New AI helps doctors predict and prevent life-threatening oxygen drops during surgery
Scientists at the University of Washington in Seattle have developed a machine called Prescience that can help doctors predict if a patient will develop hypoxemia before or during surgery. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mount Sinai builds modeling systems identifying gene-drug and environment interaction
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) A team of researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the University of Washington has designed a modeling system that integrates genomic and temporal information to infer causal relationships between genes, drugs, and their environment, allowing for a more accurate prediction of their interactions over time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

EpiPen Shortage Keeping Some Kids Out Of School
(CBS News) — Eden Morris should be in kindergarten with his friends but the 5-year-old has been home since the school year started. Eden has severe allergies so Spanaway Elementary, about 35 miles south of Seattle, won’t let him go to school without an EpiPen. The U.S. is experiencing a shortage of the lifesaving device and parents are scrambling to find them because some schools won’t let kids with allergies in the classroom if they don’t have one. This affects as many as two students in every classroom in the U.S. “There’s nothing else that made me feel worse than my son tell...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - October 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News EpiPen Local TV Source Type: news

Louisiana amphibian shows unique resistance to global disease
(Louisiana State University) Amphibian populations around the world are declining due to a skin disease caused by fungus. However, an amphibian commonly found in Louisiana, the three-toed amphiuma, has shown a resistance to the fungus, in a new study led by researchers at LSU, Southeastern Louisiana University, Duquesne University and the University of Washington. The study was published in the Journal of Experimental Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

First-of-its-kind device can repair damaged nerves - before before it DISAPPEARS inside the body 
Scientists at Northwestern University and the University of Washington have created a tiny nerve stimulator out of silicon, magnesium and a biodegradable polymer that dissolves. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High-res data offer most detailed look yet at trawl fishing footprint around the world
(University of Washington) A new analysis that uses high-resolution data for 24 ocean regions in Africa, Europe, North and South America and Australasia shows that 14 percent of the overall seafloor shallower than 1,000 meters (3,280 feet) is trawled. The analysis shows that the footprint of bottom-trawl fishing on continental shelves and slopes across the world's oceans often has been substantially overestimated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Petition with the Food and Drug Administration Requesting Regulation of Dangerously Acidic Oral Moisturizers
The objective of the study was to measure the pH levels, titratable acidity, and erosive effect of commercially distributed dry mouth lozenges on dentin.The research identified seven oral moisturizers for dry mouth sold in the US that have a pH level below 5.5 and caused significant amounts of tooth erosion:  - OraMoist®, by DenTek™ (2.9 pH)   - Mouth Kote®, by Parnell Pharmaceuticals (3.0 pH)  - Cotton Mouth Lozenges®, by Cotton Mouth Candy Company (3.1 pH)   - MedActive® Oral Relief Lozenges (3.2 pH)   - Hager Pharma Dry Mouth Drops (4.4 pH) &nb...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - October 4, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Giving patients a heavy metal alongside antibiotics could be the answer to the resistance crisis
Researchers from the University of Washington, Seattle, found that when patients with a deadly lung infection are given IV gallium, their symptoms improve without any serious side effects. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Device Offers Hope For People With Heart Failure
(CNN) — A tiny new device is offering hope of a better life for people with severe heart failure, reducing hospitalization rates and improving mortality risk within two years of treatment, a new study finds. Heart failure affects an estimated 5.7 million Americans and more than 26 million people globally, causing shortness of breath and tiredness among those affected as their heart struggles to pump blood around the body. One cause of severe heart failure that currently has a poor prognosis is a leaky valve, particularly the leakage of the mitral valve, which control’s blood flow in the left part of the heart....
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Heart Failure Local TV Source Type: news

There ’s a Promising New Way to Treat Appendicitis That Doesn’t Involve Surgery
(CHICAGO) — When emergency tests showed the telltale right-sided pain in Heather VanDusen’s abdomen was appendicitis, she figured she’d be quickly wheeled into surgery. But doctors offered her the option of antibiotics instead. A new study from Finland shows her choice is a reasonable alternative for most patients with appendicitis. Five years after treatment with antibiotics, almost two-thirds of patients hadn’t had another attack. It’s a substantial change in thinking about how to treat an inflamed appendix. For decades, appendicitis has been considered a medical emergency requiring immediat...
Source: TIME: Health - September 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Disease healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Report: Google ’s Nest looking to expand into healthcare
Connected home device maker Nest, which was bought by Google (NSDQ:GOOG) in 2014 for $3.2 billion, acquired smartphone-based health monitoring system developer Senosis Health last year in a hush-hush deal that may mark the business’ first steps towards an entry into the healthcare market, according to a GeekWire report. When the deal was initially reported last year, only Google was identified as having picked up the University of Washington spin-out focused on health monitoring. In its recent report, GeekWire said that the secrecy last year was intentional, and that Google’s Nest was the actual buyer in t...
Source: Mass Device - September 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Diagnostics Featured Mergers & Acquisitions Software / IT google nest Source Type: news

Report: Internal Google documents suggest Nest wants to expand into new health products
Alphabet Inc.-owned smart thermostat division Nest quietly drove the 2017 acquisition of Seattle-based Senosis Health, suggesting Nest has bigger ambitions than smart home devices, GeekWire reports. The news outlet reviewed public documents related to the startup’s sale to Google. Those documents reveal Nest was obsessed with secrecy around the acquisition, and negotiated with Senosis’ founders and the University of Washington, which incubated the startup, about when, how and whether to a nnounce… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 20, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Luke Stangel Source Type: news

NSF awards contract to group led by WHOI to continue OOI
(Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) The National Science Foundation (NSF) announced that it has awarded a coalition of academic and oceanographic research organizations a five-year, $220 million contract to operate and maintain the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI). The coalition, led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), with direction from the NSF and guidance from the OOI Facilities Board, will include the University of Washington (UW), Oregon State University (OSU), and Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists develop multi-strain flu vaccine patch that could be delivered to your home
Scientists at the University of Washington have made a flu vaccine that blocks more strains of the virus and can be self-administered through a band-aid like 'micro needle patch.' (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Firearm Deaths Up Globally From 1990 to 2016
THURSDAY, Sept. 13, 2018 -- Firearm deaths increased globally between 1990 and 2016, according to a study published in the Aug. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Mohsen Naghavi, M.D., Ph.D., from University of Washington... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - September 13, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Thousands of breast cancer gene variants engineered and analyzed
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) A scientific analysis of nearly 4,000 mutations deliberately engineered into the BRCA1 gene will immediately benefit people undergoing genetic testing for breast or ovarian cancer risk. Many people obtaining genetic screenings previoulsy have learned that their BRCA1 gene contains a variant of uncertain significance. Data from this study now categorizes thousands of variants as behaving like disease mutations or not, providing new information important for medical care decisions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

For women with genetic risk, twice-a-year MRI beats mammograms
(University of Chicago Medical Center) Getting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans twice a year instead of one annual mammogram is far more effective at detecting early breast cancers in young women with a high-risk genetic profile than mammograms alone, according to a research team based at the University of Chicago Medicine and the University of Washington, Seattle. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fredriksen-Goldsen earns GSA's 2018 Maxwell A. Pollack Award for Productive Aging
(The Gerontological Society of America) The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) -- the nation's largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging -- has chosen Karen Fredriksen-Goldsen, PhD, FGSA, of the University of Washington as the 2018 recipient of the Maxwell A. Pollack Award for Productive Aging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tailoring behavioral therapy for depression, obesity based on how the brain responds
(University of Illinois at Chicago) Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago, in collaboration with their colleagues at Stanford University and the University of Washington, will look at how an integrated behavioral therapy aimed at helping people with co-occurring obesity and depression can be adapted for individuals based on how their brain function changes in response to the intervention. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why Seattle Had The Worst Air Quality In The World At Some Points This Summer
NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Cliff Mass, professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Washington, about the cause of this summer's extremely smoky air in the Pacific Northwest. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Half of all gun deaths occur in just SIX countries -  and they are all in North or South America
A new study from the University of Washington found that Brazil was the country with the most gun deaths, from homicide, suicide or accidental injury, with 43,200 occurring in 2016. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Half of all firearm deaths occur in just SIX countries -  and they are all in North or South America
A new study from the University of Washington found that Brazil was the country with the most gun deaths, from homicide, suicide or accidental injury, with 43,200 occurring in 2016. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Training for parents referred to CPS improves toddler's physiological regulation
(University of California - Davis) A parental training program for families referred to Child Protective Services improved toddlers' unconscious reactions to mildly stressful situations, as well as improving parents' behavior, according to a new study by researchers at UC Davis and the University of Washington. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Take a Number: How Much Alcohol Is Safe to Drink? None, Say These Researchers
A large study of drinking habits in 195 countries contradicts widely shared advice on healthy drinking. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Alcoholic Beverages Heart Deaths (Fatalities) University of Washington Research Source Type: news

Period-tracking apps found to be inaccurate, most women disappointed with results
(Natural News) Navigating the maze that is your menstrual cycle? There’s an app for that. However, as a recent study revealed, most of these period tracking apps are seen as inaccurate and should be way less pink. According to the study by researchers from the University of Washington, most women are disappointed with most of the available period-tracking... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A New Study Says Any Amount of Drinking Is Bad for You. Here ’s What Experts Say
A new study concludes there’s no amount of alcohol consumption that’s safe for overall health — a finding that’s likely to surprise moderate drinkers, and that has left some experts unconvinced. For years, public health officials have said that, while no one should pick up drinking in search of better health, moderate drinking (defined as up to a drink per day for women and up to two per day for men) probably won’t hurt anyone who already imbibes, and may even confer some benefits. This standard is written into the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and is supported by organizations including th...
Source: TIME: Health - August 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

No Amount Of Alcohol Is Safe For Overall Health, According To New Global Study
This study is a stark reminder of the real, and potentially lethal, dangers that too much alcohol can have on our health and that even the lowest levels of alcohol intake increase our risks,” Helen Stokes-Lampard, chair of the Royal College of General Practitioners in the UK, said in a statement. She was not involved in the study. However, countered David Spiegelhalter, the Winton Professor for the Public Understanding of Risk at the University of Cambridge, “Given the pleasure presumably associated with moderate drinking, claiming there is no ‘safe’ level does not seem an argument for abstention. &...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Alcohol CNN The Lancet Source Type: news

No healthy level of alcohol consumption, says major study
Governments should consider advising people to abstain entirely, say authorsEven the occasional drink is harmful to health, according to the largest and most detailed research carried out on the effects of alcohol, which suggests governments should think of advising people to abstain completely.The uncompromising message comes from the authors of theGlobal Burden of Diseases study, a rolling project based at the University of Washington, in Seattle, which produces the most comprehensive data on the causes of illness and death in the world.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Alcohol Wine Health World news Source Type: news

“His Entire Body Was Shutting Down”: New State Rankings Show Gaps in High School Athlete Safety
By mid-afternoon on August 1, 2017, the temperature in Stockton, Calif. was at least 105 degrees. Thirteen-year-old Jayden Galbert complained to his mother, Shynelle Jones, about the heat, but didn’t want to skip preseason football practice and hurt his chances of making the freshman football team. Instead, he showed up, pushed himself to participate, and then collapsed on the field. “He started vomiting and he was shaking,” Jones says. “He couldn’t see. He was trying to focus, but he couldn’t.” Jayden was eventually airlifted to UC Davis Medical Center, where he was diagnosed with...
Source: TIME: Health - August 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Lewis Tags: Uncategorized health heat stroke high school sports Source Type: news

‘His Entire Body Was Shutting Down.’ New State Rankings Show Gaps in High School Athlete Safety
By mid-afternoon on August 1, 2017, the temperature in Stockton, Calif. was at least 105 degrees. Thirteen-year-old Jayden Galbert complained to his mother, Shynelle Jones, about the heat, but didn’t want to skip preseason football practice and hurt his chances of making the freshman football team. Instead, he showed up, pushed himself to participate, and then collapsed on the field. “He started vomiting and he was shaking,” Jones says. “He couldn’t see. He was trying to focus, but he couldn’t.” Jayden was eventually airlifted to UC Davis Medical Center, where he was diagnosed with...
Source: TIME: Health - August 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Lewis Tags: Uncategorized health heat stroke high school sports Source Type: news

Policy pivot: A new emphasis on restoration to protect Puget Sound
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers have found policies are shifting toward restoration projects that include input from more groups and offer a range of benefits to Puget Sound, including flood control, salmon recovery, recreation and habitat protection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Specialty Centers Rank on Best Hospitals List
The MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston was named the No. 1 cancer care hospital in America by U.S. News & World Report for the fourth consecutive year. MD Anderson has been a leading specialty center for pleural mesothelioma treatment, which contributed to its top billing in the 2018-19 rankings. The center is in the recruiting or active-and-not recruiting stage for 15 different clinical trials involving mesothelioma. Memorial-Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, Dana-Farber and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and the Cleveland Clinic, respectively, round ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 20, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Major global study determines 1 out of every 5 deaths is caused by poor diet
(Natural News) A study in The Lancet revealed that poor, unhealthy diet has now become the primary cause of one in five deaths worldwide. The research, carried out by the University of Washington‘s Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) showed that a diet that is low in whole grains, fruit, nuts and seeds, and fish oils, and... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Upcoming Webinar on Clinical and Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing
Many of your patrons may have an interest or even have had a clinical genetic test or done a direct to consumer genetic test. The next PNR Rendezvous session is an opportunity to learn more about both clinical and consumer genetic tests regarding health. When: Wednesday, August 15 starting at Noon, Alaska Time, 1:00pm PT, 2:00pm MT Session title: Genetic Testing in the Era of Genomic Sequencing Summary: This presentation will include information on current genetic testing and genetic counseling practices, with a focus on the implementation of new sequencing technologies into clinical medicine. Implications and ethical cons...
Source: Dragonfly - August 9, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: Health Literacy/Consumer Health Training & Education genetics genomics Source Type: news

Millions of patients with eye problems are 50% more likely to develop dementia
More than 550,000 people in the UK and 5.5 million in the US are estimated to have the memory-robbing disorder. The University of Washington trial could lead to ways of spotting those at high risk earlier on. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eye conditions provide new lens screening for Alzheimer's disease
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) A study of 3,877 randomly selected patients found a significant link between three degenerative eye diseases -- age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma -- and Alzheimer' disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Spike in Americans using toothpaste WITHOUT fluoride: Dentists urge people to stop 'ridiculous'
Fluoride has long been used in toothpaste (and even in our drinking water) to fighting tooth decay. Dentists disagree, but University of Washington research suggests that he chemical really is key. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alexa, be my friend: Children talk to technology, but how does it respond?
(University of Washington) Children communicate with technology differently than adults do, and a more responsive device -- one that repeats or prompts the user, for example -- could be more useful to more people. A new University of Washington study examines how children talk to technology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UW, PNNL to host energy research center focusing on bio-inspired design and assembly
(University of Washington) The US Department of Energy has awarded an expected $10.75 million, four-year grant to the University of Washington, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and other partner institutions for a new interdisciplinary research center to define the enigmatic rules that govern how molecular-scale building blocks assemble into ordered structures and give rise to complex hierarchical materials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 3, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Harmful dyes in lakes, rivers can become colorless with new, sponge-like material
(University of Washington) A team led by the University of Washington has created an environmentally friendly way to remove color from dyes in water in a matter of seconds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genetic basis of heart rhythms explored in large population study
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) New information about the biology behind the heart's electrical activity has been revealed in a major genome study with the largest sample size ever of a project of this type. These molecular mechanisms offer insights into cardiac electrical diseases and could suggest avenues of drug research for preventing and treating heart rhythm or conduction problems. Genes in 44 loci identified as associated with the PR interval on an EKG are overrepresented in cardiac disease processes, including heart block, sick sinus syndrome, and atrial fibrillation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Immunotherapy Clinical Trial Aims for Mesothelioma Cure
Medical oncologist Dr. Bernardo Goulart at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) believes his latest clinical trial might be the most curative approach to treatment of pleural mesothelioma. He also believes it could work. Goulart is the principal investigator at SCCA, which has embraced a novel clinical trial that combines the immunotherapy drug Tecentriq (atezolizumab) with a multimodal regimen of chemotherapy, surgery and radiation. “The trial design is very intense, requiring multidisciplinary involvement,” Goulart told Asbestos.com. “I think it could provide insight into the next step of research th...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 25, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Multiple pregnancies might make women's cells 'age' faster
(Northwestern University) Multiple pregnancies might make women's cells age more quickly, a new Northwestern University study suggests. Led by Calen Ryan and Christopher Kuzawa of Northwestern and Dan Eisenberg at the University of Washington, the research could help explain why women with many children tend to show signs of accelerated aging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

DNA-ROM: New grant aims for memory chips based on DNA
(University of California - Davis) A new grant awarded to UC Davis, the University of Washington and Emory University aims to fuse biology and electrical engineering and to build new types of electronic memory based on DNA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

ASHG honors Mary-Claire King with ASHG Advocacy Award
(American Society of Human Genetics) ASHG has named Mary-Claire King, Ph.D., as the 2018 recipient of the Advocacy Award. Dr. King is American Cancer Society Professor of Medicine and Genome Sciences at the University of Washington in Seattle. This award honors individuals or groups who have exhibited excellence and achievement in applications of human genetics for the common good, in areas such as facilitating public awareness of genetics issues, promoting funding for biomedical research, and integrating genetics into health systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Many Non-Emergency Medicine Trained Physicians in ER Care
FRIDAY, July 13, 2018 -- The emergency medicine workforce comprises many non-emergency medicine trained physicians, according to a study recently published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine. M. Kennedy Hall, M.D., from the University of Washington... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 13, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Keeping kidney stones at bay during space flights
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Ultrasonic repositioning of kidney stones will be tested in emergency department patients at UW Medicine as part of the development of a new medical technology for NASA. Astronauts are prone to kidney stones during space missions. The hope is that pushing stones with an ultrasound tractor beam would offer pain relief and avoid medical complications of urinary backups for astronauts affected in space. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hope for menopausal women: Scientists find how to banish hot flashes
Scientists at the University of Washington have shown we could target a neuron rather than estrogen levels with drugs. Hormone replacement therapy reduces hot flashes but increases stroke risk. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news