Mauritian medical herbs possess antitumor properties
(Far Eastern Federal University) Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) scientists teamed up with colleagues from the UK and Mauritius and experimentally demonstrated that extracts of the endemic (i.e. growing only on this island) medicinal herb leaves Acalypha integrifolia, Eugenia tinifolia, and Labourdonnaisia glauca stop the proliferation of esophageal squamous carcinoma cells, ones of the most deadly cancer type worldwide. A related article is published in the Acta Naturae journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Advance in CAR T-cell therapy eliminates severe side effects
(University of Southern California) An advance in the cancer treatment known as CAR T-cell therapy appears to eliminate its severe side effects, making the treatment safer and potentially available in outpatient settings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Overlooked molecular machine in cell nucleus may hold key to treating aggressive leukemia
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) Many people fighting a very aggressive form of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) don't survive more than five years. These very sick patients are often unable to receive the only cure -- a bone marrow transplant. Now, an international team of scientists report in Nature Cell Biology on a long-overlooked part of a leukemic cell's internal machinery, where they may have found a key to treating the aggressive blood cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Blood samples to help select the right early phase clinical trials for cancer patients
(Cancer Research UK) Scientists could help match cancer patients with no other treatment options to clinical trials with experimental medicines, by analyzing the genetic faults in a sample of their blood, according to research published in Nature Medicine today (Monday). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Promise of liquid biopsy in cancer biomarker detection and prenatal screening
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) The promise and challenges of liquid biopsy, an emerging, noninvasive method for targeted disease diagnosis and detection of cancer biomarkers to enable improved and personalized therapy, is the focus of a new special issue of Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert Inc. publishers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Personalizing precision medicine with combination therapies improves outcomes in cancer
(University of California - San Diego) University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers found that treating patients with personalized precision medicine that combined therapies to target multiple alterations improved outcomes in patients with therapy-resistant cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New genomics tool ECCITE-seq expands multimodal single cell analysis
(New York Genome Center) ECCITE-seq (Expanded CRISPR-compatible Cellular Indexing of Transcriptomes and Epitopes by sequencing), developed by scientists at the New York Genome Center's Technology Innovation Lab, allows researchers to perform high-throughput measurements of multiple modalities of information from single cells. The technique, published today in Nature Methods, profiles different types of biomolecules from thousands of single cells in parallel, offering a breadth of information that can be used as readout in CRISPR-based pooled genetics screens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Lessons from Hurricane Maria: Doctors offer tips to better prepare clinics for catastrophe
(American Society for Radiation Oncology) In the wake of Hurricane Maria, radiation oncologists from the mainland United States and Puerto Rico prepared a set of crisis-planning tips for radiation therapy clinics to minimize gaps in cancer treatment after a catastrophic event. Their emergency preparedness suggestions were published online April 15 in Practical Radiation Oncology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

One woman's cancer fight: A case study in structural racism
This article examines how one woman's breast cancer battle illustrates the impact of structural racism: the convergence of social, cultural, economic and institutional forces to perpetuate racial group inequity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study provides insights on marijuana and opioid use in people with cancer
(Wiley) A new study reveals that many people with cancer use marijuana, and rates of use in the US have increased over time. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study also found that patients with cancer are more likely to use prescription opioids than adults without cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A deep-learning model may help predict lung cancer survival and outcomes
(American Association for Cancer Research) A deep-learning model developed using serial image scans of tumors from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) predicted treatment response and survival outcomes better than standard clinical parameters. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Molecular target UNC45A is essential for cancer but not normal cell proliferation
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) Identifying a protein that plays a key role in cancer cell growth is a first step toward the development of a targeted cancer therapy. It is especially promising when this protein is dispensable for the growth of normal cells. Their discovery that UNC45A fits these criteria has researchers, led by Dr. Ahmed Chadli, of the Georgia Cancer Center at Augusta University, excited about potential new cancer therapeutic strategies involving the inhibition of UNC45A. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 19, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Studies identify mechanism key to removal of protein aggregates from cells
(Massachusetts General Hospital) Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have discovered the mechanism by which cells sense dysfunction of the proteasome -- a cellular component that degrades unneeded or defective proteins -- and respond in a previously undescribed manner, by editing the amino acid sequence of a key sensing protein. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 18, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New CRISPR tool executes multiple edits simultaneously, leading to unique partnership to deliver more precise cancer treatments
(Burness) Scientists at Christiana Care Health System's Gene Editing Institute and NovellusDx, an Israeli biotechnology company, have deployed a breakthrough CRISPR gene-editing tool to successfully engineer multiple edits simultaneously to fragments of DNA extracted from a human cell, according to a new study published today in The CRISPR Journal. The tool can rapidly reproduce, in a human DNA sample, the unique and complex genetic features of an individual patient's cancer tumor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 18, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Diet high in leucine may fuel breast cancer's drug resistance
(Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) A team led by Senthil Muthuswamy, PhD, at the Cancer Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, has discovered an unexpected relationship between levels of the amino acid leucine (found in beef, chicken, pork and fish and other foods) and the development of tamoxifen resistance in ER+ breast cancer. These findings reveal a potential new strategy for overcoming resistance to endocrine drugs in ER+ breast cancer patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New study targets Achilles' heel of pancreatic cancer, with promising results
(Salk Institute) Advanced pancreatic cancer is often symptomless, leading to late diagnosis only after metastases have spread throughout the body. Now, Salk Institute researchers, along with an international team of collaborators, have uncovered the role of a signaling protein, called LIF, that may be the Achilles' heel of pancreatic cancer. The findings show that pancreatic stellate cells -- resident cells typically dormant in normal tissue -- secrete LIF to convey stimulatory signals to tumor cells to drive pancreatic cancer development and progression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers pinpoint tumor-related protein, slow progression of cancers
(University of Nebraska-Lincoln) A new study in Nature has identified a potential strategy for treating multiple forms of cancerous tumors: targeting a protein that maliciously rewires immune cells and impedes cancer therapies. The researchers showed that inhibiting the protein with an existing compound helped slow or even reject tumors stemming from four cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New automated biological-sample analysis systems to accelerate disease detection
(Polytechnique Montr é al) Professor Thomas Gervais of Polytechnique Montr é al and his students Pierre-Alexandre Goyette and É tienne Boulais, in partnership with the team led by Professor David Juncker of McGill University, have developed a new microfluidic process aimed at automating protein detection by antibodies. This work, the topic of an article in Nature Communications, points to the arrival of new portable instruments to accelerate the screening process and molecule analysis in biological laboratories to accelerate research in cancer biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Preventing triple negative breast cancer from spreading
(University of Missouri-Columbia) A protein called p53 suppresses and kills cancer in people. However, a defective, mutant form of p53 helps cancer cells grow and multiply. Researchers at the University of Missouri have now found that a combination drug therapy reduces the spread of triple negative breast cancer to other locations of the body by 50 percent. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Bacterial therapy in a dish
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) Biomedical engineers have developed a system that can study 10s to 100s of programmed bacteria within mini-tissues in a dish, condensing study time from months to days. The speed and high throughput of their technology allows for stable growth of bacteria within tumor spheroids and can also be used for other bacteria species and cell types. The team says this study is the first to rapidly screen and characterize bacteria therapies in vitro. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Partner status influences sexual problems and self-efficacy in survivors of breast cancer
(The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)) Vaginal dryness and painful intercourse are some of the more common adverse events of post-breast cancer treatment therapies and often lead to sexual dissatisfaction and an overall lower quality of life (QOL). However, a new study finds that partnered women may fare better than those without a partner. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The Leukemia Atlas: researchers unveil proteins that signal disease
(University of Texas at San Antonio) Only about one in four people diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) survive five years after the initial diagnosis. To improve that survival rate, researchers at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center created an online atlas to identify and classify protein signatures present at AML diagnosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists 'reverse engineer' brain cancer cells to find new targets for treatment
(University of Toronto - Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy) Glioblastoma is one of the most devastating forms of cancer, with few existing treatment options. It is also a leading cause of cancer-related death in children and young adults. Scientists have 'reverse engineered' brain cancer stem cells gene by gene, uncovering multiple potential targets for this hard-to-treat cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 16, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Two medications from Kazan University awarded at International Exhibition of Inventions
(Kazan Federal University) The compounds are among the eight prospective medications developed by Kazan University's Pharmaceutics Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 16, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

'PRO-cision Medicine' aims to turn patient-reported outcome ratings into personalized care
(Wolters Kluwer Health) Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are an important target for efforts to improve healthcare -- focusing on the most important problems and outcomes identified by patients themselves. A special supplement to Medical Care presents a toolkit of methods to help personalize care for patients with cancer using a 'PRO-cision Medicine' approach. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 16, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Magic mouthwash effective treatment for mouth sore pain caused by radiation therapy
(Mayo Clinic) 'Magic mouthwash,' an oral rinse containing diphenhydramine, lidocaine and antacids, significantly reduced pain from oral mucositis, mouth sores, in patients receiving radiation therapy for cancers of the head and neck when compared to plaecbo. These were the findings of a multi-institution, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III clinical trial, led by Robert Miller, M.D., an emeritus Mayo Clinic radiation oncologist. Dr. Miller and his colleagues published their findings on Tuesday, April 16, in JAMA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 16, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Probing the mystery of drug resistance: New hope for leukemia's toughest cases
(Boston Children's Hospital) Alejandro Gutierrez, MD, a researcher at the Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center has made it his mission to figure out why leukemia treatments cure some patients but not others. He and 15 colleagues report progress on two important fronts: They shed light on how leukemia cells become resistant to drugs, and they describe how two drugs used in combination may overcome that resistance, offering new hope to thousands of children and adults with leukemia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 16, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

AI performs as well as experienced radiologists in detecting prostate cancer
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) UCLA researchers have developed a new artificial intelligence system to help radiologists improve their ability to diagnose prostate cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 16, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The fluid that feeds tumor cells
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT biologists have found that the nutrient composition of the interstitial fluid that normally surrounds pancreatic tumors is different from that of the culture medium normally used to grow cancer cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 16, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

PCORI Board approves $45 million to support research on opioid use disorders, cancer pain
(Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute) The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) Board of Governors today approved $44.6 million to fund 12 studies comparing the best ways to treat a range of health conditions that impose high burdens on patients, caregivers and the healthcare system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 16, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Men's knowledge on prostate cancer needs improving
(University of British Columbia Okanagan campus) UBC researchers have determined the majority of men struggle when it comes to understanding the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. Professors Joan Bottorff and John Oliffe are scientists with UBC's Men's Health Research Program. Together, while studying men's knowledge or literacy of prostate cancer, they realized many are in the dark when it comes to what they know about the disease. And, more importantly, what direction to take after diagnosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 16, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Three studies show how tumors hijack the immune system to resist radiation therapy
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) Treg cells turn off the immune system. Three recent studies show that targeting tregs may increase the effectiveness of anti-cancer immunotherapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 16, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Discovery of oral cancer biomarkers could save thousands of lives
(University of Otago) Oral cancer is known for its high mortality rate in developing countries, but an international team of scientists hope its latest discovery will change that.Researchers from the University of Otago, New Zealand, and the Indian Statistical Institute (ISI), Kolkata, have discovered epigenetic markers that are distinctly different in oral cancer tissues compared to the adjacent healthy tissues in patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Rutgers researchers discover crucial link between brain and gut stem cells
(Rutgers University) Researchers at Rutgers University have identified a new factor that is essential for maintaining the stem cells in the brain and gut and whose loss may contribute to anxiety and cognitive disorders and to gastrointestinal diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Some patients with imminently fatal cancer still receive treatment
(American Cancer Society) Patients who died within one month of being newly diagnosed with metastatic cancer in the United States received ineffective surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, and hormonal therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Decoding cancer's molecular signature
(Harvard Medical School) New algorithm successfully identifies patients with a tumor-fueling DNA repair defect found in multiple cancers and treatable with a common cancer drug. Most genetic tests currently used in clinic do not reliably capture the cancer-causing defect, missing many patients who could benefit from treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Princeton scientists discover an interaction that helps cancers spread to bone
(Princeton University) A Princeton-led team of researchers have discovered a factor that promotes the spread of cancers to bone, opening the way toward treatments that could mitigate cancer's ability to colonize bone. The study by Mark Esposito, Yibin Kang and colleagues appears in the April 15 issue of Nature Cell Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Rare but important gene target found in many tumor types, suggesting new therapy possible
(Georgetown University Medical Center) A consortium of researchers led by Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center investigators have completed the largest analysis of a new gene fusion they believe is responsible for development of a wide spectrum of cancer types. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

'Fingerprint database' could help scientists to identify new cancer culprits
(University of Cambridge) Scientists in Cambridge and London have developed a catalogue of DNA mutation 'fingerprints' that could help doctors pinpoint the environmental culprit responsible for a patient's tumour - including showing some of the fingerprints left in lung tumours by specific chemicals found in tobacco smoke. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists get sly, use deception to fight cancer
(The Hebrew University of Jerusalem) In recent years, it's become clear that RNA-binding proteins play a major role in cancer growth. These proteins, active in all cells but especially so in cancer cells, bind to RNA molecules and accelerate cancer cell growth. Unfortunately, no cancer treatment has targeted these proteins. Until now. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Moffitt researchers identify mechanism of resistance to BRAF inhibitors in melanoma
(H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center& Research Institute) Melanoma is one of the most aggressive types of skin cancer, but recent advances in targeted therapies have improved the prognosis for many patients. Unfortunately, for some patients these positive outcomes are not long lasting, due to the development of drug resistance and tumor recurrence. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have discovered a mechanism by which melanoma cells become resistant to the commonly used drugs that target the BRAF protein and its signaling pathway. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Precise decoding of breast cancer cells creates new option for treatment
(University of Zurich) Researchers at the University of Zurich and from IBM Research have investigated the vary-ing composition of cancer and immune cells in over one hundred breast tumors. They've found that aggressive tumors are often dominated by a single type of tumor cell. If certain immune cells are present as well, an immune therapy could be successful for a specific group of breast cancer patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Russian scientists alter 3D genome using 'small molecules'
(AKSON Russian Science Communication Association) Researchers have discovered that the spatial organization of the genome can be altered using small molecule compounds which are considered as promising anti-cancer drugs. This work opens up the prospect of developing a new class of anticancer epigenetic drugs that alter the 3D genome. The results were published in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scanning for cancer treatment
(Harvard University) 11,000 people are predicted to die from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 2019. Recently, drug developers designed a new treatment to target the cancer's mutated genes. But, these drugs don't always work. Now, in a new study, researchers investigate both sides of the drug-body relationship to better understand why certain AML treatments--and other cancer treatments--may not work as expected. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researcher awarded $1.17 million for cancer research
(University of Texas at Arlington) Clay Clark, professor and chair of the UTA Department of Biology, has received a four-year, $1.17 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to investigate the regulation of proteins responsible for programmed cell death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cancers 'change spots' to avoid immunotherapy
(Institute of Cancer Research) Cancers can make themselves harder for new immunotherapies to see by 'changing their spots' -- and switching off a key molecule on the surface of cells that is otherwise recognised by treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 14, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Improved procedure for cancer-related erectile dysfunction
(University of Melbourne) Melbourne surgeons have modified a minimally invasive technique to help men regain erectile function lost after prostate cancer surgery. The surgery had a 71 per cent success rate with two participants achieving their first erection in 12 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 12, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers of the University of Malaga relate DNA methylation levels to obesity
(University of Malaga) A multidisciplinary study performed at the University of Malaga (UMA) has related DNA methylation levels to the development of the metabolic disease associated with obesity. A multidisciplinary work that has been carried out by biologists, surgeons and endocrinologists and conducted in patients with metabolic risk factors such as high levels of glucose (hyperglycemia), triglycerides (hypertriglyceridemia), blood pressure (hypertension), abdominal obesity and low levels of good cholesterol (HDL). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 12, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

CD30: From witness to culprit
(Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health) Cells of certain blood cancers such as Hodgkin's lymphoma carry the protein CD30 on their surface. The molecule is not only an indicator of a few cancers of the immune system but also increases the risk of their occurrence, according to a report in the journal Blood by researchers of the Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen. A greatly increased number of CD30-bearing cells are produced after certain viral infections, e.g. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, and in autoimmune diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 12, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

LSU Health New Orleans research finds new Rx target for childhood cancer
(Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center) Research led by Michael Lan, Ph.D., Professor of Pediatrics and Genetics at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, found that a compound named 5'-iodotubercidin (5'-IT) suppresses the growth of neuroblastoma cells and identified a potential new therapeutic approach for the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 12, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news