Gene therapy treats muscle-wasting disease in dogs
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Dogs with an inherited muscle-wasting disorder that was treated with a single infusion of corrective gene therapy were indistinguishable from normal animals one year later. Puppies with this naturally occurring, fatal genetic mutation and babies with the same defective gene have several similar symptoms. American and French scientists found a way to safely replace the disease-causing MTM gene with a healthy gene throughout the entire musculature of affected dogs, and are now trying to determine the most effective dosage and timing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 15, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Love Your Data Week!
Welcome to Love Your Data Week 2017!  This “5-day international event to help researchers take better care of their data” has participants from all over the United States and also abroad, with everyone posting and tweeting about data (best practices, resources, etc.).  The PNR will be posting on our Facebook and Twitter pages, as well as here on the Dragonfly blog, about data issues and trends you may want to know about, whether or not you work directly with researchers. Today’s topic is “Documenting, Describing and Defining Data” and we are pleased to re-post a behind-the-scenes loo...
Source: Dragonfly - February 14, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Ann Glusker Tags: News From NN/LM PNR Source Type: news

Debrief and Discuss -BD2K Fundamentals of Data Science – This week ’ s topic Supervised Machine Learning (MLA CE Contact Hours Available)
Dear Network member data geeks or those interested in learning neat things about data and how it will save the planet… Please consider joining a 30 minute debrief/discussion shortly following the BD2K Guide to the fundamentals of Data Science weekly webinars. The debriefing/discussion will start after a 10 minute break after the series session ends. If you attend both the debriefing and BD2K GFDS can earn you 2 MLA CE contact hours. No registration is required. If you can’t attend the live sessions, you can participate asynchronously. This week’s topic is: Supervised Machine Learning ...
Source: MCR News - February 14, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: liaison Tags: Community College/Academic Libraries Data Science Health Sciences Webinars and Training Source Type: news

Researchers identify new process to raise natural armies of cancer-targeting T lymphocytes
(Mayo Clinic) Mayo Clinic and University of Washington researchers have discovered a new culture method that unlocks the natural fighter function of immune T cells when they are passing through the bloodstream. This allows T cell armies to be raised directly from blood that naturally recognize and target proteins that are present on most human cancers. The results are published in the Feb. 14 issue of Oncotarget. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 14, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers identify new process to raise natural armies of cancer-targeting T lymphocytes outside the body
PHOENIX ? Mayo Clinic and University of Washington researchers have discovered a new culture method that unlocks the natural fighter function of immune T-cells when they are passing through the bloodstream. This allows T-cell armies to be raised directly from blood that naturally recognize and target proteins that are present on most human cancers. The [...] (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - February 14, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

New findings reveal health, aging experiences of LGBT older adults across nation
(University of Washington) In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers from the University of Washington's School of Social Work have released new findings this month on the health and aging of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender older adults in the US. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 13, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

New study gives clues to aging in LGBT Americans
Amy WallaceFeb. 9 (UPI) -- Researchers from the University of Washington used data from the first national survey on aging and health in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender adults. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research Now Published by Wolters Kluwer
Wolters Kluwer, a leading global provider of information and point of care solutions for the healthcare industry, is pleased to announce a new, long-term publishing partnership with the The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons® (ABJS). Beginning in 2018, the journal’s 65th anniversary, Wolters Kluwer will publish Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research® (CORR®), the specialty-leading journal of ABJS. Wolters Kluwer and ABJS have a long history and this new partnership marks a homecoming of sorts. CORR was launched in 1953 in collaboration with the J.B. Lippincott Company (since acquired by Wolters Kl...
Source: News from STM - February 9, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Editorial Source Type: news

American Heart Month and Black History Month
Currently the Seattle Art Museum is hosting the exhibition, Jacob Lawrence: The Migration Series. This celebrated exhibit, which brings all 60 of Lawrence’s paintings from this series together, is collectively owned by both The Phillips Collection and the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. It marks Lawrence’s 100th birthday who also held a tenured professor position at the University of Washington in 1971 and retired in 1986. Lawrence’s iconic collection, utilizes both images and words to chronicle the exodus from the rural South to the industrialized North between the first and second World Wars. Man...
Source: Dragonfly - February 8, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: Health Literacy/Consumer Health Health Observances Source Type: news

Grand challenges for the next decade in global health policy and programmes < br/ > Keynote address at a celebration of the 10th anniversary of the University of Washington ’s Department of Global Health
Honourable ministers, distinguished fellow speakers, faculty and staff at the University of Washington, colleagues in public health, ladies and gentlemen, For global health, this is a jubilee year for the University of Washington ’s Department of Global Health and at least seven other Washington-based health organizations. (Source: WHO Director-General speeches)
Source: WHO Director-General speeches - February 8, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: director-general [subject] Source Type: news

Grand challenges for the next decade in global health policy and programmes
Honourable ministers, distinguished fellow speakers, faculty and staff at the University of Washington, colleagues in public health, ladies and gentlemen, For global health, this is a jubilee year for the University of Washington ’s Department of Global Health and at least seven other Washington-based health organizations. (Source: WHO Director-General speeches)
Source: WHO Director-General speeches - February 8, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: director-general [subject] Source Type: news

Does Running Actually Ruin Your Knees?
The Question: I’ve always heard that running is bad for your knees. Is this really true? Both runners and non-runners alike have heard that the high impact of running ― the repetitive pounding which occurs as you log miles ― can cause damage to knee joints.  But a recent study published in the European Journal of Applied Physiology turns that notion on its head: Researchers found that running actually decreased inflammation in the knees of six people, suggesting that the activity may actually be more beneficial to the joints than harmful.  “Any time you run, you put a load or force on th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

[In Brief] News at a glance
In science news around the world, the critically endangered saiga antelope faces a new threat from a livestock virus in Mongolia, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation gives a global health trends institute at the University of Washington a big financial boost, Russia's health ministry decides the country cannot afford to spend $1.2 billion to ramp up the response to its burgeoning HIV/AIDS epidemic, a new Pew Research Center poll reveals that 82% of Americans think the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine should be required for public school entry, and more. Also, scientists remind U.S. President Donald Trump that tortur...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 2, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Science Magazine (mailto:soleditor at aaas.org) Tags: SCI COMMUN Source Type: news

New route-finding tool lets pedestrians avoid hills, construction, accessibility barriers
(University of Washington) The University of Washington's AccessMap project has launched a new online travel planner offering customizable suggestions for people who need accessible or pedestrian-friendly routes when getting from point A to B in Seattle. The team is also developing pedestrian accessibility standards to expand the effort to other cities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 1, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

KenSci lands $8.5M to boost its data platform, grow business
Seattle-based KenSci has raised $8.5 million in its first round of funding. It plans to use the capital to further develop its data and machine learning platform and expand its operations. The company, which was incubated at the University of Washington in Tacoma, boasts a rapidly growing customer base. KenSci spun out in 2015 after more than four years of research and industry-academic collaboration. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - January 30, 2017 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Study shows sleep deprivation suppresses immune system
Amy WallaceJan. 27 (UPI) -- Researchers from the University of Washington Medical School studied 11 pairs of identical twins to learn the effects of sleep deprivation on the immune system. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - January 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Chronic sleep deprivation suppresses immune system
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Many people report getting sick when they don't get enough sleep. A new study helps explain why.Researchers took blood samples from 11 pairs of identical twins with different sleep patterns and discovered that the twin with shorter sleep duration had a depressed immune system, compared with his or her sibling. The findings were published Jan. 25 in the journal Sleep. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 27, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Al Gore Revives Climate Summit The CDC Abruptly Canceled
Former Vice President Al Gore is hosting his own climate change summit after the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention abruptly canceled the one it had been planning for months. Gore announced Thursday that he’ll hold the Climate & Health Meeting in Atlanta on Feb. 16 with Howard Frumkin, former director of the CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health, and a host of other health and climate groups: the American Public Health Association, The Climate Reality Project, Harvard Global Health Institute and the University of Washington Center for Health and the Global Environment. function...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

ACOG Takes Big Step In Limiting Unnecessary Interventions During Birth
The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has released new guidelines encouraging OB-GYNs and other birth practitioners to re-examine the necessity of various interventions that may not necessarily benefit low-risk moms. The new committee opinion does not signal a dramatic shift in best practices for managing uncomplicated labors, but it is a clear acknowledgement from ACOG that technological interventions can often times interfere with a natural process rather than help it along. “This committee opinion is the first one, to my knowledge, that specifically addresses low-risk patients,” author Dr. ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation pledges $279M for UW's largest-ever private donation
The Bill& Melinda Gates Foundation has pledged $279 million over 10 years to the University of Washington Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. This grant is the largest private donation in the university's history and allows the institute to build on its research to improve the health of people and communities around the world. The IHME launched at UW in 2007 with a $105 million grant from the Gates Foundation and $20 million from UW. I ts provides impartial, evidenced-based data on health… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - January 25, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation pledges $279M for UW's largest-ever private donation
The Bill& Melinda Gates Foundation has pledged $279 million over 10 years to the University of Washington Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. This grant is the largest private donation in the university's history and allows the institute to build on its research to improve the health of people and communities around the world. The IHME launched at UW in 2007 with a $105 million grant from the Gates Foundation and $20 million from UW. I ts provides impartial, evidenced-based data on health… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 25, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

'Protective' DNA strands are shorter in adults who had more infections as infants
(University of Washington) New research indicates that people who had more infections as babies harbor a key marker of cellular aging as young adults: the protective stretches of DNA which 'cap' the ends of their chromosomes are shorter than in adults who were healthier as infants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 25, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation boosts vital work of the University of Washington's IHME
(Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation) The Bill& Melinda Gates Foundation and University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) announced today the foundation's commitment to invest $279 million in IHME to expand its work over the next decade. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 25, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Yoga doesn't help to improve symptoms of the menopause
After reanalyzing their own findings, University of Washington researchers found that there's no point trying to exercise your way out of the menopause - your sleep will still be affected. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Predator or not? Invasive snails hide even when they don't know
(University of Washington) The specific cues that trigger an animal's natural defense vary depending on the species and its history in the ecosystem, a new University of Washington study finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 24, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

CDC Abruptly Canceled A Long-Planned Climate Summit Days Before Trump Became President
This article has been updated to include the CDC statement.  type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=58507c5ae4b0ee009eb44512,58824c34e4b070d8cad2252d,5880fe24e4b070d8cad116ff,587fdf43e4b00d44838cda6e,5851743ce4b0ee009eb4be71 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Jawbone CFO leaves and more digital health hires and departures
Jawbone's Chief Financial Officer has left the company, The Verge reported this week. CFO Jason Child, who joined Jawbone in 2015 from Groupon, has left the struggling company to join the  Global Advisory Board of the University of Washington's Foster School of Business. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - January 19, 2017 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Sitting down all day 'may accelerate DNA ageing'
Conclusion It's not news to anyone that being more physically active and spending less time sitting around is likely to keep people in better health. But this study has many limitations that make it difficult for us to rely on its results. While they are used as a marker for ageing cells, telomeres are not a direct measure of ageing. Although shortened telomeres have been linked to certain diseases, everyone's telomeres shorten over time. Saying shorter telomeres make someone "biologically older" doesn't mean much. This hasn't stopped the emergence of private companies offering to measure your telomer...
Source: NHS News Feed - January 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Genetics/stem cells Source Type: news

'FishTaco' sorts out who is doing what in your microbiome
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) How much do different bacterial species contribute to disease-associated imbalances in the human microbiome? A new computational method, dubbed FishTaco, is helping find out. The method looks at which microbes are present and what they are doing. Understanding imbalances in say, the human gut microbiome, might eventually suggest new ways to manage obesity, type 2 diabetes, or autoimmune diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Seeking structure with metagenome sequences
(DOE/Joint Genome Institute) In the Jan. 20, 2017 issue of Science, a team led by University of Washington's David Baker in collaboration with DOE Joint Genome Institute researchers reports that structural models have been generated for 12 percent of the protein families that had previously had no structural information available. The Baker lab's protein structure prediction server Rosetta analyzed the metagenomic sequences publicly available on the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system run by the DOE JGI. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 19, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Climate change prompts Alaska fish to change breeding behavior
(University of Washington) A new University of Washington study finds that one of Alaska's most abundant freshwater fish species is altering its breeding patterns in response to climate change, which could impact the ecology of northern lakes that already acutely feel the effects of a changing climate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 18, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Long-term dangers of the 21st birthday bender
Students who binge-drink on their 21st birthday are more likely to become future heavy drinkers, a new University of Washington study warns. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

When it comes to mating, fruit flies can make rational choices
(University of Washington) In a paper published Jan. 17 in the journal Nature Communications, University of Washington researchers report that fruit flies -- perhaps the most widely studied insect in history -- show signs of rational decision-making when choosing a mate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Immune responses against a virus-related skin cancer suggest ways to improve immunotherapy
(Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center) Researchers at Seattle's Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington say a new study suggests ways to improve immune therapy for certain cancers including a virus-associated form of Merkel cell carcinoma, a rare, aggressive skin cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 17, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Experimental Protocols and Bioinformatic Pipelines for Zika Genome Sequencing
University of Washington. 12/10/2016 This data portal provides information about Zika genome sequencing, including data schema, sample metadata, experimental protocols, bioinformatic pipelines, validation and coverage, and consensus genomes. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 14, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Zika Open-Research Portal
University of Washington. 06/2016 This open-research portal for the University of Washington was created to help facilitate collaborative research about the Zika virus. It provides a platform for investigators to make Zika research data, commentary, and results publicly available in real-time. Projects are freely available to researchers. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 14, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Diversification key to resilient fishing communities
(University of Washington) Fishing communities can survive -- and even thrive -- as fish abundance and market prices shift if they can catch a variety of species and nimbly move from one fishery to the next, a new University of Washington study finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 14, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Rapid Arctic warming has in the past shifted Southern Ocean winds
(University of Washington) Ice core records from the two poles show that during the last ice age, sharp spikes in Arctic temperatures shifted the position of winds around Antarctica. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 10, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UW spinout wins $35M deal to develop therapy for celiac disease
After spinning out of the University of Washington last month, PvP Biologics now has a $35 million deal with Takeda Pharmaceutical to develop its therapy for celiac disease. Under the terms of the agreement, PvP will conduct all research and development of the therapy through phase 1 clinical trials and Takeda will fund $35 million in PvP’s expenses. As part of the agreement, Takeda Pharmaceutical has the exclusive option to acquire PvP for an undisclosed fee upon s uccessful completion. “Takeda’s… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 6, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

Arctic sea ice loss impacts beluga whale migration
(University of Washington) A new University of Washington study finds the annual migration of some beluga whales in Alaska is altered by sea ice changes in the Arctic, while other belugas do not appear to be affected. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 5, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

How games on smartphones can treat DEPRESSION by boosting cognitive function
Scientists from the University of Washington believe video games can help treat depression by targeting the underlying cognitive issues, rather than just managing the symptoms. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eelgrass in Puget Sound is stable overall, but some local beaches suffering
(University of Washington) Eelgrass, a marine plant crucial to the success of migrating juvenile salmon and spawning Pacific herring, is stable and flourishing in Puget Sound, despite a doubling of the region's human population and significant shoreline development over the past several decades. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 4, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Songbirds divorce, flee, fail to reproduce due to suburban sprawl
(University of Washington) New University of Washington research finds that for some songbirds, urban sprawl is kicking them out of their territory, forcing divorce and stunting their ability to find new mates and reproduce successfully, even after relocating. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 3, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Studies suggest gaming your brain to treat depression
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Researchers have found promising results for treating depression with a video game interface that targets underlying cognitive issues associated with depression rather than just managing the symptoms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 3, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Study shows new global evidence of the role of humans, urbanization in rapid evolution
(University of Washington) A new study led by the University of Washington that examines 1,600 global instances of phenotypic change -- alterations to species' observable traits such as size, development or behavior -- shows more clearly than ever that urbanization is affecting the genetic makeup of species that are crucial to ecosystem health and success. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 3, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mysterious Marijuana-Related Illness Popping Up In Emergency Rooms
A mysterious marijuana-related illness is popping up with increasing frequency in hospital emergency rooms, particularly in states where cannabis is now legal. The symptoms are severe abdominal pain and violent vomiting — and most doctors are initially stumped when they encounter patients with the problem. The illness is cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome, which is linked to heavy, long-term use of marijuana, according to experts. For some reason, the nausea and vomiting of CHS can be relieved with hot showers or baths, which can serve as an important hint for physicians trying to diagnose a patient.  Si...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mysterious Marijuana-Related Illness Popping Up In Emergency Rooms
A mysterious marijuana-related illness is popping up with increasing frequency in hospital emergency rooms, particularly in states where cannabis is now legal. The symptoms are severe abdominal pain and violent vomiting — and most doctors are initially stumped when they encounter patients with the problem. The illness is cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome, which is linked to heavy, long-term use of marijuana, according to experts. For some reason, the nausea and vomiting of CHS can be relieved with hot showers or baths, which can serve as an important hint for physicians trying to diagnose a patient.  Si...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 2, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Data Science for Social Good Summer Program ­
­ The University of Washington eScience Institute, in collaboration with Urban@UW and Microsoft, is excited to announce the 2017 Data Science for Social Good (DSSG) summer program. The program brings together data and domain scientists to work on focused, collaborative projects that are designed to impact public policy for social benefit. Modeled after similar programs at the University of Chicago and Georgia Tech, with elements from our own Data Science Incubator, sixteen DSSG Student Fellows will be selected to work with academic researchers, data scientists, and public stakeholder groups on data-intensive research p...
Source: Dragonfly - December 30, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Patricia Devine Tags: Data Training & Education Source Type: news

Vera Rubin, Astronomer Who Discovered The First Direct Evidence Of Dark Matter, Dead At 88
(Reuters) - Vera Rubin, a U.S. astronomer who pioneered work on invisible dark matter in the universe and who some colleagues felt was overlooked for a Nobel Prize, has died at 88, her son said on Monday. Rubin died on Sunday at an assisted living facility in Princeton, New Jersey, and had suffered from dementia for several years, Allan Rubin, a geosciences professor at Princeton University, said in an email. Rubin, a Philadelphia native, used galaxies’ rotations to discover the first direct evidence of dark matter in the 1970s while working at the Carnegie Institution in Washington. A Sim of the dark matter distrib...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 27, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Bill Gates lauds Ana Mari Cauce and Nathan Bowling among others in his year-end star blog
In his Dec. 20 blog, “gatesnotes,” Bill Gates lists the people he calls his favorite fanatics of 2016. The list include former President Jimmy Carter; Nandan Nilekani entrepreneur, philanthropist, author; Nathan Bowling, Washington State Teacher of the Year; Ken Caldeira, a climate scientist at the Carnegie Institut ion for Science; and University of Washington President Ana Mari Cauce, the only woman on the list. Gates explains that when he was in his 20s and 30s, he was obsessed work, so much… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 21, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Patti Payne Source Type: news