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Smartphone apps reduce depression
(NICM, Western Sydney University) New Australian-led research has confirmed that smartphone apps are an effective treatment option for depression, paving the way for safe and accessible interventions for the millions of people around the world diagnosed with this condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Party discipline for jumping genes
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) Jumping genes, transposons, are part of the genome of most organisms, aggregated into families and can damage the genome by jumping. How hosts suppress the jumping is well investigated. Why they still can jump has hardly been understood so far. Researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna investigated for the first time in all transposons of the host organism, which properties and host environments facilitate jumping. They showed that family affiliation is more important than position. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tackling air pollution in Sub-Saharan Africa
(University of Portsmouth) The University of Portsmouth is helping to tackle air pollution and its harmful effects in Sub-Saharan Africa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Leopoldina Annual Assembly focuses on genome editing issues
(Leopoldina) The German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina today opened its 2017 Annual Assembly in Halle (Saale), with this year's theme being " Genome Editing - Challenges for the Future " . The two-day event sees distinguished international scientists come together to address new molecular biological methods that enable targeted genetic interventions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rainbow colors reveal cell history
(Technische Universit ä t Dresden) Dr. Nikolay Ninov, group leader at the DFG research center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden, Cluster of Excellence at the TU Dresden, and Paul Langerhans Institute Dresden, and his group developed a system called 'Beta-bow,' which allows the history ofβ-cells to be traced by genetic bar-coding and multicolor imaging. The results of this study are now published in the scientific journal Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stimuli fading away en route to consciousness
(University of Bonn) Whether or not we consciously perceive the stimuli projected onto our retina is decided in our brain. A recent study by the University of Bonn shows how some signals dissipate along the processing path to conscious perception. This process begins at rather late stages of signal processing. By contrast, in earlier stages there is hardly any difference in the reaction of neurons to conscious and unconscious stimuli. The paper is published in Current Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

HSE scholars measure prestige of fashion models
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Beginning models should choose independent magazines in order to be successful in the fashion industry, but they should also keep in mind that the fashion business is becoming increasingly closed off every year. This is one of the conclusions drawn by Margarita Kuleva, Research Fellow at the Centre for Youth Studies, HSE St. Petersburg, and her student, Daria Maglevanaya. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Our weight tells how we assess food
(Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati) A new study demonstrated that people of normal weight tend to associate natural foods such as apples with their sensory characteristics. On the other hand, processed foods such as pizzas are generally associated with their function or the context in which they are eaten. But that's not all. The research also highlighted the ways in which underweight people pay greater attention to natural foods and overweight people to processed foods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Usher syndrome: Gene therapy restores hearing and balance
(Institut Pasteur) Scientists from the Institut Pasteur, Inserm, the CNRS, Coll è ge de France, University Pierre et Marie Curie, and University Clermont Auvergne, have recently restored hearing and balance in a mouse model of Usher syndrome type 1G characterized by profound congenital deafness and vestibular disorders caused by severe dysmorphogenesis of the mechanoelectrical transduction apparatus of the inner ear's sensory cells. These findings open up new possibilities for the development of gene therapy treatments for hereditary forms of deafness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMass Amherst environmental scientist Laura Vandenberg honored as Pioneer in Public Health
(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) Collaborative   on Health and the Environment, a San Francisco-based nonprofit dedicated to educating people on the ways in which the environment affects human health and well-being, has named University of Massachusetts Amherst environmental health scientist Laura Vandenberg as one of its '20 Pioneers Under 40 in Environmental Public Health' recognizing her 'exceptional levels of accomplishment in work that is rigorous, dynamic and builds critical knowledge.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Families of survivors of ECMO for heart conditions report favorable quality of life
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) One of the few large studies to report long-term outcomes in cardiac patients treated in childhood with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has found overall favorable outcomes among survivors, as reported by families. ECMO provides short-term breathing and heart support for critically ill children while doctors treat the underlying illness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UCI scientists identify important aspect of the brain's navigational system
(University of California - Irvine) The ability to successfully navigate in the environment is essential both for animals searching for food or escaping predators, as well as for human urban dwellers. It is something we take for granted, but under the hood, it is supported by still incompletely understood brain networks that continuously calculate our position in the environment. Moreover, the location where certain experience occurred is an indispensable building block of memory. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Emergency contraception not as accessible as it should be, says CU Anschutz study
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) Efforts to remove barriers to accessing emergency contraception (EC) scored victories in 2013, when the US Food and Drug Administration removed age restrictions on over-the-counter sales of the levonogestrel drug Plan B. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTA study finds public-private partnerships key to making telemedicine sustainable
(University of Texas at Arlington) RadhaKanta Mahapatra, a professor in the Department of Information Systems and Operations Management in the UTA College of Business, conducted the study, A Collaborative Approach to Creating ICT-based Sustainable Development, which was published as part of the Americas Conference on Information Systems' proceedings earlier this year. ICT is Information and Communication Technology. Former Odisha Chief Secretary Sahadeva Sahoo co-authored the study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers describe mechanism that underlies age-associated bone loss
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) A major health problem in older people is age-associated osteoporosis -- the thinning of bone and the loss of bone density that increases the risk of fractures. Researchers have now detailed an underlying mechanism leading to that osteoporosis. When this mechanism malfunctions, progenitor cells stop creating bone-producing cells, and instead create fat cells. Knowledge of this mechanism can provide targets in the search for novel bone-loss. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lehigh's Srinivas Rangarajan awarded ACS investigator grant
(Lehigh University) Srinivas Rangarajan, assistant professor in the department of chemical and biomolecular engineering, received a research grant from The American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund (ACS PRF) in September 2017. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

USDA announces funding for nutrition incentive programs
(National Institute of Food and Agriculture) The US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced $21 million to help Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participants increase their purchases of fruits and vegetables by providing incentives at the point of purchase. The funding comes from the Food Insecurity Nutrition Incentive (FINI) program, authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Babies can learn that hard work pays off
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) A study from MIT reveals babies as young as 15 months can learn the value of hard work. Researchers found babies who watched an adult struggle to reach two different goals before succeeding tried harder at their own difficult task than babies who saw an adult succeed effortlessly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Blood metal ion levels can identify hip replacement patients at low risk of ARMD
(Wolters Kluwer Health) Patients with 'metal on metal' artificial hips are at risk of complications caused by adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD). A study in the Sept. 20, 2017, issue of the Journal of Bone& Joint Surgery confirms that blood metal ion levels specific to the type of hip implant used can help predict patients who are at low risk of ARMD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Exosomes are the missing link to insulin resistance in diabetes
(University of California - San Diego) Chronic tissue inflammation resulting from obesity is an underlying cause of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. But the mechanism by which this occurs has remained cloaked, until now. In a paper, published in the journal Cell, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers identified exosomes -- extremely small vesicles or sacs secreted from most cell types -- as the missing link. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Goal of new tissue-chip research is to assess efficacy of novel epilepsy drugs
(Vanderbilt University) An interdisciplinary team of Vanderbilt University researchers has received a two-year, $2-million federal grant to develop an 'organ-on-chip' model for two genetic forms of epilepsy. These disorders affect both brain and heart and improved modeling could lead to new drug treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NSF awards Indiana University $4 million to advance medical nanotechnology
(Indiana University) The Indiana University School of Informatics, Computing and Engineering has been awarded $4 million from the National Science Foundation to advance nanoscale devices to improve human health, including fighting cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Wayne State research findings offers hope to people with fibromyalgia
(Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research) A novel psychological therapy that encourages addressing emotional experiences related to trauma, conflict and relationship problems has been found helpful for people with the chronic pain condition fibromyalgia. A research team led by Mark A. Lumley, Ph.D., distinguished professor of psychology at Wayne State University, has released the results of its research in the prestigious journal, PAIN. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Unique gene therapy prevents, reverses multiple sclerosis in animal model
(University of Florida) Multiple sclerosis can be inhibited or reversed using a novel gene therapy technique that stops the disease's immune response in mouse models, University of Florida Health researchers have found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Into more thin air
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) Many research groups have explored human adaptation to high altitude living among three major far-flung global populations: Tibetans, Ethiopians and Peruvians. But few have simultaneously explored the other extreme---maladaptation----in the form of chronic mountain sickness (CMS).Now, in the largest whole genome study of its kind, an international research team led by University of California San Diego's Chairman of Pediatrics, Dr. Gabriel Haddad, has expanded on their recent study of understanding both adaptation extremes in a Peruvian population. (Source: EurekA...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Trusted messages key to counter community concerns during disease outbreak
(University of Louisville) Utilizing messages focused on images created by local artists and written information communicated through local dialects proved essential to counter misperceptions during the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone, according to a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Preterm children have more medical sleep problems but fall asleep more independently
(American Academy of Sleep Medicine) A new study suggests that while healthy preterm children have more medical sleep problems than full-term children, they are more likely to fall asleep independently. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Strong alcohol policies help reduce alcohol-involved homicides
(Boston Medical Center) Stronger alcohol policies, including taxes and sales restrictions, have been shown to reduce the likelihood of alcohol involvement among homicide victims, according to a new study from Boston Medical Center (BMC) and Boston University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Personality changes don't precede clinical onset of Alzheimer's, FSU study shows
(Florida State University) Findings of a new and comprehensive study from FSU College of Medicine Associate Professor Antonio Terracciano and colleagues, published today in the journal JAMA Psychiatry, has found no evidence to support the idea that personality changes begin before the clinical onset of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Understanding the dance to save the dance
(Botanical Society of America) Plant-pollinator relationships are vital to our natural and agricultural ecosystems, with an incredible amount of food crops worldwide dependent on plant-pollinator interaction success. But the advancement of climate change is disrupting plant-pollinator relationships. A special issue of Applications in Plant Sciences -- Studying Plant-Pollinator Interactions Facing Climate Change and Changing Environments -- explores the creative methods being used by researchers to study the effects of climate change on plant-pollinator relationships. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Neuron types in brain are defined by gene activity shaping their communication patterns
(Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory) In a major step forward, scientists at CSHLtoday publish a discovery about the molecular-genetic basis of neuronal cell types. Neurons are the basic building blocks that wire up brain circuits supporting mental activities and behavior. The study, which involves sophisticated computational analysis of the messages transcribed from genes that are active in a neuron, points to patterns of cell-to-cell communication as the core feature that makes possible rigorous distinctions among neuron types across the mouse brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mitochondria drive cell survival in times of need
(McGill University) McGill University researchers have discovered a mechanism through which mitochondria, the energy factory of our body's cells, play a role in preventing cells from dying when the cells are deprived of nutrients - a finding that points to a potential target for next-generation cancer drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heat-loving Australian ants believe in diversity, hint 74 species new to science
(Pensoft Publishers) A genus of Australian ants, many of whose members prefer to forage in blistering temperatures of up to 50 ° C (122 ° F), is revised to include 74 new species. The ants include seed-eaters, ant and termite raiders, 'honeypot ants' that store nectar and honeydew, and numerous others whose biology is not yet understood. Some are bizarre: one species has eyes like inverted ice-cream cones. The revision is published in the open-access journal ZooKeys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Football helmet smartfoam signals potential concussions in real time
(Brigham Young University) While football-related concussions have been top of mind in recent years, people have struggled to create technology to accurately measure them in real time.BYU mechanical engineering Ph.D. student Jake Merrell and a team of researchers across three BYU departments have developed and tested a nano composite smartfoam that can be placed inside a football helmet (and pads) to more accurately test the impact and power of hits. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

DNA discovery could help shed light on rare childhood disorder
(University of Edinburgh) Fresh analysis of how our cells store and manage DNA when they undergo cell division could give valuable insights into a rare developmental condition known as Cornelia de Lange syndrome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Obese dogs helped by 'effective' weight loss trials
(University of Liverpool) On average overweight dogs lose an average of 11 percent of their body weight when enrolled on a weight loss trial according to researchers who have conducted the largest international multi-center weight study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn First in world to treat patient with new radiation technology
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Doctors at Penn Medicine have become the first in the world to treat a patient with a new treatment platform designed to streamline the way therapeutic radiation is delivered to cancer patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Production of key diabetes cells can be improved
(University of Copenhagen The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences) In the future diabetics might benefit from getting insulin-regulating beta cells transplanted into their body because their own beta cells are destroyed or less functional. However, according to new stem cell research at the University of Copenhagen, the current way of producing beta cells from stem cells has significant shortfalls. The beta cells produced have some features resembling alpha cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Whole food diet may help prevent colon cancer, other chronic conditions
(Penn State) A diet that includes plenty of colorful vegetables and fruits may contain compounds that can stop colon cancer and inflammatory bowel diseases in pigs, according to an international team of researchers. Understanding how these compounds work on a molecular level could be an initial step toward finding treatments for people with cancer, they added. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rapid hepatitis C testing may help better screen young adults
(Boston Medical Center) Routine and rapid hepatitis C virus testing among young adults who use injection drugs improves life expectancy and may provide a good use of limited resources, according to new research out of Boston Medical Center, in partnership with the Boston Public Health Commission. The findings are published online ahead of print in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cannabis, 'Spice' -- better think twice
(University of Tsukuba) Marijuana is the most commonly abused drug in the world, and the advent of synthetic cannabinoids creates additional challenges to the society because of their higher potency and ability to escape drug detection screenings. Scientists from Japanese sleep institute have a warning for the society about a danger coming from cannabinoid abuse. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study on reasons for low rates of blood glucose monitoring in type 2 diabetes in China
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Researchers in China who assessed self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) behavior among nearly 19,000 patients with type 2 diabetes treated with oral medications reported very low SMBG rates both before and after the patients began treatment with basal insulin, although the data showed an increase in mean SMBG frequency after six months and the percentage of patients who never monitored their blood glucose decreased. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pelvic Floor Society statement -- use of mesh surgeries for constipation & rectal prolapse
(Wiley) In light of ongoing concerns by the media and the public surrounding the use of mesh in women with pelvic organ prolapse and urinary incontinence, the Pelvic Floor Society has issued a consensus statement addressing the use of mesh for the treatment of constipation and rectal prolapse (via a surgical procedure called ventral mesh rectopexy, or VMR). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

18 additional chairs for TU Dresden
(Technische Universit ä t Dresden) TUD has been granted funding for all 18 proposed tenure track chairs as part of the Federal and State government programme for the promotion of young researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study links brain inflammation to suicidal thinking in depression
(Elsevier) Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) have increased brain levels of a marker of microglial activation, a sign of inflammation, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry by researchers at the University of Manchester. Dr. Talbot and colleagues found that the increase in the inflammatory marker was present specifically in patients with MDD who were experiencing suicidal thoughts, pinning the role of inflammation to suicidality rather than a diagnosis of MDD itself. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTSA puts stake in the ground in battle against brain disease
(University of Texas at San Antonio) Making a bold commitment to develop groundbreaking approaches for treating brain diseases and injuries, The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) has assembled a world-class research enterprise, comprised of 40 of the nation's leading brain health researchers, dedicated to conquering the greatest mysteries of the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Drug combination may improve impact of immunotherapy in head and neck cancer
(University of California - San Diego) Checkpoint inhibitor-based immunotherapy has been shown to be very effective in recurrent and metastatic head and neck cancer but only in a minority of patients. University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers may have found a way to double down on immunotherapy's effectiveness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flu vaccine used in elderly may benefit middle-aged adults with chronic conditions
(University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences) Expanding the high-dose influenza vaccine recommendation to include middle-aged adults with chronic health conditions may make economic sense and save lives. The findings may justify for clinical trials of the high-dose and new recombinant trivalent influenza vaccines in 50- to 64-year-old adults with chronic illnesses, such as heart or lung disease, diabetes, or cancer, to determine if they do provide considerably better protection than the currently recommended standard dose quadrivalent vaccine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Health center services at risk if Congress fails to renew funding
(George Washington University) Community health centers all over the country could suffer catastrophic losses, resulting in site closures, job and economic losses, and a disruption in health care access for 9 million people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NAM special publication on how health clinicians can counter opioid epidemic
(National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine) Halting the opioid epidemic requires aggressive action across multiple dimensions, including informed, active, and determined front-line leadership from health clinicians working in every setting throughout the nation, says a new National Academy of Medicine (NAM) special publication developed at the request of the National Governors Association to assist the nation's governors as they work with clinicians to counter the opioid crisis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news