Broadly acting antibodies found in plasma of Ebola survivors
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Recent Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreaks highlight the need for licensed treatments. ZMapp, an experimental therapy, has shown promise in a clinical trial, but targets only one of five known species of Ebola virus. Now NIAID-supported scientists have discovered powerful, broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) in the blood of EVD survivors. In animal studies, two of these antibodies provided substantial protection against disease caused by the three species known to cause fatal human illness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Why men might recover from flu faster than women
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Men may recover more quickly from influenza infections because they produce more of a key lung-healing protein, a study from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Technique may improve lung delivery of bacteria-killing phage
(Georgia Institute of Technology) A new delivery system for bacteriophages--viruses that selectively attack harmful bacteria--could help give doctors a new way to battle lung infections that threaten older patients and people with cystic fibrosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 16, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

More data needed to determine safety of probiotics and prebiotics
(American College of Physicians) Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the efficacy of probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics often fail to report potential harms. Without safety data, experts warn that they cannot broadly conclude that these interventions are safe. The findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 16, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers to target mosquito egg production to curtail disease
(University of California - Riverside) Entomologists at the University of California, Riverside, have received a five-year grant of $2.44 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate the role hormones play in the female mosquito's ability to use human blood for egg production. The funding will allow the entomologists to introduce novel research tools for genetic manipulation, such as CRISPR, in their research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 13, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Nosocomial neonatal meningitis with Acinetobacter baumannii on myelomeningocele
(Bentham Science Publishers) In this article, together with a review of the literature, we report two cases of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii neonatal meningitis following ruptured myelomeningocele, treated with intravenous colistin with favorable results. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 13, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

National Academies target opioid abuse and infectious disease consequences
(Emory Health Sciences) The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine today released proceedings of a March 12 workshop exploring the rise in infectious diseases accompanying opioid abuse, and possible strategies for reducing both epidemics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 13, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New study finds 93 million people vulnerable to death from snakebites
(Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation) A new scientific study finds 93 people live in remote areas with venomous snakes and, if bitten, face a greater likelihood of dying than those in urban settings because of poor access to anti-venom medications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Who got bit? By mailing in 16,000 ticks, citizen scientists help track disease exposures
(Colorado State University) A bite from a disease-carrying tick can transmit a serious, potentially fatal infection, such as Lyme disease. But many ticks go unnoticed and unreported. Now, with the help of citizen scientists, ecologists at Colorado State University and Northern Arizona University are offering better insight into people's and animals' potential exposure to tick-borne diseases -- not just the disease reporting and prevalence that's only tracked when people get sick. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Developed and developing: An outdated classification for countries?
(PLOS) Countries have traditionally been divided into two broad categories according to their capacity to innovate. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases say these categories are overly simplistic and leave out the key roles that a group of Innovative Developing Countries (IDCs) play in the public health arena. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Citizen science supports tick-borne disease research
(PLOS) A nationwide investigation of the prevalence and distribution of ticks and exposure to tick-borne diseases highlights the value of public participation in science. The study, published on July 12 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE, was conducted by Nathan Nieto of Northern Arizona University and colleagues, and funded by Bay Area Lyme Foundation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists ID protein exploited by virus ravaging West Africa
(University of California - San Diego) New research has uncovered a protein enabling the replication of arenaviruses, pathogens now widespread in West Africa that are carried by rodents and can infect humans with lethal fevers. The research identified DDX3 as a key factor promoting arenavirus multiplication through its unexpected ability to promote viral RNA synthesis and dismantle normal human immune system defenses. The study may pave the way to new therapeutic treatments for arenaviruses and hemorrhagic fever. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Imaging technique illuminates immune status of monkeys with HIV-like virus
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Findings from an animal study suggest that a non-invasive imaging technique could, with further development, become a tool to assess immune system recovery in people receiving treatment for HIV infection. Researchers used single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and a CD4-specific imaging probe to assess immune system changes throughout the bodies of macaques infected with SIV following initiation and interruption of antiretroviral therapy (ART). They evaluated pools of CD4+ T cells in tissues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Purdue startup developing device that detects mosquito-borne diseases
(Purdue University) A startup created by Purdue University professors is developing a sensor that can detect dangerous mosquito-borne tropical diseases faster and at a lower cost than current methods, giving health officials time to take action before the viruses are transmitted to humans.SMK Diagnostics has created biosensor technology to identify and monitor diseases such as Zika, which set off a global health crisis in 2015 and 2016, and dengue, which causes about 22,000 deaths a year worldwide, mostly among children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Georgia State researcher gets $419,100 grant to study virus similar to Ebola virus
(Georgia State University) Dr. Christopher Basler, a professor in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University, director of the university's Center for Microbial Pathogenesis and a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in Microbial Pathogenesis, has received a two-year, $419,100 federal grant to study a virus similar to Ebola virus that causes disease in animals but not in humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Whole genome sequencing reveals cluster of resistant bacterium in returning travelers
(European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC)) Thirteen patients with OXA-48-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae ST392 have been reported by Sweden and Norway between January and April 2018 -- all returning travelers with prior hospital admission in Gran Canaria. Whole genome sequencing showed tight clustering between the bacterial isolates from the cases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NIAID dcientists create 3D structure of 1918 influenza virus-like particles
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Virus-like particles (VLPs) are protein-based structures that mimic viruses and bind to antibodies. Because VLPs aren't infectious, they show promise as vaccine platforms for many viral diseases, including influenza. Since details about influenza VLPs are scant, a team of researchers developed a 3D model based on the 1918 H1 pandemic influenza virus. The research, conducted by NIAID scientists, could benefit VLP vaccine projects, targeting a range of viruses from HIV to Ebola and SARS coronavirus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Janelle Ayres receives $1 million from W. M. Keck Foundation for disease research
(Salk Institute) Associate Professor Janelle Ayres is the recipient of a $1 million grant from the W. M. Keck Foundation to study new ways to treat deadly infections including sepsis and the flu, both of which require novel therapies beyond antibiotics and antivirals to effectively combat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NEJM publishes final results from phase two study showing vaccines can reduce rate of sustained TB infections
(Burness) Aeras, a nonprofit organization dedicated to developing vaccines against tuberculosis (TB), today announced the publication of the full results from a Phase 2, randomized, controlled clinical trial of two TB vaccines-- the currently available BCG vaccine and an investigational vaccine, H4:IC31--in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Enzyme discovery could help in fight against TB
(University of Warwick) Research by a team led by Dr. Elizabeth Fullam has revealed new findings about an enzyme found in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the bacterium that causes TB. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Developmental disabilities reported in HIV-positive children in South Africa
(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) HIV-positive children in South Africa are more likely to have developmental disabilities compared to children who are HIV negative. HIV-positive children ages 4 to 6 had nearly four times the odds of delays in sitting, standing, walking, and speaking, and more than twice the odds of a hearing disability and cognitive delay compared to HIV-negative children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How Mycobacterium tuberculosis escapes death in macrophages
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) The bacteria that cause the devastating disease tuberculosis have the ability to escape destruction and grow after they are engulfed by lung macrophages, the immune cells that are supposed to destroy pathogens. Now researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have described key biochemical steps between the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the macrophage responsible for that ability. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Can nanoparticles be used to lower antibiotic resistance?
(University of Houston) Antibiotic resistance is one of the world's most serious threats to public health, forcing the use of medications that are more toxic, more expensive and not always effective. Engineers at the University of Houston are studying whether the use of tiny amounts of antibiotics embedded in corn-based nanoparticles could help both animals and people avoid the problem. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Differences in the mouths of youth born with HIV may increase their risk of dental decay
(Forsyth Institute) A team of scientists from The Forsyth Institute, a global leader in oral health research, in collaboration with the NIH-funded Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS), has published the results of a new study indicating that differences in the mouth bacteria of youth born with HIV may increase their risk of cavities. The researchers found that HIV-infected youth, compared with uninfected youth, had lower numbers of Corynebacterium, a microbe that is abundant in dental plaque of healthy individuals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Kissing bugs kiss their hiding spots goodbye, thanks to tiny radio transmitters
(Entomological Society of America) In a new pilot study, researchers in Texas successfully attached miniature radio transmitters to kissing bugs and tracked their movements. Also known as triatomine bugs, kissing bugs transmit the pathogen that causes Chagas disease in humans and animals. They typically move at night and hide during day, and uncovering their secretive movements could play a key role in reducing their impact as a disease vector. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 9, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Using hepatitis C-infected donor kidneys could reduce time on dialysis for transplant patients with HCV
(University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center) Transplanting hepatitis C-infected dialysis patients with HCV-positive donor organs and then treating the infection later is more effective, cheaper and shortens organ wait time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 9, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Whooping cough vaccine: The power of first impressions
(La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology) In their latest study, researchers at La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology (LJI) report that individuals who had been inoculated with the newer pertussis vaccine as part of their initial series of shots, mount a weaker recall response when receiving booster shots later on. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 9, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Meningococcal infection: Bacterial aggregates form a thick honey-like liquid that flows through blood vessels
(Institut Pasteur) The Inserm team led by Guillaume Dum é nil at the Institut Pasteur, in collaboration with several teams of physicists, has unraveled a key stage in infection by Neisseria meningitidis, a human pathogen responsible for meningitis in infants and young adults. Bacterial aggregates in blood vessels appear to facilitate the progression of the disease. Even if treatment is administered rapidly, the mortality rate due to meningococcal infections remains very high. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 9, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Novel HIV vaccine candidate is safe and induces immune response in healthy adults and monkeys
(The Lancet) New research published in The Lancet shows that an experimental HIV-1 vaccine regimen is well-tolerated and generated comparable and robust immune responses against HIV in healthy adults and rhesus monkeys. Moreover, the vaccine candidate protected against infection with an HIV-like virus in monkeys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 6, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Research points to potential shortcoming of antibiotic lab tests
(Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) To determine which antibiotics reliably treat which bacterial infections, diagnostic laboratories that focus on clinical microbiology test pathogens isolated from patients. However, a recent study out of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center reveals that one aspect of these tests may fall short and not be stringent enough. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 6, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Natural lipid acts as potent anti-inflammatory
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) National Institutes of Health researchers have identified a naturally occurring lipid -- a waxy, fatty acid -- used by a disease-causing bacterium to impair the host immune response and increase the chance of infection. Inadvertently, they also may have found a potent inflammation therapy against bacterial and viral diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 6, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Biomarker discovered for pathogen that can blind or kill healthy young people
(University at Buffalo) UB researchers have have discovered several biomarkers that can accurately identify hypervirulent K. pneumoniae, a pathogen that infects completely healthy people and can cause blindness in one day and flesh-eating infections, brain abscesses and death in just a few days. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 6, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Smart bandages designed to monitor and tailor treatment for chronic wounds
(Tufts University) A team of engineers has developed a prototype bandage designed to actively monitor the condition of chronic wounds and deliver appropriate drug treatments to improve the chances of healing. While the lab-tested bandages remain to be assessed in a clinical context, the research, published today in the journal Small, is aimed at transforming bandaging from a traditionally passive treatment into a more active paradigm to address a persistent and difficult medical challenge. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 6, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Spleen microbes of wild animals change with tick-borne illness
(PLOS) Anaplasmosis, a tick-borne febrile disease, can be carried by wild mammals before being transmitted to humans through a tick bite. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have found that Anaplasma bacteria alter the patterns of other microbes in the spleens of mice and shrews. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Immunotherapy for deadly bacteria shows early promise
(Lehigh University) Lehigh University's Marcos Pires and his team have designed a strategy aimed at tagging Gram-negative bacteria for destruction via small molecule conjugates they have created that specifically home to bacterial cell surfaces and trigger an immune response. They observed a significant decrease in the number of live bacteria using their compound in experiments on E. coli in human serum. The researchers describe their work in a forthcoming paper in Cell Chemical Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Potential new drug for two life-threatening diseases
(Cardiff University) Derived from nature, a potential new drug to treat two life-threatening tropical diseases has been discovered as a result of collaboration between two Welsh universities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

£ 2 million awarded to fight disease in East Africa
(University of Warwick) The University of Warwick has been awarded £ 2 million to tackle the spread of viruses in East Africa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Amyloid beta protein protects brain from herpes infection by entrapping viral particles
(Massachusetts General Hospital) A Massachusetts General Hospital study has found the mechanism by which amyloid beta -- the protein deposited into plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease -- protects from the effects of herpes viruses commonly found in the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UNC-Chapel Hill researchers fight against current Ebola outbreak
(University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) Research conducted at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is aiding the fight against the deadly Ebola virus outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo that has been declared 'largely contained' by the World Health Organization. Carolina researchers are providing on-the-ground care to Ebola patients, continuing to monitor Ebola survivors from the 2014 outbreak to learn more about the virus, and tested the experimental drug remdesivir. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Stopping a tiny -- and deadly -- fly in its tracks
(Brigham Young University) New research presents a technique that could help treat African sleeping sickness, which impacts millions in sub-Saharan Africa and -- in its late stages -- can be fatal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Gonorrhea researchers identify novel route to vaccine, new antibiotic
(Oregon State University) Researchers have identified a protein that powers the virulence of the bacteria that causes gonorrhea, opening the possibility of a new target for antibiotics and, even better, a vaccine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Pneumococcal DNA predicts course of infection
(Radboud University Medical Center) Besides the patient's condition, pneumococcal DNA also appears to provide information about the course of an infection. In the next issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases, Radboudumc researchers describe several pneumococcal genes predicting whether a patient runs the risk of developing meningitis or dying from the disease. Use of such genetic tests can improve infection diagnostics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 4, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Combining antibiotics changes their effectiveness
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) The effectiveness of antibiotics can be altered by combining them with each other, non-antibiotic drugs or even with food additives. Depending on the bacterial species, some combinations stop antibiotics from working to their full potential whilst others begin to defeat antibiotic resistance, report EMBL researchers and collaborators in Nature on July 4. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 4, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers gather in New Delhi to kick off observational study for newborns with sepsis
(Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative) Over 80 researchers from 11 countries are meeting in New Delhi today to kick off an observational study to understand sepsis in newborns and current antibiotic prescribing practices. The observational study, led by the GARDP, is benefiting from US $2 million funding from Bill& Melinda Gates Foundation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 3, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A promising new tool to measure antibodies against malaria
(Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)) Antibodies against multiple Plasmodium falciparum proteins (or antigens) can be measured using a simple, accurate and reproducible assay that requires very small amounts of blood. In a series of recently published articles, a team led by ISGlobal -- an institution supported by 'la Caixa' Foundation -- reports the development and optimisation of several 'quantitative suspension array' assays (qSAT) that could help assess natural and vaccine-induced responses to malaria and other parasites. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 3, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A well-known animal health drug could stop outbreaks of malaria and Zika virus
(Scripps Research Institute) Medicines given to household pets to kill fleas and ticks might be effective for preventing outbreaks of malaria, Zika fever and other dangerous insect-borne diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 2, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Zika virus infection may multiply risk of miscarriage, stillbirth
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Researchers at six National Primate Research Centers (NPRCs) combined results from individual studies to find that 26 percent of pregnancies in 50 monkeys infected with Zika virus during the first trimester of pregnancy ended in miscarriage or stillbirth, dwarfing the nearly 8 percent rate found earlier this year by a study of women infected with Zika early in pregnancy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 2, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Zika virus may pose greater threat of miscarriages than previously thought
(University of California - Davis) Research from several institutions, including the California National Primate Research Center at UC Davis, suggests that more women could be losing their pregnancies to the Zika   virus without knowing they are infected. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 2, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study: Zika could cause more miscarriages than we realize
(Oregon Health& Science University) More women could be losing their pregnancies to the Zika virus without knowing they're infected, suggests a collaborative study published in Nature Medicine.The study found 26 percent of nonhuman primates infected with Zika during early stages of pregnancy experienced miscarriage or stillbirth even though the animals showed few signs of infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 2, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Undetected Zika infections may be triggering miscarriages and stillbirths
(Texas Biomedical Research Institute) A collaborative study between six of the National Primate Research Centers shows pregnancy loss due to Zika A infections that don't cause women any symptoms may be a common but unrecognized cause of miscarriages and stillbirths. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 2, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news