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Hemp shows potential for treating ovarian cancer
(Experimental Biology 2018) Results from some of the first studies to examine hemp's ability to fight cancer show that it might one day be useful as plant-based treatment for ovarian cancer. Hemp is part of the same cannabis family as marijuana but doesn't have any psychoactive properties or cause addiction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Sigmoidoscopy reduces colon cancer risk for men, but not women
(American College of Physicians) Offering sigmoidoscopy screening to men and women in Norway reduced colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality in men, but had little or no effect in women. These findings suggest that current guidelines recommending that women get screened for CRC with flexible sigmoidoscopy should be reconsidered. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Vitamin A derivative selectively kills liver cancer stem cells
(RIKEN) Acyclic retinoid, an artificial compound derived from vitamin A, has been found to prevent the recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer. Now, in research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, scientists have discovered that the compound targets one class of cancer stem cells, preventing them from giving rise to new tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Six in 7 women at high risk of breast cancer shun tamoxifen as a preventative measure
(Cancer Research UK) Six in seven women with a family history of breast cancer opt out of taking tamoxifen as a preventative measure, according to a study funded by Cancer Research UK and published in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The role of 'extra' DNA in cancer evolution and therapy resistance
(Henry Ford Health System) Researchers tracked genomic alterations detected in patient samples during tumor cell evolution in culture, in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models from the cultures, as well as before and after treatment in patients. In a recent paper in Nature Genetics, the team reports that tumor progression was often driven by cancer-promoting genes, known as oncogenes, on extrachromosomal pieces of DNA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists generate an atlas of the human genome using stem cells
(The Hebrew University of Jerusalem) Scientists from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have generated an atlas of the human genome that illuminates the roles our genes play in health and disease. The gene atlas, created using a state-of-the-art gene editing technology and human embryonic stem cells, enables a new functional view on how we study the human genome, and provides a tool that will change how we study and treat cancer and genetic disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

UNC scientists create better laboratory tools to study cancer's spread
(UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center) In the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center's Andrew Wang, MD, and colleagues report they have developed tissue-engineered models for cancer metastases that reflect the microenvironment around tumors that promotes their growth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers report four new insights into diet and health
(Experimental Biology 2018) What we eat plays a significant role in our health. The Experimental Biology 2018 meeting (EB 2018) will showcase new research into how diet could be used to fight cancer and how specific eating patterns can encourage weight loss. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Shorter courses of prostate cancer radiotherapy are safe and effective
(European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)) Radiotherapy given in high doses over a shorter period of time is safe and effective for prostate cancer patients, according to research presented at the ESTRO 37 conference today. Researchers say this method of giving radiotherapy saves time for patients. It also frees up radiotherapy equipment, saving money and benefiting other patients on the waiting list for treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Targeted radiotherapy for breast cancer offers good quality of life and fewer side effects
(European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)) Quality of life for women treated with a more targeted radiotherapy treatment -- called accelerated partial breast irradiation -- is at least as good as quality of life for women treated with standard radiotherapy, according to research presented at the ESTRO 37 conference and published simultaneously in The Lancet Oncology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New advances in the fight against cancer
(Experimental Biology 2018) Research into cancer can provide new insight into how this disease works and how it can be stopped. The Experimental Biology 2018 meeting (EB 2018) will showcase innovative research that could lead to new ways to treat and prevent cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 21, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Correcting tiny differences in patient's position for radiotherapy could increase survival chances
(European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)) Very small differences in the way a patient lies during radiotherapy treatment for lung or esophageal cancer can have an impact on how likely they are to survive, according to research presented at the ESTRO 37 conference. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 21, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New leads in the development and treatment of liver disease
(Experimental Biology 2018) A treatment gap remains for many conditions involving damage to the liver, the body's main organ for removing toxins, among other functions. The Experimental Biology 2018 meeting (EB 2018) will feature important research announcements related to the causes of liver degradation and possible treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 21, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Brachytherapy for cervical cancer does not increase the risk of ureteral stricture
(European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)) New research presented at the ESTRO 37 conference from two large international trials, shows that intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy is safe and does not increase the risk of ureteral stricture in cervical cancer patients. Until now, there have been concerns that brachytherapy might increase the risk of this serious, sometimes life-threatening complication, although the treatment itself is associated with better survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Primary pancreatic organoid tumor models for high-throughput phenotypic drug screening
(SLAS (Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening)) A multidisciplinary team of scientists share recent advancements in innovative in-vitro cancer biology methods for screening drug-like molecules in cancer tissue relevant models in a new report published online ahead-of-print at SLAS Discovery. Entitled Advanced Development of Primary Pancreatic Organoid Tumor Models for High-Throughput Phenotypic Drug Screening, the report can be accessed for free. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A study links soil metals with cancer mortality
(FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology) Spanish epidemiologists and geologists have found associations between esophageal cancer and soils where lead is abundant, lung cancer and terrains with increased copper content, brain tumor with areas rich in arsenic, and bladder cancer with high cadmium levels. These statistical links do not indicate that there is a cause-effect relationship between soil type and cancer, but they suggest that the influence of metals from the earth's surface on the geographical distribution of tumors should be analyzed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A new collaboration to maximize the benefits of radiation oncology
(European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)) With the advent of personalized cancer medicine, patients may not always receive the most effective treatment in their particular case. A new collaboration aims to put this situation to rights. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Handgrip strength test is good indicator of survival in lung cancer patients
(European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)) A simple test of handgrip strength is a good indicator of short- and long-term survival in patients with early, stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to new findings to be presented at ESTRO 37 -- Europe's largest radiation oncology conference. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Elderly less likely to benefit from simultaneous radio- & chemotherapy for lung cancer
(European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)) An analysis of elderly patients treated in a phase II trial of radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer has shown that they were less likely to benefit than younger patients if the two treatments were given at the same time. The study is presented at ESTRO37 -- Europe's largest radiation oncology conference. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

BIDMC-lead team develops new approach to study long non-coding RNAs
(Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) In a groundbreaking paper, investigators at the Cancer Research Institute Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center developed a novel approach to identify and determine the functional role of lncRNAs relevant to chemotherapy resistance in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). The new technique integrates information from publicly-available pharmacological data bases with leading-edge CRISPR technologies to screen for both coding and non-coding genes that influence response to treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers use CRISPR to edit DNA outside of the cell for the first time
(Burness) Scientists at Christiana Care Health System's Gene Editing Institute have developed a potentially breakthrough CRISPR gene-editing tool. It could allow researchers to take fragments of DNA extracted from human cells, put them into a test tube, and quickly and precisely engineer multiple changes to the genetic code, according to a new study published today in the CRISPR Journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Discovery adds to evidence that some children are predisposed to develop leukemia
(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have discovered a fourth gene that can predispose carriers to the most common childhood cancer, expanding the list of genes to include in cancer screening. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Protein can slow intestinal tumor growth
(Stockholm University) A new mechanism for regulating stem cells in the intestine of fruit flies has been discovered by researchers at Stockholm University. In addition, it was discovered that a certain protein can slow the growth of tumors in intestinal tissue. A better understanding of these mechanisms can teach us more about how diseases in human intestines occur, as well as contribute to the development of new medicine to cure them. The results are now being published in the scientific journal Stem Cell Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study may explain why some triple-negative breast cancers are resistant to chemotherapy
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive form of the disease accounting for 12 to 18 percent of breast cancers. It is a scary diagnosis, and even though chemotherapy can be effective as standard-of-care, many patients become resistant to treatment. A team at The University of Texas MD Anderson led a study which may explain how resistance evolves over time, and potentially which patients could benefit from chemotherapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Drug combination targeting HSP90 and BRAF is safe and effective in advanced melanoma
(H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center& Research Institute) A team of researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center have been working to learn more about how melanoma becomes resistant to BRAF inhibitors in order to develop new treatment strategies. They tested whether a drug targeting heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) combined with the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib could be a safe and potentially effective strategy to treat patients with melanoma. Their study was published online ahead of print in Clinical Cancer Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Chip-based blood test for multiple myeloma could make bone biopsies a relic of the past
(University of Kansas) A University of Kansas research effort has resulted in a low-cost, reliable blood test that uses a small plastic chip about the size of a credit card that can deliver the same diagnostic information as a bone biopsy -- but using a simple blood draw instead. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Homemade microscope reveals how a cancer-causing virus clings to our DNA
(University of Virginia Health System) Using a homemade, high-tech microscope, scientists have revealed how a cancer-causing virus anchors itself to our DNA. That discovery could pave the way for doctors to cure incurable diseases by flushing out viruses, including HPV and Epstein-Barr, that now permanently embed themselves in our cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Penn Medicine's Carl June named one of Time Magazine's most influential people
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) TIME named University of Pennsylvania cancer and HIV gene therapy pioneer Carl June, MD, to the 2018 TIME 100, its annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers use imaging technology to screen for colorectal cancer in young adults
(Boston Medical Center) Researchers at Boston Medical Center, in collaboration with Northwestern University, are using imaging technology to create an effective and inexpensive way to screen for colorectal cancer among young adults. The research is part of the R33 Cancer Moonshot Project, and is a 3 year $1.5 million grant from the National Cancer Institute. Once researchers create this test and achieve quality goals, they will begin a clinical trial, which can then lead to regulatory approval and launch in clinical practice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Vitamin D deficiency linked to greater risk of diabetes
(University of California - San Diego) An epidemiological study conducted by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Seoul National University suggests that persons deficient in vitamin D may be at much greater risk of developing diabetes. The findings are reported April 19 in PLOS One. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists identify 170 potential lung cancer drug targets using unique cellular library
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) After testing more than 200,000 chemical compounds, UT Southwestern's Simmons Cancer Center researchers have identified 170 chemicals that are potential candidates for development into drug therapies for lung cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Some kitchen cabinets can emit potentially harmful compounds
(American Chemical Society) Probably the last place anyone would want to find airborne polychlorinated biphenyl compounds (PCBs) is in the kitchen, yet that's exactly where scientists detected their presence, according to a new report in ACS' journal Environmental Science& Technology. They say that the PCBs, which are widely considered carcinogenic, are unwanted byproducts of sealant breakdown in modern kitchen cabinetry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Three solutions to maximize the clinical benefit and affordability of targeted cancer drugs
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A group led by the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania has proposed three solutions to maximize the clinical benefit and affordability of targeted cancer drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Early skin cancer more accurately diagnosed by dermatologist than other providers
(University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences) PAs increasingly used in dermatology to cut costs and improve access, but are less likely than dermatologists to accurately diagnose early stage skin cancers, according to new research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

For young adults with blood cancer, pediatric centers may improve survival
(American Society of Hematology) Adolescents and young adults with acute leukemia have a survival advantage if they receive treatment at a pediatric cancer center versus an adult center, according to a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Delivering cancer treatment on a nanodisc helps eliminate tumors
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) Researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center designed this new delivery system -- a drug hidden in a nanodisc -- to increase the number of patients who can be treated successfully with cancer immunotherapy drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

An artificial mole as an early warning system
(ETH Zurich) ETH researchers working with Martin Fussenegger have developed an early warning system for the four most common types of cancer. Should a tumor develop, a visible mole will appear on the skin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Engineering a better device to capture -- and release -- circulating tumor cells
(Lehigh University) Yaling Liu, of Lehigh University, has created an innovative microfluidic device that uses magnetic particles and wavy-herringbone design to capture and release circulating tumor cells with an 80-95% capture efficiency rate at different tumor cell concentrations. Liu will present some of his findings today, April 18th, at a conference taking place in Istanbul, Turkey called The Future of Medicine hosted by Royal Academy of Science International Trust (RASIT) and Bah ç e?ehir University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers identified a protein associated with breast cancer
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a protein that is strongly associated with metastatic breast cancer and that could be a target for future therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Global ROS1 initiative: A patient-researcher collaboration targeting ROS1 cancer
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) CU presentation at AACR2018 describes the first research-focused group of patients organized around the genetic mutation that creates their cancer, namely changes to the gene ROS1. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Abramson Cancer Canter studies show promise of immunotherapy combinations, including CAR T
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) As immunotherapies continue to make up a larger share of new cancer drugs, researchers are looking for the most effective ways to use these cutting edge treatments in combination with each or with other pre-existing options. New studies from the Abramson Cancer Center are providing clues on potentially effective combinations with CAR T therapy in brain cancer as well as a novel therapeutic target in head and neck cancer, and also providing greater understanding of the mechanisms of resistance in pancreatic cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Efficient control of leukaemia with treatment by dual immune-checkpoint blockade
(Luxembourg Institute of Health) Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a haematological malignancy. When infiltrating tissues, CLL cells come in contact with healthy cells, including immune cells. Researchers from the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) succeeded in characterising in depth the composition of immune cells and circulating cytokines of the CLL microenvironment in mouse models using mass cytometry. Based on this knowledge, they propose an immunotherapeutic strategy with two immune checkpoint inhibitors that efficiently blocks disease development in preclinical tests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A new, streamlined approach to diagnosing and treating bowel cancer
(University of Adelaide) Researchers at the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) and the University of Adelaide have discovered a faster, more cost-effective way to determine which DNA mutations cause human bowel cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists find some human cancers to be 'evolutionary accidents'
(University of Liverpool) New research, published in Biological Reviews and conducted by researchers from the University of Liverpool and Escola Superior de Ci ê ncias da Sa ú de (Bras í lia, Brazil) has found some type of cancers unique to humans may be a result of evolutionary accidents. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study reports possible novel method for stopping untreatable pediatric brain cancers
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) Researchers used an experimental molecular therapy in preclinical laboratory tests to effectively treat several types of deadly pediatric brain cancer and now propose advancing the treatment to clinical testing in children. Scientists report in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics testing the small molecule 6-thio-2'deoxyguanosine (6-thio-dG) in brain cancer stem cells derived from tumor cells donated by patients. Researchers also tested the treatment in humanized mouse models of pediatric brain cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Safety concerns over tungsten
(McGill University) New research shows how and where tungsten accumulates in bones of mice exposed to the element through drinking water. The findings, by a team of chemists and biologists at McGill University, could add to doubts over the once-universal assumption that tungsten poses little or no health risk to the general human population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Association for Chemoreception Sciences (AChemS) 40th Annual Meeting
(Association for Chemoreception Sciences) Smell and taste are vital senses that bring pleasure to daily life, inform us about our environment, and guide fundamental behaviors in humans and animals. This month, about 500 scientists and clinicians will gather for the nation's leading forum on smell and taste research, the annual meeting of the Association for Chemoreception Sciences (AChemS). AChemS will feature over 260 presentations on the roles of smell and taste in both human and animal health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Combination therapy strengthens T cells in melanoma pre-clinical study
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) A pre-clinical study of two drugs designed to boost T cell performance, has revealed the agents, when give in combination, may enhance the immune system's ability to kill melanoma tumors deficient in the tumor suppressor gene PTEN. The study was led by investigators at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Beyond PD-L1: Taking away TIM3 and Tregs stops cancer regrowth after immunotherapy
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) CU Cancer Center study presented at AACR18 shows that TIM3 and/or increased regulatory T cells (Tregs) within a tumor may help cancers inactivate immune system killer T cells that would otherwise identify and attack the cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

When prostate cancer reaches bone, bone cells may drive overall growth of the disease
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) When prostate cancer metastasizes to bone, it can become especially dangerous. A CU study at AACR18 hints at why: cells involved in these bone metastases may release signals that drive the progression of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news