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Flu infection study increases understanding of natural immunity
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) People with higher levels of antibodies against the stem portion of the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) protein have less viral shedding when they get the flu, but don't have fewer or less severe signs of illness, according to a new study. This NIAID study is the first of its kind to evaluate pre-existing levels of these antibodies as a predictor of protection against influenza. The findings could have implications for flu vaccine development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 23, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers find latent HIV reservoirs inherently resistant to elimination by CD8+ T-cells
(George Washington University) A research team at GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences found that latent HIV reservoirs exhibit resistance to elimination by CD8+ T-cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 22, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A better HIV test
(Stanford University) Stanford researchers have developed a reliable, hassle-free HIV test -- just what public health officials need to screen large numbers of people and head off potential outbreaks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 22, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New long-acting approach for malaria therapy developed
(University of Liverpool) A new study, published in Nature Communications, conducted by the University of Liverpool and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine highlights a new 'long acting' medicine for the prevention of malaria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 22, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Improving vaccines for the elderly by blocking inflammation
(University College London) By identifying why skin immunity declines in old age, a UCL-led research team has found that an anti-inflammatory pill could help make vaccines more effective for elderly people.The study, published today in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, found that an excessive inflammation reaction in older people can obstruct the immune system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 22, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Using social and risk networks helps identify people undiagnosed with HIV
(New York University) Conducting HIV testing among the social and risk networks of those recently diagnosed with HIV helps identify undiagnosed cases of HIV at significantly higher rates and at a lower cost than other testing approaches, finds a new study conducted in Ukraine by an international research team. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 22, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

European science on the map at Davos summit
(European Research Council) The European Research Council (ERC) will bring cutting-edge science to the forefront at the Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum (WEF) from 23 to 26 January in Davos, Switzerland. Using ideas arising from this year's meeting theme: 'Creating a shared future in a fractured world', the ERC's President, Professor Jean-Pierre Bourguignon, and eleven remarkable scientists and scholars will feed into the debate, via fourteen sessions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 22, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers borrow from AIDS playbook to tackle rheumatic heart disease
(Case Western Reserve University) Billions of US taxpayer dollars have been invested in Africa over the past 15 years to improve care for millions suffering from the HIV/AIDS epidemic; yet health systems on the continent continue to struggle. What if the investments and lessons learned from HIV could be used to improve care for those with other serious chronic conditions? (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 22, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New neuron-like cells allow investigation into synthesis of vital cellular components
(Penn State) A new method to create synthetic neurons allows researchers to investigate how the human brain makes metabolic building blocks essential for the survival of all living organisms. A new study describes a core enzyme involved in the synthesis of these building blocks, called purines, and how the enzyme might change during infection by herpes simplex virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 22, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Mice immunized with synthetic horsepox protected against vaccinia virus
(PLOS) Immunization with a synthetic horsepox virus offers mice similar protection to immunization with vaccinia virus against a lethal dose of vaccinia, according to a study published Jan. 19, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ryan Noyce from the University of Alberta, Canada, and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 19, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Older hospitalized adults are infrequently tested for influenza
(Wiley) This year's flu season is shaping up to be an especially serious one, and it's important for clinicians to promptly recognize, diagnosis, and treat influenza in hospitalized patients, especially in vulnerable populations such as older individuals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 19, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Launch of 'DeWorm3' collection
(PLOS) PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases is happy to announce the publication of a new collection, 'DeWorm3' on Jan. 18, 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 18, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

HIV-1 genetic diversity is higher in vaginal tract than in blood during early infection
(PLOS) A first-of-its-kind study has found that the genetic diversity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is higher in the vaginal tract than in the blood stream during early infection. This finding, published in PLOS Pathogens, supports the existence of a genetic bottleneck between the vaginal tract and the bloodstream. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 18, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The flu vaccine could get a much-needed boost
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) More than 700,000 Americans were hospitalized due to illnesses associated with the seasonal flu during the 2014-15 flu season, according to federal estimates. A radical new approach to vaccine development at UCLA may help lower that figure for future flu seasons. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 18, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Flu may be spread just by breathing, new UMD-led study shows
(University of Maryland) It is easier to spread the influenza virus (flu) than previously thought, according to a new study released today. People commonly believe that they can catch the flu by exposure to droplets from an infected person's coughs or sneezes or by touching contaminated surfaces. But, new information about flu transmission reveals that we may pass the flu to others just by breathing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 18, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NIH scientists find microbes on the skin of mice promote tissue healing, immunity
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Beneficial bacteria on the skin of lab mice work with the animals' immune systems to defend against disease-causing microbes and accelerate wound healing, according to new research from scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. Researchers say untangling similar mechanisms in humans may improve approaches to managing skin wounds and treating other damaged tissues. The study was published online today in Cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 18, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Zika virus damages placenta, which may explain malformed babies
(Oregon Health& Science University) New researcher shows how Zika virus infection in five pregnant rhesus monkeys caused placental tissues to become thickened and inflamed, resulting in less oxygen being transported across the placenta and to the baby. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 18, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Schistosoma vaccine to enter phase Ib clinical trial
(George Washington University) Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine, in collaboration with a team of researchers at the George Washington University and the Rene Rachou Institute, have received funding from the National Institutes of Health for a Phase Ib clinical trial for a Schistosomiasis vaccine in an endemic area of Brazil. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 18, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Genetic sequencing points to endemic origin of monkeypox virus outbreak in Nigeria
(US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases) Scientists working to control a human outbreak of monkeypox virus (MXPV) in Nigeria performed genetic sequencing of patient samples, revealing that the outbreak likely originated from a source within the country. Their results emphasize the value of local surveillance for the early detection of viral spillovers and the need for advanced genetic characterization to help determine the origins of outbreaks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 18, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How did a deadly tropical fungus get to the temperate environs of the Pacific Northwest?
(The Translational Genomics Research Institute) In what is being described as 'The Teddy Roosevelt effect,' a deadly fungus in the Pacific Northwest may have arrived from Brazil via the Panama Canal, according to a new study led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen). Cryptococcus gattii -- which until a 1999 outbreak in British Columbia's Vancouver Island was considered primarily a tropical fungus -- can cause deadly lung and brain infections in both people and animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 18, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Mass. General study reveals how MRSA infection compromises lymphatic function
(Massachusetts General Hospital) Massachusetts General Hospital investigators find that MRSA infection impairs the ability of lymphatic vessels to pump lymphatic fluid to lymph nodes in mouse models, which may contribute to the frequent recurrences of MRSA infection experienced by patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Previous influenza virus exposures enhance susceptibility in another influenza pandemic
(McMaster University) New data analysis suggests that people born at the time of the 1957 H2N2 or Asian Flu pandemic were at a higher risk of dying during the 2009 H1N1 Swine Flu pandemic as well as the resurgent H1N1 outbreak in 2013-2014. And it is not the first time this has happened. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 16, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Memory loss from West Nile virus may be preventable
(Washington University School of Medicine) More than 10,000 people in the United States are living with memory loss and other persistent neurological problems that occur after West Nile virus infects the brain. Now, a new study in mice suggests that such ongoing neurological deficits may be due to unresolved inflammation that hinders the brain's ability to repair damaged neurons and grow new ones. When the inflammation was reduced by treatment with an arthritis drug, the animals' ability to learn and remember remained sharp after West Nile disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 16, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Surfers three times more likely to have antibiotic-resistant bacteria in guts
(University of Exeter) Scientists compared fecal samples from surfers and non-surfers to assess whether the surfers' guts contained E. coli bacteria that were able to grow in the presence of the antibiotic cefotaxime. Cefotaxime has previously been prescribed to kill off these bacteria, but some have acquired genes that enable them to survive this treatment.The study found that 13 of 143 (9 percent) of surfers were colonized by these resistant bacteria, compared to just four of 130 (3 percent) of non-surfers swabbed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 14, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Past exposures shape immune response in pediatric acute respiratory infections
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) By analyzing immune cells of children who came to the emergency department with flu symptoms, researchers found that the suite of genes these early-response cells expressed was shaped by factors such as age and previous exposures to viruses. Better understanding how early infections influence long-term immune response has implications for the diagnosis and treatment of young patients who suffer from acute respiratory tract infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New antifungal provides hope in fight against superbugs
(Case Western Reserve University) Microscopic yeast have been wreaking havoc in hospitals around the world -- creeping into catheters, ventilator tubes, and IV lines -- and causing deadly invasive infection. One culprit species, Candida auris, is resistant to many antifungals, meaning once a person is infected, there are limited treatment options. But in a recent Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy study, researchers confirmed a new drug compound kills drug-resistant C. auris, both in the laboratory and in a mouse model that mimics human infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Human protein may aid neuron invasion by virus that causes hand, foot, and mouth disease
(PLOS) A human protein known as prohibitin may play a significant role in infection of the nervous system by EV71, one of several viruses that can cause hand, foot, and mouth disease. Issac Too of the National University of Singapore and colleagues highlight this finding in a new PLOS Pathogens study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Different strains of same bacteria trigger widely varying immune responses
(PLOS) Genetic differences between different strains of the same pathogenic bacterial species appear to result in widely varying immune system responses, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Long-lasting adaptations of the innate immune system through the bone marrow
(Radboud University Nijmegen) The immune system not only detects and destroys pathogens such as microbes but also plays a role in the onset of diseases such as arteriosclerosis. Scientists from Radboud university medical center, Bonn, Dresden and Pennsylvania, studied a new mechanism that regulates the immune system's functioning. They discovered that cholesterol inhibitors may prevent infections, that a high-fat Western diet can have a long-lasting effect on our immunity and that even our stem cells can be disrupted. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers map druggable genomic targets in evolving malaria parasite
(University of California - San Diego) Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues across the country and around the world, have used whole genome analyses and chemogenetics to identify new drug targets and resistance genes in 262 parasite cell lines of Plasmodium falciparum -- protozoan pathogens that cause malaria -- that are resistant to 37 diverse antimalarial compounds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NIH study supports use of short-term HIV treatment interruption in clinical trials
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) A short-term pause in HIV treatment during a carefully monitored clinical trial does not lead to lasting expansion of the HIV reservoir nor cause irreversible damage to the immune system, new findings suggest. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Re-programming innate immune cells to fight tuberculosis
(McGill University) Tuberculosis (TB), an infectious disease which attacks the lungs, claims someone's life every 20 seconds and 1.5 million lives worldwide every year. A cure has eluded scientists for more than a century but, now, a Montreal team of researchers may have discovered a new weapon to combat this global killer. The team is re-programing - or 'training' - immune cells to kill TB. These groundbreaking findings are published online today in the journal Cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Dengue takes low and slow approach to replication
(Duke University) Dengue virus slowly takes over the endoplasmic reticulum, the production site for a subset of host proteins, and steers clear of the cytosol, the fluid-filled space where the majority of host cellular proteins are synthesized. Its viral RNA template is translated into protein in such an inefficient, lackadaisical manner that it doesn't trip alarms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Biofilm buster treats drug-resistant infections
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Scientists have created a potent antibacterial agent that killed drug-resistant microbes and even eradicated stubborn pathogens growing in biofilms, which can be 10 to 1,000 times more tolerant to antibiotics than free-living bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Malaria parasite packs genetic material for trip from mosquitoes to humans
(Penn State) The parasite that causes malaria has not one, but two, specialized proteins that protect its genetic material until the parasite takes up residence in a new host. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

TSRI scientists discover workings of first promising Marburg virus treatment
(Scripps Research Institute) Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered the workings of the first promising treatment for Marburg virus, a pathogen with the same pandemic potential as Ebola virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Promise of new antibiotics lies with shackling tiny toxic tetherballs to bacteria
(University of Texas at Austin) Biologists at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a method for rapidly screening hundreds of thousands of potential drugs for fighting infections, an innovation that holds promise for combating the growing scourge of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The method involves engineering bacteria to produce and test molecules that are potentially toxic to themselves. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 9, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Younger patients constitute half of hospital-acquired pneumonia cases, most of which originate outside of the ICU, study finds
(Elsevier) Hospital-acquired pneumonia has long been associated with the elderly and intensive care units (ICU). But according to a new multicenter nationwide study, nonventilator hospital-acquired pneumonia (NV-HAP) occurs across all units in all types and sizes of US hospitals, putting every patient--the young included--at higher risk for developing the infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 9, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Common birth control shot linked to risk of HIV infection
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) Replacing the popular contraceptive shot known as DMPA with alternative methods of contraception could help protect women in sub-Saharan Africa and other high-risk regions from becoming infected with HIV, according to a comprehensive review of available evidence published in the journal Endocrine Reviews. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 8, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Research paves the way for treatment strategies of multidrug-resistant chronic infections
(Technical University of Denmark) A new study published in Cell Press finds that antibiotic treatment of chronic infections can be optimized by targeting vulnerabilities of antibiotic-resistant pathogens paving the way for more effective treatment strategies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Supercharged antibiotics could turn tide against superbugs
(University of Queensland) An old drug supercharged by University of Queensland researchers has emerged as a new antibiotic that could destroy some of the world's most dangerous superbugs.The supercharge technique , led by Dr Mark Blaskovich and Professor Matt Cooper from UQ's Institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB), potentially could revitalise other antibiotics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 4, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Building stronger health systems could help prevent the next epidemic in Madagascar
(PLOS) The peak epidemic season for plague in Madagascar is fast approaching and the severity of these outbreaks could be significantly reduced with improvements to their public health system, argues Matthew Bonds from Harvard Medical School and the nongovernmental health care organization, PIVOT, in a new Viewpoint publishing Jan. 4, 2018, in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 4, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Tick exosomes may aid transmission of viruses to vertebrates
(PLOS) Scientists have shown for the first time that exosomes from tick cells can aid transmission of viral proteins and genetic material from arthropod to vertebrate host cells, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 4, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Hijacker parasite blocked from infiltrating blood
(Walter and Eliza Hall Institute) A major international collaboration led by Melbourne researchers has discovered that the world's most widespread malaria parasite infects humans by hijacking a protein the body cannot live without. The researchers were then able to successfully develop antibodies that disabled the parasite from carrying out this activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 4, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

DNA analysis of ancient mummy, thought to have smallpox, points to Hepatitis B instead
(McMaster University) A team of scientists has sequenced the complete genome of an ancient strain of the Hepatitis B virus (HBV), shedding new light on a pervasive, complex and deadly pathogen that today kills nearly one million people every year. While little is known about its evolutionary history and origin, the findings confirm the idea that HBV has existed in humans for centuries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 4, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Nursing homes should require flu shots for all staff and patients, most older adults say
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) As flu season swings into high gear, a new poll suggests nursing homes and other long-term care facilities should be doing more to get their staff and patients vaccinated before it's too late.Nearly three-quarters of people over age 50 surveyed in a new poll say all staff in such facilities should definitely be required to get the flu vaccine. More than 60 percent say that patients in such facilities should definitely get vaccinated too. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 3, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

First typhoid conjugate vaccine achieves WHO prequalification, a key step in protecting children and reducing the burden of typhoid
(Sabin Vaccine Institute) A typhoid conjugate vaccine has been prequalified by the World Health Organization (WHO), bringing the vaccine one step closer to reaching millions more people at risk of typhoid. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 3, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Dietary sugar linked to increasing bacterial epidemics
(Baylor College of Medicine) The increasing frequency and severity of healthcare-associated outbreaks caused by bacterium Clostridium difficile have been linked to the widely used food additive trehalose. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 3, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Penn Vet's Boris Striepen receives $1.8 million grant to fight deadly diarrheal disease in infants
(University of Pennsylvania) Boris Striepen, Ph.D., Professor of Pathobiology at the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has received a $1.8-million, three-year grant from the Bill& Melinda Gates Foundation to enable the development of drugs for cryptosporidiosis, a diarrheal disease caused by microscopic parasites. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 2, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Penn Vet's Boris Striepen receives $1.8m grant to fight deadly diarrheal disease in infants
(University of Pennsylvania) Boris Striepen, PhD, Professor of Pathobiology at the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has received a $1.8-million, three-year grant from the Bill& Melinda Gates Foundation to enable the development of drugs for cryptosporidiosis, a diarrheal disease caused by microscopic parasites. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 2, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news