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Critical gaps in our knowledge of where infectious diseases occur
(Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen) Today Scientists have called for action. The scientific journal Nature Ecology& Evolution have published a joint statement from scientists at Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate, University of Copenhagen and North Carolina State University. The scientists call attention to a serious lack of data on the worldwide distribution of disease-causing organisms. Without this knowledge, predicting where and when the next disease outbreak will emerge is hardly possible. Macroecologists hold the expertise to create the needed data network and close the knowledge gaps. (So...
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

News from the pathogen that causes sleeping sickness
(University of W ü rzburg) A team of researchers from the University of W ü rzburg has discovered an interesting enzyme in the pathogens responsible for African sleeping sickness: It could be a promising target for drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UTEP Scientists awarded patent for Chagas disease vaccine
(The University of Texas at El Paso) A pair of scientists at The University of Texas at El Paso is one step closer to developing the first ever clinical Chagas disease vaccine.Researchers Rosa Maldonado, Ph.D., and Igor Almeida, Ph.D., both faculty in the Department of Biological Sciences, recently were granted a patent for " Mucin-Associated Surface Protein As Vaccine Against Chagas Disease. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Studies of US Lassa fever patient offer clues about immune response, viral persistence
(Infectious Diseases Society of America) Researchers were able to closely study a Lassa fever patient's immune response over time after he was evacuated to the US for treatment.An experimental drug, favipiravir, was used in treating the US patient and an additional patient infected with Lassa virus in Germany. The drug appeared to have few serious side effects, but its efficacy is unknown.Individual patient reports cannot be generalized to broader population, but findings suggest promising areas for future research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Biofilms -- the eradication has begun
(McGill University Health Centre) Biofilms are slimy, glue-like membranes that are produced by microbes in order to colonize surfaces. They protect microbes from the body's immune system and increase their resistance to antibiotics. Biofilms represent one of the biggest threats to patients in hospital settings. But there is good news -- Canadian scientists have developed a novel enzyme technology that prevents the formation of biofilms and can also break them down. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

HIV-positive women with cytomegalovirus likelier to pass virus that causes AIDS to infant
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) HIV-positive women with cytomegalovirus, or CMV, in their urine at the time of labor and delivery are more than five times likelier than HIV-positive women without CMV to transmit HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, to their infants. The research also found that they are nearly 30 times likelier to transmit cytomegalovirus to their infants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Could flu during pregnancy raise risk for autism?
(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) Researchers at the Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found no evidence that laboratory-diagnosis alone of maternal influenza during pregnancy is associated with risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the offspring. They did, however, find a trend toward risk in mothers with a laboratory diagnosis of influenza and self-reported symptoms of severe illness. This trend did not achieve statistical significance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers create a 'Rosetta Stone' to decode immune recognition
(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have developed an algorithm that predicts T cell recognition of antigens and sets the stage to more effectively harness the immune system (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

What are trends in emergency department utilization, costs for shingles?
(The JAMA Network Journals) A new article published by JAMA Dermatology uses a nationwide database of emergency department (ED) visits to examine herpes zoster (HZ, shingles)-related ED utilization and costs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Molecular test for common causes of vaginitis receives FDA approval
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Johns Hopkins researchers report that a molecular diagnostic test accurately distinguishes among the three most common causes of vaginitis, an inflammation of vaginal tissue they say accounts for millions of visits to medical clinics and offices in the US each year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Biological fingerprint of tuberculosis meningitis discovered in children
(The Francis Crick Institute) Children with tuberculosis meningitis have a biological fingerprint that can be used to assess the severity of the condition, help decide the best course of treatment, and provide clues for novel treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Trends in emergency room visits & costs for patients with shingles
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) Their study suggests that while emergency room visits for shingles has decreased for those vaccinated against either the chicken pox (18 to 19 years old) or the shingles (60 years and older), the patient population in-between (ages 20-59 years old) has experienced increased visits for the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Bacterial superantigens turn our immune cells to the dark side
(PLOS) A subpopulation of immune cells that normally fend off pathogens can turn against the host during certain infections, a new study publishing on June 20 in the open access journal PLOS Biology reveals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Finding the perfect match: A new approach to battle drug-resistant bacteria
(University of Utah Health) Antibiotics were the wonder drug of the 20th century, but persistent use and over-prescription have opened the door that has allowed bacteria to evolve resistance. According to the CDC, more than two million people in the US develop bacterial infections that are resistant to multiple antibiotics every year. Researchers at University of Utah Health developed a rapid screening method to pair existing FDA-approved drugs to combat multi-drug resistant bacterial infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Infections in early life associated with increased risk for Celiac disease
(Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health) Infections during infancy are associated with increased risk for gluten intolerance (celiac disease) later on. Apparently the risk is particularly high in the case of repeated gastrointestinal infections in the first year of life. This conclusion was drawn by scientists of the Institute for Diabetes Research at Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen after analyzing data provided by the Bavarian Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians. The study has now been published in the American Journal of Epidemiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - In...
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Penn study details impact of antibiotics, antiseptics on skin microbiomes
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The use of topical antibiotics can dramatically alter communities of bacteria that live on the skin, while the use of antiseptics has a much smaller, less durable impact. The study, conducted in mice in the laboratory of Elizabeth Grice, PhD, an assistant professor of Dermatology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, is the first to show the long-term effects of antimicrobial drugs on the skin microbiome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

City rats: Why scientists are not hot on their tails
(Oxford University Press USA) Researchers argue they need greater access to urban properties if they are to win the war against rats. People around the world denounce rats for fouling foods, spreading disease, starting fires, and even disabling motor vehicles. One might assume because of the threat city rats pose to health and safety, scientists would be hot on their tails -- tracking every movement, monitoring each disease they carry, and discovering new tools to control their populations and movements. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Implant infections could be banished thanks to scaffold breakthrough
(IOP Publishing) Researchers in Ireland have taken a major step forward in the battle against medical implant infections.They developed a new type of implant scaffold to provide localised drug treatment and prevent infection, which has already proven effective against two types of major problem bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Psychiatric medication protects developing mouse brain from birth defects
(Society for Neuroscience) A clinically available anxiety drug safely and effectively protects against brain defects caused by the mouse version of a common human virus, finds new research published in The Journal of Neuroscience. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists step closer to drug treatment for hepatitis B
(University of York) A major new insight into how hepatitis B virus works could pave the way for new drug treatments for the infection which is the major cause of liver cancer worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How to stop the nasty lurking toxoplasmosis parasite? Target its 'stomach,' study suggests
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) One in three people has a potentially nasty parasite hiding inside their body -- tucked away in tiny cysts that the immune system can't eliminate and antibiotics can't touch. But new research reveals clues about how to stop it: Interfere with its digestion during this stubborn dormant phase. If the discovery leads to new treatments, it could help prevent a parasitic disease called toxoplasmosis that sickens people worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

DNA delivery technology joins battle against drug-resistant bacteria
(American Friends of Tel Aviv University) Tel Aviv University researchers have developed a new DNA delivery technology to fight drug-resistant bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

CU Anschutz and Baylor researchers to study Zika virus impact on children
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and the Baylor College of Medicine will join with Guatemalan investigators in a major study examining the clinical outcomes of children infected with the Zika virus after being born, focusing on long-term brain development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Mutant mosquitos make insecticide-resistance monitoring key to controlling Zika
(Emory Health Sciences) One of the most common insecticides used in the battle against the Aedes aegypti mosquito has no measurable impact when applied in communities where the mosquito has built up resistance to it, a study led by Emory University finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Financial incentives enhance viral suppression among HIV-positive persons in the US
(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) The use of gift cards significantly increased viral suppression and clinic attendance among HIV-positive patients. Findings showed that there was a four-percent higher percentage of patients with viral suppression at HIV care sites that offered financial incentives at care sites compared to sites not offering gift cards. Additionally, there was an approximately 5 percent higher viral suppression noted among a subgroup of patients who previously had not shown consistent viral suppression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Mathematical modeling uncovers mysteries of HIV infection in the brain
(University of Alberta) After uncovering the progression of HIV infection in the brain thanks to a new mathematical model developed by a UAlberta research team, clinicians and researchers are developing a nasal spray to administer drugs more effectively. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Ebola vaccine developed in Canada shows promising results
(Canadian Medical Association Journal) A phase 1 randomized controlled trial has found an Ebola virus disease vaccine, developed in Canada, was well-tolerated with no safety concerns, and high antibodies were present in participants six months after immunization. The study, led by Canadian researchers, is published in Canadian Medical Association Journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Could therapy animal visitation pose health risks at patient facilities?
(Tufts University) A survey of United States hospitals, eldercare facilities and therapy animal organizations revealed their health and safety policies for therapy animal visits varied widely, with many not following recommended guidelines for animal visitation. The research from investigators at Tufts Institute for Human-Animal Interaction at Tufts University appears online on June 19, 2017, in advance of print in the American Journal of Infection Control. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Clinical trial for a better treatment for mycetoma starts in Sudan
(Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative) The first-ever double-blind, randomized clinical trial for an effective treatment for the severely neglected disease mycetoma has enrolled its first patient at the Mycetoma Research Centre (MRC) in Khartoum, Sudan. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Rapid test facilitates malaria diagnosis
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Diagnosing malaria has been a very time-consuming and error-prone process up to now. Together with his Dutch colleague Jan van den Boogaart, Professor Oliver Hayden from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now developed an automated rapid blood test that provides an accurate diagnosis in almost 100 percent of cases. The researchers were presented with the European Inventor Award, which honors outstanding inventors from Europe and the rest of the world, for the development of the new method on June 15. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 16, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

8 in 10 Indonesian children has been infected with dengue
(PLOS) Indonesia has one of the highest burdens of dengue fever, a mosquito-borne virus, in the world, and children account for many cases. Well over half of all children in urban areas are infected with dengue by the age of 5, and more than 80 percent have been infected with the virus at least once by age 10, researchers now report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 15, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers discover new antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria
(Rutgers University) A team of Rutgers University-New Brunswick, NAICONS Srl., and other scientists has discovered a new antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria: pseudouridimycin. The new antibiotic is produced by a microbe found in a soil sample collected in Italy and was discovered by screening microbes from soil samples. The new antibiotic kills a broad spectrum of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant bacteria in a test tube and cures bacterial infections in mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 15, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists reveal mechanism behind mosquito-borne-disease 'blocker' used to fight viruses
(Indiana University) A new study from Indiana University may explain how a bacterium called Wolbachia prevents mosquitoes from transmitting deadly diseases such as dengue fever, West Nile virus and Zika. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 15, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A rusty and sweet side of sepsis
This study that provides new avenues for therapeutic approaches against sepsis appears in the June 15 issue of the scientific journal Cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 15, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Vaccination: Main prevention measure to address hepatitis A outbreaks among MSM
(European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC)) 1 173 confirmed hepatitis A cases have been reported across 15 EU countries since June 2016. Several countries have seen increases in hepatitis A cases in 2017 compared to previous years, and these are mainly affecting men who have sex with men. In light of these outbreaks and the beginning of Pride period, ECDC stresses the importance of hepatitis A vaccination and the delivery of prevention messages as main options to avoid new infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 15, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

High prevalence of CRE in Washington, D.C. healthcare facilities
(Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America) Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), a family of highly pathogenic antibiotic-resistant organisms, are endemic across Washington, D.C. healthcare facilities, with 5.2 percent of inpatients testing positive for the bacteria, according to new research published online today in Infection Control& Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 15, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cytokine profile differentiating Old World and New World hantaviral infections
(Kazan Federal University) Hantavirus infection is acute zoonosis clinically manifesting in two forms: Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS), caused by Old World hantaviruses, and Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), caused by New World hantaviruses. Mild form of HFRS, Nephropaia epidemica (NE), is diagnosed in Tatarstan region of Russia, while HPS is endemic in Americas. Humans become infected by inhaling virus contaminated aerosol of urine and feces. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 15, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UTI treatment reduces E. coli, may offer alternative to antibiotics
(Washington University School of Medicine) Urinary tract infections (UTIs) tend to come back, even when treated. Most UTIs are caused by E. coli that live in the gut and spread to the urinary tract. A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that a molecular decoy can reduce the numbers of UTI-causing bacteria in the gut. With the pool of disease-causing bacteria smaller, the researchers say, the risk of developing a UTI goes down. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 14, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Temperature changes make it easier for malaria to climb the Ethiopian highlands
(IOP Publishing) The highlands of Ethiopia are home to the majority of the country's population, the cooler climate serving as a natural buffer against malaria transmission. New data now show that increasing temperatures over the past 35 years are eroding this buffer, allowing conditions more favorable for malaria to begin climbing into highland areas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 14, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Anti-malaria drugs: Potential new target identified
(Penn State) A newly described protein could be an effective target for combatting drug-resistant malaria parasites. The protein regulates a number of genes involved with a critical part of the parasite's complex life cycle -- its invasion of a person's red blood cells. Now that the researchers know the protein's role in this invasion process, they have a completely new angle for developing new antimalarial drugs for targeting the malaria parasite. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 14, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study finds 1 in 5 hospitalized adults suffer side effects from prescribed antibiotics
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) A study examining the impact of antibiotics prescribed for nearly 1,500 adult patients admitted to The Johns Hopkins Hospital found that adverse side effects occurred in one-fifth of them, and that nearly one-fifth of those side effects occurred in patients who didn't need antibiotics in the first place. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 14, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Why we get diarrhea
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) In a new study from Brigham and Women's Hospital, investigators explore the immune mechanism that drives diarrhea, concluding that it plays a critical role in pathogen clearance in the early stages of infection (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 14, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cleaning and sterilization techniques leave ureteroscopes contaminated
(Association for Professionals in Infection Control) The techniques used to clean and sterilize flexible ureteroscopes leave behind contamination including debris, residue, and bacteria, according to a new study being presented at the 44th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. Researchers concluded that these failures may result in the use of dirty scopes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 14, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

More than a third of heater-cooler devices used in open heart surgery may be contaminated with deadly bacteria
(Association for Professionals in Infection Control) Thirty-three of 89 (37 percent) heater-cooler units assessed between July 2015 and December 2016 tested positive for Mycobacterium chimaera (M. chimaera), a bacterium associated with fatal infections in open-heart surgery patients, according to new research presented at the 44th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 14, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Significant gaps in infection prevention impact long-term care residents
(Association for Professionals in Infection Control) While nearly 400,000 residents of long-term care facilities die as a result of healthcare associated infections (HAIs), these facilities continue to lack the resources, including qualified personnel, necessary to implement adequate infection control programs, according to research presented at the 44th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 14, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

From Genome Research: Environmental pressures on opportunistic fungal pathogen
(Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory) With an estimated one million cases diagnosed worldwide each year, the human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, which can cause life-threatening fungal infections in immunocompromised patients, is an important health concern. In a study published today in Genome Research, scientists identified natural genomic variation in C. neoformans that may influence prevalence and disease severity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 13, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

US aid to combat malaria in Africa is associated with reduced risk of childhood mortality
(PLOS) In a study published in PLOS Medicine, Aleksandra Jakubowski of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, US, and colleagues show that funding from the US President's Malaria Initiative (PMI) in 19 sub-Saharan African countries was associated with a 16 person reduction in the annual risk of under-five child mortality in the years following introduction of the Initiative. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 13, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Donor microbes persist 2 years after fecal transplant to treat C. difficile infection
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have made the first direct demonstration that fecal donor microbes remained in recipients for months or years after a transplant to treat the diarrhea and colitis caused by recurrent Clostridium difficile infections -- a serious and stubborn cause of diarrhea after an antibiotic treatment for some other illness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 13, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Clinical study shows TempTraq detects fevers quicker than the current standard-of-care method
(Falls Communications) A University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center (UH) study shows TempTraq, a patented, wearable, Bluetooth continuous temperature monitor in the form of a soft, comfortable patch, can detect a rise in body temperature up to 180 minutes earlier, in a majority of patient cases, than the current standard-of-care (SOC) method. Earlier fever detection empowers clinicians to intervene faster. The promising results were published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 13, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Identifying underlying causes of immune deficiencies that increase shingles risk
(JCI Journals) Varicella zoster virus can remain dormant for decades and reactivate to cause shingles. Shingles occurs at a higher rate in immunocompromised individuals. A study published this week in the JCI provides insights into a metabolic mechanism for immune deficiencies that permit reactivation of long-latent viruses. These findings are a step toward new strategies to improve preventative treatments for shingles and other infections in high-risk populations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 12, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news