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New drug reduces transplant and mortality rates significantly in patients with hepatitis C
(Intermountain Medical Center) Patients with hepatitis C who suffer from advanced stages of liver disease have renewed hope, thanks to findings by researchers who have discovered that a new drug significantly reduces their risk of death and need for transplantation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 26, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Bioelectricity new weapon to fight dangerous infection
(Tufts University) Changing natural electrical signaling in non-neural cells improves innate immune response to bacterial infections and injury. Tadpoles that received therapeutics, including those used in humans for other purposes, which depolarized their cells had higher survival rates when infected with E. coli than controls. The research has applications for treatment of emerging diseases and traumatic injury in humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 26, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Ineffective antibiotics form strong teams against deadly super bacteria
(University at Buffalo) A team of University at Buffalo-led researchers found that combinations of three antibiotics -- that are each ineffective against superbugs when used alone -- are capable of eradicating two of the six ESKAPE pathogens when delivered together. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

World's leading liver experts focus on continuing advancements in liver disease & transplantation
(Intermountain Medical Center) As the prevalence of liver disease continues to rise across the world, the growing number of people impacted by cirrhosis, liver cancer, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, is the focus of more than 1,700 of the world's leading liver disease experts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Large market share for non-quality-assured malaria medicines in Africa
(Infectious Diseases Data Observatory) A new study of malaria medicine quality in eight sub-Saharan African countries has found a large and potentially growing market for non-quality-assured (QA) malaria treatments -- medicines not pre-approved by global health organizations -- as much as 20 percent of the private-sector market in Kenya, and 42 percent in the Democratic Republic of Congo. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Year-long survey tracks the microbiome of a newly opened hospital
(University of Chicago Medical Center) A 12-month study mapping bacterial diversity within a hospital -- with a focus on the flow of microbes between patients, staff and surfaces -- should help hospitals worldwide better understand how to encourage beneficial microbial interactions and decrease potentially harmful contact. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

FGCU virologists publish study that finds Zika invaded Florida multiple times in 2016
(Florida Gulf Coast University) A new study by an international group of scientists reveals that the Zika virus outbreak in Florida wasn't a single virus introduction but rather at least four separate introductions from the Caribbean and Central America that each led to local chains of transmission. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Zika spread secrets tracked through new gene sequencing study
(University of Oxford) An international research collaboration studying the genetics of Zika virus in Brazil and beyond has provided a new understanding of the disease and its rapid spread through space and time. The research has significant public health implications and has the potential to improve responses to future outbreaks.The research published today in Nature, was led by the universities of Birmingham and Oxford in partnership with FioCruz Bahia, the University of S ã o Paulo, and supported by the Brazilian Ministry of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Zika virus likely circulated in Americas long before detection during 2015-16 epidemic
(Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard) Analysis of the largest collection of Zika genomes to date reveals the trajectory and evolution of the virus as it spread throughout the Americas, with implications for future surveillance efforts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Near real-time genomic sequencing maps introduction and spread of Zika virus in US
(US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases) A new study by a multi-national research team, including scientists from the US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), explains how Zika virus entered the United States last year and how it might re-enter the country this year. The study was published online today in the journal Nature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Zika virus spread undetected for many months, NIH-supported study finds
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Genetic analysis of samples collected as the Zika virus spread throughout the Americas after its introduction show that the virus circulated undetected for up to a year in some regions before it came to the attention of public health authorities. Genetic sequencing has also enabled scientists to recreate the epidemiological and evolutionary paths the virus took as it spread and split into distinct subtypes. The research, published in Nature, was supported in part by NIAID. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Zika reached Miami at least four times, Caribbean travel likely responsible
(Scripps Research Institute) With mosquito season looming in the Northern Hemisphere, doctors and researchers are poised to take on a new round of Zika virus infections. Now a new study by a large group of international researchers led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) explains how Zika virus entered the United States via Florida in 2016 -- and how it might re-enter the country this year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

MSU doctor to help eradicate malaria in Malawi with $8.5 million grant
(Michigan State University) Terrie Taylor, Michigan State University Distinguished Professor of internal medicine and an osteopathic physician, will use a 7-year, $8.5 million federal grant to study why previous malaria prevention and eradication methods in Malawi Africa have been unsuccessful and how progress can be made. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists gain better understanding of how Ebola disables people's immune defenses
(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston scientists have unlocked mysteries of how the Ebola virus hampers the body's natural defenses to speed the rate of infection and its accompanying lethal disease, according to a new report in PLOS Pathogens. The study was conducted in collaboration with the University of Washington and The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A new strategy reported to combat influenza and speed recovery
(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have used a drug being developed to fight solid tumors to restore normal metabolism in flu-infected cells and reduce viral production without the threat of drug resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

'Pregnant' housefly males demonstrate the evolution of sex determination
(University of Zurich) An international team headed up by researchers from the University of Zurich has discovered the gene that determines the male sex in houseflies. Surprisingly, the sex-determining mechanisms are not the same for all houseflies -- they depend on where the insects live. This knowledge not only helps us better understand the evolution of sex determination, but also aids in the control of agricultural pests or carriers of disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Exposure to particulate matter from traffic and residential heating
(Bentham Science Publishers) A study by researchers at the University of Tartu found that exposure to traffic-related particulate matter (PM) could be associated with cardiac diseases among people in the city of Tartu, Estonia, whereas PM from residential heating did not. Results of the study adds valuable information to the current knowledge as it they confirms the link between health effects and low-level PM, and association is different depending on the PM source. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Rising incidence of tick-borne Powassan virus infection in North America
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Cases of human infection with Powassan virus (POWV), which can cause fatal neuroinvasive disease and long-term neurological effects, appear to be increasing in the United States. POWV is transmitted by Ixodes tick species found in North America. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists develop test to identify best treatment for gonorrhea
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) Researchers from UCLA have developed a laboratory test that helps physicians determine which people with gonorrhea may be more treatable with an antibiotic that has not been recommended since 2007 because of concerns that the resistance to the drug was growing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Biofilm discovery suggests new way to prevent dangerous infections
(University of Texas at Austin) By some estimates, more than 1 million people contract infections from medical devices in US hospitals each year, many of which are due to biofilms. A new study suggests a possible new way to prevent such biofilms from forming, which would sharply reduce incidents of related hospital-borne infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Modified experimental vaccine protects monkeys from deadly malaria
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Researchers from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of NIH, modified an experimental malaria vaccine and showed that it completely protected four of eight monkeys that received it against challenge with the virulent Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite. In three of the remaining four monkeys, the vaccine delayed when parasites first appeared in the blood by more than 25 days. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Fat can neutralize listeria
(University of Southern Denmark) Certain fatty acids are not just part of a healthy diet. They can also neutralize the harmful listeria bacterium, a new study shows. This discovery could eventually lead to improved methods to combat dangerous and drug-resistant bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria
(Rice University) Laser-induced graphene made from an inexpensive polymer is an effective anti-fouling material and, when charged, an excellent antibacterial surface. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The CRISPR Journal, a new peer-reviewed publication launching in 2018
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers announces the launch of The CRISPR Journal, a broad-based international peer-reviewed publication dedicated to the dissemination of critical research on the myriad applications and underlying technology of CRISPR. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Human-induced deforestation is causing an increase in malaria cases
(Lehigh University) A new study of 67 less-developed, malaria-endemic nations led by Lehigh University sociologist Dr. Kelly Austin, finds a link between deforestation and increasing malaria rates across developing nations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins study shows one of the deadliest hospital-acquired infections is preventable
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) In a recent paper published online in the journal Critical Care Medicine, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute of Patient Safety and Quality led a study that demonstrated that health care providers can take steps to curb ventilator-associated events. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Directly observed therapy for multidrug-resistant TB decreases mortality
(American Thoracic Society) Directly observed therapy (DOT) for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) was associated with a 77 percent decrease in mortality in the United States, compared to self-administered therapy from 1993 to 2013, according to new research presented at the ATS 2017 International Conference. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Faster is better when it comes to sepsis care
(University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences) An analysis covering nearly 50,000 patients from 149 New York hospitals is the first to offer scientific evidence that a controversial early sepsis care regulation worked. The announcement -- led by the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine -- gives fuel to other states pursuing rapid sepsis care initiatives. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Portland State virus study receives major NASA grant
(Portland State University) Portland State biologist Ken Stedman has received a $540,000 grant from NASA to study the evolution of viruses, which may shed light on how viruses form, adapt and infect hosts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists enlist engineered protein to battle the MERS virus
(University of Toronto) Researchers converted a staple human ubiquitin protein into an anti-viral tool. Through subtle tweaks, they created an engineered version of the ubiquitin that binds more tightly and paralyzes a key enzyme in MERS to halt viral replication in cells. Other synthetic forms of ubiquitin can be quickly generated to target a diverse range of pathogens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Rutgers researchers develop protocol to analyze many cells at once
(Rutgers University) With the new FISH-Flow protocol, researchers are able to evaluate multitudes of cells at once for telltale mRNA species and proteins. The blended procedure provides a chance to see how multiple kinds of immune cells are responding to a foreign substance, making it possible to detect the presence of disease faster and earlier. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Deaths from Chagas disease under-reported
(PLOS) Chagas disease, affecting millions of people in Central and South America, is classified as one of the 17 most important neglected diseases by the World Health Organization. Now, researchers have found that even the non-symptomatic stage of Chagas infection, which can last for many years, more than doubles a person's risk of death. The new study, published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, also concludes that deaths from Chagas have likely been under-reported in the past. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 18, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Antibodies from Ebola survivor protect mice and ferrets against related viruses
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Researchers funded in part by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of NIH, have studied the blood of an Ebola survivor, searching for human antibodies that might effectively treat people infected with Ebola virus and those infected with related viruses. The researchers have identified two such antibodies that hold promise as Ebola treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 18, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Brain fights West Nile Virus in unexpected way
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) A biochemical self-destruct trigger found in many types of cells takes on a different role in brain cells infected with West Nile virus. In a turnabout, it guards the lives of these cells and calls up the body's defenses. Neurons might be protected by this otherwise self-demise mechanism because they are non-renewable and too important to kill off. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 18, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Canadian researcher wins grant to explore promising HIV vaccine candidate
(International AIDS Vaccine Initiative) The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) has awarded a new CA$3.99 million grant to Dr. Gary Kobinger of Universit é Laval for work on a vaccine to prevent HIV infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 18, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The dangers of money
(Frontiers) If a commonly used item passed from person to person everyday around the world was found to carry potential harmful microbes, would you continue to use it? Dr Jun Li from the University of Hong Kong and his colleagues have been investigating the bacterial community present on banknotes, recently published in Frontiers in Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 17, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Costs for generic hepatitis C drugs available in India would be paid back in 5 to 10 years
(Massachusetts General Hospital) Use of the generic versions of directly-acting antiviral drugs that are available in India to treat hepatitis C virus infection is not only cost effective but actually saves lifetime costs for treating infected patients in that country. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 17, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New way of preventing pneumococcal brain invasion
(Karolinska Institutet) An international team of researchers, led from Karolinska Institutet, has identified two receptors on the cells in the blood vessels of the brain that can be blocked and thereby prevent pneumococci from entering the brain. The study, which is published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that the use of antibodies that block the receptors can potentially be used as a new therapeutic strategy for pneumococcal meningitis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 17, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers identify changes in lung cells following infections
(Boston University Medical Center) When people develop a respiratory infection, recovery from their illness leaves behind an immunological memory that influences how they will respond to later infections. In a new study, researchers demonstrate for the first time that recovery from bacterial pneumonia changes the tissue that was infected, seeding the lungs with immune cells called resident memory T (TRM) cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 17, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New test to rapidly diagnose sepsis
(Wiley) Researchers have developed a test that can rapidly and reliably diagnose sepsis, a potentially life-threatening complication of bacterial infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 17, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Responders to recent West Africa Ebola epidemic show little evidence of infection
(PLOS) Responders to the West African Ebola epidemic of 2014-2016 who returned to the UK and Ireland included many who reported possible Ebola virus exposure or Ebola-associated symptoms, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine. The study, conducted by Catherine F. Houlihan of the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine, UK and colleagues, also reports that the vast majority showed no evidence of Ebola virus infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 16, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

An immunity gene evolved in Southeast Asia to protect against leprosy
(Cell Press) A mutation in an immune system gene rapidly rose in frequency in Southeast Asia approximately 50,000 years ago because it likely conferred protection against leprosy. The findings, published in Cell Reports, show that the gene variant, called HLA-B*46:01, encodes a protein that binds to molecules derived from the bacterium that causes leprosy. This HLS protein then presents these foreign molecules to the immune system, which destroys the infected cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 16, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists discover uncommon superbug strain in greater Houston area
(Houston Methodist) Scientists used genome sequencing to discover that an otherwise rare strain of a superbug was found in more than one-third of the Houston patients studied. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 16, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Key to 'superbug' antibiotic resistance discovered
(Monash University) An international study led by Monash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute has discovered the molecular mechanism by which the potentially deadly superbug 'Golden Staph' evades antibiotic treatment, providing the first important clues on how to counter superbug antibiotic resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 16, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Undetected Ebola infection in international healthcare workers very unlikely
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Undiagnosed Ebola virus infection was probably very rare in international workers who were deployed during the 2013-2015 outbreak of the virus in West Africa, despite mild and asymptomatic cases of Ebola being known to occur, according to new research led by the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 16, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Warm weather increases the incidence of serious surgical site infections
(Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America) Surgical site infections, a common healthcare-associated infection, are seasonal -- increasing in the summer and decreasing in the winter-according to new research published online today in Infection Control& Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. Temperatures above 90 ° F were associated with 28.9 percent increased odds for hospitalization with a surgical site infection (SSI) compared to temperatures less than 40 ° F. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 16, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

TB bacteria evolve at alarming rate
(Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology) Scientists carried out a research aimed at identifying the genes and mutations in them that allow mycobacteria to thrive in people with altered immune status including HIV-positive patients. They developed a catalog of mutations in more than 300 virulence (disease causing) genes. Further analysis identified a set of three mutations which may enable mycobacteria to develop rapidly in an immunocompromised environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 16, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New Zika virus inhibitor identified
(Sanford-Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute) Compound could serve as basis for drugs to prevent neurological complications of Zika. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 16, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Staying healthy during WorldPride 2017
(European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC)) ECDC has published a rapid risk assessment to assess the risk of outbreaks and transmission of communicable diseases during the WorldPride festival period taking place in Madrid in June 2017. For respiratory and vector-borne diseases, the risk is considered low, for food and waterborne diseases the risk is low to moderate, for vaccine-preventable diseases, it is moderate and for sexually transmitted infections, the risk is moderate to high. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 16, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Year-round flu vaccinations promote healthier infants in subtropics
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) Vaccinating pregnant mothers year-round against flu in the resource-challenged region of subtropical Nepal reduced infant flu virus infection rates by an average of 30 percent, increased birth weights by 15 percent and resulted in babies having less influenza, according to a study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. An international research team reports expanding year-round flu vaccinations during pregnancy would also benefit children in other tropical and subtropical parts of the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 15, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news