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Novel therapeutic target discovered for estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) Mount Sinai researchers identify new protein in a common subtype of breast cancer which can potentially offer more effective therapies for the future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 17, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How a poorly explored immune cell may impact cancer immunity and immunotherapy
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) The immune cells that are trained to fight off the body's invaders can become defective. It's what allows cancer to develop. So most research has targeted these co-called effector T-cells. But a new study takes a step back and considers: What if the problem isn't with the effector T-cells but starts higher up the cellular chain? (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 17, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

ALEX study shows alectinib 600 mg more effective than crizotinib in Asian cancer patients
(European Society for Medical Oncology) A subanalysis of the phase III ALEX study has shown that alectinib 600 mg twice daily is more effective than standard of care crizotinib in Asian patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), researchers report at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 17, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study analyzes mutations in cerebrospinal fluid in lung cancer with brain metastases
(European Society for Medical Oncology) Researchers have explored the analysis of mutations in cerebrospinal fluid of lung cancer patients with brain metastases in a study presented at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress. Tumor tissue from brain metastasis is difficult to obtain and therefore less invasive methods are needed to identify and monitor the presence of known actionable mutations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 17, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Anti-tumor and Immune-potentiating Enterococcus faecalis-2001 & #946;-glucans
(Bentham Science Publishers) Background: Enterococcus faecalis 2001 is a probiotic lactic acid bacterium and has been used as a biological response modifier (BRM). From physiological limitation of bacterial preservation in storage and safety, the live E. faecalis 2001 has been heat-treated and the BRM components containing high level ofβ-glucan, named EF-2001, were prepared. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 17, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Link between obesity and cancer is not widely recognized
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study published in the Journal of Public Health has shown that the majority of people in the United Kingdom do not understand the connection between weight issues and cancer. Obesity is associated with thirteen types of cancer, including those of the breast, kidney, bowel, and womb. However, after surveying 3293 adults, taken as representative of the UK population, researchers found that only a quarter of respondents were aware of the link between obesity and cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 17, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Ancient enzyme could boost power of liquid biopsies to detect and profile cancers
(University of Texas at Austin) Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin are developing a new tool for liquid biopsy that can detect RNA biomarkers from cancer cells in a patient's blood much more accurately and completely than other existing methods. This could soon provide doctors with a more complete picture of an individual's disease, improving their chances of finding the best treatment, while also sparing patients the pain, inconvenience and long wait times associated with surgical biopsies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 16, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Report suggests association between coffee and up to 70 percent reduced risk of liver disease
(Kaizo) A new roundtable report from the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC) in association with the British Liver Trust, on 'Looking after the liver: coffee, caffeine and lifestyle factors' highlights the potential role of coffee consumption in reducing the risk of liver diseases such as liver cancer and cirrhosis, with some studies reporting risk reduction of up to 70% (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 16, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

AMP Iissues consensus guideline recommendations for NGS bioinformatics pipelines
(Association for Molecular Pathology) The Association for Molecular Pathology, the premier global, non-profit molecular diagnostics professional society, today published 17 consensus recommendations to help clinical laboratory professionals achieve high-quality sequencing results and deliver better patient care. The report, 'Standards and Guidelines for Validating Next Generation Sequencing Bioinformatics Pipelines: A Joint Recommendation of the Association for Molecular Pathology and College of American Pathologists,' was released online ahead of publication in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 16, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Computer program finds new uses for old drugs
(Case Western Reserve University) Researchers at the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have developed a computer program to find new indications for old drugs. The computer program, called DrugPredict, matches existing data about FDA-approved drugs to diseases, and predicts potential drug efficacy. In a recent study published in Oncogene, the researchers successfully translated DrugPredict results into the laboratory, and showed common pain medications--like aspirin--can kill patient-derived epithelial ovarian cancer cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 16, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Brain cancer treatment previously featured on 60 Minutes now available to children
(Solving Kids' Cancer) A Phase 1 clinical trial leveraging the re-engineered polio virus is now open for enrollment to children 12 years and older at the Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center, Duke University Medical Center. After years of following the progress of this promising therapy against adult glioblastoma and working with the research team on behalf of children, Solving Kids' Cancer teamed up with The Andrew McDonough B+ Foundation to help move this forward in a trial for pediatric brain tumor patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 16, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Pancreatic cancer: Is an 'electronic nose' the answer to achieving early diagnosis?
(Spink Health) In research published in the latest edition of the UEG Journal, Scientists demonstrated that there is variance in the volatile compounds found in the urine of pancreatic cancer patients to that of healthy controls. The technique is affordable (each test costs approximately € 20), non-invasive and it is estimated that up to 20 urine samples could be analyzed every hour. The FAIMS test resulted in a sensitivity and specificity of 85 percent and 75 percent respectively. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Pharmacoscopy improves therapy for relapsed blood cancer in a first clinical trial
(CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences) 88.2 percent of patients receiving pharmacoscopy-guided treatment achieved partial or complete remission, compared to 23.5 percent to their own previous treatment. Further, the median progression-free survival increased four-fold. Retrospectively, pharmacoscopy also predicted the response of AML patients to first-line treatment with 90 percent accuracy. These results show that pharmacoscopy can assist decision-making of the responsible clinicians effectively and thus represent a powerful tool for practical precise and personalized medicine. (...
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Disparities in exposure to toxins may drive higher diabetes rates in minorities
(University of Illinois at Chicago) Unequal exposure to environmental pollutants acting as endocrine-disrupting chemicals is an under-recognized risk factor that may play a key role in driving the higher rates of diabetes among minority and low-income populations, according to a new article in the journal Diabetes Care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Quality of care for older Texas patients with colon cancer on the rise, still room for improvement
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center finds adherence to surgical treatment guidelines has improved significantly among older Texas patients with colon cancer since 2001, while adherence to chemotherapy guidelines has remained largely unchanged. The study, published today in Cancer, identifies factors influencing adherence rates, including socioeconomic status and access to skilled physicians. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cures and scientific breakthroughs happen through collaboration, new study confirms
(Elsevier) Basic research can lead to cures, drugs and other scientific breakthroughs through collaboration, confirms a new study in Heliyon. Understanding the extent of the collaboration that leads to breakthroughs could help research institutions plan and evaluate their own collaborative efforts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Oncotarget: Researchers identify potential therapeutic target in aggressive breast cancer cells
(Rapamycin Press) An especially aggressive breast cancer cell can respond to hormone therapy if they express a specific protein known as estrogen receptor beta, according to research published in Oncotarget. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Tapeworm drug fights prostate cancer
(The University of Bergen) Medicine against parasites contains a substance that kills Prostate- and colon cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Single men 'less likely' to participate in bowel screening
(University of Stirling) Single men are significantly less likely to participate in bowel screening tests compared to those who live with a partner, according to a new University of Stirling study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Children's exposure to secondhand smoke may be vastly underestimated by parents
(American Friends of Tel Aviv University) A new Tel Aviv University study suggests that parents who smoke mistakenly rely on their own physical senses to gauge the presence of tobacco smoke in the air. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Targeting cancer without destroying healthy T-cells
(Cardiff University) A unique approach to targeting the abnormal T-cells that cause T-cell lymphomas could offer hope to patients with the aggressive and difficult-to-treat family of cancers, finds a study involving researchers from Cardiff University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Developing new molecular methods for synthetizing treatments for drug-resistant cancers
(Worcester Polytechnic Institute) With a $1.7 million award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Anita Mattson, a biochemist at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), will develop a new class of catalysts that could make it possible to reliably synthesize organic compounds that hold the promise of treating cancers that have become resistant to commonly used chemotherapy medications. The catalysts may also open the door to a new approach to discovering new drugs for cancer and many other diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Children undergoing radiation for cancer may have alternative to sedation
(University of North Texas) Radiation therapy for children with cancer is painless, but preparation for it may cause great stress for a child and his or her family because the child is routinely sedated before each treatment, to stay motionless. Manish Vaidya at the University of North Texas is using a computer program to train young patients to stay motionless so sedation won't be necessary. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Wider sampling of tumor tissues may guide drug choice, improve outcomes
This study challenges current guidelines and supports evaluation of metastatic lesions and circulating tumor DNA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Type 2 diabetes associated with risk of aggressive breast cancer in black women
(Boston University School of Medicine) African American women with type 2 diabetes (often referred to as adult-onset diabetes) are at a greater risk for developing breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

African-American women with type 2 diabetes may have higher risk for ER-neg breast cancer
(American Association for Cancer Research) Among African-American women, those with type 2 diabetes may have a higher risk of developing estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Multifunctional fluorescent nanoparticles for cancer surgery show promise
(American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists) Even with pre-operative imaging techniques, surgeons still rely on visual inspection to locate malignant tissues during surgery. New research released today at the 2017 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) Annual Meeting and Exposition may help surgeons better view and treat these tumor cells with engineered naphthalocyanine-based nanoparticles (SiNc-PNP) injected 24 hours before surgery, which then light up when they connect with the cancerous tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 14, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A new strategy for prevention of liver cancer development
(University of California - San Diego) Primary liver cancer is now the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and its incidences and mortality are increasing rapidly in the United Stated. In late stages of the malignancy, there are no effective treatments or drugs. However, an unexpected finding made by a team of University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers sheds light on the development of a new strategy for prevention of liver cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 14, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

CHLA is awarded more than $1 million from St. Baldrick's Foundation to fund cancer research
(Children's Hospital Los Angeles) Three physician-researchers with the Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases at Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) have been awarded more than $1 million in grants from the St. Baldrick's Foundation, the largest private funder of childhood cancer research. The funding will be used to support research efforts spanning both neuroblastoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia -- two of the most aggressive childhood cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 14, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Insurance linked to black-white survival disparities in colorectal cancer
(American Cancer Society) Health insurance coverage differences account for nearly one-half of the black-white survival disparity in colorectal cancer patients, according to a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 14, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

HPV testing is better than the Pap test at detecting cervical cancer
(Oxford University Press USA) A new paper in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute finds that testing for cervical cancer using HPV testing in addition to the Pap smear is unlikely to detect cancer cases that wouldn't be found using HPV testing alone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 14, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Monoclonal antibody prevents graft-vs-host disease in bone marrow transplantation model
(Bioscribe) New research provides preclinical proof-of-concept for the ability of PRO 140, a humanized anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody under development by CytoDyn Inc., to effectively block the development of graft-versus-host disease, a potentially lethal complication of bone marrow stem cell transplantation. CytoDyn is currently enrolling patients in a Phase 2 clinical trial with PRO 140 for the prevention of GvHD in leukemia patients undergoing BMSC transplantation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 14, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Dresden scientists develop a sensor for the most important human cancer gene
(Technische Universit ä t Dresden) The molecular smoke detector works like a TP53 sensor, which monitors the correct function of the gene. A non-functional TP53 gene is going to activate the sensor, which initiates cell death. Results from this study from the research team of Prof. Frank Buchholz are now published in the journal Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 14, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

CHLA is awarded more than $1M from St. Baldrick's Foundation to fund cancer research
(Children's Hospital Los Angeles) Three physician-researchers with the Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases at Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) have been awarded more than $1 million in grants from the St. Baldrick's Foundation, the largest private funder of childhood cancer research. The funding will be used to support research efforts spanning both neuroblastoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia -- two of the most aggressive childhood cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 14, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Nano-targeting treatment for prostate cancer
(American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists) Metastatic or castrate-resistant prostate cancer can spread to the bone in certain patients. While several new treatments are available, they can have a difficult time reaching the bone and can result in missing the metastatic lesions. New research presented today at the 2017 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) Annual Meeting and Exposition seeks to address this challenge with the development of a bone-targeted nanoparticle (NP) that delivers the chemotherapy drug cabazitaxel directly to the bone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 13, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease increases risk of liver, colorectal, and breast cancers
(Elsevier) Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the more common chronic liver diseases worldwide. It is associated with metabolic syndrome (i.e. insulin resistance and diabetes) and predisposes to cardiovascular disease. In a new study published in the Journal of Hepatology, researchers identified links not only between NAFLD and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which have been well established, but also to cancers outside the liver, including colorectal and breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 13, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The first effective therapy against glioblastoma by attacking telomeres
(Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncol ó gicas (CNIO)) Researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have shown that it is possible to block the growth of human and murine glioblastoma in mouse models by blocking the TRF1 protein; an essential component of the telomere-protective complex. The study, published in Cancer Cell, describes a new and promising way to combat this type of brain tumor by attacking its ability to regenerate and divide immortally. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 13, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Engineering non-immune cells to kill cancer cells
(ETH Zurich) ETH researchers have reprogrammed normal human cells to create designer immune cells capable of detecting and destroying cancer cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 13, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

'Mini liver tumors' created in a dish for the first time
(Wellcome Trust) Scientists have created mini biological models of human primary liver cancers, known as organoids, in the lab for the first time. In a paper published today in Nature Medicine, the tiny laboratory models of tumors were used to identify a new drug that could potentially treat certain types of liver cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 13, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Genes that hold the clues to bladder cancer and its treatment
(University of Leeds) Scientists have discovered the 'genetic signatures' of the most common form of bladder cancer -- and it could open up the possibility of better-targeted treatment, according to research published today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 13, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cellular network identified that 'short circuits' the antitumor effect of immunotherapies
(The Wistar Institute) Wistar researchers discovered a novel form of crosstalk among tumor cells and other cell types in the tumor microenvironment, elucidating the mechanism of action of an immunotherapeutic strategy that inhibits tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and instructing a more effective use of this therapeutic approach. This work was published online in Cancer Cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 13, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Ludwig scientists share findings at 2017 Society for Neuro-oncology Annual Meeting
(Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research) Ludwig Cancer Research has released the scope of its participation at this year's Annual Meeting and Education Day of the Society for Neuro-Oncology in San Francisco, California, Nov. 16-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 13, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

ESMO Precision Medicine Glossary published today
(European Society for Medical Oncology) ESMO, the leading professional organisation for medical oncology, is pleased to announce the publication of the ESMO Precision Medicine Glossary in the Annals of Oncology. The 43 definitions are set to pave the way for consistent communication on precision medicine between oncologists, researchers and patients by standardizing the language in the field. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 13, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

PharmaMar presents positive results from a Phase II study of PM1183 in Ewing's sarcoma
(Pharmamar) PharmaMar (MSE:PHM) has presented positive results from a Phase II study of lurbinectedin in Ewing ´ s sarcoma at the Connective Tissue Oncology Society ´ s (CTOS) International Congress that took place in Hawaii from the 8th to the 11th of November. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 13, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Harder for T cells to fight cancer in absence of VEGF-A
(Karolinska Institutet) Contrary to what was previously believed, the immune system's cancer-killing T cells are more effective in a tumour's anoxic environment when they have access to growth factor VEGF-A. In a study from Karolinska Institutet published in Cancer Cell, the researchers show how the T cells not only survive in this oxygen-depleted micro-environment with the help of transcription factor HIF-1a but also become more effective at killing cancer cells inside it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 13, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

UC Davis, Leibniz Institute for Photonic Technologies partner in biophotoni
(University of California - Davis) UC Davis and the Leibniz Institute for Photonic Technologies (Leibniz-IPHT), in Jena, Germany, have entered an agreement of cooperation to establish the   Jena-Davis (JEDIS) Alliance of Excellence in Biophotonics, designed to promote North American-German cooperation on research and development in the field of biophotonics.   (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 13, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Patients with depression and advanced cancer survive longer with palliative care intervention
(Dartmouth College) A new Dartmouth-led study finds that patients with depression and advanced cancer live longer when exposed to palliative care interventions designed to improve quality of life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 10, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

HPV jab means women only need 3 cervical screens in a lifetime
(Cancer Research UK) Women may only need three cervical screens in their lifetime if they have been given the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, according to a new study published in the International Journal of Cancer today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 9, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Th1/17 hybrid T cells offer potent and durable anti-tumor response in preclinical model
(Medical University of South Carolina) Adoptive cell therapy for cancer involves harvesting T cells from a patient and expanding and sometimes modifying them in the laboratory before reinfusion. It has been challenging to create T cells that are both potent and durable. In a Cell Metabolism article, Medical University of South Carolina investigators report the potent anti-tumor properties of hybrid Th1/Th17 cells that combine the cancer-fighting properties of Th1 cells and the ability of Th17 cells to self-renew and regenerate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 9, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cancer drug parity laws lower costs for many, but not everyone
(UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center) State laws designed to ensure that the pill form of cancer drugs is not costlier than treatments given through an infusion in a clinic or hospital have had a mixed impact on patients' pocketbooks, according to University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers. Many patients experienced modest improvements in costs, but patients paying the most for their medications saw their monthly costs go up. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 9, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news