Trial slated in wrongful death suit over Norian XR bone cement
A state court in Washington is slated next week to hear the 1st trial in a group of civil lawsuits filed by the families of patients who died on the operating table minutes after injection with the Norian XR bone cement then made by now-Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) subsidiary Synthes. At least 5 patients died during otherwise routine operations after the Norian cement was used off-label in their spine surgeries. The bone cement was initially developed by a company called Norian, which Synthes bought in 1999 for about $50 million. Synthes, in turn, was acquired by J&J for $21.3 billion in 2012. The FD...
Source: Mass Device - June 23, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Legal News Orthopedics Spinal DePuy Synthes Johnson & Johnson Kensey Nash Corp. Norian Corp. Royal DSM Source Type: news

OWRC@HSL: The story of bringing a writing center to a health sciences library
This guest post is from Terry Ann Jankowski, Assistant Director for User Experience at the Health Sciences Library at the University of Washington, reporting about the project that was funded with a Medical Library Pilot Project Award received from the NN/LM PNR. For the past 10 years, the Odegaard Writing and Research Center (OWRC) has operated in the University of Washington’s undergraduate library. It offers both drop-in and by appointment services to all UW students, staff and faculty. However, it was underutilized by the health sciences population because of its distance from the UW Health Science...
Source: Dragonfly - June 22, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: Funding News from Network Members Source Type: news

UW-led team awarded $1 million bioelectronics innovation prize
(University of Washington) An international team led by researchers at the Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering based at the University of Washington is one of three finalists in a race to produce an implantable wireless device that can assess, stimulate and block the activity of nerves that control organs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 21, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UW electrical engineering students help develop a device to combat malaria
Two electrical engineering students at the University of Washington worked with Bellevue-based Intellectual Ventures to develop a portable device that will make diagnosing malaria in poor countries less dependent on limited specialized workers. The device, called an autoscope, is a portable automated device that will scan and analyze a sample and return a report that includes diagnosis, the quantity of parasites and the parasite makeup to be verified by medical professionals. This can take the… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - June 20, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

Self-assembling icosahedral protein designed
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Researchers have designed and produced a self-assembling protein shell shaped like an icosahedron -- similar to those that encapsulate viruses. The achievement may open new avenues for engineering cargo-containing nano-cages to package and deliver drugs and vaccines directly into cells, or building small reactors to catalyze biochemical reactions. The shell is also amenable to genetic fusion, such as the addition of fluorescent proteins. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Language gene accounts for nearly 50% of success in learning a foreign tongue
Research from the University of Washington looked at 79 students who were learning a second language. They found results could be predicted by a combination of genetic and brain factors. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UW's dental school jumps from 49th to 15th in the world
The University of Washington School of Dentistry ranks 15th out of the world's top 50 dental schools, according to a recent report from Quacquarelli Symonds World University Rankings. That is up from its No. 49 ranking last year. In 2015, the school of dentistry started a new curriculum, called Dentist of the Future, designed to reflect the rapid changes in dental science and technology, as well as new modes of dental practice. UW's dean of the dental school, Dr. Joel Berg, attributes the jump… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - June 13, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

UW's dental school jumps from 49th to 15th in the world
The University of Washington School of Dentistry ranks 15th out of the world's top 50 dental schools, according to a recent report from Quacquarelli Symonds World University Rankings. That is up from its No. 49 ranking last year. In 2015, the school of dentistry started a new curriculum, called Dentist of the Future, designed to reflect the rapid changes in dental science and technology, as well as new modes of dental practice. UW's dean of the dental school, Dr. Joel Berg, attributes the jump… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 13, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

PPMD Awards University of Washington Grant to Support Technology to Help Optimize Gene Therapy
PPMD is proud to support Dr. Odom from the University of Washington and we are hopeful that his work will help make gene therapy in Duchenne more effective and long lasting. (Source: Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy)
Source: Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy - June 9, 2016 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

Jerry Franklin named 2016's 'Eminent Ecologist' by leading ecological group
(University of Washington) The Ecological Society of America has named University of Washington professor Jerry Franklin its 'Eminent Ecologist' of 2016. The award, considered the organization's most prestigious accolade, honors a senior ecologist who has made significant, long-standing contributions to the field of ecology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 9, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

PNR Partners webinar next week
PNR Partners Tuesday June 14 1:00-2:00pm PT, noon- 1:00pm Alaska, 2:00-3:00pm MT Robin Champieux, Scholarly Communications Librarian at Oregon Health & Science University Library will present about the Open Insight program which is designed to inspire an understanding and the adoption of open science practices and activities. Meg Brunner, staff librarian at the University of Washington’s Alcohol & Drug Abuse Institute, will present about the online toolkit of resources created to increase outreach and education for Washington state’s communities needing reliable substance abuse information. How Do ...
Source: Dragonfly - June 8, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: Funding News from Network Members Training & Education Source Type: news

Next PNR Rendezvous, June 15
PNR Rendezvous Wednesday June 15 1:00-2:00pm PT, noon- 1:00pm Alaska, 2:00-3:00pm MT Engaging Public Libraries in Community Health Information and Services is the name of the the next PNR Rendezvous presentation. In collaboration with the National Networks of Libraries of Medicine Pacific Northwest regional medical library (NN/LM PNR), University of Washington Information School MLIS candidate Liz Morris planned and executed outreach activities to gather input from public libraries in Idaho regarding their current efforts, needs, priorities and perceptions regarding community health information and services. The ...
Source: Dragonfly - June 7, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: Health Literacy/Consumer Health News From NN/LM PNR Source Type: news

What Makes Donald Trump Such A Cranky Baby?
Maybe Donald Trump acts childish because no one tells him he needs to go to bed. “I think he’s absolutely exhausted to the point he’s almost delirious,” Mika Brzezinski, co-host of MSNBC's "Morning Joe," said during a discussion Monday of Trump's “completely racist” remarks about the federal judge presiding over Trump University lawsuits.  Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, is a one-man media circus, ringmaster of a show that always seems to be on. He brags about how little sleep he gets.  “He’s 69 years old," Joe S...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Finding connections to nature in cities is key to healthy urban living
(University of Washington) The authors of a Science perspective piece discuss the growing tension between an arguably necessary role urban areas play in society and the numbing, even debilitating, aspects of cities that disconnect humans from the natural world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 3, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Arivale's Leroy Hood: This is dawn of 'scientific wellness' era
In the 16 years since Dr. Leroy Hood left the University of Washington to create the Institute for Systems Biology, his definition of systems biology, and within it systems medicine, has grown. Now he is working on defining a new industry entirely that he says will transform health care: scientific wellness. Hood wants his new company, Arivale, and the ISB's affiliation with Providence Health & Services, to be as transformative for health care as Seattle's four other major companies were for their… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - June 1, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

Arivale's Leroy Hood: This is dawn of 'scientific wellness' era
In the 16 years since Dr. Leroy Hood left the University of Washington to create the Institute for Systems Biology, his definition of systems biology, and within it systems medicine, has grown. Now he is working on defining a new industry entirely that he says will transform health care: scientific wellness. Hood wants his new company, Arivale, and the ISB's affiliation with Providence Health & Services, to be as transformative for health care as Seattle's four other major companies were for their… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 1, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

Treatment 'breakthrough' in man with advanced skin cancer
Conclusion This is described as the first case study in humans to have successfully combined these immune treatments. The results demonstrate that long-term cancer remission was achieved even after the cancer had previously progressed quickly when the person had been given IL-21, CTL and anti-CTLA4 separately. These seem to be extremely encouraging findings for metastatic melanoma, a cancer with notoriously poor prognosis. However, before the findings raise too much hope, it must be emphasised that this case report focuses on just one man. The researchers note he is one of 10 people entered into the trial of ...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 31, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Medication Source Type: news

Changing attitudes to periods - let's get rid of them completely
An obstetrician gynaecologist at the University of Washington, Seattle, says that attitudes within society have changed, and that the need for women to have regular periods is just not there - and avoidable with modern contraceptive methods. Daily Mail (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - May 27, 2016 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Modern medicine means there's no need for menstruation at all
Dr Elizabeth Micks, an obstetrician gynaecologist at the University of Washington, Seattle, said many women are taking continuous hormonal contraceptives to stop themselves menstruating. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

ACNs, process improvement and revamping the clinical librarian program
This is a summary of a presentation from the recent Medical Library Association annual conference in Toronto from Andrea Ball, Care Management and Population Health Librarian at the University of Washington Health Sciences Library The Affordable Care Act has brought many changes to healthcare. This transformation is moving at a fast pace and librarians are trying to keep up. The University of Washington has established itself as an Accountable Care Network (ACN) striving towards the Triple Aim of improved health, increased patient satisfaction and reduced costs. As such, a new clinical librarian position was created with ...
Source: Dragonfly - May 25, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: News from Network Members Source Type: news

Seattle's PATH has a new partner to bring newborn feeding cups to market
Seattle's PATH announced a new partnership last week with Norway-based Laerdal Global Health to accelerate access to a feeding cup that is intended to help newborn babies struggling to breast feed get the nutrients they need to survive. The cup was designed over the last five years in a partnership between PATH, the University of Washington and Seattle Children's Craniofacial Center. It is known as the NIFTY cup, short for Neonatal Intuitive Feeding Technology. The cup will now go to market with… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 24, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

Zika Preparedness: Lessons for the U.S. Public Health System
University of Washington, Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. 05/17/2016This one-hour webinar discusses what Zika preparedness means for the Northwest region's public health and emergency management systems. It discusses the basic science of Zika, and its likely impact in the area; current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance for Zika; and how Foundational Public Health Services can help strengthen public health preparedness and response for communicable diseases. (Video or Multimedia) Site requires free registration. (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - May 24, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Climate Change, Equity, and Health: Lessons Learned from Local Planning Efforts in Oregon
University of Washington, Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. 04/19/2016This one-hour webinar reviews Oregon's state and local efforts to address the health impacts of climate change in the Northwest. It discusses key health concerns related to climate change in the Northwest, resources for addressing climate change-related health concerns, and ways in which some governmental public health agencies in the Northwest are aligning their work to address climate change. (Video or Multimedia) Site requires free registration. (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - May 24, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

UW experts develop method for including migration uncertainty in population projections
(University of Washington) University of Washington statisticians have developed what is believed to be the first model for factoring in the uncertainties of migration in population projections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 24, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Human Activity May Wipe Out One-Third Of North American Birds
More than one-third of North America's 1,154 native bird species are at high risk of extinction due to climate change and other manmade factors, a new report found. Thirty-seven percent of the continent's bird species across 10 different habitat types need "urgent conservation action," the North American Bird Conservation Initiative said in its annual "State of the Birds" report released Sunday. Forty-nine percent were identified as having moderate risk, while just 14 percent were marked as low risk.  Researchers categorized bird species based on their population size, population trends, popul...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 24, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Low-income children receive sub-par care for brain injuries, study says
Stephen FellerSEATTLE, May 23 (UPI) -- Low-income, Spanish-speaking children generally receive sub-par care after traumatic brain injuries, according to a recent University of Washington study. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - May 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study shows disparities in treatment for children with traumatic brain injuries
(University of Washington) Research found that less than 20 percent of rehabilitation providers in Washington state accepted Medicaid and also provided language interpretation services to children with traumatic brain injuries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 23, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Bacteria in branches naturally fertilize trees
(University of Washington) A University of Washington team has demonstrated that poplar trees growing in rocky, inhospitable terrain harbor bacteria within them that could provide valuable nutrients to help the plant grow. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lingcod meet rockfish: Catching one improves chances for the other
(University of Washington) In a new study, University of Washington researchers found that selectively fishing for lingcod in protected areas actually avoided hampering the recovery of other fish, including rockfish species listed as overfished. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Surprising Way Sleep Makes You A Better Boss
Being well-rested plays a major role in helping people get ahead in their careers -- from keeping stress levels under control to being a better learner and creative thinker. Now, a new study in the Journal of Applied Psychology suggests that good sleep habits can also make an employee easier to lead -- and a leader easier to follow.  Leaders were rated as less charismatic when they weren't well-rested. But additionally, sleep-deprived employees were harder to inspire and less likely to view designated leaders as charismatic than well-rested individuals. In other words, not getting enough rest leaves eve...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Partnerships and the pursuit of innovation at large and small companies
Anne Sissel, managing director of Baxter Ventures and Adam Berman, CEO of TVA Medical, Inc. shared their perspectives on topics related to innovation and partnership between large, commercial organizations and small, venture-backed start-ups. Anne E. Sissel, M.B.A., C.F.A. is managing director of Baxter Ventures and has been in that role since she joined the company in 2014. She previously served as a member of the founding team and vice president, head of finance and business development at Veracyte, Inc., a molecular diagnostics company. Prior to Veracyte, Anne was an investment banker with Goldman, Sachs & Co. and c...
Source: Mass Device - May 19, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Blog Baxter International TVA Medical Source Type: news

Appeal of 'genetic puzzles' leads to National Medal of Science for UW's Mary-Claire King
(University of Washington) In a White House ceremony May 19, President Barack Obama presented the National Medal of Science to Mary-Claire King, University of Washington professor of genome sciences and medicine. The award, the nation's highest recognition for scientific achievement, honors King's more than 40 years dedicated to research in evolution and the genetics of human disease, as well as to teaching and outreach endeavors that have supported human rights efforts on six continents and reunited families. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 19, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Calcium channels team up to activate excitable cells
(University of California - Davis Health System) Voltage-gated calcium channels open in unison, rather than independently, to allow calcium ions into and activate excitable cells such as neurons and muscle cells, researchers with UC Davis Health System and the University of Washington have found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 18, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

1,100 undergrads die by suicide each year. Washington can help, UW says
More than 1,000 undergraduate students die by suicide each year. Washington state can help decrease that number, according to a new effort led by the University of Washington. Seattle’s largest school – with participation from many Washington state public colleges and universities – has launched a four-year initiative to improve mental health among students and prevent suicide and substance abuse at educational institutions. “We are working proactively in a very large-scale way to address… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 12, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ashley Stewart Source Type: news

1,100 undergrads die by suicide each year. Washington can help, UW says
More than 1,000 undergraduate students die by suicide each year. Washington state can help decrease that number, according to a new effort led by the University of Washington. Seattle’s largest school – with participation from many Washington state public colleges and universities – has launched a four-year initiative to improve mental health among students and prevent suicide and substance abuse at educational institutions. “We are working proactively in a very large-scale way to address… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 12, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Ashley Stewart Source Type: news

Skull specializations allow bats to feast on their fellow vertebrates
(University of Washington) Over their 52-million-year history, a few bats have evolved a taste for their fellow vertebrates. Now biologists at the University of Washington and the Burke Museum of History and Culture are shedding light on how these so-called 'carnivorous bats' adapted to the daunting task of chowing down their backboned prey. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 12, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UW, Chinese genomics group forge new partnership to advance biomedical research
The University of Washington School of Medicine and Chinese genomics group BGI have agreed to develop a joint institute to advance biomedical research. In addition, the Seattle mayor’s office signed an agreement with the city of Shenzhen, China, where BGI is located, to support biomedical research. The memorandum of understanding between the cities doesn't spell out specifics, instead saying broadly that "both sides support collaboration and exchanges among relevant entities in medical research,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 11, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Rachel Nielsen Source Type: news

UW, Chinese genomics group forge new partnership to advance biomedical research
The University of Washington School of Medicine and Chinese genomics group BGI have agreed to develop a joint institute to advance biomedical research. In addition, the Seattle mayor’s office signed an agreement with the city of Shenzhen, China, where BGI is located, to support biomedical research. The memorandum of understanding between the cities doesn't spell out specifics, instead saying broadly that "both sides support collaboration and exchanges among relevant entities in medical research,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 11, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Rachel Nielsen Source Type: news

BGI and UW Medicine to collaborate on precision medicine development
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) BGI, one of the world's largest genomics organizations, and UW Medicine, the academic medical and health system at the University of Washington, have signed a memorandum of understanding to collaborate on biomedical technology development. The shared aim is to advance precision medicine for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of common and rare diseases. BGI is headquartered in Shenzhen, Guangdong, China. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Lung function measured in just a phone call with new health-sensing tool
Researchers from the University of Washington have developed a new health-sensing tool that can accurately measure lung function over a simple phone call. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Respiratory / Asthma Source Type: news

Brain pattern predicts how fast an adult learns a new language
(University of Washington) New University of Washington research found that a five-minute measurement of resting-state brain activity predicted how quickly adults learned a second language. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 10, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Do Probiotic Products Live Up to Their Promises?
By: Amy Gorin A daily dose of good bacteria can boost your health, but not all foods containing probiotics are created equal. Find out which are the best to add to your diet. You've probably heard the term "probiotics" thrown around in your doctor's office or grocery store, especially regarding some staple foods in your kitchen, including yogurt, kefir, and kimchi. You might've also caught wind that probiotics are living microorganisms (including common bacterial strains like Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium as well as yeast), but not the scary kind that make you sick. It's the opposite: Probiotics support pro...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rapamycin 'miracle drug' trialed on dogs with anti-ageing results, scientists say
Scientists from the University of Washington are testing the effects of a drug called rapamycin on dogs to see if it will slow down the aging process. So far, dogs have shown improved heart function. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Acucela CEO: I chose UW over Harvard and it changed my life
Acucela CEO Dr. Ryo Kubota says choosing to go into research at the University of Washington was one of the best decisions he made in his life. As an ophthalmologist by training, Kubota found himself discouraged by the lack of eye treatments available for his patients who were losing their sight. So, he decided to become a physician scientist, going into research. Leaving Japan, Kubota had two offers in front of him: the UW or Harvard. While many in Japan knew the Harvard brand and encouraged… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 6, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

Acucela CEO: I chose UW over Harvard and it changed my life
Acucela CEO Dr. Ryo Kubota says choosing to go into research at the University of Washington was one of the best decisions he made in his life. As an ophthalmologist by training, Kubota found himself discouraged by the lack of eye treatments available for his patients who were losing their sight. So, he decided to become a physician scientist, going into research. Leaving Japan, Kubota had two offers in front of him: the UW or Harvard. While many in Japan knew the Harvard brand and encouraged… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 6, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

Can You Really Break Your Penis? (And Answers To 8 Other Candid Sex Questions)
If human penises don't have any bones in them, can they really break during sex or other intense activities? That's one of the questions sent in by a listener and tackled on the latest episode of the HuffPost Love+Sex Podcast. "You can break your penis," Dr. Zhana Vrangalova, sex expert, writer and professor at New York University, told me and my co-host, Carina Kolodny. "It is a very real thing and it’s a very unfortunate thing but technically it’s not a bone that breaks... The lining that goes around the erectile tissue of the penis -- the corpus cavernosum -- can tear." The...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news