Diabetes diagnosis may signal early pancreatic cancer in older African-Americans, Latinos
(University of Southern California - Health Sciences) A new study from the Keck School of Medicine of USC shows that African-Americans and Latinos who are diagnosed with diabetes after age 50 have a more than threefold risk of developing pancreatic cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Protein analysis may reveal new cancer treatment targets
(Wiley) Researchers have used lab technology called mass spectrometry to study the proteins expressed by human cancer cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

20 years of excellence in gastrointestinal research and practice [WCGI 2018]
(European Society for Medical Oncology) Groundbreaking research will be revealed at this year's ESMO World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer (June 20-23, 2018, Barcelona, Spain), celebrating 20 years of clinical progress in a group of diseases that affect both men and women worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

No difference in malignancy rates seen between tocilizumab and TNFi in patients with RA
(European League Against Rheumatism) The results of a study presented at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) examined rates of malignancy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), excluding non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), and found no difference between those newly treated with tocilizumab (TCZ) versus TNF inhibitors (TNFi). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Greater levels of vitamin D associated with decreasing risk of breast cancer
(University of California - San Diego) Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine suggest higher levels of vitamin D are associated with decreasing risk of breast cancer. Their epidemiological study is published in the June 15 online issue of PLOS ONE, in collaboration with Creighton University, Medical University of South Carolina and GrassrootsHealth, an Encinitas-based nonprofit organization that promotes vitamin D research and its therapeutic benefits. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

PIM-2 protein kinase regulates T-cell activity differently than PIM-1 or PIM-3 isoform
(Medical University of South Carolina) The PIM-2 protein kinase negatively regulates T cell responses in transplantation and tumor immunity, while PIM-1 and PIM-3 are positive regulators, report Medical University of South Carolina investigators in The Journal of Clinical Investigation. Blocking PIM-2 in allogeneic bone marrow transplant dramatically accelerated graft-versus-host disease. In adoptive immunotherapy with autologous T cells, silencing PIM-2 on T cells produced robust tumor immunity, highlighting the importance of PIM-specific inhibition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers find combination can enhance ipilimumab immunotherapy
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Using a targeted therapy to block a protein that suppresses T cell activity could improve cancer treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

JAK inhibitors associated with aggressive lymphoma
(American Society of Hematology) Austrian researchers have discovered that a small number of patients taking targeted drugs known as Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors to treat myelofibrosis may develop aggressive lymphomas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers pinpoint new subtype of prostate cancer
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) Researchers led by the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center have identified a new subtype of prostate cancer that occurs in about 7 percent of patients with advanced disease. This subset of tumors were responsive to immunotherapy treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Large international study links blood vitamin D levels to colorectal cancer risk
(American Cancer Society) A new study authored by scientists from more than 20 medical centers and organizations finds that higher circulating vitamin D concentrations are significantly associated with lower colorectal cancer risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Without 'yoga and chardonnay' leukemia stem cells are stressed to death
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) University of Colorado Cancer Center researchers nix leukemia stem cell (LSC) stress-relief pathway to kill LSCs without harming healthy blood stem cells, paving the way for new therapies targeting these most dangerous cancer cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Parents ranked cancer prevention as number one provider reason for HPV vaccination
(UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center) Parents ranked cancer prevention as the most compelling reason health care providers can give for recommending the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, according to a survey led by University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Gene testing could identify men with prostate cancer who may benefit from immunotherapy
(Institute of Cancer Research) Scientists have identified a pattern of genetic changes that could pick out men with advanced prostate cancer who are likely to benefit from immunotherapy.Developing a genetic test to pick out these men could speed up the path of immunotherapy into use for prostate cancer patients.The research found that men whose tumors had a distinct pattern of genetic changes could be much more likely to benefit from immunotherapy than otherwise. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

3D imaging and computer modeling capture breast duct development
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Working with hundreds of time-lapse videos of mouse tissue, a team of biologists joined up with civil engineers to create what is believed to be the first 3D computer model to show precisely how the tiny tubes that funnel milk through the breasts of mammals form. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Case Comprehensive Cancer Center endorses elimination of HPV-related cancers
(Case Western Reserve University) Case Comprehensive Cancer Center has partnered with 69 other National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated cancer centers to issue a statement urging increased HPV vaccination and screening to eliminate HPV-related cancers, starting with cervical cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers develop molecular assembly method for cancer therapy and diagnostics
(Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology) Cancer is a complex disease to treat, and yet the operating principle of many current treatments is to simply kill healthy cells a little slower than cancerous ones. In response, an international team of researchers from Russia and Australia has developed a sophisticated nanoparticle-based treatment.They created a universal assembly method, which allows a number of molecules with therapeutic and diagnostic potential to be easily combined while preserving their spatial structure and properties. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Synodos for NF2 Consortium publishes key results of its work
(Children's Tumor Foundation) The Synodos for NF2 consortium of the Children's Tumor Foundation (CTF) today published its first set of results in the scientific journal PLOS ONE. Synodos is CTF's innovative team science collaborative that brings researchers, clinicians and patients together in a shared data environment in order to develop treatments for NF patients at an accelerated pace. The $3 million project is a combined effort among 12 leading research labs at 8 institutions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A maestro that conducts the invasiveness of glioblastoma tumors
(Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia) Glioblastoma is the most severe form of brain cancer in adults. The aggressiveness of this cancer is largely due to its ability to invade surrounding brain tissue, making the tumor difficult to remove by surgery. Now, a research team led by Diogo Castro, from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia (IGC, Portugal), discovered a genetic program that controls the invasiveness of this form of cancer. This research, published now in The EMBO Journal, may open avenues for developing new therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists show that drugs targeting tumor metabolism will not stop Natural Killer cells
(Trinity College Dublin) The scientists discovered that while glutamine is a key fuel for many tumors, it is not so for natural killer cells. This highlights the therapeutic potential for targeting glutamine metabolism to treat cancer as any drugs that do this will not hinder our cancer-killing NK cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study finds music therapy brings effective pain relief for sickle cell patients
(University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center) In a randomized controlled trial, patients with sickle cell disease were assigned to one of three 20-minute conditions: a session with a music therapist, an iPod to listen to pre-selected music themselves, or no music at all. While passively listening to music improved mood, music therapy had a significantly stronger impact on aiding in pain management for patients actively engaged with a music therapist. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 13, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New radiation therapy technique aims to preserve sexual function
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) A multicenter clinical trial being led by UT Southwestern physicians is testing a technique for sparing nerve bundles and arteries involved in sexual function to preserve potency in patients getting radiation therapy for prostate cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Dialogue toward a human-relevant paradigm for biomedical research echoed in South America
(Humane Society International) South American scientists call for strategy and funding for human-specific approaches in biomedical research and toxicology, emphasizing mechanistic understanding and non-animal technology infrastructures such as iPSC and microphysiological systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Modern blood cancer treatments require new approach for monitoring, reporting side effects
(The Lancet) Treatment changes including the advent of targeted and immune therapies have dramatically improved survival for blood cancers, but new report calls for improved evaluation of poorly understood side effects that may develop over time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A call to neuroscientists to help reveal root causes of chemobrain
(Cell Press) Though well documented, cancer-related cognitive impairment (CRCI), known colloquially as chemobrain or chemofog, remains a mystery regarding its underlying neurological causes. In a Forum paper published June 12 in the journal Trends in Neurosciences, researchers at the National Cancer Institute propose a new approach to studying CRCI and call for changes in the way it's diagnosed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Temple scientists eradicate cancer cells through dual targeting of DNA repair mechanisms
(Temple University Health System) BRCA proteins serve a critical role in cellular DNA repair, but when mutated they allow genetic error replication, facilitating cancer development. If the repair system is disabled in cancer cells, they use backup repair mechanisms and adapt to alternative repair pathways, a survival mode that underlies their ability to evade targeted drug therapies.Now, Temple scientists show it's possible to eliminate at least two backup repair mechanisms at the same time using two targeted therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

CureWorks Collaborative launches to accelerate development of immunotherapy treatments
(Seattle Children's) Seattle Children's, with participating members Children's National Health System, BC Children's Hospital and Children's Hospital Los Angeles, has launched CureWorks, an international collaborative of leading academic children's hospitals determined to accelerate the development of immunotherapy treatments for childhood cancer. CureWorks focuses on expanding immunotherapy trials and patient access around the world, as well as sharing data and collective expertise to advance novel cell therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

AACR to host international lymphoma meeting in Boston
(American Association for Cancer Research) The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) will host its Inaugural AACR International Meeting: Advances in Malignant Lymphoma later this month in Boston. Presented in cooperation with the International Conference on Malignant Lymphoma (ICML), this program will provide a forum for discussion and brainstorming about how recent advances and emerging areas of lymphoma research hold enormous potential for transforming clinical care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Genetic discovery will help clinicians identify aggressive versus benign bone tumors
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) The first genetic marker for the bone tumor, osteoblastoma, has been discovered by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators. Whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing of human bone tumors revealed that a genetic change that affects the transcription factor, FOS, is a hallmark mutation of osteoblastoma. The results, published in Nature Communications, will help clinicians correctly distinguish benign osteoblastoma tumors from aggressive osteosarcoma tumors and direct the correct treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Recipe for perfect balance of breaks and repairs in our genome could help fight cancer
(University of Sheffield) Scientists at the University of Sheffield have discovered what keeps the perfect balance of breaks and repairs in our DNA -- something which could help improve the success of chemotherapy and combat neurodegeneration associated with ageing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Newly-approved therapy provides improved quality of life for midgut neuroendocrine tumor patients
(H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center& Research Institute) The Journal of Clinical Oncology published new data from the NETTER-1 clinical trial highlighting the impact of Lutathera on patients' quality of life. The results showed that treatment with Lutathera provides significantly longer time to deterioration of quality of life for patients compared to those treated with octreotide LAR alone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cancer: More targeted use of immunotherapy
(Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF)) SNSF-supported researchers have discovered a method for predicting the likelihood of success when treating cancer with immunotherapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mozart, meditation and a yoga mat: Oncologists welcome integrative therapies for breast cancer
(Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center) A breast cancer patient dealing with anxiety, depression or mood swings could soon be encouraged by her oncologist to learn meditation techniques, join a yoga class or put music to therapeutic use. Today, The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), published its endorsement of integrative therapy guidelines recently established by the Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Long periods of viral suppression shown to prevent cancer in aging HIV population
(American College of Physicians) Early, sustained antiretroviral therapy (ART), which results in long-term viral suppression, helps to prevent AIDS-defining cancers and also non-AIDS-defining cancers, to a lesser degree. However, patients with long-term viral suppression still had excess cancer risk compared to uninfected patients. The study, published in Annals of Internal Medicine, is the first to examine the effects of prolonged periods of viral suppression and potential cancer prevention benefits for the aging population of persons living with HIV. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Key cancer-fighting gene's secret weapons revealed
(Walter and Eliza Hall Institute) Melbourne scientists have discovered how the most important gene in preventing human cancer, p53, is able to stop the development of lymphoma -- a type of blood cell cancer -- and potentially other types of cancer as well. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A new therapy proves effective against brain metastasis
(Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncol ó gicas (CNIO)) A study published in Nature Medicine by a team led by Manuel Valiente, head of the Brain Metastasis Group at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), shows that the administration of silibinin in patients with brain metastasis reduces lesions without causing any adverse effects. This preliminary trial provides proof of concept that this compound could be a new effective and safe alternative to treat brain metastasis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

USC scientists help identify genetic markers for prostate cancer in global DNA download
(University of Southern California) An international research team including USC scientists found telltale genetic markers that can be used to predict those most at risk of prostate cancer, a disease common for older men. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Prostate cancer DNA test identifies men with six-fold increased risk
(Institute of Cancer Research) A major new study of more than 140,000 men has identified 63 new genetic variations in the DNA code that increase the risk of prostate cancer.Researchers devised a new test combining these single letter genetic variants with more than 100 others previously linked to prostate cancer, to predict which men were most at risk of developing the disease during their lifetime. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Genome-editing tool could increase cancer risk
(Karolinska Institutet) Therapeutic use of gene editing with the so-called CRISPR-Cas9 technique may inadvertently increase the risk of cancer, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, and the University of Helsinki, Finland, published in Nature Medicine. Researchers say that more studies are required in order to guarantee the safety of these 'molecular scissors' for gene-editing therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Reviving the protector: new tactic against medulloblastoma
(Emory Health Sciences) Scientists have a new tactic with potential for fighting medulloblastoma, the most common and most aggressive form of brain tumor in children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

MD Anderson Therapeutics Discovery team identifies and advances a drug that targets metabolic vulnerability and impairs cancer cell growth and survival
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) A drug discovered and advanced by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center's Institute for Applied Cancer Science (IACS) and the Center for Co-Clinical Trials (CCCT) inhibits a vital metabolic process required for cancer cells' growth and survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New epigenetic drug against Mantle Cell Lymphoma
(IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute) A new study by doctor Manel Esteller's group at IDIBELL presents an epigenetic drug capable of slowing down cell growth in Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study points to possible treatment target for aggressive liver cancer in kids
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) A protein in the cell nucleus already targeted therapeutically for several types of cancer has now been linked to an aggressive form of pediatric liver cancer called hepatoblastoma (HBL), according to a study published in the Nature journal Communications Biology. Scientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center report that laboratory testing indicates the protein, PARP1, may be an effective treatment target for the cancer, but emphasize additional research is needed to verify this. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Toxicant levels up to 99 percent less in myblu ™ aerosols compared to cigarette smoke
(Fontem Ventures) A new aerosol chemistry study presented at the 1st Scientific Summit -- Tobacco Harm Reduction: Novel products, Research& Policy, has revealed toxicant levels in myblu pod-system e-cigarette aerosols are up to 99 percent lower than in cigarette smoke. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Artificial gene defect reveals target to fight genetic disease
(CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences) Fanconi anemia (FA) is caused by defective genes for DNA-repair leading to bone marrow failure, developmental abnormalities and increased cancer risk. Using genome-wide genetic approaches, researchers at CeMM systematically screened for the loss of an additional gene that could rescue the disease -- and found it. The corresponding protein turned out to be a potential target that could be therapeutically exploited for FA. The study was published in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Fighting tobacco use among adults with mental illness
(University of Houston) Of all the groups that try to quit smoking, it seems hardest for those who suffer from anxiety and depression. University of Houston psychology doctoral student Brooke Kauffman is targeting that group, creating personalized feedback to help them quit smoking. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Transatlantic clinical trial for neuroblastoma is open in UK -- US and Germany to open soon
This study combines 131-I mIBG with Nivolumab and Dinutuximab beta. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Children with neuroblastoma have an elevated risk of long-term psychological difficulties
(Wiley) A new study reveals that pediatric neuroblastoma patients are at elevated risk for long-term psychological impairment. In addition, those who experience such impairment as they get older tend to require special education services and to not go on to college. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Improving Americans' diets could save billions in health-related costs
(Nutrition 2018) New research suggests improving the quality of the average American's diet could substantially reduce costs associated with heart disease, diabetes, cancer and other major health problems. The study is the first to comprehensively analyze the potential cost implications of improved adherence to healthy dietary patterns (as measured by the Healthy Eating Index (HEI) and the Mediterranean-style diet (MED) score) among US adults across major chronic disease types. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 10, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

$8.1 million grant funds new center to research highly aggressive form of lung cancer
(Vanderbilt University) A five-year National Cancer Institute grant will fund an interdisciplinary research center at Vanderbilt for the study of small cell lung cancer, a highly aggressive, incurable form of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Does cancer increase risk of diabetes?
(JAMA Network) Developing cancer was associated with increased risk for later diabetes in a nationally representative sample of the Korean general population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news