Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Creation of synthetic horsepox virus could lead to more effective smallpox vaccine
(University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine& Dentistry) UAlberta researchers created a new synthetic virus that could lead to the development of a more effective vaccine against smallpox. The discovery demonstrates how techniques based on the use of synthetic DNA can be used to advance public health measures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Beyond drugs for IBD: Improving the overall health of IBD patients
(American Gastroenterological Association) 1.6 million Americans suffer from IBD. Identifying the best medical treatment leads to improved disease management, but IBD patients also experience mental, emotional and other physical side effects that need to be understood and managed to improve the overall health of IBD patients. Research presented at the Crohn's& Colitis Congress ™ helps health care providers understand how to better manage their patients' overall health and mental well-being to increase the quality of their lives. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Fanconi anemia: Insight from a green plant
(American Society of Plant Biologists) Fanconi anemia is a human genetic disorder with severe effects, including an increased risk of cancer and infertility. Research in plants helps us understand the disease in humans, showing how a key protein functions in the exchange of genetic material. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

UCLA study describes structure of herpes virus tumor linked to Kaposi's sarcoma
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) UCLA team shows in the laboratory that an inhibitor can be developed to break down the herpes virus. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus, or KSHV, is one of two viruses known to cause cancer in humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers find link between breast cancer and two gene mutations
(Springer) Individuals with Lynch syndrome, a genetic condition that has long been known to carry dramatically increased risk of colorectal cancer and uterine cancer, now also have an increased risk of breast cancer. This is the conclusion of a study in the journal Genetics in Medicine which is published by Springer Nature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Factor that doubles the risk of death from breast cancer identified
(Karolinska Institutet) Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered that the risk of death from breast cancer is twice as high for patients with high heterogeneity of the oestrogen receptor within the same tumour as compared to patients with low heterogeneity. The study, published in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute, shows that the higher risk of death is independent of other known tumour markers and also holds true for Luminal A breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mortality of surgery vs. targeted radiation in early lung cancer patients
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) Among patients older than 80 years, 3.9 percent receiving surgery passed away within the 30-day post-treatment window, compared with 0.9 percent of patients receiving focused radiation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Hedgehog signaling proteins keep cancer stem cells alive
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) Researchers from Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin have discovered that the survival of cancer stem cells is dependent on the 'Hedgehog signaling pathway.' Targeting this pathway had previously shown no effect on the growth of colorectal cancer. Now, Charit é scientists have demonstrated that using different drugs to target a specific aspect of the pathway may yield better treatment outcomes for patients. Results from this research have been published in the journal Cell Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

MIT Portugal is developing a compression sleeve for breast cancer patients
(MIT Portugal Program) The project developed by the MIT Portugal Ph.D. Student at the University of Minho Carlos Gon ç alves, was considered the most innovative of the nine projects incubated during 10 weeks by Startup Nano, a pioneer incubation and acceleration program for nanotechnology innovation promoted by Startup Braga in a partnership with the International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory and the Centre for Nanotechnology and Smart Materials (CeNTI) both located in Braga. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cells lacking nuclei struggle to move in 3-D environments
(UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center) A study led by UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers and published in the Journal of Cell Biology examined the role of the physical structure of the nucleus in cell movement through different surfaces. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

CancerSEEK: Generalized screening for multiple cancer types
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Researchers have developed a noninvasive blood test based on combined analysis of DNA and proteins that may allow earlier detection of eight common cancer types. In more than 1,000 patients, their method, dubbed CancerSEEK, detected cancer with a sensitivity of 69 to 98 percent (depending on cancer type). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Distorted view amongst smokers of when deadly damage caused by smoking will occur
(University of Surrey) Smokers have a distorted perception on when the onset of smoking-related conditions will occur, a new study in the Journal of Cognitive Psychology reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

DNA study casts light on century-old mystery of how cells divide
(University of Edinburgh) Scientists have solved a longstanding puzzle of how cells are able to tightly package lengthy strands of DNA when they divide -- an essential process for growth, repair and maintenance in living organisms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How cancer metastasis happens: Researchers reveal a key mechanism
(Weill Cornell Medicine) Cancer metastasis, the migration of cells from a primary tumor to form distant tumors in the body, can be triggered by a chronic leakage of DNA within tumor cells, according to a team led by Weill Cornell Medicine and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Can mice really mirror humans when it comes to cancer?
(Michigan State University) A new Michigan State University study is helping to answer a pressing question among scientists of just how close mice are to people when it comes to researching cancer. The findings reveal how mice can actually mimic human breast cancer tissue and its genes, even more so than previously thought, as well as other cancers including lung, oral and esophagus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Two new breast cancer genes emerge from lynch syndrome gene study
(Columbia University Medical Center) Columbia University researchers have identified two new breast cancer genes that also cause Lynch syndrome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers discover new enzymes central to cell function
(Case Western Reserve University) Doctors have long treated heart attacks, improved asthma symptoms, and cured impotence by increasing levels of a single molecule in the body: nitric oxide. The tiny molecule can change how proteins function. But new research featured in Molecular Cell suggests supplementing nitric oxide--NO--is only the first step. Researchers have discovered previously unknown enzymes in the body that convert NO into 'stopgap' molecules--SNOs--that then modulate proteins. The newly discovered enzymes help NO have diverse roles in cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Single blood test screens for eight cancer types
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers developed a single blood test that screens for eight common cancer types and helps identify the location of the cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

More evidence of link between severe gum disease and cancer risk
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Data collected during a long-term health study provides additional evidence for a link between increased risk of cancer in individuals with advanced gum disease, according to a new collaborative study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and Tufts University School of Medicine and Cancer Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cancer gene screening more cost effective in the general population than high-risk groups
(Oxford University Press USA) A study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that screening the general population for mutations in specific genes is a more cost effective way to detect people at risk and prevents more breast and ovarian cancers compared to only screening patients with a personal or family history of these diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Harrington Discovery Institute announces 2018 grant funding to 10 physician-scientists
(University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center) Ten physician-scientists are named 2018 Harrington Scholar-Innovator Award recipients to support their discoveries in diverse research areas, including cancer, diabetes, osteoporosis and addiction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mammogram rates increase after ACA eliminates co-payments
(Brown University) A new study finds that screening mammogram rates increased after the Affordable Care Act eliminated out-of-pocket costs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New drug combination helps kickstart the immune system to fight back against cancer
(King's College London) Scientists from King's College London have found a way to boost the immune system to help it fight back against cancer. The breakthrough involves the first ever use of a combination of chemotherapy and a drug being trialed as a treatment for neonatal jaundice, that together help kick start the body's natural defenses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists zoom in to watch DNA code being read
(Institute of Cancer Research) Scientists have unveiled incredible images of how the DNA code is read and interpreted -- revealing new detail about one of the fundamental processes of life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers develop swallowable test to detect pre-cancerous Barrett's esophagus
(Case Western Reserve University) Investigators at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center have developed a simple, swallowable test for early detection of Barrett's esophagus that offers promise for preventing deaths from esophageal adenocarcinoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Presurgical targeted therapy delays relapse of high-risk stage 3 melanoma
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) A pair of targeted therapies given before and after surgery for melanoma produced at least a six-fold increase in time to progression compared to standard-of-care surgery for patients with stage 3 disease, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in Lancet Oncology. Patients who had no sign of disease at surgery after combination treatment did not progress to metastasis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Patients with blood cancer precursor at risk of developing cancer even after 30 years
(Mayo Clinic) Patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance are at risk of progressing to multiple myeloma or a related cancer -- even after 30 years of stability. These are the findings of a study by Mayo Clinic researchers published in the Wednesday, Jan. 17, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Whole-population testing for breast and ovarian cancer gene mutations is cost effective
(Queen Mary University of London) Screening the entire population for breast and ovarian cancer gene mutations, as opposed to just those at high-risk of carrying this mutation, is cost effective and could prevent more ovarian and breast cancers than the current clinical approach, according to research published today in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Dulling cancer therapy's double-edged sword
(Boston Children's Hospital) Researchers have discovered a very promising new pathway to preventing tumor recurrence -- 'resolvins' could be used in complement with chemotherapy, radiation and targeted therapies to stave off the tumor-promoting effects of dead cancer cell debris. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Bioengineered soft microfibers improve T-cell production
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) Columbia Engineering researchers have developed a new method for improving T cell manufacture by focusing on the materials involved in this process. Their study uses a polymer mesh to activate the T cells, a critical step for their production. This approach simplifies processing compared to systems in use today. In addition, making the fibers out of a mechanically soft material improved T cell growth, outperforming the current gold standard on several fronts. (Advanced Biosystems) (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Who might benefit from immunotherapy? New study suggests possible marker
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) New research finds that PDL-1 expressed in antigen presenting cells -- macrophages and dendritic cells found in the tumor microenvironment and in the nearby lymph nodes -- is a better indicator than PDL-1 in the tumor of who will respond to immunotherapy drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Bladder Cancer named the official journal of the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network
(IOS Press) IOS Press, an international scientific, technical and medical publisher, and the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network (BCAN), are pleased to announce that the journal Bladder Cancer is now the official journal of BCAN. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Bright light therapy improves sleep in people treated for cancer
(American Academy of Sleep Medicine) Results of a randomized controlled trial suggest that systematic bright light exposure can improve sleep for fatigued people who have been treated for cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

From a novel support group to a book, learning from seven widowed fathers
(UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center) UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center's Donald Rosenstein, MD, and Justin Yopp, PhD, have published 'The Group: Seven Widowed Fathers Reimagine Life,' which tells the story of personal transformation through the eyes and voice of a group of widowed fathers trying to make sense of being a single parent while grieving the loss of their spouse and helping their children address the loss of a parent. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The Salk Institute and Indivumed partner to advance global cancer research
(Salk Institute) Salk and Indivumed have established a strategic partnership to advance research in precision oncology and personalized medicine by utilizing the highest quality molecular and clinical data in cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Normal tissue BRCA1 methylation associated with risk for high-grade ovarian cancer
(American College of Physicians) Normal tissue BRCA1 methylation is associated with risk for high-grade ovarian cancer and may occur as a prenatal event. These findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers develop a remote-controlled cancer immunotherapy system
(University of California - San Diego) A team of researchers has developed an ultrasound-based system that can non-invasively and remotely control genetic processes in live immune T cells so that they recognize and kill cancer cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Teens likely to crave junk food after watching TV ads
(Cancer Research UK) Teenagers who watch more than three hours of commercial TV a day are more likely to eat hundreds of extra junk food snacks, according to a report by Cancer Research UK. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

NHS bowel scope uptake boosted by a fifth when patients sent reassuring reminders
(Cancer Research UK) Bowel scope screening increased by more than a fifth (21.5 percent) when people were sent additional reminders with a leaflet that addressed common concerns, according to a new study funded by Cancer Research UK. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists identify genes implicated in the high regenerative capacity of embryos and ESCs
(Biogerontology Research Foundation) Researchers at Insilico Medicine , AgeX Therapeutics and the Biogerontology Research Foundation have published a landmark study titled 'Use of deep neural network ensembles to identify embryonic-fetal transition markers: repression of COX7A1 in embryonic and cancer cells' in the journal Oncotarget. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New epidemiological study finds no connection between cases of cancer and use of plant protection products containing glyphosate
(BfR Federal Institute for Risk Assessment) BfR Communication No. 036/2017 from 22 December 2017Epidemiological studies are a central element of public discussion in the debate surrounding the carcinogenic potential of glyphosate. A publication that appeared in the USA in November examined whether there is a possible connection between the use of glyphosate containing plant protection products and cases of cancer among people who work in agriculture using a significantly broader data base. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scleroderma study: Hope for a longer life for patients with rare autoimmune disorder
(University of Virginia Health System) The approach could represent the first new treatment to improve survival in patients with severe scleroderma in more than four decades. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New warning system discovered in the immune defence
(Link ö ping University) Researchers at Link ö ping University in Sweden have discovered a previously unknown warning system that contributes to the body's immune system. Mitochondria in the white blood cells secrete a web of DNA fibers that raises the alarm. The results have been published in the scientific journal PNAS, and may lead to increased knowledge about autoinflammatory diseases and cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cancer's gene-determined 'immune landscape' dictates progression of prostate tumors
(Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) The field of immunotherapy -- the harnessing of patients' own immune systems to fend off cancer -- is revolutionizing cancer treatment today. However, clinical trials often show marked improvements in only small subsets of patients, suggesting that as-yet unidentified variations among tumors result in distinct paths of disease progression and response to therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

MDI Biological Laboratory discovery could lead to new therapies for diabetics
(Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory) New research by MDI Biological Laboratory scientist Sandra Rieger, Ph.D., has demonstrated that an enzyme she had previously identified as playing a role in peripheral neuropathy induced by cancer chemotherapy also plays a role in peripheral neuropathy caused by diabetes. The significance of the identification of a common molecular mechanism is that the drug candidates she identified to treat chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy could potentially be used to treat peripheral neuropathy caused by diabetes as well. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

NIH researchers report first 3-D structure of DHHC enzymes
(NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) The first three-dimensional structure of DHHC proteins -- enzymes involved in many cellular processes, including cancer -- explains how they function and may offer a blueprint for designing therapeutic drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

By altering bone marrow, training can prepare innate immune system for future challenges
(University of Pennsylvania) In a new paper, published in Cell, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania collaborated with an international team to show how the innate immune system, which responds more generally to dangers detected in the body, can be trained to 'remember' past threats and respond more robustly to future challenges. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New polygenic hazard score predicts when men develop prostate cancer
(University of California - San Diego) An international team, led by researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, has developed and validated a genetic tool for predicting age of onset of aggressive prostate cancer, a disease that kills more than 26,000 American men annually. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Do less harm: E-cigarettes a safer option than smoking
(New York University) A new article publishing in the forthcoming volume of the Annual Review of Public Health focuses on harm minimization and smoking cessation, with alternative nicotine products like e-cigarettes emerging as a promising avenue for people who want to quit smoking. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers demonstrate RAS dimers are essential for cancer
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) Researchers at UT Southwestern's Simmons Cancer Center have shown that RAS molecules act in pairs, known as dimers, to cause cancer, findings that could help guide them to a treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news