ANU researchers find new disease
(Australian National University) Researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) have discovered a new genetic disease and a method for detecting more unexplained medical conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 18, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Genomic analysis offers insight into 2018 Nigeria Lassa fever outbreak
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) A surge in Lassa fever cases in Nigeria in 2018 doesn't appear to be linked to a single virus strain or increased human-to-human transmission, according to genomic analysis published in NEJM. Multiple institutions collaborated on the report, and the research was supported in part by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the National Human Genome Research Institute, and the NIH Common Fund's Human Heredity and Health in Africa Program, all components of NIH. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Letting the sunshine in may kill dust-dwelling bacteria
(BioMed Central) Allowing sunlight in through windows can kill bacteria that live in dust, according to a study published in the open-access journal Microbiome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The Lancet HIV: PrEP implementation is associated with a rapid decline in new HIV infections
(The Lancet) Study from Australia is the first to evaluate a population-level roll-out of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in men who have sex with men. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Outbreak of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis undetected by standard tests
(CNRS) Amid a plan announced by the United Nations to eradicate tuberculosis by 2030, a new study has revealed the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of the disease which go undetected by WHO-endorsed tests. These findings, from an international research team co-directed by CNRS researcher Philip Supply are published in the Oct. 17, 2018 edition of The Lancet Infectious Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How drug resistant TB evolved and spread globally
(University College London) The most common form of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) originated in Europe and spread to Asia, Africa and the Americas with European explorers and colonialists, reveals a new study led by UCL and the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Exposure to malaria before birth may boost childhood immunity
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Pamela Odorizzi and colleagues have discovered that human fetal immune cells can proliferate in response to malaria infection in pregnant women, a finding that helps to demystify fetal immunity and potentially has implications for malaria control programs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Breastfeeding protects infants from antibiotic-resistant bacteria
(University of Helsinki) A new study shows that infants that are breastfed for at least six months have less antibiotic-resistant bacteria in their gut compared with babies breastfed for a shorter time. On the other hand, antibiotic use by mothers increases the number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in infants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Texas Biomed scientists researching Ebola-malaria connection
(Texas Biomedical Research Institute) Texas Biomed researchers -- in collaboration with the University of Iowa -- are trying to find out how malarial infections impact people exposed to Ebola virus. Both diseases are endemic in that region. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Thanks to $1.72M federal grant: UA researchers using green light for HIV-related pain
(University of Arizona Health Sciences) Green light therapy results in decreased chronic pain without side effects and has the promise of easy clinical application due to its low cost, efficacy and availability. This new project addresses the critical need for effective non-pharmacological treatments for HIV-related neuropathy and the hypersensitivity associated with antiretroviral therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Research assesses geographic distribution of new antibiotics following market introduction
(Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics& Policy) New study finds that between 1999 and 2014, only 25 new antibiotics entered the global market. The majority of antibiotics released in this time period originated from Japanese or US companies and were launched in Japan or the US. Of the 25 antibiotics, 18 treat community-acquired respiratory infections, 14 treat skin infections, and 12 treat urinary infections. Half treat infections caused by resistant bacteria, but none targeted Gram-negative bacteria, which cause most untreatable infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 16, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Video monitoring of tuberculosis treatment effective in urban and rural areas
(University of California - San Diego) Researchers from University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with statewide collaborators, report that patients who recorded videos of themselves taking tuberculosis (TB) medications better adhered to treatment than patients who were observed in-person. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 16, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New scholars named by program to promote research into the influence of gender on health
(University of Pennsylvania) The University of Pennsylvania's Melanie Kornides, Jennifer Lewey, and C. Alix Timko, also of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, are pursuing research that examines the role of sex and gender on health. The work is supported by the Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 16, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New test rapidly identifies antibiotic-resistant 'superbugs'
(University of California - Berkeley) A simple and inexpensive new test developed by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, can diagnose patients with antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria in a matter of minutes. The technique could help doctors prescribe the right class of antibiotics for each infection, and could help limit the spread of antibiotic-resistant 'superbugs' that kill as many as 700,000 people worldwide each year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 15, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

HIV-positive infants are at high risk for acquiring congenital cytomegalovirus infection
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) Infants born to HIV-positive mothers had high rates of congenital cytomegalovirus, or CMV. Infants who also were infected before birth by the virus that causes AIDS were especially prone to CMV infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 15, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Polio: Environmental monitoring will be key as world reaches global eradication
(University of Michigan) Robust environmental monitoring should be used as the world approaches global eradication of polio, say University of Michigan researchers who recently studied the epidemiology of the 2013 silent polio outbreak in Rahat, Israel. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 15, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Stanford study traces hospital-acquired bloodstream infections to patients' own bodies
(Stanford Medicine) The most common source of a bloodstream infection acquired during a hospital stay is not a nurse's or doctor's dirty hands, or another patient's sneeze or visitor's cough, but the patient's own gut, Stanford University School of Medicine investigators have found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 15, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Walter Reed Army Institute of Research begins phase 1 clinical trial of Marburg vaccine
(Walter Reed Army Institute of Research) WRAIR this week administered the first vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of a Marburg vaccine candidate in healthy adult volunteers. The WRAIR study evaluates the VRC-MARADC087-00-VP vaccine, developed by the Vaccine Research Center (VRC) of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH). The Marburg virus is in the same family as Ebola and causes severe hemorrhagic fever in humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 15, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers at MU produce virus-resistant pigs, could vastly improve global animal health
(University of Missouri-Columbia) Researchers at the University of Missouri have successfully produced a litter of pigs that are genetically resistant to Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus (TGEV), which commonly infects the intestines of pigs and causes almost 100 percent mortality in young pigs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 15, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Basophils -- Underestimated players in lung development
(CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences) The adult lung consists of highly specialized cell types that are protected by a variety of immune cells. How these immune cells migrate to the lungs during development and after birth and influence each other is poorly understood. Using single cell sequencing methods, researchers from Israel and Austria discovered a hitherto unknown, fundamental mechanism: immune cells mainly known in the context of allergy play a crucial role in the development of macrophages in the lung. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Plant compound found to have therapeutic effect on complications from snakebites
(PLOS) Researchers have found that rutin, an inexpensive, plant-based compound may protect envenomed mice from bleeding and inflammation problems, according to a study published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases by Ana Teresa Azevedo Sachetto of Institute Butantan, S ã o Paulo, Brazil. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Dramatic drop in public confidence after Philippines dengue vaccine controversy
(Taylor& Francis Group) The Philippines' highly politicised response to newly-reported risks of a dengue vaccine led to a dramatic drop in public trust in vaccines overall, according to new research published in Human Vaccines& Immunotherapeutics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists develop novel vaccine for lassa fever and rabies
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) A novel vaccine designed to protect people from both Lassa fever and rabies showed promise in preclinical testing, according to new research published in Nature Communications. The investigational vaccine, called LASSARAB, was developed and tested by scientists at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia; the University of Minho in Braga, Portugal; the University of California, San Diego; and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Link between gut flora and multiple sclerosis discovered
(University of Zurich) In multiple sclerosis, a defective response of the body's own immune system leads to brain tissue damage. Gastrointestinal microbiota could play a far greater role in the pathogenesis of the disease than previously assumed, researchers at the University of Zurich have now found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Fruit fly protein could be new tool in tackling disease-carrying mosquitos
(University of York) An insulin-binding protein in fruit flies could provide new opportunities for tackling disease-carrying mosquitos, such as malaria and yellow fever, scientists at the University of York have found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New techniques can detect lyme disease weeks before current tests
(Rutgers University) Researchers have developed techniques to detect Lyme disease bacteria weeks sooner than current tests, allowing patients to start treatment earlier. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Path to deadly sepsis varies by bacterial infection
(Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute) Sepsis remains a common and deadly condition that occurs when the body reacts to an infection in the bloodstream. However, scientists know little about the early stages of the condition. Now, researchers from Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) and UC Santa Barbara have discovered that host responses during sepsis progression can vary in important ways based on pathogen type--which could lead to more effective treatments. The study published today in Cell Host and Microbe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Pneumonia-causing bacteria can be spread by nose picking and rubbing
This study is the first to show that transmission can occur via contact between the nose and the hands after exposure to pneumococcus bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UNC to create next generation, ultra-long-acting antiretroviral formulations
(University of North Carolina Health Care) Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine have been awarded a 5-year, $3.8 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to develop next generation, ultra-long-acting antiretroviral formulations for HIV treatment and prevention that have the potential to dramatically improve adherence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NIH study finds probiotic Bacillus eliminates Staphylococcus bacteria
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) A new study from NIH scientists and their Thai colleagues shows that a 'good' bacterium commonly found in probiotic digestive supplements helps eliminate Staphylococcus aureus, a type of bacteria that can cause serious antibiotic-resistant infections. The researchers, led by NIAID, unexpectedly found that Bacillus bacteria prevented S. aureus bacteria from growing in the gut and nose of healthy individuals. Researchers from Mahidol University and Rajamangala University of Technology in Thailand collaborated on the project. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Klebsiella pneumoniae drug resistance in infants studied in Kazan
(Kazan Federal University) In neonates with sepsis testing of K. pneumoniae isolates for ESBL production was positive in 60 percent of cases, in neonates with UTI -- in 40 percent of cases. The authors commented that one of key virulence factors -- the rmpA gene -- was found in both groups of infants. This means the prevalence of virulent K. pneumoniae strains is higher than was previously thought, and heavier clinical forms of diseases were found in patients with those virulent strains. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Unseen infections harming world's children, research reveals
(University of Virginia Health System) Children around the world are suffering from unnoticed infections that are stunting their growth and mental development, new research from an international coalition of scientists reveals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 9, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

VaxArray potency kit for 'pandemic' vaccines fills gap in pandemic preparedness
(InDevR, Inc.) To help prevent or mitigate the severity of a potentially devastating influenza pandemic, public health agencies and vaccine manufacturers must be able to rapidly define, develop, manufacture, and release 'pandemic' vaccines. To address these shortcomings of SRID, InDevR developed the VaxArray Influenza Pandemic HA Potency Assay (VXI-pHA). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 9, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

15 emerging technologies that could reduce global catastrophic biological risks
(Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security) Strategic investment in 15 promising technologies could help make the world better prepared and equipped to prevent future infectious disease outbreaks from becoming catastrophic events. This subset of emerging technologies and their potential application are the focus of a new report by a team of researchers at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 9, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Vaccinating humans to protect mosquitoes from malaria
(University at Buffalo) For decades, scientists have been trying to develop a vaccine that prevents mosquitoes from spreading malaria among humans. This unique approach -- in which immunized humans transfer anti-malarial proteins to mosquitoes when bitten -- is called a transmission-blocking vaccine (TBV). A new biotech advancement moves us closer to this goal. If successful, it could help reduce the spread of the disease, which kills more than 400,000 people annually. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 8, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

MIT, SMART and NTU scientists have discovered a potential treatment for severe malaria
(Nanyang Technological University) Scientists from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have discovered a potential treatment that could be effective against severe malaria and even drug-resistant malaria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 8, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

$3 million grant extends HIV intervention to prevent heart disease
(Case Western Reserve University) A team of nurses and physicians has received a four-year, $3 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to extend traditional HIV treatment protocols to improve the cardiovascular health of people living with HIV. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 8, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How vampire bats are supporting virus research
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) A new research project underway at Charit é -- Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin is investigating how, and under what conditions, viruses can persist inside the body and remain capable of triggering new infections. As part of this endeavor, the researchers are studying the nature of virus-host interactions in vampire bats with a new type of Morbillivirus, the genus of viruses to which the human measles virus belongs. The project is being funded by the Human Frontier Science Program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 8, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Long-acting injectable implant shows promise for HIV treatment and prevention
(University of North Carolina Health Care) A long-acting antiretroviral drug formulation, developed by UNC School of Medicine researchers, shows promise for HIV treatment and prevention in a study published in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 8, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Biosecurity Research Institute studies African swine fever to prevent US outbreak
(Kansas State University) Kansas State University researchers and the Biosecurity Research Institute have several projects focused on stopping the spread of African swine fever and preventing it from reaching the US. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 8, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Lessons from the 1918 flu pandemic, 100 years on
(Frontiers) With flu season nearly upon us, a new study looks at the factors behind the extremely high mortality of the 1918 flu pandemic and how to prepare for future outbreaks. The authors warn that while the world is better prepared than 100 years ago, new challenges will affect the impact of the next influenza virus pandemic -- including changing population demographics, antibiotic resistance and climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 8, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Outpatient antibiotic overprescribing rampant
(Infectious Diseases Society of America) Clinicians prescribed antibiotics without an infection-related diagnosis nearly half of the time and one in five prescriptions were provided without an in-person visit, according to research being presented at IDWeek 2018. The study, which is the first to look at overall outpatient antibiotic prescribing, analyzed more than half a million prescriptions from 514 outpatient clinics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Sink traps are surprising source of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in ICU
(Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America) During a nationwide outbreak of healthcare-associated infections of an antibiotic-resistant bacteria, an Israeli hospital traced repeated infections of patients in its intensive care unit (ICU) to an unexpected source -- sink traps, according to a study published today in Infection Control& Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UTMB develops a universal vaccine platform that's cheaper and shelf stable
(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) Researchers at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have developed less expensive way to produce vaccines that cuts the costs of vaccine production and storage by up to 80 percent without decreasing safety or effectiveness. The findings are currently available in EBioMedicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists call for microbial 'Noah's Ark' to protect global health
(Rutgers University) A Rutgers University-New Brunswick-led team of researchers is calling for the creation of a global microbiota vault to protect the long-term health of humanity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 4, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Would you rather die of liver failure or live with HIV?
(University of the Witwatersrand) In 2017, doctors from the Transplant Unit at the Wits Donald Gordon Medical Centre performed what is believed to be the world's first intentional liver transplant from a mother living with HIV to her critically ill HIV negative child, who had end-stage liver disease. Now, more than a year later, the mother and child have fully recovered, however, doctors are unsure the HIV-status of the child. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 4, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Viruses in blood lead to digestive problems
(Washington University School of Medicine) Some people suffer unpredictable bouts of abdominal pain and constipation. A new study in mice, from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, shows that viruses that target the nervous system can kill neurons in the gut that coordinate the process of moving waste along. Such viruses may be involved in causing people's digestive woes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 4, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Nanoparticles to treat snakebites
(PLOS) Venomous snakebites affect 2.5 million people, and annually cause more than 100,000 deaths and leave 400,000 individuals with permanent physical and psychological trauma each year. Researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have now described a new approach to treating snake bites, using nanoparticles to bind to venom toxins and prevent the spread of venom through the body. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 4, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Tales from 141,430 and one genomes
(University of California - Berkeley) Non-invasive prenatal testing potentially provides a wealth of genetic information, but the quality of the DNA sequencing is poor -- only about 10 percent coverage per genome. Nevertheless, scientists led by Rasmus Nielsen at UC Berkeley now show that with enough genomes -- in this case, 141,431 -- it is possible to find genetic variants linked with human traits, including birth outcomes and susceptibility to infectious disease. Such statistical analyses can even by used to track migration patterns. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 4, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

At-risk teens and young adults overlooked during opioid crisis
(Infectious Diseases Society of America) Teens and young adults who have injected drugs are at risk for contracting hepatitis C, but most aren't tested and therefore don't receive life-saving treatment, according to a national study being presented at IDWeek 2018. The study of more than 250,000 at-risk youth found only one-third of those with diagnosed opioid use disorder (OUD) were tested for hepatitis C. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 4, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news