Using Edge AI to listen to the 'silent voices' of cattle
(Tokyo Institute of Technology) A joint project team led by Tokyo Institute of Technology, Shinshu University and Information Services International-Dentsu, Ltd. developed cattle observing systems equipped with a 'Sense and Think Collar' that utilizes state-of-the-art Edge AI technology, under the supervision of Tokyo Tech's Center of Innovation (COI) Research Center for the Earth Inclusive Sensing Empathizing with Silent Voices. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

On-chip drug screening for identifying antibiotic interactions in eight hours
(The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)) A KAIST research team developed a microfluidic-based drug screening chip that identifies synergistic interactions between two antibiotics in eight hours. This chip can be a cell-based drug screening platform for exploring critical pharmacological patterns of antibiotic interactions, along with potential applications in screening other cell-type agents and guidance for clinical therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Collecting the right quantity of evidence: How the brain makes a difficult decision
(Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati) New research conducted in the Cognitive Neuroscience group of SISSA shows that a perceptual decision - recognizing an object and taking the appropriate action - is triggered as soon as the brain's processing networks accumulate the exact right quantity of sensory information. The studies uncover fundamental brain mechanisms underlying decision making in an uncertain world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Marijuana users weigh less, defying the munchies
(Michigan State University) New evidence from Michigan State University suggests that those who smoke cannabis, or marijuana, weigh less compared to adults who don't. The findings, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, are contrary to the belief that marijuana users who have a serious case of the munchies will ultimately gain more weight. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Light and peptides: New method diversifies natural building blocks of life
(Ecole Polytechnique F é d é rale de Lausanne) EPFL chemists have developed a new, light-based method for modifying peptides at the C-terminal position. The method introduces the structural diversity needed for drug design in this class of bioactive compounds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How to break up with a dentist: New dental technology which doubles the life of seals
(National University of Science and Technology MISIS) Scientists from NUST MISIS have presented innovative antibacterial compositions for materials used in permanent dental fillings - pickling gel, washing fluid and 'drying'. A special antibacterial agent based on metal oxides' colloidal solutions as part of preparations allows suppressing the growth of pathogenic dental microflora by 90% and reducing the risk of secondary caries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Kidney transplant patients need even better aftercare!
(ERA-EDTA) Kidney transplantation is the best renal replacement therapy available. Although survival and quality of life are significantly better compared to dialysis patients, transplant recipients nevertheless have a significantly higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than healthy people. One recently published study [1] shows current data and derives important conclusions for further long-term improvements in outcomes after kidney transplantation - a highly topical issue, especially for cost reasons and in the event of organ or donor scarcity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Timing of steroid shots before rotator cuff surgery affects infection risk
(Wolters Kluwer Health) For patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery to repair a torn rotator cuff, previous steroid injections into the shoulder don't increase the risk of surgical-site infection - unless the injection is administered within one month before surgery, reports a study in the April 17, 2019, issue of the Journal of Bone& Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ocean currents bring good news for reef fish
(ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies) A new study suggests reefs suffering coral bleaching can still be productive, as fish dependent on reefs get a bulk of their food delivered via the currents flowing past. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cutting-edge discovery points to potential treatment for NEC in preemies
(Ann& Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago) Cutting-edge discovery in the lab of Catherine Hunter, MD, from Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute at Ann& Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago offers a new direction toward treatment of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) -- a devastating intestinal emergency that occurs in up to 10 percent of premature infants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists advance creation of 'artificial lymph node' to fight cancer, other diseases
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) In a proof-of-principle study in mice, scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine report the creation of a specialized gel that acts like a lymph node to successfully activate and multiply cancer-fighting immune system T-cells. The work puts scientists a step closer, they say, to injecting such artificial lymph nodes into people and sparking T-cells to fight disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Oregon researchers map sound, response and reward anticipation in mouse brain
(University of Oregon) University of Oregon neuroscientists report that two areas of the mouse brain combine representations of what is heard and anticipated, guiding behavior that leads mice to the best reward. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cell-killing proteins suppress listeria without killing cells
(North Carolina State University) New North Carolina State University research shows that key proteins known for their ability to prevent viral infections by inducing cell death can also block certain bacterial infections without triggering the death of the host cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Making digital tissue imaging better
(Case Western Reserve University) A low-tech problem troubles the high-tech world of digital pathology imaging: There are no reliable standards for the quality of digitized tissue slides comprising the source material for computers reading and analyzing vast numbers of images. Poor-quality slides get mixed in with accurate slides, potentially confusing a computer program trying to learn what a cancerous cell looks like. Researchers from Case Western Reserve University are trying to fix this, sharing an open-source quality control standard. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pig experiment raises ethical questions around brain damage
(Case Western Reserve University) The brain is more resilient than previously thought. In a groundbreaking experiment published in this week's issue of Nature, neuroscientists created an artificial circulation system that successfully restored some functions and structures in pig brains. The result challenges the notion that mammalian brains are fully and irreversibly damaged by a lack of oxygen. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

General anesthesia hijacks sleep circuitry to knock you out
(Duke University) In a study published online April 18 in Neuron, researchers found that general anesthesia induces unconsciousness by hijacking the neural circuitry that makes us fall sleep. They traced this neural circuitry back to a cluster of cells at the base of the brain responsible for churning out hormones to regulate bodily functions, mood, and sleep. The finding could lead to better drugs capable of putting people to sleep with fewer side effects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mount Sinai researchers discover that diabetes drug may reverse heart failure
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) Study finds drug could have new applications in non-diabetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bioengineers program cells as digital signal processors
(Rice University) Synthetic biologists have added high-precision analog-to-digital signal processing to the genetic circuitry of living cells. The research, described online today in the journal Science, dramatically expands the chemical, physical and environmental cues engineers can use to prompt programmed responses from engineered organisms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Preliminary study suggests mercury not a risk in dog foods
(University of California - Davis) Researchers at the University of California, Davis, recently investigated levels of methylmercury in a small sampling of commercial dog foods and found good news for dog owners. Of the 24 diets tested, only three were positive for low concentrations of total mercury, and only one of those contained detectable methylmercury. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New book on next-generation sequencing in medicine from CSHL Press
(Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press) Written and edited by experts in the field, 'Next-Generation Sequencing in Medicine' from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press examines next-generation sequencing technologies and their use, particularly in translational research. The contributors discuss the various sequencing platforms, their capabilities, and their applications in both research and clinical practice. The roles of next-generation sequencing in diagnosing autism and intellectual disabilities, monitoring cancers during disease progression, and determining the most appropriate drug treatments for patients are also covere...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A mother lode of protection
(Harvard Medical School) Now research conducted in mice offers new hope that neonatal herpes infections might eventually be avoidable by stimulating an immune response in mothers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Asian nations in early tobacco epidemic: study
(Vanderbilt University Medical Center) Asian countries are in the early stages of a tobacco smoking epidemic with habits mirroring those of the United States from past decades, setting the stage for a spike in future deaths from smoking-related diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Massachusetts Medical Device Development Center announces $200K Challenge winners
(University of Massachusetts Lowell) Entrepreneurs developing new technologies to treat blood clots, congestive heart failure, incontinence and more were the big winners at the Massachusetts Medical Device Development Center $200,000 Challenge, an annual pitch competition that showcases cutting-edge innovations in the medical-device and biotech fields. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How do we make moral decisions?
(Dartmouth College) When it comes to making moral decisions, we often think of the golden rule: do unto others as you would have them do unto you. Yet, why we make such decisions has been widely debated. Are we motivated by feelings of guilt or fairness? Some people may rely on principles of both guilt and fairness and may switch their moral rule depending on the circumstances, according to a Radboud University -- Dartmouth College study on moral decision-making and cooperation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Behavioral disorders in kids with autism linked to reduced brain connectivity
(Yale University) More than a quarter of children with autism spectrum disorder are also diagnosed with disruptive behavior disorders. For the first time, Yale researchers have identified a possible biological cause: a key mechanism that regulates emotion functions differently in the brains of the children who exhibit disruptive behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research provides important insight on the brain-body connection
(University of Arkansas) A study conducted by University of Arkansas researchers reveals that neurons in the motor cortex exhibit an unexpected division of labor, a finding that could help scientists understand how the brain controls the body and provide insight on certain neurological disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Late dinner and no breakfast is a killer combination
(European Society of Cardiology) People who skip breakfast and eat dinner near bedtime have worse outcomes after a heart attack. That's the finding of research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Preschoolers with chronic constipation tend to be picky eaters
(Ann& Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago) In the first study of its kind in the US, researchers found that normally developing preschool children with chronic constipation have underlying sensory issues that contribute to their difficulties with toileting behaviors. These children are often picky eaters who might be overly sensitive to food textures, tastes, or odors. They also might have an exaggerated response to noises, bright lights, or other sensory stimuli. Findings were published in the Journal of Pediatrics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows female managers don't mean higher pay for women
(Oxford University Press USA) A new paper in the European Sociological Review indicates that women's and men's earnings are not affected by the share of female managers in an organization, nor by the sex of workers' individual managers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ocean circulation likely to blame for severity of 2018 red tide
(University of South Florida (USF Innovation)) 2018 was the worst year for red tide in more than a decade. A new study reveals what made it so severe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Investigators explore temperature-triggered devices for gastrointestinal therapies
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and MIT are designing devices that can be triggered by the ingestion of a warm liquid to break down into smaller segments that can be excreted. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Major study finds one in five children have mental health problems
(McMaster University) The 2014 OCHS study included 10,802 children and youth aged four to 17 in 6,537 families. It replicated and expanded on the landmark 1983 Ontario Child Health Study of 3,290 children in 1,869 families. The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry has simultaneously published eight papers on different aspects of the 2014 OCHS results. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Critical errors in inhaler technique common in children with asthma
(Ann& Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago) In the first study to evaluate inhaler technique in children hospitalized for asthma -- the group at highest risk for complications and death from asthma -- researchers found that nearly half of participants demonstrated improper inhaler use, which means they routinely were not taking in the full dose of medication. Adolescents most commonly displayed critical errors in inhaler technique. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

OSU researcher to help lead $10.7 million push toward gonorrhea vaccine
(Oregon State University) The National Institutes of Health has awarded a $10.7 grant to researchers from seven universities to work toward developing a vaccine for gonorrhea. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pediatric endocrinologist gives iconic 'Mona Lisa' a second medical opinion
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) Michael Yafi, MD, refutes the most recent hypothesis that 'Lisa' had hypothyroidism and psychomotor retardation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Technology automatically senses how Parkinson's patients respond to medication
(Florida Atlantic University) Adjusting the frequency and dosage of Parkinson's patients' medication is complex. In their 'ON' state they respond positively to medication and in their 'OFF' state symptoms return. Addressing these fluctuations requires a clinical exam, history-taking or a patient's self-report, which are not always practical or reliable. A new technology that combines an algorithm with a senor-based system using wearable motion sensors, automatically, continuously and reliably detects a patient's medication ON and OFF states without patient or physician engagement. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tracking global trends in the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy using the Drug Resistance Index
(Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics& Policy) Using resistance data from CDDEP's ResistanceMap and antibiotic use data obtained from IQVIA's MIDAS database, researchers calculated the DRI rates for 41 countries. Overall, the DRI rates varied widely across countries and ranged from a low of 8.1 in Sweden to a high of 71.6 in India. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study reveals factors behind embryonic stem cell state
(Monash University) An international collaboration has found for the first time that two new epigenetic regulators, TAF5L and TAF6L, maintain self-renewal of embryonic stem cells. The scientists also found that these proteins activate c-Myc (a well-known cancer gene), and its regulatory network. This is the first time scientists have been able to show what these regulators do and how they control gene expression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heavy drinkers consuming more than half of all alcohol
(La Trobe University) La Trobe University researchers have found the heaviest drinking 10% of Australians drink over half the alcohol consumed in Australia, downing an average of six standard drinks per day. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cervical cancer is more aggressive when human papillomavirus is not detected
(Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)) Cervical cancer negative for the human papillomavirus (HPV) is rare but more aggressive: it is more frequently diagnosed at advanced stages, with more metastasis and reduced survival. These are the conclusions of a study co-led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by 'la Caixa,' the Hospital Clinic and the University of Barcelona. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Russian scientists investigate thermodynamic properties of an energy metabolism stimulator
(Lobachevsky University) A group of researchers led by Professor Alexander Knyazev at the Faculty of Chemistry of Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod has been studying the thermodynamic properties of L-carnitine for several years. There is only a limited number of substances that have proven their effectiveness and safety in the course of long-term observation and at the same time offer such advantages as acceleration of recovery after exercise or the ability to eliminate body dysfunctions associated with intense exercise. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gender identity leaves imprint on human brains, Georgia State researchers find
(Georgia State University) Society's expectations about gender roles alter the human brain at the cellular level, according to a paper published by a group of neuroscience researchers at Georgia State University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study compares colonoscopy polyp detection rates and endoscopist characteristics
(Cleveland Clinic) Previous research has suggested that specific factors about the doctor performing colonoscopy -- for example, a gastroenterologist versus a surgeon, female versus male -- were associated with different rates of detection of precancerous polyps. However, a Cleveland Clinic-led research team found that those previously described differences among endoscopists are not true. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ribociclib in advanced breast cancer: Survival advantages, but also severe side effects
(Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care) Study indicates longer overall survival of postmenopausal women. However, there is a higher frequency of severe diseases of blood and lymphatic system. Overall, added benefit not proven. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cannabidiol could help deliver medications to the brain
(American Chemical Society) Cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive compound in cannabis, is being touted as beneficial for many health conditions, ranging from anxiety to epilepsy. Although much more research is needed to verify these claims, scientists have now shown that CBD could have a different use as a 'Trojan horse': helping slip medications across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and into mouse brains. The researchers report their results in the ACS journal Molecular Pharmaceutics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Biosensor 'bandage' collects and analyzes sweat
(American Chemical Society) Like other biofluids, sweat contains a wealth of information about what's going on inside the body. However, collecting the fluid for analysis, usually by dripping or absorbing it from the skin's surface, can be time-consuming and messy. Now, researchers have developed a bandage-like biosensor that both collects and -- in conjunction with a smart phone -- analyzes sweat. The device, which could someday help diagnose diseases, is reported in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A light-activated remote control for cells
(American Chemical Society) What if doctors had a remote control that they could use to steer a patient's own cells to a wound to speed up the healing process? Although such a device is still far from reality, researchers reporting in the ACS journal Nano Letters have taken an important first step: They used near-infrared light and an injected DNA nanodevice to guide stem cells to an injury, which helped muscle tissue regrow in mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hospital deaths after surgery fall after launch of surgical safety checklists in Scotland
(Wiley) The World Health Organization (WHO) created the Surgical Safety Checklist over a decade ago, in an effort to reduce mortality after surgery. The BJS (British Journal of Surgery) has published a study that used a national database to look at the records of over 12 million patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study identifies how Enterococcus faecalis bacteria causes antibiotic resistant infection
This study examined one of the first sustained hospital outbreaks of a multidrug-resistant bacterium, Enterococcus faecalis, which occurred from the early through the mid-1980s, causing over 60 outbreak strains. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Taking care of people with TBI: New tool could speed caregiver research
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) A traumatic brain injury happens in an instant: a battlefield blast, a car crash, a bad fall. But the effects can last a lifetime -- and can leave the survivor dependent on daily care from their loved ones for decades. Now, a new tool seeks to give a voice to those caregivers, who spend countless hours tending to the daily needs of family members whose moods, thinking and abilities seemed to change overnight. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news