Alaska and promotes the growth of plants and methane-producing microbes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 4, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

An unexpected mode of action for an antibody
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Studies of human monoclonal antibodies isolated from survivors of coronavirus-induced severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or Middle-East respiratory syndrome (MERS) are unveiling surprising immune defense tactics against fatal viruses. Atomic and molecular information about the workings of the highly potent antibodies may provide insights to prevent these serious and sometimes deadly lung infections. Currently, no vaccines or specific treatments are available for any of the six coronaviruses that can infect humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 31, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news