'Lethal' mutation made tuberculosis bacteria resistant to important antibiotic
(Uppsala University) Antibiotic-resistant tuberculosis is a common and serious problem globally. In a new article, researchers from Uppsala University describe how tuberculosis bacteria that carries a mutation that in theory should kill them manages to stay alive. The researchers discovered that the same trick that kept the bacteria alive also made them resistant to a very important type of antibiotic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 27, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Action needed to ensure research is carried out ethically in global health emergencies
(Nuffield Council on Bioethics) Governments, funders, and research bodies must take action to ensure that research is undertaken ethically during global health emergencies, says a new report from the Nuffield Council on Bioethics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 27, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

An old plant virus inspires the design of a modern vaccine to fight against malaria
(Walter Reed Army Institute of Research) WRAIR scientists demonstrated that a novel, second-generation malaria vaccine candidate based on the tobacco mosaic virus may offer protection against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Malaria, infecting approximately 228 million individuals in 2018, remains a meaningful threat to public health, regional stability and deploying Service Members. This research shows that the TMV coat protein can also be highly effective as a vaccine scaffold to refocus the host immune system to the most vulnerable epitopes on circumsporozoite protein. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 27, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New portable tool analyzes microbes in the environment
(Rutgers University) Imagine a device that could swiftly analyze microbes in oceans and other aquatic environments, revealing the health of these organisms - too tiny to be seen by the naked eye - and their response to threats to their ecosystems. Rutgers researchers have created just such a tool, a portable device that could be used to assess microbes, screen for antibiotic-resistant bacteria and analyze algae that live in coral reefs. Their work is published in the journal Scientific Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 27, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Consequences of Zika virus attack on glial cells
(D'Or Institute for Research and Education) Few studies have identified the effects of zika virus infection on astrocytes, as well as their association with developmental alterations, including brain malformations and microcephaly. Published in Scientific Reports, a new article sought to unravel the virus reactions on laboratory-created astrocytes, comparing them to the same cells present in the brain tissue of animals and fetuses infected with Zika. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 27, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Outbreak of acute respiratory syndrome associated with a novel coronavirus, China
(European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC)) On Jan. 24, 2020, the first imported cases (3) of 2019-nCoV were identified in France. The rapid increase in the number of reported cases can be partly attributed to the ongoing improved testing protocols and epidemiological investigations of the Chinese authorities; however, since the original source remains unknown and human-to-human transmission has been documented, further cases and deaths are expected. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 26, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Marburg virus found in Sierra Leone bats
(University of California - Davis) Scientists have detected Marburg virus in fruit bats in Sierra Leone, marking the first time the deadly virus has been found in West Africa. Eleven Egyptian rousette fruit bats tested positive for active Marburg virus infection. The presence of Marburg virus, a close relative to Ebola virus that also causes hemorrhagic disease in people, was detected in advance of any reported cases of human illness in Sierra Leone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 24, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Stressed-out dust is sharing antibiotic resistance genes
(Northwestern University) A new Northwestern University study is the first to find that bacteria living in household dust can spread antibiotic resistance genes. Although most bacteria are harmless, the researchers believe these genes could potentially spread to pathogens, making infections more difficult to treat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 23, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

West Nile virus triggers brain inflammation by inhibiting protein degradation
(Hokkaido University) West Nile virus (WNV) inhibits autophagy -- an essential system that digests or removes cellular constituents such as proteins -- to induce the aggregation of proteins in infected cells, triggering cell death and brain inflammation (encephalitis), according to Hokkaido University researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 23, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Portable device helps doctors diagnose sepsis faster
(Ecole Polytechnique F é d é rale de Lausanne) EPFL researchers have developed a highly sensitive and portable optical biosensor that stands to accelerate the diagnosis of fatal conditions like sepsis. It could be used by ambulances and hospitals to improve the triage process and save lives. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 23, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A Zika vaccine could save suffering and costs
(CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy) A new study led by researchers at the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH) and the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine found that routinely giving the Zika vaccine to women of childbearing age could save money if the risk of Zika is around that of other mosquito-borne diseases like dengue and chikungunya. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 23, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NIAID officials discuss novel Coronavirus that recently emerged in China
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) The new cluster of viral pneumonia cases originating in Wuhan, China, marks the third time in 20 years that a member of the large family of coronaviruses (CoVs) has jumped from animals to humans and sparked an outbreak. In a new JAMA Viewpoint essay, Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), looks back at two earlier novel CoV outbreaks that initially caused global havoc and describes steps needed to contain the current one. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 23, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

In animal models, a 'shocking' step toward a potential HIV cure
(Emory Health Sciences) Yerkes and UNC researchers report sustained latency reversal in two animal models of HIV infection. It's not a cure, but it's a step forward. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Mosquito-borne diseases could be prevented by skin cream
(University of Leeds) A skin cream used to treat warts and skin cancer could help protect people against viral diseases such as Zika and dengue, according to new research from the University of Leeds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NIH-supported scientists reverse HIV and SIV latency in two animal models
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) In a range of experiments, scientists have reactivated resting immune cells that were latently infected with HIV or its monkey relative, SIV, in cells in the bloodstream and a variety of tissues in animals. As a result, the cells started making copies of the viruses, which could potentially be neutralized by anti-HIV drugs and the immune system. This advance, published today in two papers in Nature, marks progress toward a widely accessible cure for HIV. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study results will inform immunization programs globally
(University of Adelaide) The results of the B Part of It study -- the largest meningococcal B herd immunity study ever conducted -- are published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Controlled-release opioid may be leading to heart infections in persons who inject drugs
(Lawson Health Research Institute) A new study from ICES, Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University suggests that injection drug users prescribed controlled-release hydromorphone are three times more likely to develop endocarditis, a serious bacterial heart infection, when compared to those prescribed other opioids. The findings, published today in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, build on growing evidence that some controlled-release opioids may lead to higher risk of infectious disease among persons who inject drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A roadmap for adding ivermectin to the malaria toolbox
(Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)) A group of experts led by Regina Rabinovich and Carlos Chaccour from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) has published a roadmap to evaluate -- and subsequently implement -- ivermectin as a complementary vector control tool against malaria. The Ivermectin Roadmap, published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, includes a foreword signed by Nobel laureate William C. Campbell, co-discoverer of the drug. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Hope for patients with a rare genetic condition linked to severe infections
(University of Montreal) A research team sheds light on the mechanisms underlying chronic granulomatous disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Most rehabilitating sea turtles with infectious tumors don't survive
(Florida Atlantic University) Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is the most significant infectious disease affecting sea turtle populations worldwide. FB leads to tumors on the turtles' eyes, flippers and internal organs and is widespread in warmer climates like Florida. A large-scale study evaluated tumor score, removal and regrowth in rehabilitating green sea turtles with FP in the southeastern US from 2009 to 2017, and found that 75 percent did not survive following admission into a rehabilitation facility, irrespective of whether or not tumor regrowth occurred after surgery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Dying people give last gift to help cure HIV
(Elevated Science Communications) New year, new promise? Despite decades of research, scientists do not fully know all the places HIV hides in the human body. A new study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation enrolled people with HIV who also happened to have a terminal illness to study where HIV hides in the human body so doctors can better treat and maybe even cure HIV. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 21, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Antiviral compound offers hope against deadly flu
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) A study in mice finds that a compound modeled on a protein found in bananas safely protects against multiple strains of the influenza virus, Ebola and coronaviruses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 21, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Novel composite antimicrobial film could take a bite out of foodborne illnesses
(Penn State) A novel composite film -- created by the bonding of an antimicrobial layer to conventional, clear polyethylene plastic typically used to vacuum-package foods such as meat and fish -- could help to decrease foodborne illness outbreaks, according to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 21, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Mason researchers Narayanan and Veneziano receive funding to build better vaccines
(George Mason University) George Mason University's Aarthi Narayanan and Remi Veneziano received $314,000 from US Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity (USAMRAA) for a project using DNA-nanoparticles to improve vaccine design. The new design uses one-, two-, and three-dimensional structures made out of DNA molecules to increase immunogenic potential by delivering precise arrangements of heterogenous antigens while ensuring safety. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 21, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Influenza vaccination of children cuts hospitalization in half: Ben-Gurion U. researchers
(American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) The findings reveal that the flu vaccine reduced hospitalizations associated with the flu by more than half. They also validate guidelines in the United States and Israel that recommend two vaccine doses for children up to age 8 who have never been vaccinated or who previously received one dose. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 21, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How diarrhea pathogens switch into attack mode at body temperature
(Ruhr-University Bochum) Many bacterial pathogens excrete toxins as soon as they have entered the host in order to suppress its immune response. Researchers at Ruhr-Universit ä t Bochum (RUB) have analysed what happens on the molecular level when the diarrhea pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis switches into attack mode. To this end, they examined so-called RNA thermometers, which signal to the bacteria whether they are in the host. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 20, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New species of antibiotic-resistant bacteria found in infected wound
(University of Gothenburg) A hitherto unknown antibiotic-resistant bacteria species, in the same family as E. coli and Salmonella spp., has been found and classified in Sweden. The proposed taxonomic name of the species -- the first of the new genus -- is Scandinavium goeteborgense, after the city of Gothenburg, Sweden, where the bacterium was isolated and the research was done. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 20, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Statistics conference to mark eminent statistician's 70th birthday
(Lancaster University) Lancaster University is to host a conference in honour of the 70th birthday of Distinguished Professor Peter Diggle.He was awarded the Guy medal in Silver by the Royal Statistical Society in 1997 before becoming its President from 2014 until 2016. He also holds honorary positions at Columbia, Yale and Johns Hopkins and has a part-time post with Health Data Research UK as Director of their Wellcome-funded PhD Programme in Health Data Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 17, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The Lancet Digital Health: Real-time flu prediction may be possible using wearable heart rate and sleep tracking devices
(The Lancet) The research, published in The Lancet Digital Health journal, demonstrates the potential of data from wearable devices to improve surveillance of infectious disease. Resting heart rate tends to spike during infectious episodes and this is captured by wearable devices such as smartwatches and fitness trackers, that track heart rate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 16, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Why we differ in our ability to fight off gut infections
(Ecole Polytechnique F é d é rale de Lausanne) Scientists at EPFL have published two papers showing how genetics affects the ability of different individuals to fight off gut infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 16, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study gauges efficacy of drugs against pork tapeworm
(PLOS) Taenia solium -- also called pork tapeworm -- is a parasite which causes disease around the world, particularly in very poor communities with deficient sanitation and where pigs roam free. Researchers have now analyzed the efficacy and adverse effects of three chemotherapeutics against T. solium and report their results in a review published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 16, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Do studies underestimate the prevalence of typhoid?
(PLOS) Blood culture surveillance programs are critical for estimating the prevalence of typhoid and paratyphoid fevers, but cases can be missed when patients don't seek medical care, or seek medical care and don't have a blood culture test. Researchers writing in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have now calculated inflation factors that can be used to adjust these incidence rates to account for under-detection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 16, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Mosquitoes engineered to repel dengue virus
(University of California - San Diego) An international team of scientists has synthetically engineered mosquitoes that halt the transmission of the dengue virus. Led by biologists at UC San Diego, the researchers developed a human antibody for dengue suppression in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the insects that spread dengue. The development marks the first engineered approach in mosquitoes that targets the four known types of dengue, improving upon previous designs that addressed single strains. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 16, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Sepsis associated with 1 in 5 deaths globally, double previous estimate
(University of Pittsburgh) Twice as many people as previously believed are dying of sepsis worldwide, according to an analysis published today in The Lancet and announced at the Critical Care Reviews annual meeting in Belfast. Among them are a disproportionately high number of children in poor areas. Led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and University of Washington schools of medicine, the study revealed 48.9 million global cases of sepsis in 2017 and 11 million deaths, representing 1 in 5 deaths worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 16, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers develop first diagnostic test for novel coronavirus in China
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) Researchers from the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) at Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin have developed a new laboratory assay to detect the novel Chinese coronavirus. The assay protocol has now been published by WHO as a guideline for diagnostic detection. The new assay enables suspected cases to be tested quickly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 16, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Probiotic drink could offer new way to combat antibiotic resistance
(University of Birmingham) A probiotic drink could become a promising new weapon in the battle against antibiotic resistant bacteria, after a team of scientists at the University of Birmingham engineered and patented a key genetic element that can tackle the genetic basis of resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 15, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Molecular understanding of drug interactions suggests pathway to better malaria treatments
(University of Houston) Researchers have for the first time demonstrated what happens at the molecular level when two compounds known to inhibit crystal growth were combined, yielding new insights into malaria treatments and, more broadly, improving the process of drug development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 15, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Infectious disease defenses among ancient hominid contributions to adaptation of modern humans
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) In a new study published in the advanced online edition of Molecular Biology and Evolution, scientists Alexandre Gouy and Laurent Excoffier have developed new computational tools to better analyze human genome datasets, and found more evidence of a legacy of ancient hominid adaptation, particularly to help fight off infectious diseases like malaria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 14, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cat parasite reduces general anxiety in infected mice, not just fear of feline predators
(Cell Press) The cat parasite Toxoplasma gondii is known to cause infected rodents to lose their fear of feline predators, which makes them easier to catch. Predators then spread the parasites through their feces. But this so-called fatal feline attraction theory is flawed, suggests a study publishing Jan. 14 in the journal Cell Reports. Rather than exhibiting a loss of feline-specific fear, infected rodents show decreases in general anxiety and aversion to a range of threats. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 14, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers discover new strategy in the fight against antibiotic resistance
(KU Leuven) Bioscience engineers from KU Leuven in Belgium have developed a new antibacterial strategy that weakens bacteria by preventing them from cooperating. Unlike with antibiotics, there is no resistance to this strategy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 14, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Truvada should remain first choice for HIV prevention, experts say
(Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute) In October 2019, the FDA approved a second medication for use as HIV preexposure prophylaxis, also known as PrEP, sparking controversy about which drug should be prescribed. Gilead Sciences, which manufactures both approved drugs, has argued that the new drug is safer and more effective than the old drug. But these claims are overstated, say a team of clinical and public health experts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 13, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Boost to lung immunity following infection
(The Francis Crick Institute) The strength of the immune system in response to respiratory infections is constantly changing, depending on the history of previous, unrelated infections, according to new research from the Crick. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 13, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

IVI and Sweden renew partnership to accelerate vaccines for global public health
(International Vaccine Institute) The International Vaccine Institute (IVI), a Seoul, Korea-based international organization, announced today that the Swedish International Cooperation Agency (Sida) will continue to support IVI's mission to accelerate vaccine research and development for global health with a total contribution of SEK 50 million (approximately 5.24 million USD) over the next five years as part of a longstanding partnership between the Swedish government and IVI. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 13, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence, human gene-editing ethics and more at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Seattle
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) The growing use of artificial intelligence in society, how math can help address political gerrymandering, the ethics of human gene-editing, and the spread of infectious disease among ocean organisms will be discussed at the 2020 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting, the world's largest general scientific conference. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 13, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

First robust cell culture model for the hepatitis E virus
(Ruhr-University Bochum) A mutation switches the turbo on during virus replication. This is a blessing for research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 13, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Israeli docs strike big blow to superbugs
(The Hebrew University of Jerusalem) In a study published in Science magazine, the researchers showed that aggressive bacteria can be controlled -- but only if doctors administer treatment within a short window of opportunity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 13, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

PREVAC-UP: The Partnership for Research on Ebola Vaccination extends follow-up
(INSERM (Institut national de la sant é et de la recherche m é dicale)) Public health efforts successfully stopped human-to-human transmission of Ebola virus in West Africa in 2016 after the worst Ebola outbreak in history. Pursuing and intensifying efforts to develop a safe and effective vaccination strategy against Ebola virus disease, with durable protection in all populations, including children, is vital. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 13, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Herpes simplex viruses: new relationships between epidemiology and history
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) An Italian research team has refined the history and origins of two extremely common pathogens in human populations, herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2. Using and applying rather precise data methods they estimated that the circulating strains of herpes simplex virus type 1 migrated from Africa about 5000 years ago. The exit from Africa of herpes simplex virus type 2 was even more recent and probably occurred in the eighteenth century, during the height of the slave trade. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 13, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Decoy molecule neutralizes a range of viruses
(Weizmann Institute of Science) The molecule points the way toward treating viruses that cross from animals to humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 12, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Taking one for the team: How bacteria self-destruct to fight viral infections
(University of California - San Diego) UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers have discovered how a new immune system works to protect bacteria from phages, viruses that infect bacteria -- new information that could be leveraged to improve treatment of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections by refining phage therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 10, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news