WPSI says screen all women annually for urinary incontinence
(American College of Physicians) All women should be screened annually for urinary incontinence, according to new guidelines from the Women's Preventive Services Initiative (WPSI). Screening should assess whether women experience urinary incontinence and whether it affects their activities and quality of life. If treatment is indicated, women should be referred for further evaluation. The clinical guideline and evidence review are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 13, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Rare cancer could be caught early using simple blood tests
(University of Exeter) A pioneering study into myeloma, a rare cancer, could lead to GPs using simple blood tests to improve early diagnosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 13, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Doctor-patient discussions neglect potential harms of lung cancer screening, study finds
(UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center) Although national guidelines advise doctors to discuss the benefits and harms of lung cancer screening with high-risk patients because of a high rate of false positives and other factors, those conversations aren't happening the way they should be, according to a study by researchers from the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 13, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Blood test could detect kidney cancer up to 5 years earlier
(Cancer Research UK) Scientists have discovered that a marker in the blood could help predict the risk that a person will develop kidney cancer, according to research published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 13, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cellular escape artists help explain why some women present with advanced ovarian cancer
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) In a new study published recently in The Journal of Pathology, BWH investigators conducted an exhaustive analysis of 'normal' fallopian tubes from patients with HGSC. Their analysis indicates that normal appearing tubes can contain pre-cancerous cells may escape the tubes, later progressing to cancer in the pelvic or abdominal cavity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 13, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

First study on physical properties of giant cancer cells may inform new treatments
(Brown University) Giant cancer cells are much larger and stiffer than other cancer cells and move further, study shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 13, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers create specialized delivery methods to help treat cancer, other disorders
(University of Missouri-Columbia) More than 100 years ago, German Nobel laureate Paul Ehrlich popularized the 'magic bullet' concept -- a method that clinicians might one day use to target invading microbes without harming other parts of the body. Although chemotherapies have been highly useful as targeted treatments for cancer, unwanted side effects still plague patients. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have demonstrated that specialized nucleic acid-based nanostructures could be used to target cancer cells while bypassing normal cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 13, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Drop the C-word to reduce anxiety and overtreatment, say experts
(University of Sydney) Medical researchers are calling for the word 'cancer' to be dropped from some doctor-patient conversations in a bid to reduce patient anxiety and harm from over treatment.The appeal in today's BMJ follows mounting evidence that patients who are told they have 'cancer' for low risk conditions more often choose surgery than those whose condition is described with terms such as 'lesions' or 'abnormal cells'. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Association of radiation therapy plus lumpectomy in reduced risk of dying in women with DCIS
(JAMA Network) Lumpectomy plus radiation was associated with a small clinical benefit in reduced risk of breast cancer death compared with lumpectomy or mastectomy alone   in women   with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a noninvasive early form of breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 10, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

AI model 'learns' from patient data to make cancer treatment less toxic
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT researchers are employing novel machine-learning techniques to improve the quality of life for patients by reducing toxic chemotherapy and radiotherapy dosing for glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of brain cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 10, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Palliative care may reduce suicide risk in veterans with lung cancer
(Oregon Health& Science University) New research finds patient care focused on relieving symptoms, stress reduces suicide risk by 81 percent (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Common skin cancer can signal increased risk of other cancers, Stanford researchers say
(Stanford Medicine) People who develop abnormally frequent cases of a skin cancer known as basal cell carcinoma appear to be at significantly increased risk for the development of other cancers, including blood, breast, colon and prostate cancers, according to a preliminary study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Nuclear gatekeeper could block undruggable prostate cancer targets
(Thomas Jefferson University) Blocking nuclear gateways that traffic cancer-promoting molecules to nucleus, could offer a new way to target aggressive cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Finally, a potential new approach against KRAS-driven lung cancer
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) University of Colorado Cancer Center and M.D. Anderson Cancer Center study shows KRAS-driven lung cancers are also marked by high levels of 'gel-forming mucins,' as seen in some forms of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. The study, published Aug. 9 in the journal JCI Insight, also pinpoints a cause of increased mucin production, namely the gene MUC5AC. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists identify genetic marker for gastric cancer prognosis
(Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center) Although immunotherapy is seen as a very promising treatment for cancer, currently only 20 to 30 percent of patients respond positively. Being able to identify the people most likely to benefit from the costly therapy is a Holy Grail for oncologists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Kidney cancer's developmental source revealed
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) In the first experiment of its kind, scientists have revealed the precise identity of cancer cells of the most common childhood and adult kidney cancers. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the University of Cambridge and their collaborators showed the cancer cells are versions of specific healthy cells from developing or adult kidneys. Reported in Science, this study could lead to the development of completely new methods of treating kidney cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Late effects of treatment hinder independence of adult survivors of childhood brain tumors
(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) In the first study of its kind, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators have found that more than half of pediatric central nervous system tumor survivors do not achieve complete independence as adults. Investigators looked at six aspects of independence in more than 300 survivors, including employment, independent living, marital status, assistance with routine or personal care needs, and the ability to drive. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New study views cancer treatment as a game to find strategies that improve patient outcomes
(H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center& Research Institute) Game theory can be utilized to identify potential flaws in current cancer treatment approaches and suggest new strategies to improve outcomes in patients with metastatic cancer, according to a new article published online today by JAMA Oncology. The study from Moffitt Cancer Center and Maastricht University, challenges the decades old standard of treatment for metastatic cancers in which drugs are typically administered continuously at the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) until the tumor progresses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Discovery could lead to better treatment for leukemia
(University of Illinois at Chicago) Scientists from the University of Illinois at Chicago report on how a certain mutation helps improve sensitivity to chemotherapy in patients in the journal JCI Insight. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Kaiser Permanente Northern California's colorectal cancer screening program saves lives
(Kaiser Permanente) Kaiser Permanente members in Northern California are 52 percent less likely to die from colorectal cancer since the health care system launched a comprehensive, organized screening program, according to a new study in the specialty's top journal, Gastroenterology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Community health centers can help boost rates of colorectal cancer screening
(Kaiser Permanente) An innovative program in community health centers to mail free colorectal cancer screening tests to patients' homes led to a nearly 4 percentage point increase in CRC screening, compared to clinics without the program, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Arsenic in combination with an existing drug could combat cancer
(Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) Investigators have discovered that arsenic in combination with an existing leukemia drug work together to target a master cancer regulator. The team, led by researchers at the Cancer Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), is hopeful that the discovery could lead to new treatment strategies for diverse types of cancer. Their findings were published today online in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Computational platform optimizes multiple myeloma treatments
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Masturah Bte Mohd Abdul Rashid and colleagues have developed a new platform that optimizes drug combinations for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), an incurable blood cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cancer cells send out 'drones' to battle immune system from afar
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Checkpoint inhibitor therapies have made metastatic melanoma and other cancers a survivable condition for 20 to 30 percent of treated patients, but clinicians have had very limited ways of knowing which patients will respond. Researchers have uncovered a novel mechanism by which tumors suppress the immune system. Their findings also usher in the possibility that a straightforward blood test could predict and monitor cancer patients' response to immunotherapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Genetic mutations of appendix cancer identified, may impact treatment
(University of California - San Diego) To understand why some patients with appendix cancer respond to standard treatment while others do not, University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center researchers, in collaboration with Foundation Medicine, performed genetic profiling on 703 appendiceal tumors -- the largest such study of this disease to date -- to compare mutations present in both cancer types. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Anticancer drugs delivered by a new drug delivery system reduce tumor size
(Osaka University) A joint group of researchers from Osaka University and Tokyo Institute of Technology created a drug delivery system (DDS) using a poly (ethylene glycol)-poly(lysine) block copolymer-ubenimex conjugate (PEG-b-PLys(Ube)). The use of this DDS has enabled an increase in the concentration of ubenimex in target CSCs. In addition, combined use of standard anticancer drugs significantly decreased CSCs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientist receives $708,044 grant from Florida Department of Health to study metastasis
(Florida Atlantic University) A leading scientist has been working to identify what contributes to the ability of tumor cells to move through the body and find other places to 'set up shop.' He has identified a number of enzymes that he believes are responsible for this process and is working to develop novel compounds to slow down this spreading aspect of cancer. Currently, there is a great need to find new and effective compounds to target these enzymes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers using big data to predict immunotherapy responses
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) In the age of Big Data, cancer researchers are discovering new ways to monitor the effectiveness of immunotherapy treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Hidden signs in cancer tissue
(ETH Zurich) When scientists at ETH Zurich analysed huge amounts of genetic cancer data, they found previously unresearched molecular changes. These could help in developing new personalised cancer treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cleveland Clinic researchers receive $4.7 million NIH grant to prevent cancer-associated thrombosis
(Cleveland Clinic) The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, awarded a $4.7 million grant to Cleveland Clinic to study the prevention of life-threatening, cancer-associated blood clots. The new funding will support a Cleveland Clinic-led research consortium, which will focus on developing strategies to prevent cancer-associated thrombosis (blood clot formation), a potential side effect of cancer treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New NYUAD research finds 3D printers offer alternate method to create microfluidic probes
(Rubenstein Associates, Inc.) Biomedical engineers at NYU Abu Dhabi are using 3D printers to create new technologies that may help biologists make important discoveries pertaining to cancer research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Is your lung cancer really ROS1-negative?
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) CU Cancer Center study shows that three common laboratory tests used to determine ROS1 status may return false-negative results, meaning that some patients who could benefit from ROS1-directed therapy may be slipping through the cracks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

SwRI, UTSA researchers design minimally invasive medicinal implant
(Southwest Research Institute) SwRI and UTSA are developing a 3D printed implant that, when injected in a patient's body, could deliver a personalized dose of medicine to treat infections as well as ailments such as arthritis, cancer and AIDS. The project, led by Albert Zwiener of SwRI's Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Division and Dr. Lyle Hood of UTSA's College of Engineering, is supported by a $125,000 grant from the Connecting through Research Partnerships (Connect) program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Dental care may benefit patients scheduled for cancer surgery
(Wiley) Preoperative oral care by a dentist may help reduce postoperative complications in patients who undergo cancer surgery, according to a new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Observing the mechanism of metastasis for the first time
(American Institute of Physics) The exact mechanisms for how broken cellular function appears in cells far removed from a cancer's primary tumor remain an area of ongoing research. Scientists have now confirmed a link between healthy-tumor hybrid cells and metastatic tumors for the first time in live animals. In APL Bioengineering, they discuss how they studied the distinct, heterogenous gene expression profiles found in human hybrid cells and how hybrid cells spontaneously occur in mouse models. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Back to the future: breast cancer reprises pathways found in fetal cells
(Salk Institute) Salk Institute scientists have uncovered a reason for the uncanny likeness between cells in the most malignant cancers and the embryonic cells of the organ in which the cancer originated: cells in human basal-like breast cancers share features with the embryonic mammary (breast) stem cells that are the progenitors of all cell types in the mammary gland (of a mouse). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Sensor could help doctors select effective cancer therapy
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT chemical engineers have developed a sensor that lets them see hydrogen peroxide inside cancer cells and determine whether they are responding to drugs that affect redox signaling. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Rapid diagnostic coupled with local therapy developed for brain tumors
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) Working together, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) and neurosurgeons from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), along with colleagues at MIT, are designing a new, rapid molecular diagnostic and sustained release therapeutic that could be deployed during brain surgery to treat gliomas and prevent their return. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study: Prioritize cardiac monitoring for high-risk breast cancer patients
(American College of Cardiology) Overall, heart failure is an uncommon complication of breast cancer treatment; however, the risk is higher in patients treated with certain types of chemotherapy and lower in younger patients, according to a study in a special 'Imaging in Cardio-oncology' issue of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging. Researchers concluded that cardiac monitoring should be a higher priority for high-risk patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How common is endometrial cancer in women with postmenopausal bleeding?
(JAMA Network) Postmenopausal bleeding is a common symptom among most women with endometrial cancer but most women with   postmenopausal bleeding won't be diagnosed with endometrial cancer, findings that raise questions about how to best manage postmenopausal bleeding for the early detection of endometrial cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mayo research team identifies genes that increase risk for triple-negative breast cancer
(Mayo Clinic) A research team led by Fergus Couch, Ph.D., a geneticist at Mayo Clinic, has identified specific genes associated with an increased risk for developing triple-negative breast cancer. Their research was published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

MD Anderson and Jazz Pharmaceuticals collaborate to evaluate treatment options for hematol
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Jazz Pharmaceuticals plc today announced a five-year collaboration agreement with a goal of evaluating therapies for multiple hematologic malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

PET tracer identifies estrogen receptor expression differences in breast cancer patients
(Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging) In metastatic breast cancer, prognosis and treatment is largely influenced by estrogen receptor (ER) expression of the metastases. However, little is known about ER expression across metastases throughout the body and surrounding normal tissue. Using a PET tracer, researchers in the Netherlands have been able to identify differences in ER expression, which could help guide treatment for metastatic breast cancer patients. The study is featured in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine's August issue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Comprehensive pediatric CAR T guidelines developed by MD Anderson and PALISI
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Almost one year after the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators Network (PALISI) today published treatment guidelines for managing the treatment in the online issue of Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Early trauma may be risk factor for anxiety and depression in adults with head/neck cancer
(Wiley) Among individuals with head and neck cancer (HNC), those who experienced childhood trauma were more likely to have advanced cancer, to have higher alcohol consumption, and to experience symptoms of anxiety and depression. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings indicate that childhood trauma history should be considered during treatment for HNC. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

What role do inflammatory cytokines play in creating T cell exhaustion in cancer?
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A better understanding of the role secreted inflammatory cytokines play in the tumor microenvironment that results in the differentiation of effector T cells into exhausted T cells points to possible approaches to improve the antitumor activity of T cells and to intervene in T cell exhaustion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 3, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Blocking digestive hormone may prevent diet-induced pancreatic cancer
(American Physiological Society) A high-fat diet may promote the growth of pancreatic cancer independent of obesity because of the interaction between dietary fat and cholecystokinin (CCK), a digestive hormone. In addition, blocking CCK may help prevent the spread of pancreatic tumors to other areas of the body (metastases). The new findings are published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology--Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology. The research was chosen as an APSselect article for August. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 2, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists develop novel drug that could potentially treat liver cancer more effectively
(National University of Singapore) A research team led by scientists from the Cancer Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore has developed a novel peptide drug called FFW that could potentially stop the development of hepatocellular carcinoma or primary liver cancer. This landmark discovery opens door for more effective treatment of liver cancer with less side effects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 2, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

LSU health research discovers new link between hypoxia and blood clot risk
(Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center) Research led by Rinku Majumder, PhD, Associate Professor of Biochemistry at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, has found how hypoxia (a low concentration of oxygen) decreases Protein S, a natural anticoagulant, resulting in an increased risk for the development of potentially life-threatening blood clots (thrombosis). Although hypoxia has been associated with an increased risk for thrombosis, this research showed for the first time a molecular cause. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 2, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mushrooms of the far east hold promise for the anti-cancer therapy
(Far Eastern Federal University) Mushrooms from the Far East area contain the natural chemical compounds, which could be used for the design of the novel drugs with highly specific anti-tumor activities and low-toxicity. These compounds may offer new avenues for oncology, providing us with either stand-alone alternatives to chemotherapy, chemopreventive medicines, or drugs to be used in combination with other therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 2, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news