EHP names Kaufman new editor in chief
<img width="100" src="https://factor.niehs.nih.gov/sites/niehs-factor/files/styles/large/public/2020/1/feature/1-feature-ehp/thumb882934.jpg?itok=eWJe80nV" /><br /><p>The journal announced that Joel Kaufman, from the University of Washington, will take the helm in February.</p> (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - February 3, 2023 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Ongoing Duwamish River recovery inspires video series, book
<img width="100" src="https://factor.niehs.nih.gov/sites/niehs-factor/files/styles/large/public/2020/8/community-impact/duwamish/thumb896947.jpg?itok=jBfTez9u" /><br /><p>Outreach by University of Washington Superfund Research Program includes a new history of the river and educational videos on safe fishing.</p> (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - February 3, 2023 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Fine particulate air pollution associated with higher dementia risk
<img width="100" src="https://factor.niehs.nih.gov/sites/niehs-factor/files/styles/large/public/2021/9/papers/dementia-risk/thumb921321.jpg?itok=h8C7YhpT" /><br /><p>NIEHS-funded researchers from the University of Washington analyzed detailed exposure data from more than 4,000 Seattle-area residents.</p> (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - February 3, 2023 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Postdocs need raises. But who will foot the bill?
Postdocs—the Ph.D.s who do much of the labor of science—are notoriously underpaid. But the problem has intensified over the past year as postdocs struggle to get by amid soaring inflation and professors report problems recruiting Ph.D. graduates to fill positions. Several institutions and states have recently implemented policies to increase their pay. But these policies haven’t always come with an increase in funding, leaving lab leaders wondering how to cover rising staff costs and what the downstream effects will be. “I think a lot of faculty feel extremely trapped,” one professor says. “This...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 31, 2023 Category: Science Source Type: news

China ’s True COVID Death Toll Estimated To Be in Hundreds of Thousands
This reported number of Covid-19 deaths might be the tip of the iceberg,” said Zuo-Feng Zhang, chair of the department of epidemiology at the Fielding School of Public Health at University of California, Los Angeles. While the figure is roughly in line with what Zhang estimated might be coming from the country’s hospitals, he said it’s only a fraction of the total Covid deaths across the country. Using a report from the National School of Development at Peking University that found 64% of the population was infected by mid-January, he estimated 900,000 people would have died in the previous five weeks bas...
Source: TIME: Health - January 16, 2023 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized China COVID-19 overnight wire Source Type: news

NSF still won ’t track sexual orientation among scientific workforce, prompting frustration
The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) says it does not plan to include a question about sexual orientation in a major national workforce survey, prompting hundreds of researchers to send a letter of protest. Last month, the agency submitted its plans for the 2023 National Survey of College Graduates (NSCG), a biennial survey of more than 160,000 U.S. bachelor’s degree holders with a focus on the science and engineering workforce, to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for approval. Many LGBTQ scientists were pleased that the survey will, for the first time, include a question about gender identity for al...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 13, 2023 Category: Science Source Type: news

Why Rapid COVID-19 Test Results Are Getting More Confusing
After a recent COVID-19 exposure, Dr. Christina Astley tested positive on an at-home test—but just barely. The line signifying a positive result was so faint that Astley, an endocrinologist at Boston Children’s Hospital, took a picture and applied a camera filter to confirm it was there at all. Further complicating matters, Astley later tested negative with a different manufacturer’s kit. Even for a physician who is “hyper-vigilant” about COVID-19, Astley says, the results were hard to interpret. Experts say ambiguous results like these may be more common now—but not because rapid tests ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 12, 2023 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Expert describes the health benefits of ‘Dry January’
A growing number of people are participating in what's known as "Dry January," taking a month-long break from alcohol after the indulgences of the holiday season. Dr. Rotonya Carr, head of gastroenterology at the University of Washington School of Medicine, joins John Yang to discuss.#rotonyacarr #johnyang (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 7, 2023 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is Good Sleep Tougher to Find in Winter? Morning Light May Help
WEDNESDAY, Dec. 14, 2022 -- If you want to get some good sleep at night, be sure to get outside for a bit during the day, even if it ' s cloudy. That ' s the advice of researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle, where overcast skies are... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 14, 2022 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Who is Nick Szabo and how important is he in the development of Bitcoin? \ stacker news
1 - Nick Szabo, is an American of Hungarian descent. So far, we don't know the date or place of his birth. He graduated in computer science in 1989 from the University of Washington. 2 - Recently, in 2017, he received an Honorary Doctorate in Social Sciences from Francisco Marroquín University. It…#7bitgold #btc #lightningnetwork #nickszabo #trustedthirdparties #universityofwashington #socialsciences #satoshi #anhonorarydoctorate #franciscomarroquínuniversity (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 11, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alzheimer's blood test may detect disease years in advance
University of Washington researchers have developed a test that can detect the presence of amyloid beta - a protein strongly believed to be a cause of the memory-robbing disorder. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 5, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New TREMFYA ® (guselkumab) Post-Hoc Analysis Reveals Early Efficacy Predicted Longer-Term Efficacy And Sustained Achievement Among A Diverse Active Psoriatic Arthritis Patient Population
SPRING HOUSE, PENNSYLVANIA, November 11, 2022 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson today announced a new post-hoc analysis of the Phase 3 DISCOVER program (DISCOVER-1 and DISCOVER-2) evaluating TREMFYA® (guselkumab) in adult patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA), which showed that early skin and enthesitis responsesa,b predicted longer-term clinical response,c including disease remission, at week 52.1 TREMFYA is the first fully human selective interleukin (IL)-23 inhibitor therapy approved in the U.S. for adults with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis (PsO) and adults with active PsA...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - November 11, 2022 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Latest News Source Type: news

In a First, Doctors Treat a Fatal Genetic Disease Before Birth
A toddler is thriving after doctors in the U.S. and Canada used a novel technique to treat her before she was born for a rare genetic disease that caused the deaths of two of her sisters. Ayla Bashir, a 16-month-old from Ottawa, Ontario, is the first child treated as fetus for Pompe disease, an inherited and often fatal disorder in which the body fails to make some or all of a crucial protein. Today, she’s an active, happy girl who has met her developmental milestones, according to her father, Zahid Bashir and mother, Sobia Qureshi. “She’s just a regular little 1½-year-old who keeps us on our toes,...
Source: TIME: Health - November 10, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JONEL ALECCIA/AP Tags: Uncategorized Disease healthscienceclimate wire Source Type: news

New TREMFYA ® (guselkumab) Post-Hoc Analysis Reveals Active Psoriatic Arthritis Patients With Early Efficacy Had Meaningful Long-Term Improvement in Health-Related Quality of Life
SPRING HOUSE, PENNSYLVANIA, November 10, 2022 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson today announced a new post-hoc analysis of the Phase 3 DISCOVER-2 study that show early (week 8) clinical improvementsa of most measures (joint and skin disease, enthesitis and dactylitis) in adult patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) treated with TREMFYA® (guselkumab) were associated with meaningful improvements in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) (measured by EQ-5D)b from year one (week 52) through year two (week 100).1 TREMFYA is the first fully human selective interleukin (IL)-23 inhibitor th...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - November 10, 2022 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Latest News Source Type: news

Study pinpoints neurons that may help paralyzed people walk again
It seems like something out of science fiction: People paralyzed from a motorcycle or other accident are suddenly able to walk again when doctors jolt their spinal cord with electricity. Now, scientists have pinpointed the nerve cell population that’s responsible—at least in injured mice—potentially opening the door to new treatments for paralysis. This work “is finally getting at the important contributors to recovery,” says Sarah Mondello, a neuroscientist at the University of Washington, Seattle, who was not involved with the study. A bad fall or car accident can sever nerve connections in the spin...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 9, 2022 Category: Science Source Type: news