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Brain cell's Achilles' heel may prompt hydrocephalus
(Duke University) Viruses may spark hydrocephalus by exploiting a surprising weakness of cells that circulate fluid in the brain, called ependymal cells, report Duke University scientists. The researchers discovered that ependymal cells from mice require a continuous production of a transcription factor called Foxj1 to maintain their shape and function. Viruses known to infect the brain have found a way to shut down the production of Foxj1 and disable the cells, the researchers show. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Exercise could make the heart younger
(Harvard University) After a heart attack, patients must create new heart muscle cells to heal. Harvard study shows that mice make more new heart muscle cells when they exercise compared to when they do not. This was true for both healthy mice and those that had experienced a heart attack. Findings demonstrate that one reason exercise is beneficial to health is that it increases the heart's capacity to regenerate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Implantable islet cells come with their own oxygen supply
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Researchers at MIT and a company, Beta-O2 Technologies, have designed and tested an implantable device for treatment of Type 1 diabetes. The device furnishes islet cells with their own supply of oxygen, carried in a chamber that can be replenished every 24 hours. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Telemedicine aided people hit by hurricanes Harvey and Irma
(RAND Corporation) Telemedicine has been used during disasters for many years, but providing such care directly to consumers only has become viable because of the widespread growth of smartphones and the creation of services that allow consumers to directly access thousands of US physicians. A new study of the aftermath of hurricanes Harvey and Irma finds that direct-to-consumer telemedicine is a viable way to deliver medical care in the days following a natural disaster. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Looking past peer influence: Genetic contributions to increases in teen substance use?
(Florida Atlantic University) Parents spend a lot of time worrying about the influence of peers on teen substance use. A new study examines if there is a genetic component that drives teens' desire for risk taking and novelty. A key finding revealed genetic influences that are unique to the growth in substance use. With each passing year, genetic differences between individuals become more and more important in explaining why substance use increases in some adolescents but not in others. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Culprit in reducing effectiveness of insulin identified
(Osaka University) Scientists at Osaka University discovered that Stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1) secreted from adipocytes reduced the effectiveness of insulin in adipocytes and decreased insulin-induced glucose uptake. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Oxidative stress makes difference between metabolically abnormal and healthy obesities
(Osaka University) Scientists at Osaka University clarified that deletion of adipose oxidative stress (Fat ROS) decreased lipid accumulation in the liver, clinically improving insulin resistance and inducing metabolically healthy obesity. In fact, Fat ROS suppressed lipid accumulation and increased ectopic lipid accumulation in the liver, worsening insulin resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A wearable device intervention to increase exercise in peripheral artery disease
(Northwestern University) A home-based exercise program, consisting of wearables and telephone coaching, did not improve walking endurance for patients with peripheral artery disease, according to a study published in JAMA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rheumatology leaders respond to Short-Term, Limited-Duration Insurance proposed rule
(American College of Rheumatology) In comments submitted to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the American College of Rheumatology expressed concern that the Short-Term, Limited-Duration Insurance proposed rule could weaken consumer protections that enable individuals living with rheumatic diseases to access quality, affordable care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Surgery recovery program slashes opioid use, benefits patients, cuts costs, study finds
(University of Virginia Health System) A special recovery program for thoracic surgery patients developed at the University of Virginia Health System is getting patients home sooner while decreasing both healthcare costs and opioid use, a review of the first year of the program shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Future wearable device could tell how we power human movement
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) For athletes and weekend warriors alike, returning from a tendon injury too soon often ensures a trip right back to physical therapy. However, a new technology developed by University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers could one day help tell whether your tendons are ready for action. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cognitive behavioral therapy can improve emotion regulation in children with autism
(York University) New research from York University's Faculty of Health shows cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can help children with autism manage not only anxiety but other emotional challenges, such as sadness and anger. study shows CBT can lead to significant improvements in children's emotional regulation. It also shows -- for the first time -- that CBT can improve more than just anxiety. This is the first transdiagnostic CBT trial for children with autism, employing a randomized controlled trial. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Healthcare costs for adults with autism more than double those for general population
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Researchers compared total annual healthcare costs for adults on the autism spectrum to costs for adults with attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and adults in the general population and found them to be 20 percent and 70 percent higher, respectively. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Opioid prescribing at veterans hospitals varies widely in treating chronic pain
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) A recently published article in the Journal of General Internal Medicine surveyed care provided to 1.1 million veterans at 176 VHA medical centers between 2010 and 2015. At some centers, as many as one-third of the veterans seeking care for chronic pain began long-term opioid therapy, compared with only 5 percent at other centers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What can a tasty milkshake teach us about the genetics of heart disease?
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Analysis of high-resolution genomic data in a large study population reveals novel low-frequency polymorphisms that drive response to dietary lipids and medication. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain activity linked to stress changes chemical codes
(University of California - San Diego) UC San Diego scientists have identified light-induced electrical activity as the brain mechanism controlling chemical code switching in relation to stress. While investigating neurotransmitter switching in rats, the researchers found that specific brain neurons were responsible, with possible implications for chemical imbalances in the brain underlying mental illness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study identifies overdose risk factors in youth with substance use disorders
(Massachusetts General Hospital) A team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has identified factors that may increase the risk of drug overdose in adolescents and young adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bariatric surgery successes lead to type 2 diabetes treatment
(Cornell University) Bariatric surgery has long yielded almost immediate health benefits for patients with type 2 diabetes, and new findings from Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine may be the key to developing drug alternatives to surgery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hospital patients are eager to play a role in tracking health data, researchers find
(Indiana University) New research shows that patients in the hospital are eager to collaborate with clinicians to track their health data. Traditionally, clinicians have been the only ones who collect, track and reflect on that data. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New robot for skull base surgery is very accurate and alleviates surgeon's workload
(Eindhoven University of Technology) Drilling out a hole in the skull base has to be done with great precision and often takes many hours, which requires the maximum from a surgeon. Researchers of Eindhoven University of Technology have developed a surgery robot to take over this task, with sub-millimeter precision. The robot is expected to perform its first surgery within five years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

More than 1 in 20 US children and teens have anxiety or depression
(Wolters Kluwer Health) About 2.6 million American children and adolescents had diagnosed anxiety and/or depression in 2011-12, reports an analysis of nationwide data in the Journal of Developmental& Behavioral Pediatrics, the official journal of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Incompatible' donor stem cells cure adult sickle cell patients
(University of Illinois at Chicago) Doctors at the University of Illinois Hospital have cured seven adult patients of sickle cell disease, an inherited blood disorder primarily affecting the black community, using stem cells from donors previously thought to be incompatible, thanks to a new transplant treatment protocol. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Managing chronic pain with light
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Scientists from EMBL Rome have identified the population of nerve cells in the skin that are responsible for sensitivity to gentle touch, and which cause severe pain in neuropathic pain patients. The team developed a light-sensitive chemical that selectively binds to this type of nerve cell. By first injecting the affected skin area with the chemical and then illuminating it with near-infrared light, the targeted cells retract from the skin's surface, leading to pain relief. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Use of 2 anti-clotting medications following bypass surgery improves outcomes for grafted veins
(JAMA Network) Taking aspirin plus an anti-clotting medication for one year after heart bypass surgery resulted in less narrowing of the vein used to bypass a blocked artery than taking aspirin alone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Effect of a home-based exercise program with wearable activity monitor, telephone coaching on walking endurance for peripheral artery disease
(JAMA Network) A home-based exercise program that consisted of a wearable   activity monitor and telephone coaching to promote walking by patients with peripheral artery disease didn't improve walking endurance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Early treatment for leg ulcers gets patients back on their feet
(Imperial College London) Treating leg ulcers within two weeks by closing faulty veins improves healing by 12 percent compared to standard treatment, according to new findings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Reconstructing what makes us tick
(American Institute of Physics) A major issue that limits modeling to predict cardiac arrhythmia is that it is impossible to measure and monitor all the variables that make our hearts tick, but researchers have now developed an algorithm that uses artificial intelligence to model the electrical excitations in heart muscle. Their work, appearing in Chaos, draws on partial differential equations describing excitable media and echo state networks to cross-predict variables about chaotic electrical wave propagations in cardiac tissue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ATS Foundation and ResMed announce two-year research grant in sleep-disordered breathing
(American Thoracic Society) The ATS Foundation is pleased to announce its new ATS Foundation/ResMed Research Fellowship in Sleep-disordered Breathing and PAP Therapy. The award will provide funding for two years in the amount of $100,000, provided by ResMed (NYSE: RMD, ASX: RMD), a global leader in connected health with more than 4 million cloud-connected PAP devices monitoring patients every night. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Availability of orphan medicines varies between European countries
(University of Eastern Finland) There are differences in the availability of orphan medicines between different European countries, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. The study focused on the availability and distribution channels of ten orphan medicines used in outpatient care in 24 European countries. On average, five of the 10 medicines were available on the markets. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

State-of-the-art reviews in osteoimmunology
(International Osteoporosis Foundation) A series of outstanding, well illustrated reviews by leading experts in osteoimmunology provide new insights and point to future directions in one of the most rapidly evolving areas of research within the bone field. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Technology used to map Mars now measuring effect of treatment on tumors
(University of Manchester) A machine learning approach for assessing images of the craters and dunes of Mars, which was developed at The University of Manchester, has now been adapted to help scientists measure the effects of treatments on tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Commonly prescribed heartburn drug linked to pneumonia in older adults
(University of Exeter) Researchers at the University of Exeter have found a statistical link between pneumonia in older people and a group of medicines commonly used to neutralise stomach acid in people with heartburn or stomach ulcers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Music lessens pain and anxiety in patients undergoing surgery
(Wiley) Music can reduce the anxiety and pain of invasive surgery, according to an analysis of all relevant randomized controlled trials published since 1980. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ESCEO-IOF Pierre Meunier Young Scientist Award presented to Dr. Emmanuel Biver
(International Osteoporosis Foundation) Dr. Emmanuel Biver of the Division of Bone Diseases Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine has been presented with the 2018 ESCEO-IOF Pierre Meunier Young Scientist Award. The joint award of the European Society for Clinical& Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) and the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) was awarded on April 22nd, at the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis& Musculoskeletal Diseases, held in Krak ó w, Poland. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A non-coding RNA lasso catches proteins in breast cancer cells
(Aarhus University) A Danish-German research team has shown that not only the where and when of long non-coding RNA expression is important for their function but also the how. The results can have a big impact on our understanding of dynamic regulation of gene expression in biological processes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists unearth vital link between fat, immunity and heat regulation
(Trinity College Dublin) Scientists from Trinity College Dublin have discovered a key, previously unknown role for a population of cells that live in our fat -- these cells regulate our body heat and protect us against cold shock. The discovery opens the door to future treatments in which weight loss (or gain) is the desired goal, as activating the pathway involved may stimulate the body to burn (or not burn) white fat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stem cells from adults function just as well as those from embryos
(Frontiers) A review of research on induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) finds that donor age does not appear to influence their functionality. This validates iPSCs as a viable alternative to embryonic stem cells in regenerative medicine, and highlights the enormous potential of iPSCs derived from elderly patients to treat their age-related diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flavins keep a handy helper in their pocket
(University of Freiburg) Freiburg researchers show for the first time in detail how a flavin-containing enzyme interacts with oxygen (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Artificial leaf as mini-factory for medicine
(Eindhoven University of Technology) Using sunlight for sustainable and cheap production of, for example, medicines. The 'mini-factory' in the form of a leaf that chemical engineers from Eindhoven University of Technology presented in 2016 showed that it is possible. Now the researchers have come with an improved version: their 'mini-factory' is now able to keep production at the same level, irrespective of the variation in sunlight due to cloudiness or time of the day. As a result, this boosts the average yield by about 20 percent. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

$11.2 million federal grant to support microorganism and disease research
(University of Louisville) University of Louisville has received an $11.2 million federal grant over five years to establish a Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) to study the interface between microbiome, inflammation and disease development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Natural barcodes enable better cell tracking
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) A group of researchers from the Wyss Institute at Harvard University and Harvard Medical School has developed a new genetic analysis technique that harnesses the 10 million small nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found in the human genome as 'barcodes' to create a faster, cheaper, and simpler way to keep track of pooled cells from multiple individuals during multiplexed experiments, enabling large samples of cells from multiple people to be quickly analyzed for personalized medicine.   (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Five ways to help cancer patients avoid the emergency room
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Unnecessary emergency department visits and hospitalizations are debilitating for patients with cancer and far too common -- and costly -- for the United States health care system. To reverse the trend, researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center, the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, and the Wharton School, all at the University of Pennsylvania, have identified the five best practices to reduce unnecessary emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heart disease may only be a matter of time for those with healthy obesity
(Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center) People who are 30 pounds or more overweight may want to slim down a bit even if they don't have high blood pressure or any other heart disease risk, according to scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Significant advances detected in knowledge about renal cancer
(University of the Basque Country) The prestigious journal Cell is today publishing three papers on renal cancer signed by an interdisciplinary group known as the TRACERx Renal Consortium, a member of which is Dr Jose Ignacio L ó pez, a pathologist at University Hospital Cruces and tenured lecturer in the Faculty of Medicine and Nursing of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country. These studies offer fresh data on different aspects of the biology of renal cancer which could help to improve predictions and possible therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Aging: The natural stress reliever for many women
(University of Michigan) While some research suggests that midlife is a dissatisfying time for women, other studies show that women report feeling less stressed and enjoy a higher quality of life during this period. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What if you could know that your mild cognitive impairment wouldn't progress
(IOS Press) Researchers from the Lisbon School of Medicine, University of Lisbon found that, in some mild cognitive impairment patients, real neuropsychological stability over a decade is possible and that long-term stability could be predicted based on neuropsychological tests measuring memory and non-verbal abstract reasoning. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Prolonged acetaminophen use during pregnancy linked to increased ASD and ADHD risk
(The Hebrew University of Jerusalem) Acetaminophen is one of the most common medications used for treatment of pain and fever reduction during pregnancy and is considered safe in humans. Now, in a first-of-its-kind meta-analysis, researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have found a link between prolonged use of drugs containing acetaminophen (paracetamol or Tylenol) during pregnancy, and increased risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How do you get teens to stop cellphone use while driving? Survey says, show them the money
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Teens who admit to texting while driving may be convinced to reduce risky cellphone use behind the wheel when presented with financial incentives such as auto-insurance apps that monitor driving behavior, according to a new survey. However, while more than 90 percent of teens surveyed said they were willing to give up sending or reading text messages, almost half indicated that they would want to retain some control over phone functions such as music and navigation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New mobile app addresses depression in pregnant and postpartum women
(Worcester Polytechnic Institute) Lifeline4Moms, an app developed by a researcher at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, gives obstetric providers an important new tool for assessing perinatal depression in women and guiding them to treatment. Perinatal depression affects one in seven women and is the most common medical complication of pregnancy. The app is a how-to decision aid, not a diagnostic tool, for obstetricians and other maternal healthcare providers, who generally are not trained to diagnose and treat psychiatric illness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hippo pathway found essential to orchestrate the development of the heart
(Baylor College of Medicine) A team of researchers has discovered that during development, when progenitor heart cells progressively differentiate into various cell types, the Hippo pathway is essential to coordinate the progress of these cell types into a working heart (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news