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Positive Phase 2 results of NovaDigm TX's NDV-3A vaccine published in Clinical Infectious Diseases
(MacDougall Biomedical Communications, Inc.) NovaDigm Therapeutics, a company developing innovative immuno-therapeutics and preventative vaccines for fungal and bacterial infections, today announced the publication of data from a Phase 2a study of its NDV-3A vaccine program in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. The data demonstrate that a single dose of NDV-3A with alum adjuvant was safe, well-tolerated, immunogenic and efficacious, leading to reduced recurrences of vaginitis in patients with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 25, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Commonly prescribed heartburn drug linked to pneumonia in older adults
(American Geriatrics Society) Researchers at the University of Exeter have found a statistical link between pneumonia in older people and a group of medicines commonly used to neutralize stomach acid in people with heartburn or stomach ulcers. Although proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are still a valuable group of medicines, research is indicating that PPIs are not as completely safe for older people as previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 24, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Malaria study reveals gene variants linked to risk of disease
(University of Edinburgh) Many people of African heritage are protected against malaria by inheriting a particular version of a gene, a large-scale study has shown. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 24, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers use smart phone to make a faster infection detector
(Washington State University) Washington State University researchers have developed a low-cost, portable laboratory on a phone that works nearly as well as clinical laboratories to detect common viral and bacterial infections.The work could lead to faster and lower-cost lab results for fast-moving viral and bacterial epidemics, especially in rural or lower-resource regions where laboratory equipment and medical personnel are sometimes not readily available. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 24, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Virulence switch in 'Iraqibacter': Potential Achilles heel?
(Emory Health Sciences) Microbiologists have identified a component of a genetic switch, which they call a potential 'Achilles' heel,' for a type of bacteria often associated with wounded warriors. The switch makes it possible for Acinetobacter baumannii to change between a virulent, hardy form and an avirulent form that is better at surviving at lower temperatures outside a host. Defining the switch could map out targets for new antibiotics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 23, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Fight against Zika, dengue get boost from reliable spread of bacteria
(Vanderbilt University) How a bacteria hijacked insect fertility remained a mystery for five decades, until Associate Professor of Biological Sciences Seth Bordenstein and his team helped solve it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 23, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Antibiotic resistance can be caused by small amounts of antibiotics
(Uppsala University) Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a global and growing problem in health care. To be able to prevent further development of resistance developing, it is important to understand where and how antibiotic resistance in bacteria arises. New research from Uppsala University shows that low concentrations of antibiotics, too, can cause high antibiotic resistance to develop in bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 23, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Addition precautions at hospital don't help prevent spread of resistant bacteria
(European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases) Contact precautions, used in addition to the standard precautions, the basic level of infection control applied to all patients, did not limit or prevent the spread of drug-resistant bacteria in non-intensive care unit (ICU) hospital wards, according to research presented at the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 22, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Multiple sclerosis may be linked to sheep disease toxin
(University of Exeter) Exposure to a toxin primarily found in sheep could be linked to the development of multiple sclerosis (MS) in humans, new research suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 22, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers describe role of novel mutations in fosfomycin resistance
(European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases) Researchers identified novel chromosomal mutations and described their role in the development of resistance of Escherichia coli (E. coli) to broad-spectrum antibiotic fosfomycin, according to research presented at the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 22, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Gene linked to fatal outcomes in P. aeruginosa BSI may be used as marker, target
(European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases) Researchers discovered an easily measured gene linked to a high fatality rate, which could be used as a novel prognostic biomarker in patients with a Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) bloodstream infection, according to research presented at the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 21, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

6-day antibiotic cellulitis therapy results in faster, greater relapse than 12-day course
(European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases) Cellulitis treated with a six-day course of intravenous antibiotic flucloxacillin resulted in greater rates of relapse at 90 days post treatment despite having similar short-term results to that of the 12-day course, according to research presented at the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 21, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

West Nile virus reemerged and spread to new areas in Greece in 2017, researchers show
(European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases) West Nile virus (WNV), which is transmitted via mosquito bites, reemerged and spread to new territories of Greece in 2017 following a two-year hiatus in reported human cases, according to findings presented at the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID). Greece provides the appropriate ecological and climatic conditions for WNV circulation. The virus has been established in Greece and disease transmission may continue in the future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 20, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Bedside tests for syphilis and yaws tested in sub-Saharan Africa
(PLOS) In many countries where the bacterial infections syphilis and yaws are found, there is limited access to diagnostic testing. Now, researchers have tested the use of a point-of-care test for both syphilis and yaws, which allows testing in rural areas without development of infrastructure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 19, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

HIV-1 Viruses transmitted at birth are resistant to antibodies in mother's blood
(PLOS) Of the genetically diverse population of HIV-1 viruses present in an infected pregnant woman, the few she might transmit to her child during delivery are resistant to attack by antibodies in her blood, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens by Amit Kumar of Duke University Medical Centre, North Carolina, and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 19, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New research findings suggest that most vulnerable patients across Africa are at risk of receiving sub-optimal malaria treatment
(Burness) A large proportion of malaria patients in endemic countries in Africa are likely to receive doses of malaria medicine that are too low to offer effective treatment, according to new research presented at the MIM Conference taking place in Dakar this week. Researchers found that an estimated 21.3 million people -- or 24 percent of all confirmed malaria cases--were at risk of being prescribed inadequate doses of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACTs), the frontline treatment against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 19, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Low-cost anti-hookworm drug boosts female farmers' physical fitness
(Yale University) Impoverished female farm workers infected with intestinal parasites known as hookworms saw significant improvements in physical fitness when they were treated with a low-cost deworming drug. The benefits were seen even in those with low level infections, according to a study co-authored by researchers at Yale and the nonprofit company InnovationsCZ. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 18, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Rethinking the fight as surge of malaria deaths in conflict zones threatens to upend progress
(Burness) Ten years of progress globally in the fight against malaria have masked the rapid rise of infections and deaths in African countries experiencing conflict and famine, though new strategies implemented in places like the Central African Republic, South Sudan, and northern Nigeria could provide a way forward, according to research presented this week at the 7th Multilateral Initiative on Malaria (MIM) Pan African Malaria Conference. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Of mice and disease: Antibiotic-resistant bacteria discovered in NYC house mice
(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) A study by scientists at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health finds New York City house mice carry bacteria responsible for mild to life-threatening gastroenteritis in people, and some of these bacteria may be resistant to antibiotics. Findings appear in the journal mBio. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Under-fives should be priority for snail fever therapy, study finds
(University of Edinburgh) Pre-school children in sub-Saharan Africa should be tested regularly for a common infection known as snail fever, which would reduce the spread of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Bacterial 'gene swapping' sparks disease outbreaks
(University of Liverpool) A new study by scientists at the University of Liverpool documents, for the first time, how the ability of bacteria to swap genetic material with each other can directly affect the emergence and spread of globally important infectious diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New research: High risk of malaria transmission after blood transfusions in sub-Saharan Africa
(Burness) A new study suggests that in high transmission areas of sub-Saharan Africa, nearly one in four blood bank supplies contain the parasites that cause malaria. Additional research, focusing on the blood supply of Equatorial Guinea's capital, Malabo, found slightly higher levels of latent malaria infection, most of it -- more than 89 percent -- at a level that commonly used diagnostic technology cannot detect. Both studies were presented at the 7th Multilateral Initiative on Malaria (MIM) Pan African Malaria Conference in Dakar, Senegal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 16, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Genetically altered broadly neutralizing antibodies protect monkeys from HIV-like virus
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Two genetically modified broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) protected rhesus macaques from an HIV-like virus, report scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). After introducing genetic mutations into two potent HIV bNAbs, researchers prepared intravenous infusions of two bNAbs. Single infusions of each modified bNAb protected monkeys against weekly exposures to simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) up to 37 weeks, compared with a median of three weeks in 12 monkeys receiving no antibody. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infec...
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 16, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Epstein-Barr virus protein can 'switch on' risk genes for autoimmune diseases
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the cause of infectious mononucleosis, has been associated with subsequent development of systemic lupus erythematosus and other chronic autoimmune illnesses, but the mechanisms behind this association were unclear. Now, a novel computational method shows that a viral protein found in EBV-infected human cells may activate genes associated with increased risk for autoimmunity. Scientists supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases report their findings today in Nature Genetics. (Source: EurekAlert!...
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 16, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A foodborne illness outbreak could cost a restaurant millions, study suggests
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A single foodborne outbreak could cost a restaurant millions of dollars in lost revenue, fines, lawsuits, legal fees, insurance premium increases, inspection costs and staff retraining, a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 16, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Spikes of graphene can kill bacteria on implants
(Chalmers University of Technology) A tiny layer of graphene flakes becomes a deadly weapon and kills bacteria, stopping infections during procedures such as implant surgery. This is the findings of new research from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, recently published in the scientific journal Advanced Materials Interfaces. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 16, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

University of Waterloo develops new way to fight HIV transmission
(University of Waterloo) Scientists at the University of Waterloo have developed a new tool to protect women from HIV infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 16, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Integrating malaria and schistosomiasis control programs? There's an app for that
(PLOS) Integrated disease control programs, which combine resources to fight multiple diseases at once, can be effective and lead to financial savings in developing countries. Now, researchers have designed a simple web-based application which allows on-the-ground decision making about the integration of malaria and schistosomiasis control programs. The application is described this week in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Bad antibodies made good: The immune system's secret weapon uncovered
(Garvan Institute of Medical Research) The 'bad apples' of the immune system are also its secret weapon, according to major Australian research published today in the world-leading journal Science. In a world first, scientists from Sydney's Garvan Institute of Medical Research have revealed how a population of 'bad' antibodies in the immune system -- which are usually 'silenced' because they can harm the body -- can provide crucial protection against invading microbes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Viruses can evolve in parallel in related species
(University of Exeter) Viruses are more likely to evolve in similar ways in related species -- raising the risk that they will 'jump' from one species to another, new research shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How highly contagious norovirus infection gets its start
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers have shown, in mice, that norovirus infects a rare type of intestinal cell called a tuft cell. Noroviruses tucked inside tuft cells are effectively hidden from the immune system, which could explain why some people continue to shed virus long after they are no longer sick. These 'healthy carriers' are thought to be the source of norovirus outbreaks, so understanding how the virus evades detection in such people could lead to better ways to prevent outbreaks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Punjab, India: Mass treatment of a population with chronic hepatitis C infection produces high rates of cure
(European Association for the Study of the Liver) A program of decentralized public healthcare achieves high rates of cure regardless of genotype or the presence of cirrhosis: the Punjab Model. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scotland: Direct-acting antiviral agent therapy reduces the burden of HCV-related decompensated cirrhosis
(European Association for the Study of the Liver) National surveillance data and cost-effectiveness modeling provide complementary evidence to support the scale-up of DAA therapy in Scotland. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Linkage to care specialist facilitates access to hepatitis C treatment for people who inject drugs
(European Association for the Study of the Liver) A longitudinal study involving more than 1,000 individuals reports promising role for linkage to care specialists in expanding access to hepatitis C treatment for people who inject drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A simple tool for doubling down on disease control
(Georgetown University Medical Center) A team of Georgetown global health researchers have created a web-based tool that allows public health officials to assess the cost-effectiveness and benefits of disease control initiatives in countries around the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Remnants of antibiotics persist in treated farm waste, research finds
(University at Buffalo) Each year, farmers in the US purchase tens of millions of pounds of antibiotics approved for use in cows, pigs, fowl and other livestock. When the animals' manure is repurposed as fertilizer or bedding, traces of the medicines leach into the environment, raising concerns about how agriculture contributes to the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. New research holds troublesome insights with regard to the scope of this problem. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

An unexpected discovery in a central line
(Children's National Health System) An otherwise healthy 6-year-old had a central line that tested positive for a type of fungal infection that typically strikes adults with compromised immune systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Foodborne disease outbreaks
(BfR Federal Institute for Risk Assessment) Is it possible to prepare for a food crisis? How should the severity of the health risk be estimated? When and how should communication be established in a food crisis? These are only a few of the questions which will be discussed at the 2nd workshop on 'Current Challenges of Risk Assessment in Food Safety' in the Cape Verdean capital Cidade de la Praia from April 10-12, 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

First real-world studies report glecaprevir/pibrentasvir to be effective and well tolerated in chronic HCV infection
(European Association for the Study of the Liver) Studies conducted in Italy and Germany confirm the effectiveness and safety of glecaprevir/pibrentasvir in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection, with viral suppression rates similar to those observed in clinical trials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study explores new strategy to develop a malaria vaccine
(Yale University) A serum developed by Yale researchers reduces infection from malaria in mice, according to a new study. It works by attacking a protein in the saliva of the mosquitoes infected with the malaria parasite rather than the parasite itself. If the novel approach proves effective in further studies, it could potentially be used to enhance existing malaria vaccines, the researchers said. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Novel mosquito net provides children with greater protection against malaria
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) A novel class of bed net that neutralizes mosquitoes' ability to resist pyrethroid insecticide is shown to significantly reduce malaria infection in children, according to new research published in The Lancet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How do children develop immunity to malaria as they become older?
(Case Western Reserve University) Children in Africa can be diagnosed with malaria two or three times a year, a rate that decreases as they become older and develop immunity. But the way children generate and maintain this immunity remains a mystery. Katherine Dobbs, M.D., a tropical infectious diseases and malaria researcher, is conducting research in Kenya to find answers by studying white blood cells important to innate immunity, the body's 'first response' to infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Even short travel can spread colistin-resistant bacteria
(Osaka University) The use of the antibiotic colistin, a last-resort treatment option in the infection by multidrug-resistant bacteria, is increasingly impeded by colistin-resistant bacteria. Japanese researchers used biochemical and genetic assays to track resistant strains of bacteria in Japanese travelers returning from Vietnam. The researchers found short trips to a developing country can lead to the appearance of the colistin-resistance gene mcr-1. The study highlights that even brief international trips can contribute to the spread of colistin resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Wide differences exist between states in impact of disease
(JAMA Network) The impact of diseases varies widely across states, with tobacco, overweight, poor diet, alcohol and drug use, high blood sugar and high blood pressure accounting for   many years lost to ill health, disability or early death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Genetic screening tool identifies how the flu infiltrates cells
(University of Chicago Medical Center) Researchers at the University of Chicago have developed a genetic screening tool that identified two key factors that allow the influenza virus to infect human lung cells. The technique uses new gene editing tools to create a library of modified cells, each missing a different gene, allowing scientists to see which changes impact their response to flu. This in turn could identify potential targets for antiviral drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
(European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases) We invite you to the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, which will take place in Madrid, Spain, from April 21 - 24, 2018. ECCMID is the most important congress in infectious diseases, infection control and clinical microbiology. It offers a comprehensive scientific program with keynote lectures, symposia, oral and poster sessions as well as educational formats on parallel tracks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Hepatitis C: A novel point-of-care assay
(Institut Pasteur) One of the major challenges identified by the WHO in efforts to eradicate the hepatitis C virus is the diagnosis of chronic cases that are generally asymptomatic. Major progress is required for new diagnostic techniques that can be 'decentralized,' in other words accessed by populations and countries with limited resources. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and Inserm, in collaboration with the company genedrive, have developed and validated a rapid, reliable, point-of-care HCV assay. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Oral sirolimus alters the course of DIPNECH syndrome in three patients
(American College of Physicians) Sirolimus, which is used to prevent rejection after kidney transplants, has been used to successfully treat three cases of a rare disorder called diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia, or DIPNECH syndrome. The syndrome is so rare that there are no clinical recommendations to guide care and, therefore, no proven therapies. The brief case report is published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 9, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Rats, cats, and people trade-off as main course for mosquitoes in Baltimore, Md.
(Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies) Understanding how neighborhood dynamics regulate mosquito bites is key to managing diseases like West Nile virus and Zika virus. Today in Parasites& Vectors, researchers report that in Baltimore, Md., socioeconomic differences between neighborhoods influence bite risk, with rats being a primary blood meal source in lower income neighborhoods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 9, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UCSF researcher identifies risk genes for ALS
(University of California - San Francisco) The largest analysis to date of genetic data in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) -- the muscle-crippling neurodegenerative disease that afflicted the late astrophysicist Stephen Hawking and cut short the career of iconic Yankee baseball slugger Lou Gehrig -- has identified two previously unrecognized genetic risks that are significantly associated with the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 9, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news