Oregon State researchers discover new class of cancer fighting compounds
(Oregon State University) A team of Oregon State University scientists has discovered a new class of anti-cancer compounds that effectively kill liver and breast cancer cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Researchers use eel-like protein to control brain
(University of Washington School of Medicine/UW Medicine) Researchers successfully used a protein called parapinopsin to turn off brain circuits. This protein is found in lamprey - an ancient lineage of jawless fish similar to eel. This could eventually lead to turning off unwanted behaviors like addiction and depression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Americans are increasingly experiencing chronic pain
This study comprehensively documents rising levels of chronic pain among Americans aged 25-84 to show that pain prevalence -- already high at baseline -- increased substantially from 2002-18, with increases evident in all leading pain sits (joint, back, neck, jaw and migraine). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tumor-promoting immune cells retrained to fight most aggressive type of brain cancer
(Massachusetts General Hospital) Using a targeted antibody calledαGITR, tumor-promoting immune cells called regulatory T cells (Tregs) can be reprogrammed into cancer-killing immune cells in glioblastomas. Combining theαGITR antibody with immune-checkpoint-blocking drugs may benefit patients with glioblastomas, the most aggressive and uniformly fatal type of brain tumor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Greater presence of family docs, midwives may decrease rates of cesarean birth
(American Academy of Family Physicians) Surgical cesarean births can expose new mothers to a range of health complications, including infection, blood clots and hemorrhage. As part of Healthy People 2020 and other maternal health objectives, the state of California exerted pressure to reduce cesarean deliveries, and statewide organizations established quality initiatives in partnership with those goals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Combination of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy more effective in treating depression
(American Academy of Family Physicians) Most patients with depression are treated in primary care, however, relatively few clinical trials for treating depression have focused on primary care. Researchers at the Vrije University Amsterdam examined the effects of the two major approaches to treating depression: psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy, as well as combined treatment and care-as-usual. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Newer class of fluoroquinolone antibiotics may present reduced risk of tendon ruptures
(American Academy of Family Physicians) It's widely understood that people taking a common class of antibiotics, like ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, run the risk of tendonitis and tendon ruptures. However, a new analysis sheds light on newer, third-generation fluoroquinolones and suggests they may have a lower risk of Achilles tendon rupture. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Shared medical appointments help patients with prediabetes
(American Academy of Family Physicians) Researchers from the Cleveland Clinic and Takeda Pharmaceutical Company conducted a study to evaluate the effectiveness of shared medical appointments for people with pre-diabetes compared with a group of patients receiving usual care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mason researchers studying flexible ultrasound imaging patch
(George Mason University) Parag Chitnis, Associate Professor, Bioengineering, Pilgyu Kang, Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering, Siddhartha Sikdar, Professor, Bioengineering, and Qi Wei, Associate Professor, Bioengineering, received $499,977 from the U.S. Department of Defense for the project: " Training and Recovery Augmented with Ultrasound Myography and Assessment (TRAUMA) Using a Flexible Ultrasound-Imaging Patch. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Interdisciplinary consults can help primary care docs treat patients with chronic pain
(American Academy of Family Physicians) Between 11% to 40% of adults in the United States experience chronic pain, and primary care physicians may feel ill-equipped to effectively and safely care for patients with chronic pain, addiction or both. Researchers from Tufts University conducted a study to evaluate the effectiveness of an interdisciplinary consultation service that supports primary care physicians who care for patients experiencing chronic pain and addiction. The goal was to identify new and effective strategies that clinics can use to support PCPs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Patient expectations, doctors' prescribing habits, and antimicrobial resistance
(American Academy of Family Physicians) Inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections contributes to antibiotic resistance, making some bacterial infections difficult to treat. This often leads to higher medical costs, prolonged hospital stays and increased mortality. Still, many physicians report prescribing antibiotics at their patients' request. To address patients' expectations for antibiotic prescribing for URTIs, researchers conducted an experiment in which study participants were assigned brief educational videos to watch on a tablet immediately prior to their appointment. (Source: Eure...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study examines connection between oral and general health in patients with diabetes
(American Academy of Family Physicians) Individuals with diabetes are at greater risk of developing oral health issues, like gum disease, yet care for these linked health issues are usually disconnected, split between primary care and dental care. A research team from the University of Amsterdam developed an intervention that provided primary care-based oral health information and dental referrals for patients with diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

This stinks: New research finds sense of smell and pneumonia linked
(Michigan State University) EAST LANSING, Mich. - An acute loss of smell is one of the most common symptoms of COVID-19, but for two decades it has been linked to other maladies among them Parkinson's disease and dementia. Now, a poor sense of smell may signify a higher risk of pneumonia in older adults, says a team of Michigan State University researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Phenomenon explains why patients who survive sepsis die sooner after hospital discharge
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) A review article by Brazilian researchers shows that alterations in the defense cell metabolism may explain why many patients who survive sepsis die within a year or suffer from long-term complications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Understanding SARS-COV-2 proteins is key to improve therapeutic options for COVID-19
(Bentham Science Publishers) Recently, the Oxford University and Pfizer and BioNTech made SARS-CoV-2 vaccines through targeting the spike protein gene. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the health authorities of the United Kingdom approved and started vaccination using the Pfizer and BioNTech mRNA vaccine. Also, The FDA of USA approved the treatment of COVID-19 using two monoclonal antibodies produced by Regeneron pharmaceuticals to target the spike protein. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Improving smoking cessation counseling and blood pressure quality metrics in primary care
(American Academy of Family Physicians) In order to make meaningful gains in cardiovascular disease care, primary care medical practices should adopt a set of care improvements specific to their practice size and type, according to a new study from the national primary care quality improvement initiative EvidenceNOW. High blood pressure and smoking are among the biggest risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease. Primary care physicians help patients manage high blood pressure and provide smoking cessation interventions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Multiple factors influence family physicians' practice scope
(American Academy of Family Physicians) Although new family medicine graduates intend to provide a broader scope of practice than their senior counterparts, individual family physicians' scope of practice has been decreasing, with fewer family physicians providing basic primary care services, such pediatric and prenatal care. Russell et al conducted a study to explore family medicine graduates' attitudes and perspectives on modifiable and non-modifiable factors that influenced their scope of practice and career choices. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gene editing expands to new types of immune cells
(Gladstone Institutes) A team of researchers at Gladstone Institutes and UC San Francisco (UCSF) has adapted CRISPR-Cas9 for use in monocytes and shown the potential utility of the technology for understanding how the human immune system fights viruses and microbes. Their results were published online today in the journal Cell Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pregnant women hospitalized for COVID-19 infection do not face increased risk of death
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Pregnant women who develop severe COVID-19 infections that require hospitalization for pneumonia and other complications may not be more likely to die from these infections than non-pregnant women. In fact, they may have significantly lower death rates than their non-pregnant counterparts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

APS 2021 virtual convention news highlights
(Association for Psychological Science) The latest news and discoveries from the field of psychological science will be featured at the 2021 Virtual Convention of the Association for Psychological Science (APS), held May 26-27. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tiny, wireless, injectable chips use ultrasound to monitor body processes
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) Researchers at Columbia Engineering report that they have built what they say is the world's smallest single-chip system, consuming a total volume of less than 0.1 mm3. The system is as small as a dust mite and visible only under a microscope. In order to achieve this, the team used ultrasound to both power and communicate with the device wirelessly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19 vaccine does not damage the placenta in pregnancy
(Northwestern University) Like an airplane's black box, a woman's placenta can show if something went wrong during pregnancy. A new Northwestern Medicine study of 84 vaccinated patients and 116 control patients found the COVID-19 vaccine did not damage the placenta during pregnancy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A comprehensive map of the SARS-CoV-2 genome
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT researchers have generated what they describe as the most complete gene annotation of the SARS-CoV-2 genome. In their study, they confirmed several protein-coding genes and found that a few others that had been suggested as genes do not code for any proteins. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Boosting body heat production: A new approach for treating obesity
(Garvan Institute of Medical Research) Targeting a heat production 'brake' on fat tissues may be a safer way to treat obesity than current medication. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New genetic copycatchers detect efficient and precise CRISPR editing in a living organism
(University of California - San Diego) Scientists have developed a novel genetic sensor called a " CopyCatcher, " which capitalizes on CRISPR-based gene drive technology, to detect instances in which a genetic element is copied precisely from one chromosome to another throughout cells in the body of a fruit fly. Next-generation CopyCatcher systems have the potential to measure how often such perfect copying might take place in different cells of the human body. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows how our brains sync hearing with vision
(McGill University) The brain alters our sense of time to synchronize our joint perception of sound and vision. A new study finds that this recalibration depends on brain signals constantly adapting to our environment to sample, order and associate competing sensory inputs together. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Inhibition of proteins activated by nitric oxide reverses aortic aneurysm in Marfan syndrome
(Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III (F.S.P.)) Scientists at the he Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Centro de Biolog í a Molecular Severo Ochoa (CBM-CSIC-UAM have shown that elevated activity of proteins regulated by nitric oxide (NO) causes the aortic disease seen in Marfan Syndrome patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cell reprogramming could aid spinal cord injury recovery
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) Cells called astrocytes normally support our neurons, and now scientists are working to reprogram the star-shaped cells into neurons that help reconnect the brain and body after a spinal cord injury. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Informed tourists make whale watching safer for whales
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) How does whale watching affect whale behavior? Who watches whales in Panama's Las Perlas Archipelago? Researchers from STRI and ASU hope to recommend innovative data-based conservation strategies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

For twins, gesture and speech go hand-in-hand in language development
(Georgia State University) Twins produce fewer gestures and gesture to fewer objects than other children. Language use also lags for twins, and language--but not gesture--is also affected by sex, with girls performing better than boys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH awards Marshall University professor $1.8 million for nicotine addiction research
(Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine) Brandon J. Henderson, Ph.D., an assistant professor of biomedical sciences at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, has been awarded a $1.86 million Research Project Grant (R01) from the National Institutes of Health to study the neurobiological and neurophysiological changes that occur due to vaping nicotine in flavored products. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CHEST releases updated guidelines to diagnose and evaluate hypersensitivity pneumonitis
(American College of Chest Physicians) The American College of Chest Physicians ® (CHEST) recently released new clinical guidelines on the Diagnosis and Evaluation of Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis (HP). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH meeting on bridges to better integrate sex and gender considerations into biomedical research
(NIH/OD/Office of Research on Women's Health) The Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) of the National Institutes of Health, in collaboration with the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH), will hold the 5th Annual Vivian W. Pinn Symposium. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Early screening tool leads to earlier diagnosis and treatment for autism spectrum disorder
(University of California - San Diego) Since it debuted in 2011, the Get SET Early program, which provides pediatricians and parents with a relatively simple process to screen for indicators of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children as young as age 1, has steadily grown in use and validation. Early screening and identification of ASD has been linked to more effective treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers use arcuate organoids to study development and disease of the hypothalamus
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) For the first time, researchers at Penn Medicine created organoids of the arcuate nucleus (ARC),providing an atlas of cell types in the human hypothalamus, which will be a blueprint to further understanding the development of brain disorders, such as certain causes of obesity and autism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Agents that target viral RNA could be the basis for next generation anti-viral drugs
(University of Birmingham) A new approach to tackling viruses by targeting the 'control centre' in viral RNA could lead to broad spectrum anti-viral drugs and provide a first line of defence against future pandemics, according to new research at the University of Birmingham. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Friendly pelicans breed better
(University of Exeter) Captive pelicans that are free to choose their own friendships are more likely to breed successfully on repeated occasions, new research suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SARS-CoV-2 research: Second possible effective mechanism of remdesivir discovered
(Goethe University Frankfurt) After infection, SARS-CoV-2 causes the host cell to produce new virus particles and suppresses host cell defence mechanisms. Virus protein nsP3 plays a central role in the latter process. Using structural analyses, researchers at Goethe University in cooperation with the Swiss Paul Scherrer Institute have now discovered that a decomposition product of the remdesivir binds to nsP3. This previously unknown effective mechanism may be important for the development of new drugs to combat RNA viruses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dartmouth-led study finds overemphasis on toy giveaways in TV ads unfairly promotes fast-food to children
(The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth) A new Dartmouth-led study, published this week in the journal Pediatrics, has found that the disproportionate use of premiums within child-targeted TV advertising for children's fast-food meals is deceptive, violating the industry's own self-regulatory guidelines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Synergistic effects of acoustics-based therapy and immunotherapy in cancer treatment
(Compuscript Ltd) Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this review the authors Yuheng Bao, Jifan Chen, Pintong Huang and Weijun Tong from Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China discuss the synergistic effects of acoustics-based therapy and immunotherapy in cancer treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research shows opportunities to improve the accuracy of dispatching pre-hospital critical care
(University of Surrey) Research from life-saving charity Air Ambulance Kent Surrey Sussex (KSS) and the University of Surrey indicates that the criteria for immediate Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) dispatch to older trauma patients should be reviewed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Even small bills for health insurance may cause healthy low-income people to drop coverage
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) Twenty dollars a month might not seem like a lot to pay for health insurance. But for people getting by on $15,000 a year, it's enough to make some drop their coverage - especially if they're healthy, a new study of Medicaid expansion participants in Michigan finds. That could keep them from getting preventive or timely care, and could leave their insurance company with a sicker pool of patients than before. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Esophageal cancers resurrect ancient retroviruses hidden in our genome
(Columbia University Irving Medical Center) Scientists have found that many esophageal cancers turn on ancient viral DNA embedded in our genome, a finding that could lead to improvements in immunotherapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How Legionella makes itself at home
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) Scientists at UT Southwestern have discovered a key protein that helps the bacteria that causes Legionnaires' disease to set up house in the cells of humans and other hosts. The findings, published in Science, could offer insights into how other bacteria are able to survive inside cells, knowledge that could lead to new treatments for a wide variety of infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Older adults having surgery less frequently -- but it depends on the surgery and hospital
(University of Chicago Medical Center) Contrary to popular belief, a new study from the University of Chicago Medicine found the frequency of abdominal surgery in older adults is decreasing, especially among adults over the age of 85. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hormones matter in EU health policy
(European Society of Endocrinology) On May 4th, we organised a webinar to present our new White Paper on endocrinology, titled " Hormones in European Health Policies: How endocrinologists can contribute towards a healthier Europe " .With this White Paper, we call on all policy makers in Europe, including the EU institutions and national governments across Europe, to recognise the importance of endocrinology in all EU and national health policies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Living memory home helps people stay connected with deceased loved ones
(Weill Cornell Medicine) When a loved one dies, memories of that person become particularly valuable in connecting the mourners with the deceased. A new Weill Cornell Medicine online application, called Living Memory Home, offers a virtual and personal memorial space that allows mourners to deposit their memories and feelings about their loss and honor their loved one. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A national distinction
(University of California - Santa Barbara) For their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research, UC Santa Barbara professors Denise Montell, Linda Petzold and Glenn Fredrickson have been elected to the National Academy of Sciences. They are among 120 members, and 30 international members, to join the academy this year. Membership in the NAS is one of the most prestigious recognitions awarded to a scientist or engineer in the United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Diet, exercise and sleep linked to high risk of cardiovascular disease in autistic people
(University of Cambridge) Autistic people have far greater risks of long term physical health conditions than others, but the reasons for this remain unclear. New research from the University of Cambridge suggests that unhealthy lifestyle habits may be an important contributing factor. The results are published today in the journal Molecular Autism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

AGS welcomes 15 new fellows, recognized for exceptional commitment to geriatrics
(American Geriatrics Society) The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) today honored 15 leading health professionals who joined the newest class of AGS Fellows--a select group of experts recognized for their deep commitment to the AGS and to advancing high-quality, person-centered care for us all as we age. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news