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Researchers define burden of Hepatitis in Democratic Republic of the Congo
(University of North Carolina Health Care) Using laboratory equipment readily available in developing countries, researchers from UNC and Abbott Diagnostics were able to define and map the burden of hepatitis C virus for the first time in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Their findings were published in Clinical Infectious Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 18, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

'Mystery clients' reveal weaknesses of tuberculosis care in rural China
(PLOS) Many health care providers in China -- especially those at village clinics and township health centers -- fail to correctly manage tuberculosis (TB) cases, according to a study involving standardized patients published this week in PLOS Medicine by Sean Sylvia of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA, Chengchao Zhou of Shangdong University, China, and colleagues at the World Bank, McGill University, Stanford University and other institutions in China. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 17, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Gene transcription in virus-specific CD8 T cells differentiates chronic from resolving HCV
(Massachusetts General Hospital) Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have identified differences in gene transcription within key immune cells that may distinguish those individuals infected with the hepatitis C virus who develop chronic infection from those whose immune systems successfully clear the virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 17, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New study: nearly half of US medical care comes from emergency rooms
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Nearly half of all US medical care is delivered by emergency departments, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. In recent years, the percentage of care delivered by emergency departments has grown. The paper highlights the major role played by emergency rooms in US health care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 17, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UMass Amherst tick testing lab receives grant to study new disease
(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) Taking advantage of its special expertise in identifying tick-borne, disease-causing pathogens, plus its access the thousands of people who send ticks to be tested each year, the LMZ at UMass Amherst will partner with with L2 Diagnostics of New Haven, a biotech company that has developed a human test for Borrelia miyamotoi, one of the latest tick pathogens to emerge. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 17, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New research opens the door to 'functional cure' for HIV
(Scripps Research Institute) Scientists have for the first time shown that a novel compound effectively suppresses production of the virus in chronically infected cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 17, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Portable 3-D scanner assesses patients with elephantiasis
(Washington University in St. Louis) An estimated 120 million people worldwide are infected with lymphatic filariasis, a parasitic, mosquito-borne disease that can cause major swelling and deformity of the legs, a condition known as elephantiasis. Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that a portable scanning device can measure limb enlargement and disfigurement faster and more easily in patients with elephantiasis. The research tool makes it easy to obtain accurate measurements and determine whether treatments to reduce swelling are effective. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 16, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Endogenous infection marker guides antibiotic therapy
(University of Basel) The endogenous infection marker procalcitonin can help to guide the use of antibiotics when treating infections. The course of antibiotic therapy is shortened, and its side effects and mortality rate also decrease, as researchers from the University of Basel and other colleagues report in the journal The Lancet Infectious Diseases. They conducted a meta-analysis of over 6,700 international data sets from patients with respiratory infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 16, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New antibiotic resistance genes found
(Chalmers University of Technology) Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have found several previously unknown genes that make bacteria resistant to last-resort antibiotics. The genes were found by searching large volumes of bacterial DNA and the results are published in the scientific journal Microbiome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 16, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Bentham Science Journals indexed in The Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI)
(Bentham Science Publishers) The Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI) has accepted to index two more journals published by Bentham Science Publishers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 13, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Immune reaction to sandfly saliva varies between individuals living in endemic areas
(PLOS) The Phlebotomus papatasi sandfly is responsible for spreading Leishmania throughout the tropics and subtropics. How individuals in areas endemic for Leishmania infection react to sandfly saliva depends on their long-term exposure to the flies, researchers now report PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases TK. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 12, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Reengineered immune system cells show early promise against HIV
(PLOS) Improving on a previous attempt, scientists have developed a new strategy that could potentially be used to reengineer a patient's own immune system cells to fight HIV. The approach, described in PLOS Pathogens, shows benefit in human cell cultures and in mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 12, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers find mechanism involved in novel drug design with potential to treat tuberculosis
(Instituto de Medicina Molecular) Portuguese researchers successfully used a pioneer method to chemically modify a protein's components with potential medical applications and an impact in the fight against tuberculosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 12, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NIFA honors land-grant university partners, announces hall of fame inductees
(National Institute of Food and Agriculture) The US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today honored several land-grant university partners during its annual Day of Appreciation ceremony. Those honored were recognized for supporting NIFA's mission to advance agricultural research, education, and extension to solve significant societal challenges. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 12, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New UK-India scheme to tackle antimicrobial resistance announced
(Academy of Medical Sciences (UK)) The Academy of Medical Sciences is today (Friday, 13th October) announcing the pledge from The Yusuf and Farida Hamied Foundation1 for a scheme to build stronger research links between the UK and India to jointly address the challenge of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 12, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Promising new leprosy vaccine moves into human trials
(Infectious Disease Research Institute) Today marks a significant step forward in the prevention and treatment of leprosy as the Infectious Disease Research Institute (IDRI) and American Leprosy Missions announce the start of a Phase 1 clinical trial in humans for a promising leprosy vaccine candidate -- the first vaccine developed specifically for leprosy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 12, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Experimental Ebola vaccines elicit year-long immune response
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Results from a large randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial in Liberia show that two candidate Ebola vaccines pose no major safety concerns and can elicit immune responses by one month after initial vaccination that last for at least one year. The findings, published in NEJM, are based on a study of 1,500 adults that began during the West Africa Ebola outbreak. The trial is being conducted by a US-Liberia clinical research collaboration known as PREVAIL. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 11, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New study mapping pandemic potential could help prevent future disease outbreaks
(Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation) A new scientific study provides the first evidence-based assessment of pandemic potential in Africa prior to outbreaks and identifies ways to prevent them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 11, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UTokyo NY Conference to headline studies on deadly viruses, Alzheimer's
(University of Tokyo) Leading scientists from Japan in the fields of medical science and industrial science will speak at the UTokyo NY Conference on Friday, November 3, 2017, to report on their international collaboration projects on deadly viruses and Alzheimer's prevention. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 11, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Norovirus evades immune system by hiding out in rare gut cells
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new mouse study shows that, even in immunized animals, noroviruses can escape the immune system and still spread by hiding out in an extremely rare type of cell in the gut. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 11, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Calcium lets T cells use sugar to multiply and fight infection
(NYU Langone Health / NYU School of Medicine) A calcium signal controls whether immune cells can use the nutrients needed to fuel their multiplication into a cellular army designed to fight invading viruses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 11, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study exposes the dark side of coffee cultivation in Uganda
(Lehigh University) New research led by Kelly Austin, associate professor of sociology at Lehigh, explores unequal exchange in the coffee industry. She cites a range of negative consequences that coffee cultivation contributes to, including: malaria vulnerability, decreased participation in schooling, gender inequalities, and environmental degradation in Bududa, Uganda. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 11, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists find evidence our best friends, dogs, similarly adapted to malaria in Africa
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) Once domesticated, dogs spread across the globe wherever humans migrated and settled. 'Recently, we have shown the first evidence that dogs can undergo similar adaptations as humans, using the same genes to live in the high altitudes of Tibet,' said Dr. Ya-ping Zhang. Now, the Chinese research team led by Dr. Zhang has successfully identified genes selected in African dogs and functionally verified the action of one of these as the first evidence of dog adaptation to malaria.   (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 10, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How fever in early pregnancy causes heart, facial birth defects
(Duke University Medical Center) Researchers have known for decades that fevers in the first trimester of pregnancy increase risk for some heart defects and facial deformities such as cleft lip or palate. Exactly how this happens is unclear. Scientists have debated whether a virus or other infection source causes the defects, or if fever alone is the underlying problem. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 10, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A new potential alternative to mosquito control discovered
(Taylor& Francis Group) Natural essential oils extracted from the peel of a citrus fruit could be an effective new eco-friendly alternative in mosquitoes control programs, reports a new study published today in Natural Product Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 10, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Mum's immune response could trigger social deficits for kids with autism
(University of Sydney) Children with autism are more likely to show severe social symptoms if their mother had chronic asthma or allergies while pregnant, the University of Sydney's Brain and Mind Centre reveals today in Molecular Psychiatry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 10, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Better mini brains could help scientists identify treatments for Zika-related brain damage
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) UCLA researchers have developed an improved technique for creating simplified human brain tissue from stem cells. Because these so-called 'mini brain organoids' mimic human brains in how they grow and develop, they're vital to studying complex neurological diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 10, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

TB Alliance moves two novel tuberculosis drugs into human trials
(Burness) TBA-7371 and sutezolid entered phase 1 clinical trials, TB Alliance announced today. Both compounds have proceeded through early preclinical development and were granted 'Investigative New Drug' status by the US Food and Drug Administration. The phase 1 clinical trials are presently ongoing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 10, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study warns of pumpkin-colored zombies
(Virginia Institute of Marine Science) Salt marsh research shows that growing abundance of tiny shrimp infected by a microscopic parasite may portend future threats to humankind through disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 9, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Indian government needs to do more to tackle rising sale of unapproved antibiotics
(Queen Mary University of London) In India, the sale of antibiotics requiring the tightest control and regulation is rising the fastest, according to an analysis by researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and Newcastle University. The correspondence published in The Lancet Global Health highlights serious hurdles for controlling antimicrobial resistance in the country. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 9, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

TGen sequencing test enables precise identification of drug-resistant TB
(The Translational Genomics Research Institute) Two studies led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) document how a new advanced genetic sequencing approach can help thwart the growing worldwide threat posed by drug-resistant mutations of tuberculosis (TB). The threat of TB is increasing in some places as mutant versions of the disease become more and more resistant to current drug treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 9, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

GW research team brings Zika virus vaccine clinical trial to Brazil site
(George Washington University) A research team at GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences awarded over $2 million to participate in Zika vaccine trial in Brazil. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 9, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Global kids study: More trees, less disease
(University of Vermont) A study of 300,000 children in 35 nations says children whose watersheds have greater tree cover are less likely to experience diarrheal disease, the second leading cause of death for kids under the age of five.Published in Nature Communications, the study is the first to quantify the connection between watershed quality and individual health outcomes of children at the global scale. The study results from a major new database that enables 'big data' approaches. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 9, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Reported penicillin allergy appears to increase the risk of surgical site infections
(Massachusetts General Hospital) A study by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators found that surgical patients believed to be allergic to penicillin were significantly more likely to develop surgical site infections than were patients with no documented allergy, a difference totally attributable to the alternative antibiotics used to prevent such infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 9, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

US Olympians at the 2016 Rio Games were infected with West Nile virus, not Zika
(University of Utah Health) US Olympic and Paralympic athletes and staff who traveled to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, for the 2016 Summer Games did not become infected with Zika virus but did test positive for other tropical, mosquito-borne viral infections, including West Nile Virus, Dengue Fever and Chikungunya. Results from the University of Utah Health-led study will be reported on Oct. 7 at IDWeek, a national infectious disease conference being held in San Diego. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 7, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New York City PrEP prescriptions increase nearly 1,000 percent, but disparities remain
(Infectious Diseases Society of America) New York City saw a 976 percent increase in PrEP prescriptions in two years, but disparities remain, according to an IDWeek study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 6, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Antibiotics for dental procedures linked to superbug infection, study shows
(Infectious Diseases Society of America) Dental procedures are an overlooked source of antibiotic prescribing, which is a concern as these medications increase the risk of developing C. difficile, according to an IDWeek study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 6, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Penn team shows how seemingly acute viral infections can persist
(University of Pennsylvania) Led by Carolina L ó pez of the University of Pennsylvania, a multi-disciplinary research team has resolved a paradox of viral infection. They've identified how a viral product can both trigger an immune response aimed at eliminating the virus or, conversely, allow the virus to survive and persist. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 6, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers analyze cost-effectiveness of guinea worm disease eradication
(PLOS) Eradication of guinea worm disease (dracunculiaisis), targeted by the World Health Organization (WHO) for the year 2015, is finally within reach, with only 25 reported human transmissions in 2016. Now, researchers writing in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have re-asserted the cost-effectiveness of the global Guinea Worm Eradication Programme (GWEP), some 30 years after it started. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 5, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Women who get frequent UTIs may reduce risk by drinking plenty of water
(Infectious Diseases Society of America) Women who suffer from recurrent urinary tract infections may reduce their risk by drinking more water, according to an IDWeek 2017 study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 5, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Second grade handwashing experiment leads to big decrease in bacteria, illness
(Infectious Diseases Society of America) An experiment with Petri dishes and black lights helped second graders observe the value of hand hygiene, according to an IDWeek 2017 study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 5, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Multiple research approaches are key to pandemic preparedness, NIAID officials say
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Preparedness in the face of major disease outbreaks can save thousands of lives. A new article by Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of NIH, and colleagues examines the multifaceted nature of effective preparedness and the role that biomedical research plays. Specifically, the article examines three approaches to pandemic preparedness: pathogen-specific work, platform-based technologies, and prototype-pathogen efforts. The article appears online in JAMA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 5, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers create molecule that could 'kick and kill' HIV
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) Researchers have been looking for ways to eliminate the 'reservoirs' where the virus hides, and researchers from UCLA, Stanford University and the National Institutes of Health may have developed a solution. Their approach involves sending an agent to 'wake up' the dormant virus, which causes it to begin replicating so that either the immune system or the virus itself would kill the cell harboring HIV. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 4, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Light-activated nanoparticles can supercharge current antibiotics
(University of Colorado at Boulder) Light-activated nanoparticles, also known as quantum dots, can provide a crucial boost in effectiveness for antibiotic treatments used to combat drug-resistant superbugs such as E. coli and Salmonella, new University of Colorado Boulder research shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 4, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Antibiotic susceptibility testing in 30 minutes or less may help doctors
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Scientists have pioneered a method to detect antibiotic susceptibility for urinary tract infections in less than 30 minutes -- potentially enabling patients to be diagnosed and prescribed effective treatments during a single clinical visit. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 4, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Monoclonal antibody 'cocktail' halts Zika infection, according to new Miller School study
(University of Miami Miller School of Medicine) A collaborative study led by a University of Miami Miller School of Medicine researcher has found that a " cocktail " of monoclonal antibodies prevented Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in primates. 'This is a promising intervention to prevent and treat ZIKV infection during pregnancy,' said David Watkins, Ph.D., professor and vice chair for research, Department of Pathology. 'We would like to develop this antibody combination and get it into clinical trials as soon as possible.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 4, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study: therapists lack knowledge to prevent transmission of CMV
(Midwestern University) Results from a new health-risk knowledge survey indicate that physical and occupational therapists are at increased risk of contracting cytomegalovirus (CMV), a leading cause of prenatal infection and lifelong disabilities, but that they lack sufficient knowledge to prevent its transmission. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 4, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New approach may hold the key to treating antibiotic-resistant bacteria
(Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology) A new study published online in The FASEB Journal highlights the therapeutic potential of a simple chemical mimic of host defense peptides (C10OOc12O) to cure bacterial infections both on its own, as well as in combination with otherwise inefficient antibiotics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 4, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Test reveals antibiotic-resistant bacteria in a half hour
(California Institute of Technology) A new test developed at Caltech can identify whether bacteria are resistant to antibiotics in a mere half hour, giving medical professionals a new tool for fighting infections and superbug bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 4, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Brain damage caused by Zika exposure in utero can be detected by both fetal MRI and ultrasound
(Children's National Health System) Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound provide complementary data needed to assess ongoing changes to the brains of fetuses exposed to Zika in utero. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 4, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news