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Asthma attacks reduced in tree-lined urban neighborhoods
(University of Exeter) People living in polluted urban areas are far less likely to be admitted to hospital with asthma when there are lots of trees in their neighborhood, a study by the University of Exeter's medical school has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

First-graders fitter than expected
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Childhood obesity is often attributed to a lack of exercise. So what about sports among elementary school students? A team from the Technical University of Munich pursued this question and collected the results of fitness tests for first-year students over a period of one decade. Their study shows that students did not lose their strength. Speed or balance even increased over the time of 10 years. One change was in the boys, whose endurance decreased compared to the girls of the same age. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain astrocytes linked to Alzheimer's disease
(University of Eastern Finland) Astrocytes, the supporting cells of the brain, could play a significant role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. This is the first time researchers discovered a direct association between astrocytes and AD. Published in Stem Cell Reports, the study investigated the brain cell function of familial AD patients by using stem cell technologies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Electrochemistry opens up novel access to important classes of substances
(Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz) Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in Germany have succeeded in overcoming the problem of electrochemical polymer formation and in developing a sustainable and efficient synthesis strategy for these important products for the first time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New interdisciplinary research program in biomedical innovation law
(University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Law) The Novo Nordisk Foundation has awarded a grant of DKK 35 million to Timo Minssen, Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Copenhagen for establishing a Collaborative Research Programme in Biomedical Innova-tion Law (CeBIL).The aim of CeBIL is to analyse the most important legal obstacles to pharmaceutical innovation and thereby contribute to translating innova-tive biomedical research into new effective, affordable and easily acces-sible forms of treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study hopes to empower parents of children with autism
(Boston Medical Center) Researchers from Boston Medical Center, in conjunction with researchers from Florida State University and others across the country, are collaborating on a study that aims to get parents involved with early intervention services sooner. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Carefully crafted light pulses control neuron activity
This study is the first demonstration of using coherent control to regulate function in a living cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Age and gut bacteria contribute to MS disease progression, according to Rutgers
(Rutgers University) Gut bacteria at a young age can contribute to multiple sclerosis disease onset and progression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study out of WSU further supports use of progesterone to fight preterm birth
(Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research) A new study published today -- World Prematurity Day -- in the American Journal of Obstetrics& Gynecology provides additional support for treatment with vaginal progesterone to reduce the risk of preterm birth, neonatal complications and infant death in pregnant women with a short cervix. A shortened cervix is the most powerful predictor of preterm birth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Investigating patterns of degeneration in Alzheimer's disease
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) Alzheimer's disease (AD) is known to cause memory loss and cognitive decline, but other functions of the brain can remain intact. The reasons cells in some brain regions degenerate while others are protected is largely unknown. In a paper to be published in Stem Cell Reports, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital have found that factors encoded in the DNA of brain cells contribute to the patterns of degeneration, or vulnerability, in AD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rheumatology leaders urge support for graduate student exemption & continuous health coverage
(American College of Rheumatology) The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) today expressed concerns with a provision of the House tax bill passed on Nov. 16 that would repeal the tax-exempt status for graduate student tuition waivers, and a provision included in the Senate tax bill that would repeal the individual health insurance mandate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Decrease in sunshine, increase in rickets
(University of Toronto) A University of Toronto student and professor have teamed up to discover that Britain's increasing cloudiness during the summer could be an important reason for the mysterious increase in rickets among British children over the past few decades. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

These ring-tailed lemurs raise a 'stink' when they flirt with potential mates
(University of Toronto) Stink-flirting among ring-tailed lemurs come at a cost, but may also influence females in choosing a mate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When to fish: Timing matters for fish that migrate to reproduce
(University of Washington) A new University of Washington study points to yet another human factor that is hampering the ability of fish to reproduce: the timing of our fishing seasons. The study considers how the timing of fishing efforts might disproportionately target certain fish and change the life history patterns of entire populations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Like a baby: The vicious cycle of childhood obesity and snoring
(Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) In a new longitudinal observational study, scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) looked at the relationships among maternal snoring, childhood snoring and children's metabolic characteristics -- including body mass index (BMI) and insulin resistance, which reflects future risk for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease -- in approximately 1,100 children followed from gestation through early adolescence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Not an illusion: Clever use of mirrors boosts performance of light-sheet microscope
(Marine Biological Laboratory) Using a simple 'mirror trick' and not-so-simple computational analysis, scientists affiliated with the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) have considerably improved the speed, efficiency, and resolution of a light-sheet microscope, with broad applications for enhanced imaging of live cells and embryos. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Small changes to organ procurement system could lead to more life-saving transplants
(Indiana University) Slight changes to the system for allocating deceased-donor kidneys could result in higher rates of organ procurement and lead to more kidney transplants across the country, according to new research co-authored by an Indiana University Kelley School of Business professor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hibernating ground squirrels provide clues to new stroke treatments
(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) In the fight against brain damage caused by stroke, researchers have turned to an unlikely source of inspiration: hibernating ground squirrels. While the animals' brains experience dramatically reduced blood flow during hibernation, just like human patients after a certain type of stroke, the squirrels emerge from their extended naps suffering no ill effects. Now, a team of NIH-funded scientists has identified a potential drug that could grant the same resilience to stroke patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dog ownership linked to lower mortality
(Uppsala University) A team of Swedish scientists have used national registries of more than 3.4 million Swedes aged 40 to 80 to study the association between dog ownership and cardiovascular health. Their study shows that dog owners had a lower risk of death due to cardiovascular disease or to other causes during the 12-year follow-up. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Vaginal progesterone reduces preterm birth and neonatal complications in women with a mid-trimester short cervix
(Elsevier) Prematurity is the main complication of pregnancy, and 15 million babies are born preterm worldwide each year. Physicians worldwide have investigated whether vaginal progesterone administration to women with a mid-trimester sonographic short cervix reduces the rate of preterm birth. Now physicians and researchers have found that when all available information is considered in an individual patient data meta-analysis, the results are clear: vaginal progesterone reduces the rate of preterm birth at (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Environmental factors may trigger lupus onset and progression
(University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center) While genetics play a role in the development of Lupus, a systemic autoimmune disease, so do environmental triggers, such as particulates in air pollution and ultraviolet light, says a University of Cincinnati researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Using social media big data to combat prescription drug crisis
(The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth) Researchers conducted a critical review of existing literature to determine whether social media big data can be used to understand communication and behavioral patterns related to prescription drug abuse. Their study found that with proper research methods and attention to privacy and ethical issues, social media big data can reveal important information concerning drug abuse, such as user-reported side effects, drug cravings, emotional states, and risky behaviors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research reveals biological mechanism of a leading cause of childhood blindness
(Virginia Tech) Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute (VTCRI) have revealed the pathology of cells and structures stricken by optic nerve hypoplasia, a leading cause of childhood blindness in developed nations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Redefining obesity in postmenopausal women
(The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)) There is no doubt the prevalence of obesity has increased significantly across all age groups, creating greater health risks. What exactly constitutes obesity, however, is subject to debate, especially for postmenopausal women who have a different body composition than younger women. A study published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS), demonstrates that the long-accepted BMI definition for obesity may no longer be accurate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A new way to reduce surgery complications stemming from high blood sugar
(Thomas Jefferson University) Using a different marker to track a patient's glycemic levels could help improve outcomes after surgery for diabetic and non-diabetic patients alike. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How infants modernized America examined in new book
(Rutgers University) The 20th century saw revolutions in scientific medicine, consumer culture, and social welfare, and in the understanding of human development and potential, explains Janet Golden.And while many intellectual thinkers, scientists, and industrial innovators helped to lead America into this new age, says the professor of history at Rutgers University-Camden, credit also goes to our youngest members of society: babies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New tool predicts risk of heart attack in older surgery patients
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) A tool designed to more accurately predict the risk of heart attack in older patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery works significantly better than traditional risk assessment tools. By having more accurate information, older patients and their physicians can make an informed decision on whether to undergo surgery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Neuroscience research provides evidence the brain is strobing not constant
(University of Sydney) It's not just our eyes that play tricks on us, but our ears. That's the finding of a landmark Australian-Italian collaboration that provides new evidence that oscillations, or 'strobes', are a general feature of human perception.While our conscious experience appears to be continuous, the University of Sydney and Italian universities study suggests that perception and attention are intrinsically rhythmic in nature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cross off that 'to do' list, study shows all daily activity can prolong life
(University of California - San Diego) That 'to do' list of chores and errands could actually provide a variety of health benefits, according to researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine. The study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, found women over age 65 who engaged in regular light physical activity had a reduction in the risk of mortality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

MUSC leads research on potential research treatment
(Medical University of South Carolina) A five-year, $3.8 million grant from the Lupus Foundation of America funds phase 2 of a clinical trial evaluating a treatment using mesenchymal stem cells harvested from donated umbilical cords in patients with lupus resistant to treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A new test to measure the effectiveness of CF drugs
(University of North Carolina Health Care) UNC School of Medicine researchers have developed a new laboratory model to measure and compare the responses of CF and normal airway cells to CF-related infectious/inflammatory factors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Could this protein protect people against coronary artery disease?
(University of North Carolina Health Care) The buildup of plaque in the heart's arteries is an unfortunate part of aging. But by studying the genetic makeup of people who maintain clear arteries into old age, researchers led by UNC's Jonathan Schisler, PhD, have identified a possible genetic basis for coronary artery disease (CAD), as well as potential new opportunities to prevent it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New therapy lessens impact of mistreatment at a young age
(University of Delaware) Work underway in a laboratory at the University of Delaware suggest certain drugs can prevent and reduce changes to the brain caused by mistreatment at an early age. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Detailed view of immune proteins could lead to new pathogen-defense strategies
(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) Biologists at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley used cryo-EM to resolve the structure of a ring of proteins used by the immune system to summon support when under attack, providing new insight into potential strategies for protection from pathogens. The researchers captured the high-resolution image of a protein ring, called an inflammasome, as it was bound to flagellin, a protein from the whiplike tail used by bacteria to propel themselves forward. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Noninvasive brain imaging shows readiness of trainees to perform operations
(Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) While simulation platforms have been used to train surgeons before they enter an actual operating room (OR), few studies have evaluated how well trainees transfer those skills from the simulator to the OR. Now, a study led by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute that used noninvasive brain imaging to evaluate brain activity has found that simulator-trained medical students successfully transferred those skills to operating on cadavers and were faster than peers who had no simulator training. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bristol wins grant to tackle antibacterial drug resistance in Thailand
(University of Bristol) The University of Bristol has been awarded a grant by the UK Research Councils and the Department of Health to lead an inter-disciplinary research project to tackle the growing threat of antibacterial drug resistance (ABR) in Thailand. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Newly found immune defence could pave way to treat allergies
(University of Edinburgh) Scientists have made a fundamental discovery about how our body's immune system clears harmful infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

School exacerbates feelings of being 'different' in pupils with Autism Spectrum Conditions
(University of Surrey) Negative school experiences can have harmful long term effects on pupils with Autism Spectrum Conditions, a new study in the journal Autism reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows therapy improves quality of life in people who have sleep apnea
(American Academy of Sleep Medicine) A new study shows that positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy improves quality of life measures in people who have obstructive sleep apnea. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Seattle Children's opens first pediatric CAR T-Cell trial targeting CD22 and CD19 proteins
(Seattle Children's) Seattle Children's has opened the first chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell immunotherapy trial in the US for children and young adults with relapsed or refractory CD19- and CD22-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that will simultaneously attack two targets on cancer cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UNN scientists are studying the problem of modeling the cognitive dissonance phenomenon
(Lobachevsky University) Lobachevsky University (UNN) scientists, Associate Professor of the History and Theory of International Relations Department Alexander Petukhov and Head of the Department of Psychophysiology Sofya Polevaya, are studying the modeling of the cognitive dissonance phenomenon. They rely on the theory of information images and a mathematical model developed on the basis of this theory. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Russian scientist determined the normal content of boron in the human body
This study will provide a better understanding of the role that this important trace element plays in metabolism. The results of the work were presented in the Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Naturally occurring molecule may help prevent and treat atherosclerosis and gum disease
(Boston University School of Medicine) Resolvin E1, a molecule produced naturally in the body from an omega -3 fish oil, topically applied on gum tissues not only prevents and treats gum disease as previously shown (Hasturk et al 2006 and 2007), but also decreases the likelihood for advanced arterial atherosclerotic plaques to rupture and form a dangerous thrombus or blood clot. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Listening to the patient's voice: A more patient-centered approach to medication safety
(Regenstrief Institute) Involving the patient is critical for improving medication safety according to Regenstrief Institute researcher and Indiana University School of Medicine assistant professor of medicine Joy L. Lee, PhD, corresponding author of 'Towards a More Patient-Centered Approach to Medication Safety' recently published in the Journal of Patient Experience. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When vegetables are closer in price to chips, people eat healthier, Drexel study finds
(Drexel University) A new study determined that the difference in price of healthy foods compared to unhealthy foods plays a significant role in whether people have a healthy diet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sight-saving imaging technology secures funding
(University of Liverpool) Staff at the University of Liverpool's Department of Eye& Vision Science have been awarded £ 1.3 million by the National Institute for Health Research's (NIHR) Intervention for Innovation (i4i) programme to develop a state-of-the-art Ultra-Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (Ultra-OCT) system.The Ultra-OCT is intended to revolutionise the way corneal eye conditions are detected, diagnosed and managed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers find diffusion plays unusual signaling role in drosophila embryos
(North Carolina State University) Researchers have found that diffusion plays an unexpected role in cell differentiation during the early stages of development in the embryos of Drosophila, or fruit flies. Instead of spreading a molecular signal out, it was found that diffusion, facilitated through a carrier molecule, actually concentrates the signal in one place. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tax reform proposal has serious implications for older americans
(American Geriatrics Society) We are deeply concerned about the impact that the two tax reform proposals could have on older Americans as currently drafted. We continue to offer our support and expertise to the many bipartisan legislators and experts working across the aisle on proposals that would give us all the opportunity to make open, informed decisions about a better health system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

David Bowie & the art of slow innovation: A   new strategy for global precision medicine
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) With what strategies should developing countries invest in for emerging biotechnologies and precision medicine? (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New talking therapy could help cancer survivors cope after treatment
(Queen Mary University of London) A new project to develop and test a talking-based therapy for cancer survivors, led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), Barts Health NHS Trust and King's College London, has been awarded £ 2.5m by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news