Women found to be at higher risk for heart failure and heart attack death than men
(American Heart Association) Researchers found women face a 20% increased risk of developing heart failure or dying within five years after their first severe heart attack compared with men. In addition, women were more likely than men to be older and have a more complicated medical history at the time of their heart attacks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Forearm fractures may signal intimate partner violence
(Radiological Society of North America) Up to one-third of adult women who sustain a non-displaced fracture to the ulna bone of the forearm may be victims of intimate partner violence, according to a study being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). The findings underscore the need to screen for intimate partner violence in women with these types of injuries, researchers said. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heart disease risk in women increases leading up to menopause; early intervention is key
(American Heart Association) Experts with the American Heart Association reviewed current research indicating how a woman's hormone changes, body composition, cholesterol and vascular health during the years leading to menopause (or menopause transition), which can increase the risk of developing heart disease after menopause.A new scientific statement provides an up-to-date synopsis on menopause data and how it relates to cardiovascular disease in women. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Measuring broken hearts: divorce has negative effects on physical and mental health
(Frontiers) Divorce can be grueling, and researchers are interested in understanding the factors that affect mental and physical health during this experience. A recent study is the first to examine divorcees immediately after a divorce and finds that their mental and physical health is reduced, with conflict emerging a key factor. The results could help researchers to design interventions to support divorcees through their divorce. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Detecting bacteria with fluorescent nanosensors
(University of G ö ttingen) Researchers from Bochum, G ö ttingen, Duisburg and Cologne have developed a new method for detecting bacteria and infections. They use fluorescent nanosensors to track down pathogens faster and more easily than with established methods. A team headed by Professor Sebastian Kru ß , formerly at Universit ä t G ö ttingen, now at Ruhr-Universit ä t Bochum (RUB), describes the results in the journal Nature Communications, published online on 25 November 2020. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Even razor clams on sparsely populated Olympic Coast can't escape plastics, study finds
(Portland State University) Portland State University researchers and their collaborators at the Quinault Indian Nation and Oregon State University found microplastics in Pacific razor clams on Washington's sparsely populated Olympic Coast -- proof, they say, that even in more remote regions, coastal organisms can't escape plastic contamination. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UK's aim to half maternal mortality by 2030 is challenged by social inequalities, and increasing maternal age, obesity and c-section rates
(The European Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care (ESAIC)) The complex issues around maternal deaths in the UK will be presented at Euroanaesthesia in a new review by an anaesthesiologist who works on the UK Confidential Enquiry into Maternal Deaths (CEMD), which began in 1952 and investigates the death of every mother during pregnancy and after childbirth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mine ponds amplify mercury risks in Peru's Amazon
(Duke University) The proliferation of pits and ponds created in recent years by miners digging for gold in Peru's Amazon has altered the landscape and amplified the risk of mercury poisoning, a new study shows. In some watersheds, there's been a 670% increase in land area covered by abandoned mining pits that have filled in with water. Low-oxygen conditions in these ponds accelerate the conversion of submerged mercury, a leftover from the mining, into highly toxic methylmercury. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists reveal regions of the brain where serotonin promotes patience
(Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University) In a study on mice conducted by the Neural Computation Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), the authors, Dr. Katsuhiko Miyazaki and Dr. Kayoko Miyazaki, pinpoint specific areas of the brain that individually promote patience through the action of serotonin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Struggles of care home staff during COVID-19 first wave revealed in Whatsapp messages
(University of Leeds) Analysis of social media messages between care home staff on the coronavirus front line reveal their growing concerns over how to manage in the face of the virus. Workers were often asking questions which went unanswered due to a lack of proper guidance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A cold-health watch and warning system for cold waves in Quebec
(Institut national de la recherche scientifique - INRS) A team from the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) and the Institut national de sant é publique du Qu é bec (INSPQ), led by Professor Fateh Chebana, has recently developed a cold-health watch and warning system for cold waves, a first in the world. Their results were published in November 2020 in the journal Science of the Total Environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

German researchers compile world's largest inventory of known plant species
(German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig) Researchers at Leipzig University and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) have compiled the world's most comprehensive list of known plant species. It contains 1,315,562 names of vascular plants, thus extending the number by some 70,000 - equivalent to about 20%. The researchers have also succeeded in clarifying 181,000 hitherto unclear species names. The data set has now been published inScientific Data. This marks the culmination of ten years of intensive research work. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists develop new gene therapy for eye disease
(Trinity College Dublin) Scientists from Trinity College Dublin have developed a new gene therapy approach that offers promise for one day treating an eye disease that leads to a progressive loss of vision and affects thousands of people across the globe. The study, which involved a collaboration with clinical teams in the Royal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital and the Mater Hospital, also has implications for a much wider suite of neurological disorders associated with ageing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Deep Longevity adds partnership with My Care Express in Merrillville to add biomarkers of aging
(Deep Longevity Ltd) Deep Longevity added My Care Express Merriville to its growing longevity network. My Care Express physicians will get training in longevity medicine and interpret the AgeMetric ™ reports incorporating multiple aging clocks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Age not just a number: Causes of joint stiffness differ between older and younger adults
(Shibaura Institute of Technology) As people age, joints become less flexible, causing balance problems that lower quality of life. Dr. Kosuke Hirata, Mr. Ryosuke Yamadera, and Prof. Ryota Akagi from the Shibaura Institute of Technology revealed that among younger adults, muscle but not nerve stiffness is associated with the ankle's range of motion (ROM), whereas only nerve stiffness is linked to ankle ROM among older adults. In other words, non-muscle tissue becomes more important for joint flexibility with age. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Iron infusion proves effective to treat anaemia in Rural Africa
(Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute) Iron-deficiency anaemia is a major concern in low-income settings, especially for women. In a new study by the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) and partners published yesterday inThe Lancet Global Health, researchers found that iron infusion was feasible, safe and, in contrast to the standard iron-deficiency anaemia treatment of oral iron tablets, highly effective in Tanzania. This is the first study to provide evidence of the benefits and safety of iron infusion in a low-income setting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New breakthrough in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis
(University of Oxford) People with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) could soon benefit from a new drug treatment, otilimab, that not only suppresses inflammation but also significantly reduces patient reported pain scores. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Everyday activities enhance personal well-being
(Karlsruher Institut f ü r Technologie (KIT)) Physical activity makes happy and is important to maintain psychic health. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the Central Institute of Mental Health (CIMH) in Mannheim studied the brain regions which play a central role in this process. Their findings reveal that even everyday activities, such as climbing stairs, significantly enhance well-being, in particular of persons susceptible to psychiatric disorders. The study is published inScience Advances (DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aaz8934). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Framework to improve training for children's palliative care professionals launches in UK
(University of Birmingham) A new educational framework and toolkit will be launched in the UK and Ireland this week. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genetic study shows that the risk of pre-eclampsia is related to blood pressure and BMI
(University of Nottingham) An international study, coordinated by experts from the University of Nottingham, has revealed that the genetic risk of pre-eclampsia - a potentially dangerous condition in pregnancy - is related to blood pressure and body mass index. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New insights into how the CRISPR immune system evolved
(Aarhus University) With new insights into how the genetic tool CRISPR - which allows direct editing of our genes - evolved and adapted, we are now one step closer to understanding the basis of the constant struggle for survival that takes place in nature. The results can be used in future biotechnologies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New immunotherapy shows promise against rare childhood cancer
(University College London) A novel CAR T-cell therapy developed by researchers at UCL and designed to target cancerous tumours, has shown promising early results in children with neuroblastoma, a rare form of childhood cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chia, goji & co. -- BfR consumer monitor special superfoods
(BfR Federal Institute for Risk Assessment) Chia seeds, goji berries or quinoa -- 48% of the population see so-called 'superfoods' as part of a health-conscious diet. This is shown by a recent representative survey by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NUI Galway coordinates 'first in man' clinical trial
(National University of Ireland Galway) Research and analysis team at NUI Galway CORRIB Core Lab, led by Professor Patrick W Serruys, is coordinating a cutting edge clinical trial of cardiovascular diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease involving more than 100 patients across Europe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Basketball on the brain: Neuroscientists use sports to study surprise
(Princeton University) Princeton neuroscientists tracked the brains and pupils of self-described basketball fans as they watched March Madness games, to study how people process surprise -- an unexpected change of circumstances that shifts an anticipated outcome. They found that that shifts in the pattern of activity in high-level brain areas only happened at moments that contradicted the watchers' current beliefs about which team was more likely to win. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Otsuka Pharmaceutical and Columbia University School of Public Health enter into global agreement
(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) PRINCETON, N.J. and NEW YORK, N.Y. (November 25, 2020) - Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development& Commercialization, Inc., announced an agreement with research experts from the Columbia University Irving Center Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons and Mailman School of Public Health to help support the epidemiological needs of Otsuka Global Pharmacovigilance (GPV) for products, enhanced training, and employee education. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BIDMC researchers reveal how genetic variations are linked to COVID-19 disease severity
(Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) New BIDMC-led research sheds light on the genetic risk factors that make individuals more or less susceptible to severe COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What makes a happy couple, a happy family?
(University of Rochester) Being emotionally flexible may be one of the most important factors when it comes to longevity and overall health of your romantic and familial relationships. That's the finding of a new University of Rochester meta-analysis, published in theJournal of Contextual Behavioral Science, which statistically combined the results of 174 separate studies that had looked at acceptance and commitment therapy, mindfulness, and emotion regulation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Specific bacterium in the gut linked to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
(University of Gothenburg) Researchers at the University of Gothenburg have detected a connection between Brachyspira, a genus of bacteria in the intestines, and IBS -- especially the form that causes diarrhea. Although the discovery needs confirmation in larger studies, there is hope that it might lead to new remedies for many people with irritable bowel syndrome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Quantum nanodiamonds may help detect disease earlier
(University College London) The quantum sensing abilities of nanodiamonds can be used to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostic tests, potentially allowing for earlier detection of diseases such as HIV, according to a study led by UCL researchers in the i-sense McKendry group. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows minimal impact of APPs on ED productivity, flow, safety, patient experience
(Society for Academic Emergency Medicine) Advanced practice providers (APPs) have lower productivity compared with emergency department physicians, seeing fewer and less complex patients and generating less relative value units per hour, and having no apparent impact on patient satisfaction and safety metrics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Princeton scientists solve the mystery behind an enigmatic organelle, the pyrenoid
(Princeton University) Princeton researchers Shan He, Martin Jonikas, and colleagues have discovered how Rubisco holoenzymes assemble to form the fluid-like matrix of the algal pyrenoid, an organelle that mediates the incorporation of carbon dioxide into sugars. The study detailing the group's findings was published November 23, 2020 in the journal Nature Plants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Immune checkpoint inhibitor efficacy against glioblastoma may decrease with dexamethasone
(American Association for Cancer Research) Among patients with glioblastoma receiving an immune checkpoint inhibitor, those who received the corticosteroid dexamethasone at baseline for cerebral edema had significantly worse overall survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stronger memories can help us make sense of future changes
(Washington University in St. Louis) Research from the Department of Psychological& Brain Sciences in Arts& Sciences finds a new relationship between memory and the ability to incorporate changes into one's understanding of the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New paper proposes framework for eliminating defects in psychiatric care
(University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center) A new paper from University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center proposes a framework for eliminating defects in behavioral health treatment. The authors cite a large majority of defects result from system failures rather than individual psychiatrists. Authors propose psychiatrists need to function as " systems engineers " to help eliminate these defects in healthcare organizations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hack for NF winning projects announced
(Children's Tumor Foundation) Hack for NF, a hackathon for neurofibromatosis research hosted by the Children's Tumor Foundation, today announced the winners of the 2020 virtual event that brought together healthcare startups, developers, solutions architects, and hackathon enthusiasts for six weeks to drive scientific and medical innovation and improve the lives of patients living with neurofibromatosis and other rare diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

From the woodworking shop to the operating room: New technique uses mortise and tenon joints to repair unstable shoulders
(Wolters Kluwer Health) Orthopaedic surgery techniques for treatment of recurrent shoulder instability are effective, but prone to problems with nonunion of bone grafts held in place by screws alone. A new technique - borrowing a design used for centuries in Chinese architecture and woodworking - provides an effective approach to shoulder stabilization, suggests a study inThe Journal of Bone& Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

nTIDE COVID Update October 2020: jobseekers with disabilities cope with uncertainties
(Kessler Foundation) As the job market strives to recover from the devastating impact of lockdowns, the unemployment rate continues to decline for people with and without disabilities, characterized by a decrease in the numbers of workers on furlough and an increase in those actively looking for work. Dr. Houtenville: " As months go on, the likelihood of these workers being recalled to their jobs diminishes. Many will seek new jobs, which may be difficult if the ongoing pandemic prompts states to institute further lockdowns. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Team uses copper to image Alzheimer's aggregates in the brain
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, News Bureau) A proof-of-concept study conducted in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease offers new evidence that copper isotopes can be used to detect the amyloid-beta protein deposits that form in the brains of people living with -- or at risk of developing -- Alzheimer's. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study examines remission of obesity-related complications in teens after bariatric surgery
(Children's Hospital Colorado) Researchers at Children's Hospital Colorado have shown that, with the exception of cholesterol and triglyceride levels, remission of obesity-related complications in teens following bariatric surgery was not dependent on major sustained weight loss. Rather, a majority of adolescents benefited from such remission whether or not they lost a significant amount of weight. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sestrin makes fruit flies live longer
(Max-Planck-Gesellschaft) Researchers identify positive effector behind reduced food intake. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Can we harness a plant's ability to synthesize medicinal compounds?
(Carnegie Institution for Science) Anthraquinones are a class of naturally occurring compounds prized for their medicinal properties, as well as for other applications, including ecologically friendly dyes. Despite wide interest, the mechanism by which plants produce them has remained shrouded in mystery until now. New work reveals a gene responsible for anthraquinone synthesis in plants. Their findings could help scientists cultivate a plant-based mechanism for harvesting these useful compounds in bulk quantities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Crisis decision making at the speed of COVID-19' - Bay Area public health officials share their experience with shelter-in-place order
(Wolters Kluwer Health) In mid-March, public health officials across the San Francisco area issued the first US regional shelter-in-place order in response to the emerging COVID-19 pandemic. A 'field report' on the crisis decision-making approach followed in that effective early response is featured in a special COVID-19 supplement to the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Closing the racial disparity gap in survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) In-hospital cardiac arrests (IHCA) represent catastrophic and often terminal events. Despite investments to improve the quality of resuscitation efforts, fewer than 25% of all patients that experience cardiac arrests in hospitals survive to discharge, and survival varies significantly across hospitals and by race. Until now, few have been able to specify reasons for the between-hospital differences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Simple new testing method aims to improve time-release drugs
(University of California - Riverside) UC Riverside engineers filled a glass tube bent like a tuning fork, kept vibrating by a circuit at its resonance frequency, with simulated stomach and intestine contents and passed an over-the-counter time-release drug granule through the tube. They observed a brief change in the frequency. When plotted, they could compare the peaks of resonance frequency against the time to learn the buoyant mass of the drug granule at that moment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID's collateral damage: Germicidal lamps may damage corneas
(University of Miami Miller School of Medicine) In a paper published in the journal of Ocular Immunology and Inflammation, physicians from the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine reported that several patients using germicidal lamps in an attempt to sanitize against the coronavirus, developed painful inflammation of the cornea, a condition called photokeratitis. These consumer-available ultraviolet (UV) emitting devices were being usedin an attempt toeliminate coronavirusfrom homes and offices. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research shows bariatric surgery may reduce severity of COVID-19 in patients with obesity
(Cleveland Clinic) A Cleveland Clinic study shows that among patients who have obesity and who tested positive for COVID-19, a past history of bariatric surgery was significantly associated with a lower risk of hospital and intensive care unit admission. The results were published in the journal of Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

For people with diabetes, medicaid expansion helps, but can't do it all: BU study
(Boston University School of Medicine) Medicaid expansion through the Affordable Care Act has insured millions of low-income people in the United States, improving outcomes for patients with many different diseases. But expansion alone has not been enough to improve outcomes for patients with diabetes, according to a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Areas where the next pandemic could emerge are revealed
(University of Sydney) An international team of human- and animal health experts has incorporated environmental, social and economic considerations -- including air transit centrality - to identify key areas at risk of leading to the next pandemic. Led by the University of Sydney and with academics spanning the United Kingdom, India and Ethiopia, the open-access paper shows the cities worldwide that require collective prompt attention. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Head in the game
(University of Tsukuba) Researchers at the University of Tsukuba find that blind soccer players rotate their heads downward when trapping an incoming pass. This work may lead to an improved understanding of the sensory changes that can manifest in visually impaired individuals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news