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Socioeconomic factors and severity of coronary artery disease
(Bentham Science Publishers) Historically, from the 1930's to the 1950's, the rate of cardiovascular disease in high-income countries was high. Since the mid-1970's, the rate of cardiovascular disease has declined in high income countries, possibly due to socioeconomic inequalities and better management of risk factors for coronary heart disease among the wealthy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Spatial orientation: New model for the origin of grid cells
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich neurobiologists present a new theory for the origin of the grid cells required for spatial orientation in the mammalian brain, which assigns a vital role to the timing of trains of signals they receive from neurons called place cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Alzheimer's drug may help treat traumatic brain injury
(Wiley) Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of disability and death globally, but medications have generally failed to benefit patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Depression changes structure of the brain, study suggests
(University of Edinburgh) Changes in the brain's structure that could be the result of depression have been identified in a major scanning study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How physical exercise prevents dementia
(Goethe University Frankfurt) Numerous studies have shown that physical exercise seems beneficial in the prevention of cognitive impairment and dementia in old age. Now researchers at Goethe University Frankfurt have explored in one of the first studies worldwide how exercise affects brain metabolism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pharmacology: Probing the pores in membrane vesicles
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) Ion channels in the membrane vesicles that mediate intracellular protein transport play a crucial role in cell physiology. A method developed by an Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich team now allows them to be studied with greater specificity than ever before. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

University of Cincinnati creates new model to support workers with disabilities
(University of Cincinnati) The University of Cincinnati's Advancement and Transition Services trained Aramark dining services employees on evidence-based practices used by job coaches to support workers with intellectual and developmental disabilities, or I/DD. The result: the independence levels and social capital of workers with I/DD drastically improved over the course of a semester. The new model of support could help workers with I/DD in other workplaces. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In saliva, clues to a 'ghost' species of ancient human
(University at Buffalo) In saliva, scientists have found hints that a 'ghost' species of archaic humans may have contributed genetic material to ancestors of people living in sub-Saharan Africa today. The research adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting that sexual rendezvous between different archaic human species may not have been unusual. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Good fighters are bad runners
(University of Utah) For mice and men, a strength in one area of Darwinian fitness may mean a deficiency in another. A look at Olympic athletes shows that a wrestler is built much differently than a marathoner. It's long been supposed that strength in fighting, or protecting territory and resources, comes at the expense of running, or spatial mobility. Now an experiment with house mice provides evidence for this theory. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rush hour pollution may be more dangerous than you think
(Duke University) Everyone knows that exposure to pollution during rush hour traffic can be hazardous to your health, but it's even worse than previously thought. In-car measurements of pollutants that cause oxidative stress found exposure levels for drivers to be twice as high as previously believed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

First issue of Structural Heart: The Journal of the Heart Team is now available
(Cardiovascular Research Foundation) The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is pleased to announce that the first issue of Structural Heart: The Journal of the Heart Team is now available online. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CRI scientists provide insight into genetic basis of neuropsychiatric disorders
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) A study by scientists at the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) is providing insight into the genetic basis of neuropsychiatric disorders. In this research, the first mouse model of a mutation in the ARID1B gene was created and then used to show that growth hormone treatments reverse some manifestations of the mutation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

High-fat diet in pregnancy can cause mental health problems in offspring
(Oregon Health& Science University) New research in an animal model suggests a high-fat diet during pregnancy alters the development of the brain and endocrine system of offspring. The new study links an unhealthy diet during pregnancy to mental health disorders such as anxiety and depression in children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sleep disorders may increase cognitive problems particularly in those at risk for Alzheimer's
(American Thoracic Society) People who carry a genetic susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease appear to be at greater risk of diminished cognition from sleep-disordered breathing than those without the susceptibility, according to new research published online, ahead of print in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study reveals that causes of severe antisocial behavior may differ for boys and girls
(University of Bath) The causes of severe antisocial behavior may differ between boys and girls, which could pave the way for new sex-specific treatments, according to a major new study published today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study offers potential diagnostic and prognostic tools for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders
(University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine& Dentistry) UAlberta researchers believe they have a clearer picture of why people living with HIV so commonly suffer from dementia and other neurocognitive disorders. They found a number of critical peroxisomal proteins were virtually absent in the brains of HIV patients. The team believes the finding offers a strong clue as to the underlying cause of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) and that it could lead to new biomarkers to rapidly diagnose HAND in patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Engaging Islamic religious leaders to improve African-American Muslim women's attitudes towards breastfeeding
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) While research has demonstrated the positive impact a woman's social support network and faith community can have on influencing decisions to breastfeed, little is known regarding the influence of Islamic traditions on the breastfeeding beliefs and practices of African-American Muslims. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Opioids and obesity, not 'despair deaths,' raising mortality rates for white Americans
(University of Colorado at Boulder) Drug-related deaths among middle-aged white men increased more than 25-fold between 1980 and 2014, with the bulk of that spike occurring since the mid-1990s when addictive prescription opioids became broadly available, according to new CU Boulder research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Similar improvements between speech language therapy delivered online and in-person
(Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care) A recent Baycrest study found that patients who accessed speech language therapy over the Internet saw large improvements to their communication abilities that were similar to those of patients doing in-person therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ancient Italian fossils reveal risk of parasitic infections due to climate change
(University of Missouri-Columbia) In 2014, a team of researchers led by a paleobiologist from the University of Missouri found that clams from the Holocene Epoch (that began 11,700 years ago) contained clues about how sea level rise due to climate change could foreshadow a rise in parasitic trematodes. Now, an international team from Mizzou and the Universities of Bologna and Florida has found that rising seas could be detrimental to human health on a much shorter time scale. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot
(Stanford University) A newly developed vine-like robot can grow across long distances without moving its whole body. It could prove useful in search and rescue operations and medical applications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New PET-CT scan improves detection in rare cardiac condition
(University of Illinois at Chicago) Using a new imaging technique that can diagnose cardiac sarcoidosis much more accurately than traditional tests, researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago have found that the disease affects other organs in 40 percent of patients with cardiac sarcoidosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Taste and health affect consumer choices for milk and nondairy beverages
(Elsevier) To learn more about what affects consumer decisions regarding fluid milk purchases, researchers from North Carolina State University used surveys, conjoint analysis, and means-end-chain analysis to uncover the underlying values among dairy milk and nondairy beverage consumers. The results of the study highlighted the most important factors for both milk and nondairy beverages, which were the same: they must be healthy and taste good. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New mutations related to hereditary neuroendocrine tumours
(Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncol ó gicas (CNIO)) The presence of a germline mutation in the GOT2 gene found in a patient with metastasis gives rise to increased activity of the encoder enzyme. Furthermore, the authors describe extraordinarily rare mutations in two patients: one in the SDHC gene and another in the IDH1. Finally, by way of an extension study focused on more than 60 patients with these neuroendocrine tumours, a new susceptibility gene, IDH3B, associated with the development of paragangliomas was identified. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A changing society -- 100 is the new 80
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) When it comes to aging successfully and remaining in good health, are centenarians the perfect role models? Researchers from Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin have been studying illness trajectories in centenarians during the final years of their lives. According to their findings, people who died aged 100 or older suffered fewer diseases than those who died aged 90 to 99, or 80 to 89. The findings of this study have been published in The Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences*. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds day-to-day experiences affect awareness of aging, mood
(North Carolina State University) A study of older adults finds an individual's awareness of aging is not as static as previously thought, and that day-to-day experiences and one's attitude toward aging can affect an individual's awareness of age-related change -- and how that awareness affects one's mood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ESMO Awards recognise four outstanding oncologists
(European Society for Medical Oncology) The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), the leading professional organisation for medical oncology, has announced the recipients of its four distinguished annual awards, to be presented at the ESMO 2017 Congress (8-12 September, Madrid, Spain). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Concurrent chemotherapy, proton therapy improves survival in patients with advanced lung cancer
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) For patients with advanced, inoperable stage 3 lung cancer, concurrent chemotherapy and the specialized radiation treatment, proton therapy, offers improved survival compared to historical data for standard of care, according to a new study from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heritage and ancient grain project feeds a growing demand
(Cornell University) After a century of markets dominated by a few types of wheat and white flour, ancient and heritage wheat varieties are making a comeback. Restaurants and bakeries that promote organic and local agriculture have sprouted up across the country in the last decade, meeting a rising consumer demand for tasty and nutritious foods that support an ethic of sustainability. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

University of Sussex to carry out vital skin cancer research thanks to new grant
(University of Sussex) The Spencer Lab has been awarded a £ 428K grant to research a protein present in high amounts in melanoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Young adult cancer survivors struggle to get back to normal
(University of Michigan) Cancer survivors often talk about wanting to get back to normal, but a new study indicates many young adults who survived the disease struggle with attaining this goal two years after their initial diagnosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Innate reaction of hematopoietic stem cells to severe infections
(University of Zurich) Researchers at the University of Zurich have shown for the first time that hematopoietic stem cells detect infectious agents themselves and begin to divide -- that is, without signals from growth factors. This direct production of defensive cells damages hematopoiesis in the long term, however, which could lead to malignant hematopoietic stem cell diseases at advanced age. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Molecular changes with age in normal breast tissue are linked to cancer-related changes
(Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center) New research provides insight into how changes that occur with age may predispose breast tissue cells to becoming cancerous. Specifically, the study demonstrates that regions in the genome where DNA methylation changes occur with age are particularly sensitive to disruption in cancer. This new data provides insight into how certain molecular changes with age in normal breast tissue itself may contribute to breast cancer risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New York Blood Center joins Blood Centers of America
(PadillaCRT) Blood Centers of America (BCA) announced today that New York Blood Center (NYBC) has joined its network of blood and source plasma collection centers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Search and rescue dogs do their jobs despite travel stress
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) When disaster strikes, you want the very best tools, functioning at their peak. In the case of catastrophic earthquakes, tornadoes, or even bombings in war zones, those tools are search and rescue dogs. But researchers have found that getting dogs to disaster sites can add to the animals' stress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study offers potential diagnostic and prognostic tools for HIV-associated neurocognitiv
(University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine& Dentistry) UAlberta researchers believe they have a clearer picture of why people living with HIV so commonly suffer from dementia and other neurocognitive disorders. They found a number of critical peroxisomal proteins were virtually absent in the brains of HIV patients. The team believes the finding offers a strong clue as to the underlying cause of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) and that it could lead to new biomarkers to rapidly diagnose HAND in patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study predicts heart cell's response to dwindling oxygen
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT researchers have developed a model that predicts a single heart cell's response to dwindling supplies of oxygen. Specifically, it evaluates a cell's ability to keep producing ATP -- a cell's primary fuel source -- and stay alive, even as it is increasingly deprived of oxygen. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Engaging Islamic religious leaders to improve AA Muslim women's attitudes towards breastfeeding
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) While research has demonstrated the positive impact a woman's social support network and faith community can have on influencing decisions to breastfeed, little is known regarding the influence of Islamic traditions on the breastfeeding beliefs and practices of African American Muslims. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Using a pig model to study chronic diseases may help minimize drug failure rate
(Penn State) Scientists may be able to minimize the failure rate of drugs for diseases linked to high-calorie diets, such as colon cancer and type 2 diabetes, if they test treatments using a pig model, according to an international team of researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds aboriginal community with strong ethno-cultural identity and connection to the land has lower suicide rates
(University of Guelph-Humber) A University of Guelph-Humber funded study investigating mental health perceptions and practices of an aboriginal community in northern Ontario, and its significantly lower rates of mental health services utilization and suicide, suggests that a strong ethno-cultural identity and connection to the land are significant factors to positive mental health outcomes in this region.The study findings are published in the August 2017 edition of the International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Not under the skin, but on it: Living together brings couples' microbiomes together
(American Society for Microbiology) Couples who live together share many things: Bedrooms, bathrooms, food, and even bacteria. After analyzing skin microbiomes from cohabitating couples, microbial ecologists at the University of Waterloo, in Canada, found that people who live together significantly influence the microbial communities on each other's skin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Parents have critical role in preventing teen drinking
(University of Adelaide) Fewer Australian teenagers are drinking alcohol but more needs to be done to curb the drinking habits of Aussie students, based on the findings of the latest study by Adelaide researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Duke Endowment grant to help UNC Lineberger roll out lay patient navigation program in N.C.
(UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center) The Duke Endowment of Charlotte, N.C., has awarded a three-year, $600,000 grant to UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center to establish a multi-institutional lay patient navigation program aimed at improving cancer outcomes in North Carolina. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cow antibodies yield important clues for developing a broadly effective AIDS vaccine
(International AIDS Vaccine Initiative) As outlined in a study published today in Nature, lead author Devin Sok, Director, Antibody Discovery and Development at the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI), reports the elicitation of powerful, HIV-blocking antibodies in cows in a matter of weeks - a process that usually takes years in humans. The unexpected animal model is providing clues for important questions at a moment when new energy has infused HIV vaccine research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists discover combined sensory map for heat, humidity in fly brain
(Northwestern University) Northwestern University neuroscientists now can visualize how fruit flies sense and process humidity and temperature together through a 'sensory map' within their brains, according to new research. The findings could one day help researchers better understand how the human brain simultaneously processes humidity and temperature and might influence how humans control for mosquitoes in cities and prevent mosquito-borne diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lorenz Studer awarded the 2017 Ogawa-Yamanaka Stem Cell Prize
(Gladstone Institutes) Lorenz   P. Studer, MD, was announced today as the winner of the 2017 Ogawa-Yamanaka Stem Cell Prize by the Gladstone Institutes. Studer is the director of the Center for Stem Cell Biology and a member of the Developmental Biology Program at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Small pest, big battle
(University of California - Santa Barbara) Researchers use gene editing to control disease-causing mosquitoes, thanks to a multimillion-dollar DARPA contract. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Experts: 1 in 3 cases of dementia preventable, nonmedical therapies ideal for dementia
(University of Southern California - Health Sciences) A report by the first Lancet Commission on Dementia Prevention and Care identifies powerful tools to prevent dementia and touts the benefits of nonmedical interventions for people with dementia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

High levels of antibiotic-resistance in Indian poultry farming raises concerns
(Burness) A new study from India raises questions about the dangers to human health of farming chicken with growth-promoting antibiotics -- including some of the same drugs used in raising millions of chickens in the United States and worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Insurance approval rates for clinical trial participation rose under Affordable Care Act
(American Association for Cancer Research) Approval rates for privately insured patients seeking to enroll in oncology clinical trials increased after the passage of the Affordable Care Act. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news