Brotman Baty Institute's Helen Chu named 'Washingtonian the Year'
(Brotman Baty Institute for Precision Medicine) SEATTLE (January 15, 2021) - A University of Washington physician and professor, whose team of researchers identified the first case of the coronavirus in the United States, has been named " Washingtonian of the Year. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 15, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Why Some Sexual Harassment Claims Are Considered More Credible Than Others
Women who are young, "conventionally attractive" and appear and act feminine are more likely to be believed when making accusations of sexual harassment, a new University of Washington-led study finds. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - January 14, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Misha Gajewski, Contributor Tags: Healthcare /healthcare Innovation /innovation Leadership /leadership ForbesWomen /forbeswomen Source Type: news

Sexual harassment claims considered more credible if made by 'prototypical' women
(University of Washington) A new UW-led study reveals people's perceptions that sexual harassment primarily affects young, feminine and conventionally attractive women. Women who fall outside that prototype not only are perceived as unharmed by harassment, but also have a harder time convincing others that they have been harassed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Astronomers document the rise and fall of a rarely observed stellar dance
(University of Washington) Astronomers have catalogued 126 years of changes to HS Hydra, a rare evolving eclipsing binary star system. Analyzing observations from astro-photographic plates in the late 1800s to TESS observations in 2019, they show that the two stars in HS Hydra began to eclipse each other around a century ago, peaking in the 1960s. The degree of eclipsing then plummeted over the course of just a half century, and will cease around February 2021. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New treatment allows some people with spinal cord injury to regain hand and arm function
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers helped six Seattle-area people with spinal cord injuries regain some hand and arm mobility. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Talkspace receives NIH grants to conduct telepsychiatry research
The grants total nearly $7 million and support investigational partnerships between Talkspace, the University of Washington and Mental Health America.   (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - January 11, 2021 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Former Fred Hutch president joins board of TwinStrand Biosciences
Seattle-based biotech TwinStrand Biosciences, Inc. named former Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center president Dr. Gary Gilliland to its board this week, the company announced Wednesday. Gilliland, president emeritus at Fred Hutch, served as its president until stepping down last February. TwinStrand, which focuses on sequencing DNA to diagnose cancer, spun out of the University of Washington in 2015 and officially began operations in 2017. Last year, the company brought in a $1 6 million Series… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 8, 2021 Category: American Health Authors: Megan Campbell Source Type: news

The COVID-19 Virus Is Mutating. What Does That Mean for Vaccines?
As we enter the second year of living with the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the virus is celebrating its invasion of the world’s population with yet more mutated forms that help it to spread more easily from person to person. One, first detected in the U.K. in December, has already raised alarms about whether the COVID-19 virus is now escaping from the protection that vaccines just being rolled out now might provide. The variant has also been found in the U.S. Already, U.K. officials have tightened lockdowns in England, Scotland and Wales, and over the holidays, more than 40 countries banned travelers from the region ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Designer protein patches boost cell signaling
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) A new class of protein material that interacts with living cells without being absorbed by them can influence cell signaling, a new study shows. The material does this by binding and sequestering cell surface receptors. The discovery could have far-reaching implications for stem cell research and enable the development of new materials designed to modulate the behavior of living systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 6, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Covid vaccine: Studies suggest giving a single shot to more people
Studies from Yale University and the University of Washington found that one dose of the coronavirus about 50% effective while a Stanford study said this could reduce 29% of infections. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AI algorithms detect diabetic eye disease inconsistently
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) In a paper published Jan. 5 inDiabetes Care, researchers compared seven algorithms to detect diabetic retinopathy against the diagnostic expertise of retina specialists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 5, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Feds Calculate Riskiest, Safest Places in the United States
BY SETH BORENSTEIN AP Science Writer Spending her life in Los Angeles, Morgan Andersen knows natural disasters all too well. In college, an earthquake shook her home hard. Her grandfather was affected by recent wildfires in neighboring Orange County. “It’s just that constant reminder, ‘Oh yeah, we live somewhere where there’s natural disasters and they can strike at any time,'” said the 29-year-old marketing executive. Related Innovative Approaches to Management of Mass Casualty IncidentsThe Basics of Mass Casualty Triage The Federal Emergency Management Agency has calculated th...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 4, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Major Incidents FEMA MCI Rescue Source Type: news

Feds Calculate Riskiest, Safest Places in the United States
BY SETH BORENSTEIN AP Science Writer Spending her life in Los Angeles, Morgan Andersen knows natural disasters all too well. In college, an earthquake shook her home hard. Her grandfather was affected by recent wildfires in neighboring Orange County. “It’s just that constant reminder, ‘Oh yeah, we live somewhere where there’s natural disasters and they can strike at any time,'” said the 29-year-old marketing executive. Related Innovative Approaches to Management of Mass Casualty IncidentsThe Basics of Mass Casualty Triage The Federal Emergency Management Agency has calculated th...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 4, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Major Incidents FEMA MCI Rescue Source Type: news

Feds Calculate Riskiest, Safest Places in the United States
BY SETH BORENSTEIN AP Science Writer Spending her life in Los Angeles, Morgan Andersen knows natural disasters all too well. In college, an earthquake shook her home hard. Her grandfather was affected by recent wildfires in neighboring Orange County. “It’s just that constant reminder, ‘Oh yeah, we live somewhere where there’s natural disasters and they can strike at any time,'” said the 29-year-old marketing executive. Related Innovative Approaches to Management of Mass Casualty IncidentsThe Basics of Mass Casualty Triage The Federal Emergency Management Agency has calculated th...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 4, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Major Incidents FEMA MCI Rescue Source Type: news

Feds Calculate Riskiest, Safest Places in the United States
BY SETH BORENSTEIN AP Science Writer Spending her life in Los Angeles, Morgan Andersen knows natural disasters all too well. In college, an earthquake shook her home hard. Her grandfather was affected by recent wildfires in neighboring Orange County. “It’s just that constant reminder, ‘Oh yeah, we live somewhere where there’s natural disasters and they can strike at any time,'” said the 29-year-old marketing executive. Related Innovative Approaches to Management of Mass Casualty IncidentsThe Basics of Mass Casualty Triage The Federal Emergency Management Agency has calculated th...
Source: JEMS Latest News - January 4, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Major Incidents FEMA MCI Rescue Source Type: news

Feds Calculate Riskiest, Safest Places in the United States
BY SETH BORENSTEIN AP Science Writer Spending her life in Los Angeles, Morgan Andersen knows natural disasters all too well. In college, an earthquake shook her home hard. Her grandfather was affected by recent wildfires in neighboring Orange County. “It’s just that constant reminder, ‘Oh yeah, we live somewhere where there’s natural disasters and they can strike at any time,'” said the 29-year-old marketing executive. Related Innovative Approaches to Management of Mass Casualty IncidentsThe Basics of Mass Casualty Triage The Federal Emergency Management Agency has calculated th...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - January 4, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Major Incidents FEMA MCI Rescue Source Type: news

Feds Calculate Riskiest, Safest Places in the United States
BY SETH BORENSTEIN AP Science Writer Spending her life in Los Angeles, Morgan Andersen knows natural disasters all too well. In college, an earthquake shook her home hard. Her grandfather was affected by recent wildfires in neighboring Orange County. “It’s just that constant reminder, ‘Oh yeah, we live somewhere where there’s natural disasters and they can strike at any time,'” said the 29-year-old marketing executive. Related Innovative Approaches to Management of Mass Casualty IncidentsThe Basics of Mass Casualty Triage The Federal Emergency Management Agency has calculated th...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 4, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Major Incidents FEMA MCI Rescue Source Type: news

How to Set Goals You ’ll Actually Achieve
Whether you want to run a marathon, eat more healthfully or just get off the couch a little more, “for the majority of people, setting a goal is one of the most useful behavior change mechanisms for enhancing performance,” says Frank Smoll, professor of psychology at the University of Washington. “It’s highly individual,” he says—there’s no one way to achieve a goal. But these goal-setting strategies will help you stay the course. Pick a specific, realistic goal People often start setting goals with a little too much gusto, trying to overhaul many aspects of their life at once. But...
Source: TIME: Health - January 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda Loudin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Latest News - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Operations - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

Coronavirus can affect the brain because its 'spike' protein is capable of crossing blood barrier
University of Washington researchers believe the same process may happen in people, which could explain some of the coronavirus' more unusual symptoms, such as headaches and brain fog. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Perspective: Why opioids cannot fix chronic pain
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) New epidemiological and neuroscientific evidence suggests that the relationship between chronic pain and emotional distress is bidirectional. Pain experts at University of Washington School of Medicine explain the relation inAnnals of Family Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19 Vaccines and Cancer Patients: 4 Things to Know COVID-19 Vaccines and Cancer Patients: 4 Things to Know
A cancer vaccine expert from the University of Washington discusses key issues when it comes to vaccinating cancer patients against COVID-19.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Research strongly suggests COVID-19 virus enters the brain
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) The SARS-CoV-2 virus, like many viruses before it, is bad news for the brain. In a study published Dec. 16, 2020 in Nature Neuroscience, researchers found that the spike protein, often depicted as the red arms of the virus, can cross the blood-brain barrier in mice. The spike proteins alone can cause brain fog. Since the spike protein enters the brain, the virus also is likely to cross into the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 17, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NSF-funded deep ice core to be drilled at Hercules Dome, Antarctica
(University of Washington) Antarctica's next deep ice core, drilling down to ice from 130,000 years ago, will be carried out by a multi-institutional U.S. team at Hercules Dome, a location hundreds of miles from today's coastline and a promising site to provide key evidence about the possible last collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 8, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Military flights biggest cause of noise pollution on Olympic Peninsula
(University of Washington) A University of Washington study provides the first look at how much noise pollution is impacting the Olympic Peninsula. The paper found that aircraft were audible across a large swath of the peninsula at least 20% of weekday hours, or for about one hour during a six-hour period. About 88% of all audible aircraft in the pre-pandemic study were military planes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How a police contact by middle school leads to different outcomes for Black, white youth
(University of Washington) A new University of Washington study finds that Black youth are more likely than white youth to be treated as 'usual suspects' after a first encounter with police, leading to subsequent arrests over time. Even as white young adults report engaging in significantly more illegal behavior, Black young adults face more criminal penalties. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Virus May Have Arrived in U.S. in December, but Didn ’t Spread Until Later
Blood samples collected in mid-December indicate possible infections more than a month before the known first case of Covid-19, but do not show community transmission. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: James Gorman Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Antibodies Blood Donation American Red Cross Clinical Infectious Diseases (Journal) University of Washington United States Source Type: news

COVID-19 Vaccines Coming Soon – When Can I Get One?
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Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Healthcare Status Coronavirus Coronavirus Vaccine Moderna Moderna Therapeutics Source Type: news

Seattle-area hospitals plan for surge in Covid-19 patients
As cases of Covid-19 skyrocket in Washington, Seattle hospitals are prepared for a surge of new patients. University of Washington Medicine, Swedish Medical Center and Providence Health have all seen increases in Covid-19 patients in the past two weeks. To make sure they continue to have the capacity for Covid-19 patients, some hospitals have rescheduled elective and nonemergency surgeries and changed their visitor policies. Almost 2,900 new cases of Covid-19 were reported Tuesday in Washington,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - November 25, 2020 Category: Health Management Authors: Nat Rubio-Licht Source Type: news

Seattle-area hospitals plan for surge in Covid-19 patients
As cases of Covid-19 skyrocket in Washington, Seattle hospitals are prepared for a surge of new patients. University of Washington Medicine, Swedish Medical Center and Providence Health have all seen increases in Covid-19 patients in the past two weeks. To make sure they continue to have the capacity for Covid-19 patients, some hospitals have rescheduled elective and nonemergency surgeries and changed their visitor policies. Almost 2,900 new cases of Covid-19 were reported Tuesday in Washington,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 25, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Nat Rubio-Licht Source Type: news

Microbes help unlock phosphorus for plant growth
(University of Washington) A research team led by the University of Washington and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has shown that microbes taken from trees growing beside pristine mountain-fed streams in Western Washington could make phosphorus trapped in soils more accessible to agricultural crops. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 24, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study Claims School Closures Took Millions Of Years Off Life Expectancy
While we have yet to know the long term impact of students being sent home just weeks after being back at school, investigators based at The University of Washington and UCLA published some concerning data in this month ’s JAMA. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - November 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Nina Shapiro, Contributor Tags: Healthcare /healthcare Innovation /innovation Source Type: news

Albert R. Jonsen, 89, Dies; Brought Medical Ethics to the Bedside
A former Jesuit priest and leader in bioethics, he believed that an ethicist should be part of a patient ’s medical team when hard decisions have to be made. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - November 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gina Kolata Tags: Deaths (Obituaries) Society of Jesus University of San Francisco University of Washington California Bioethics Medical ethics Ethics and Official Misconduct Jonsen, Albert R (1931-2020) Doctors Source Type: news

The Most Promising Alzheimer ’s Drug in Years Took a Thrashing From an FDA Advisory Committee
For several years, doctors and patients have been closely following the development of the drug aducanumab, hoping that it might finally be the first medication to stop the cycle of failure that has been the fate of dozens of Alzheimer’s drug candidates that have come before. If approved, it would become the first treatment for Alzheimer’s; current medications address symptoms of the disease but do not tackle the root causes of the neurodegenerative illness. Those hopes were slowly quashed during a seven-hour meeting of a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory committee last week. The committee, made up of...
Source: TIME: Health - November 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Old Dogs, New Research and the Secrets of Aging
The ways that dogs grow and age may provide potentially useful similarities with people. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - November 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: James Gorman Tags: Dogs Research Age, Chronological Animal Behavior Genetics and Heredity Eotvos Lorand University University of Vienna University of Washington your-feed-science Source Type: news

Blood cell mutations confound prostate cancer liquid biopsy results
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Unrelated mutations, when present in the blood, can give false positive results in men with advanced prostate cancer undergoing liquid biopsies. Such tests, which look for variants in cell-free DNA that tumors shed into the blood plasma, help determine suitable treatment options. Incorrect test results might mean the patient gets therapies unsuited for his cancer. A simple solution overcomes this problem. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 5, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

COVID-19 'nanoparticle' vaccine could trigger strong immune response
A new vaccine developed by University of Washington School of Medicine produced ten times more neutralizing antibodies than those seen in coronavirus survivors, in mice trials. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ultrapotent COVID-19 vaccine candidate designed via computer
An innovative nanoparticle vaccine candidate for the pandemic coronavirus produces virus-neutralizing antibodies in mice at levels ten-times greater than is seen in people who have recovered from COVID-19 infections. Designed by scientists at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle, the vaccine candidate has been transferred to two companies for clinical development. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - November 2, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Ultrapotent COVID-19 vaccine candidate designed via computer
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) An ultrapotent nanoparticle candidate vaccine against COVID-19 has been developed with structure-based vaccine design techniques invented at UW Medicine. It is a self-assembling protein nanoparticle that displays 60 copies of the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein's receptor-binding domain in a highly immunogenic array. The molecular structure of the vaccine roughly mimics that of a virus, which may account for its enhanced ability to provoke an immune response. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 2, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Where you get depression care matters, study finds
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Research shows that collaborative care programs in which primary-care providers work with a depression care manager and a designated psychiatric consultant can more than double the likelihood of improving depression outcomes. But a new study published in Health Affairs shows that not all care is equal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 2, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Worm War
Chelsea Wood, a University of Washington parasitologist and this month's Scientist to Watch, gives an overview of her research on schistosomiasis in Africa. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - November 1, 2020 Category: Science Tags: Videos Source Type: news

Chelsea Wood Tracks Parasites Around the World
The University of Washington parasite ecologist aims to understand how humans have changed the diversity and abundance of the enigmatic and misunderstood organisms. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - November 1, 2020 Category: Science Tags: Scientist to Watch Source Type: news

Models show how COVID-19 cuts a neighborhood path
(University of Washington) A research team led by UC Irvine and the University of Washington has created a new model of how the coronavirus can spread through a community. The model factors in network exposure -- whom one interacts with -- and demographics to simulate at a more detailed level both where and how quickly the coronavirus could spread through Seattle and 18 other major cities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tabba Heart Institute and IHME collaborate to improve health
(Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation) Tabba Heart Institute (THI) and the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington's School of Medicine are partnering to improve public knowledge and inform policymakers of cardiovascular health in Pakistan by collecting and sharing data, leveraging their expertise in health metrics sciences to provide more accurate estimates of the national and provincial burden of cardiovascular diseases in Pakistan. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SoundWatch: New smartwatch app alerts d/Deaf and hard-of-hearing users to birdsong, sirens and other desired sounds
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers have developed SoundWatch, a smartwatch app for deaf, Deaf and hard-of-hearing people who want to be aware of nearby sounds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news