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Obesity can cause cardiovascular ill-health, even in the young
(European Society of Human Genetics) Higher than normal body mass index (BMI) is known to lead to cardiovascular ill-health in mid-to-late life, but there has been limited investigation of its effect in young, apparently healthy, adults. Researchers have now shown that having a higher BMI can cause worse cardiovascular health in those aged as young as 17. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mind-controlled device helps stroke patients retrain brains to move paralyzed hands
(Washington University School of Medicine) Stroke patients who learned to use their minds to open and close a plastic brace fitted over their paralyzed hands gained some ability to control their own hands when they were not wearing the brace, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The participants, all of whom had moderate to severe paralysis, showed significant improvement in grasping objects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Losing sleep over climate change
(University of California - San Diego) UC San Diego study of US data suggests a sleep-deprived planet by century's end. Researchers show that unusually warm nights can harm human sleep and that the poor and elderly are most affected. Rising temperatures will make sleep loss more severe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Open-access genetic screening for hereditary breast cancer is feasible and effective
(European Society of Human Genetics) Offering open-access genetic testing for the inherited breast cancers BRCA1 and 2 to Ashkenazi women unaffected by cancer, regardless of their family history, enables the identification of carriers who would otherwise have been missed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Increased facial and head injuries after motorcycle helmet law change in Michigan
(Wolters Kluwer Health) Skull fractures and other head and facial injuries from motorcycle trauma in Michigan have doubled since that state relaxed its motorcycle helmet laws, reports a study in the June issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). The new study is one of the first to focus on how helmet laws affect CMF trauma rates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers studying century-old drug in potential new approach to autism
(University of California - San Diego) In a small, randomized Phase I/II clinical trial (SAT1), researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine say a 100-year-old drug called suramin, originally developed to treat African sleeping sickness, was safely administered to children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), who subsequently displayed measurable, but transient, improvement in core symptoms of autism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers develop faster and cheaper cardiac imaging test for developing countries
(European Society of Cardiology) Researchers in the UK and Peru have developed a faster and cheaper cardiac imaging test that can be used in developing countries, according to the results of the INCA-Peru study presented today at EuroCMR 2017. The scan is three times faster, less than one-fifth of the cost, and changed clinical management in 33 percent of patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Diesel pollution linked to heart damage
(European Society of Cardiology) Diesel pollution is linked with heart damage, according to research presented today at EuroCMR 2017. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Statins associated with improved heart structure and function
(European Society of Cardiology) Statins are associated with improved heart structure and function, according to research presented today at EuroCMR 2017. The benefits were above and beyond the cholesterol lowering effect of statins. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn State DNA ladders: Inexpensive molecular rulers for DNA research
(Penn State) New license-free tools will allow researchers to estimate the size of DNA fragments for a fraction of the cost of currently available methods. The tools, called a DNA ladders, can gauge DNA fragments ranging from about 50 to 5,000 base pairs in length. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Isolated Greek villages reveal genetic secrets that protect against heart disease
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) A genetic variant that protects the heart against cardiovascular disease has been discovered by researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators. Reported today in Nature Communications, the cardioprotective variant was found in an isolated Greek population, who are known to live long and healthy lives despite having a diet rich in animal fat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Vitamin D in pregnancy may help prevent childhood asthma
(King's College London) A new study published today in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology has found that taking Vitamin D supplements in pregnancy can positively modify the immune system of the newborn baby, which could help to protect against asthma and respiratory infections, a known risk factor for developing asthma in childhood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Millions in funding for TU Dresden
(Technische Universit ä t Dresden) The German Research Foundation approves three Collaborative Research Centres -- a new CRC in Humanities explores the phenomena of vituperations and insults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Methicillin resistance among clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus in Egypt
(Bentham Science Publishers) In this article that appeared in Infectious Disorders - Drug Targets, Dr. AlaaAbouelfetouh, Associate Professor of Microbiology at the Faculty of Pharmacy, Alexandria University, is gathering the published data describing methicillin resistance in S. aureus (MRSA) in Egypt. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

University, medical foundations partner to create Brown Physicians, Inc.
(Brown University) By bringing together Brown's Warren Alpert Medical School and six medical practices employing more than 500 doctors, BPI will enable a new level of coordination for research, teaching and clinical care in southern New England. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Coroners unable to agree on what caused a person's death
(University of Huddersfield) A FORMER top detective turned University of Huddersfield researcher has published his findings that coroners in England and Wales are seemingly unable to agree on what caused a person's death or whether it merits an inquest, even when faced with identical case information. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New £ 3.5 million microscope and ion accelerator now operational
(University of Huddersfield) THE completion of a £ 3.5 million research facility means that the University of Huddersfield is established as one of Europe's leading centres for the use of ion beams as a tool for the investigation of issues ranging from nuclear technology and nanoparticles to semiconductors and the effects of radiation exposure on materials in space. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists jump hurdle in HIV vaccine design
(Scripps Research Institute) Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have made another important advance in HIV vaccine design. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

High levels of PFOA found in mid-Ohio River Valley residents from 1991 to 2013
(University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center) New research from the University of Cincinnati reveals that residents of the mid-Ohio River Valley had higher than normal levels of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) based on serum samples collected over a 22-year span. The exposure source was likely from drinking water contaminated by industrial discharges upriver. This is the first study of PFOA serum concentrations in US residents in the 1990s. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Alzheimer's Association calls for new strategies against dementia in Scientific American
(Alzheimer's Association) The time has come for advancing combination therapies against Alzheimer's disease, explains James A. Hendrix, Ph.D., Alzheimer's Association director of global science initiatives, in a new post appearing this week on Scientific American's 'Observations' blog. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

HIV patients sticking with therapy longer, Medicaid data show
(Brown University) A large new study based on Medicaid data identifies a clear trend of people staying on their HIV medications longer than they used to. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Total abdominal wall transplantation for complex transplant cases -- experts outline technique
(Wolters Kluwer Health) For some patients undergoing intestinal or multi-organ transplantation, closing the abdominal wall poses a difficult surgical challenge. Total abdominal wall transplantation provides an alternative for abdominal closure in these complex cases, according to a state-of-the-art approach presented in the June issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery ® , the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Small non-profit's unconventional approach offers new hope with autism suramin trial
(N of One: Autism Research Foundation) Results from a new clinical trial at UCSD School of Medicine using an old drug, suramin, in boys with autism may represent one of the most dramatic advances in autism yet. The findings offer both a new view of what autism is and the possibility of the first-ever treatment for its core symptoms. The trial was supported by N of One: Autism Research Foundation, a small non-profit that has previously demonstrated success funding unorthodox autism research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn study finds gray matter density increases during adolescence
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new study published by Penn Medicine researchers this month and featured on the cover of the Journal of Neuroscience may help resolve this puzzle, revealing that while volume indeed decreases from childhood to young adulthood, gray matter density actually increases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn Medicine's Irene Hurford receives Exemplary Psychiatrist Award
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Irene Hurford, MD, an assistant professor in the department of Psychiatry, has received a 2017 Exemplary Psychiatrist Award from the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ATS 2017 Wrap-up: Rapid sepsis treatment, predicting mortality after the ICU and more
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) Thousands of critical care and pulmonology specialists from across the world gathered this week for the American Thoracic Society International Conference in Washington, D.C., to share research, medical developments and best practices for patient care. Here, we highlight a few standouts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bouldering envisioned as new treatment for depression
(University of Arizona) UA researcher Eva-Maria Stelzer and her colleagues involved more than 100 individuals in a bouldering intervention in Germany, where some hospitals have begun to use climbing as a therapeutic treatment. The team found the social, mental and physical endurance of bouldering could be successful psychotherapy for treating depression in adults. Stelzer co-led the team, based in Germany, with Katharina Luttenberger of the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Engines of twingenuity: NASA's twin study investigators have a meeting of the minds
(NASA/Johnson Space Center) NASA's Twins Study investigators met in Houston this week to discuss findings from the final data collections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mechanisms of neuronal cell death in AGE-exposed retinas -- research and literature review
(Bentham Science Publishers) Gradual accumulation of glycated proteins, lipids and nucleic acid is a common process in normal aging, however rise in blood glucose levels, an increase of oxidative stress over time triggering further protein modification and resulting in impairment of defense mechanisms. AGEs accumulation in various tissues under diabetic conditions plays an important role in the development of neuronal and vascular complications such as diabetic retinopathy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sorting out HIV
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Researchers at EMBL, ESPCI Paris, and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative have developed a new technique for rapidly sorting HIV viruses, which could lead to more rapid development of a vaccine for HIV, as they report in Cell Chemical Biology.The technique will enable scientists to identify specific features in the proteins on the virus's surface which are recognized by the immune system and elicit a response similar to that seen in elite controllers -- patients that are able to survive without antiviral treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

One in 3 high blood pressure patients failing to take medication
(University of Leicester) University of Leicester researchers design novel urine test to help to diagnose adherence to blood pressure medications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Safe space for illegal drug consumption in Baltimore would save $6 million a year
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A new cost-benefit analysis conducted by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and others suggests that $6 million in costs related to the opioid epidemic could be saved each year if a single 'safe consumption' space for illicit drug users were opened in Baltimore. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How to prevent lying and drinking in teens, according to research
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Adolescents who have a greater tendency to lie to their parents are also more likely to start using alcohol at an earlier age, while excessive parental supervision may aggravate rather than solve the problem. Both honesty and a lower risk of developing a drinking habit are usually the result of a trusting relationship between a teenager and parents, according to a joint study by New York University and HSE researchers, published at Journal of Adolescence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How fear can develop out of others' traumas
(Karolinska Institutet) What happens in the brain when we see other people experiencing a trauma or being subjected to pain? Well, the same regions that are involved when we feel pain ourselves are also activated when we observe other people who appear to be going through some painful experience. This is shown in a study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

An inflammatory inference
(King Abdullah University of Science& Technology (KAUST)) The surface proteins responsible for navigating immune cells to sites of inflammation are identified. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study provides understanding of how nerve cells are damaged by accumulation of abnormal proteins
(Boston University Medical Center) A new study has uncovered a molecular mechanism in the prion protein, a protein responsible for neurodegenerative diseases, which may explain why nerve cells degenerate in these disorders.The findings, which appear in the journal eLife, may one day lead to better therapies and treatments for these diseases (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists to probe dolphin intelligence using an interactive touchpad
(Rockefeller University) Using optical technology specifically developed for this project, dolphins at the National Aquarium in Baltimore, MD, are at the center of   research from an interdisciplinary team from Hunter College and Rockefeller University. The system involves an underwater computer touchscreen   through which dolphins are able to interact and make choices.   The system, the first of its kind, will be used to investigate dolphin intelligence and communication by providing them choice and control over a number of activities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study implicates 2 genetic variants in bicuspid aortic valve development
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) Researchers report a key protein is affected during heart valve formation, in the first genome-wide study of bicuspid aortic valve. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Can fat 'feel' fat?
(University of Iowa Health Care) Researchers at the University of Iowa have discovered that a molecule which can sense the swelling of fat cells also controls a signaling pathway that allows fat cells to take up and store excess glucose. Mice missing this protein, known as SWELL1, gain less weight (fat) than normal mice on a high-fat diet, but also develop diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CRKL in 22q11.2; a key gene that contributes to common birth defects
(Baylor College of Medicine) The research findings imply that patients with genitourinary birth defects due to 22q11.2 changes in gene dosage should also be evaluated for other potential birth defects seen in patients with DiGeorge syndrome that would affect the patient's future health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ancient genetic markers in sockeye salmon can help manage healthier fish stocks
(University of British Columbia Okanagan campus) A recent study from UBC's Okanagan campus identifies new genetic markers in sockeye salmon that can help improve management of fish populations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

PharmaMar and Eczasibasi sign a licensing agreement for Aplidin ® in Turkey
(Pharmamar) PharmaMar (MSE:PHM) has announced today a licensing agreement with Eczasibasi Group to commercialize the marine-derived anticancer drug Aplidin ® (plitidepsin) in Turkey. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why this IndyCar driver is outpacing diabetes
(Michigan State University) New Michigan State University research is the first to help a professional race car driver with diabetes improve his performance during competition, helping him capture two top-5 finishes at the Indianapolis 500. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cellular stress in the brain may contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
(George Washington University) Research published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation Insight shows that cellular stress in the brain may contribute to development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Georgia State receives $2.3 million renewal grant to study enzyme in diabetic vascular diseases
(Georgia State University) Dr. Ming-Hui Zou, director of the Center for Molecular& Translational Medicine and a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in Molecular Medicine, has renewed a four-year, $2.3 million federal grant to study the role of an enzyme in causing diabetic vascular diseases and the molecular mechanism that leads to these diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FDA approval granted to pediatric device used to treat esophageal birth defect
(University of Chicago Medical Center) The US Food and Drug Administration has granted authorization for a magnetic device used to treat pediatric esophageal atresia, a birth defect that causes abnormal formation of the esophagus. The Flourish ™ Pediatric Esophageal Atresia device was created by University of Chicago Medicine assistant professor of radiology Mario Zaritzky, MD, in collaboration with Cook Medical. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Kidney transplants from diabetic donors will save more lives, sooner
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) In a study published today in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, have found that the best chance of survival, for older patients, those who live in areas with long waits for transplantation, or those who already have diabetes, may come from accepting a kidney from a deceased donor who had diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New medicine shows potential to reduce oral steroid use in severe asthma patients
(McMaster University) The results of the trial, published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine, demonstrate that patients treated with a potential new medicine and antibody, called benralizumab, were more than four times likely to reduce their usage of oral corticosteroids than those taking a placebo. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Look at Eva, 4 months old and standing
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Both the literature and practice indicate that children can stand without support starting at around 9 months old. " But with some training, children can stand much sooner than that, even before they're 4 months old, " says Professor Hermundur Sigmundsson at NTNU's Department of Psychology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tiny shells indicate big changes to global carbon cycle
(University of California - Davis) Experiments with tiny, shelled organisms in the ocean suggest big changes to the global carbon cycle are underway, according to a study from the University of California, Davis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news