First Nations children and youth experiencing more pain than non-First Nations children
(Canadian Medical Association Journal) First Nations children and youth are experiencing more pain than non-First Nations children, but do not access specialist or mental health services at the same rate as their non-First Nations peers, found new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Statins have low risk of side effects
(American Heart Association) Cholesterol-lowering statin drugs are associated with a low risk of side effects. The benefits of statin therapy for most people outweigh the risks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Regular flu shots may save heart failure patients' lives
(American Heart Association) Compared with skipping a flu shot, getting a flu shot was associated with an 18 percent reduced risk of premature death among newly-diagnosed heart failure patients. Moreover, regular annual flu shots were associated with a 19 percent reduction in both all-cause and cardiovascular death when compared with no vaccination. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genetic changes associated with physical activity reported
(UK Biobank) Machine learning used to improve understanding of sleep, physical (in)activity and their health consequences (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Activating parts of the brain could help alleviate opioid-related social isolation
(American College of Neuropsychopharmacology) One of the many painful and challenging aspects of the US opioid crisis is that people abusing opioids often isolate themselves from family and friends, making it difficult for loved ones to help people on a path towards recovery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ben-Gurion University researchers improve diabetes remission predictors in bariatric surgery
(American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) 'We know weight-loss surgery has the potential to put diabetes in remission,' says Dr. Rachel Golan, a lecturer in the BGU School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences. 'The previous DiaRem model was limited to projecting outcomes for only one year after only one type of procedure. Our 'Advanced-DiaRem' was able to predict the longer-term probability of achieving remission from diabetes out to five years following three different surgical procedures.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How to survive on 'Game of Thrones': Switch allegiances
(BioMed Central) Characters in the 'Game of Thrones' TV series are more likely to die if they do not switch allegiance, and are male, according to an article published in the open-access journal Injury Epidemiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Middle aged men in lyrca on the rise but 'Mamils' confined to weekends, affluent suburb
(University of Sydney) The number of middle-aged Australian men who cycle on weekends has doubled in recent years, but the rise of the so-called 'Mamils' (middle aged men in lyrca) is confined to men in more affluent suburbs, says research in today's Medical Journal of Australia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers explore what's behind Mediterranean diet and lower cardiovascular risk
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health offers insights from a cohort study of women in the U.S. who reported consuming a Mediterranean-type diet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study highlights correlations between violent death and substance use
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Consumption of alcohol or at least one drug was associated with over half the violent deaths that occurred in S ã o Paulo City in the period analyzed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Carnegie Mellon researchers probe hydrogen bonds using new technique
(Carnegie Mellon University) Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have used nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy to probe the hydrogen bonds that modulate the chemical reactivity of enzymes, catalysts and biomimetic complexes. The technique could lead to the development of better catalysts for use in a wide range of fields. The findings were published as a 'Very Important Paper' in the Dec. 3 issue of Angewandte Chemie and featured on the journal's back cover. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Graphic warnings snuff out cigarettes' appeal to kids
(Cornell University) New research from Cornell University suggests graphic warning labels on cigarette ads have the same anti-smoking effect as similar warning labels on cigarette packs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Elucidating protein-protein interactions & designing small molecule inhibitors
(Bentham Science Publishers) To carry out wide range of cellular functionalities, proteins often associate with one or more proteins in a phenomenon known as Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI). Experimental and computational approaches were applied on PPIs in order to determine the interacting partners, and also to understand how an abnormality in such interactions can become the principle cause of a disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New generation of therapeutics based on understanding of aging biology show promise for Alzheimer's disease
(Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation) A scientific strategy that explores therapeutic targets based on the biology of aging is gaining ground as an effective approach to prevent and treat Alzheimer's disease, according to research published in the December 7, 2018 online issue of Neurology ® . (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A code for reprogramming immune sentinels
(Lund University) For the first time, a research team at Lund University in Sweden has successfully reprogrammed mouse and human skin cells into immune cells called dendritic cells. The process is quick and effective, representing a pioneering contribution for applying direct reprogramming for inducing immunity. Importantly, the finding opens up the possibility of developing novel dendritic cell-based immunotherapies against cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ultrarestrictive opioid prescribing strategy associated with fewer pills dispensed
(JAMA Network) An ultrarestrictive opioid prescribing strategy was associated with a reduction in the number of pills dispensed in a study of patients having surgery   for gynecologic cancer, without changes in postoperative pain scores, complications or increases in prescription refill requests. Under the protocol,   patients having ambulatory or minimally invasive surgery weren't prescribed opioids at discharge unless they required more than five doses of oral or intravenous opioids while in the hospital. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Increasing statins dose and patient adherence could save more lives
(Imperial College London) Thousands of heart attacks and deaths from cardiovascular disease could be prevented by patients taking higher doses of statins and taking the drugs as advised by doctors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

GW expert calls for strong, sustainable action to make world roadways safer
(George Washington University) According to the latest World Health Organization (WHO) report on road safety, more than 1.3 million people die on the world's roadways each year -- and millions more are injured or disabled. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mount Sinai researcher receives $2.5 million to fight neurodegenerative disorders
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) Chan Zuckerberg Initiative Funding Brings Together Interdisciplinary Experts to Accelerate Understanding (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Faulty sensing: Cellular energy sensor linked to the progression of chronic kidney disease
(Tokyo Medical and Dental University) Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with energy depletion in kidney cells, resulting in reduced kidney function. Researchers at TMDU and Kyushu University found that failure of an important cellular energy sensor to detect energy depletion is key to the progression of CKD. However, by stimulating the activity of the sensor using alternative methods, the researchers could halt CKD progression and repair some of the tissue damage. This mechanism therefore represents a novel therapeutic target. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study confirms: Multigene test is a useful decision making tool in breast cancer treatment
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Multigene tests have been used in breast cancer treatment to assess the risk of metastasis for several years. A team at the Breast Cancer Center at the Technical University of Munich's (TUM) Klinikum rechts der Isar has now presented results based on data collected in its routine clinical work. These results show that the multigene test used at the university hospital is indeed helpful in making more targeted use of chemotherapy treatments and thus improves prognosis of breast cancer patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

News about a plant hormone
(University of W ü rzburg) The plant hormone jasmonic acid also performs a function that was previously unknown. It ensures that the leaf pores close when leaves are injured. For the plant, this could be an emergency signal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bacterial 'sleeper cells' evade antibiotics and weaken defense against infection
(Imperial College London) New research, from scientists at Imperial College London, unravels how so-called bacterial persister cells manipulate our immune cells, potentially opening new avenues to finding ways of clearing these bacterial cells from the body, and stopping recurrence of the bacterial infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Seeing and avoiding the 'blind spot' in atomic force measurements
(University of Melbourne) Researchers have discovered a 'blind spot' in atomic force microscopy -- a powerful tool capable of measuring the force between two atoms, imaging the structure of individual cells and the motion of biomolecules. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Closer look at TAILORx confirms lack of chemo benefit regardless of race or ethnicity
(ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group) Before TAILORx, there was uncertainty about treatment for women with hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative, node-negative breast cancer and a score of 11-25 on a tumor gene test. The trial was designed to address this question and provides a definitive answer: no benefit from chemotherapy for women over 50 with a score of 11-25; 50 years old or younger with a score of 11-15; and any age with a score of 0-10. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mayo-led study: Drug reduces hot flashes, improves breast cancer survivor quality of life
(Mayo Clinic) Research led by oncologists Roberto Leon-Ferre, M.D. and Charles Loprinzi, M.D. of Mayo Clinic has found that the drug oxybutynin helps to reduce the frequency and intensity of hot flashes in women who are unable to take hormone replacement therapy, including breast cancer survivors. These findings were presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Planning processes for Chicago's 606 Trail spawned gentrification, study finds
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) In a paper published in the journal Cities, Alessandro Rigolon, a professor of recreation, sport and tourism at the University of Illinois, and University of Colorado urban and regional planning professor Jeremy Nemeth examined the planning processes associated with the 606 Trail and conclude that these processes may have made gentrification the most likely outcome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New York City to Host cutting-edge linguistic research in January
(Linguistic Society of America) Research presentations on topics as diverse as sounds systems, endangered languages, computer-mediated language, and modes of communication developed by deaf-blind communities are among the highlights of the upcoming Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Society of America (LSA), to be held in New York, N.Y. from Jan. 3-6, 2019. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

MIT engineers repurpose wasp venom as an antibiotic drug
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT engineers have repurposed wasp venom as an antibiotic drug that's nontoxic to human cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Reproduction: From Hippocrates to IVF
(University of Cambridge) A new book is the first to encompass the vast history of how living things procreate, from the banks of the ancient Nile to the fertility clinics of today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Risk Analysis releases special issue on communicating about Zika virus
(Society for Risk Analysis) Today, Risk Analysis, an International Journal, published a special issue, 'Communicating About Zika,' which features several articles that were originally presented as works-in-progress at the Zika Communication Summit convened in March 2017 by the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Modest increases indicate ongoing job growth for Americans with disabilities
(Kessler Foundation) 'President Bush understood that hiring people with disabilities benefits employers and our economy, as well as the individuals who gain greater independence,' noted Dr. O'Neill. 'When more employers recognize that they can rely on employees with disabilities, more job seekers with disabilities will effectively compete for jobs. Let's encourage employers across the nation to raise their expectations and honor his memory by hiring people with disabilities, thus providing opportunities for them to succeed.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers evaluate   pMSCs   sheets for engineered repair and regeneration of heart tissue
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) The placenta offers an abundant source of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (pMSCs), which a new study has shown can readily form cell sheets that could be implanted in children with congenital heart defects and offer benefits for heart repair and regeneration compared to commonly used synthetic material-based scaffolds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Inflammatory bowel disease linked to prostate cancer
(Northwestern University) Men with inflammatory bowel disease have four to five times higher risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer. This is the first report to show these men have higher than average PSA values and a significantly higher risk of potentially dangerous prostate cancer. They need to be screened more carefully for prostate cancer. About 1 million men have inflammatory bowel disease in the U.S., a common chronic condition that includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Virus- and oncogene-free reprogramming method for the production of iPSCs published in the journal Regenerative Medicine
(Future Science Group) Regenerative Medicine is delighted to publish open access original research demonstrating the first virus- and oncogene-free induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology to produce safer pluripotent stem cells from cord blood and peripheral blood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Blood test for tau, Alzheimer's disease under development
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) Investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital are working to develop a blood test to accurately diagnose or even predict Alzheimer's disease before symptoms appear. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What does expanded Medicaid mean for the health & work lives of enrollees? A lot
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) A new study could help states that will soon expand Medicaid, or may add a work requirement, understand what might be in store. Nearly half of enrollees in Michigan's expanded Medicaid felt their physical health improved; more than a third cited better mental or dental health. Over two-thirds of those with jobs said coverage helped them do better at work; those who said their health had improved were four times as likely to say this. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CZI announces support for open-source software efforts to improve biomedical imaging
(Chan Zuckerberg Initiative) Today, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) announced funding for open-source software efforts to improve image analysis and visualization in biomedicine. Microscopy -- critical to modern cell biology -- generates large volumes of complex data that pose significant challenges for analysis and visualization. The funding will support developers ('Imaging Software Fellows') from three projects to develop and maintain software tools, and begin collaborating to help create a cohesive, shared ecosystem of resources that can accelerate basic research and benefit the entire field. (Source: EurekAlert! ...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How do schools address self-harm in adolescents?
(Wiley) In a survey-based study of 153 secondary schools in England and Wales, staff stated that adolescent self-harm is an important concern, but emotional health and wellbeing is the primary health priority for schools. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lancaster University guide will help young people with albinism access education
(Lancaster University) A booklet, in Swahili and English, could help teachers in Tanzania improve conditions for pupils with albinism in their schools.It has been written by Lancaster University academic Dr Charlotte Baker in collaboration with a team from the Albinism in Africa network founded by Dr Baker in 2014 with funding from the Wellcome Trust. The guide attempts to dispel many of the myths and perceptions surrounding albinism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UA receives $1.2 million NIH grant to use AI to restore movement in paralyzed limbs
(University of Arizona Health Sciences) When a person is paralyzed by a stroke or an injury, the brain and the neuron networks that control movement become disconnected from the muscles. Dr. Andrew Fuglevand is using artificial intelligence to stimulate multiple muscles to elicit natural movement in ways previous methods have been unable to do. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hazelnuts improve older adults' micronutrient levels
(Oregon State University) Older adults who added hazelnuts to their diet for a few months significantly improved their levels of two key micronutrients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Purdue developing new treatment options for millions with autoimmune diseases
(Purdue University) Purdue University researchers have developed a series of molecules that may provide more reliable relief with fewer side effects for people with any of several autoimmune diseases. The new molecules overcome difficulties with current drugs in targeting, for purposes of inhibiting, the appropriate form of Janus kinase, which has four forms affecting cell signaling and gene expression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Kidneys from deceased donors with acute kidney injury suitable for transplant
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Organ procurement teams are sometimes leery of accepting kidneys from deceased donors with acute kidney injury (AKI), fearing they will harm the recipients. However, a national study chaired by a Johns Hopkins kidney specialist suggests these fears may be unfounded. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

VCU researchers test effectiveness of anti-opioid vaccine
(Virginia Commonwealth University) Virginia Commonwealth University researchers are testing a vaccine against opioid abuse developed by the Scripps Research Institute in California. The vaccine is meant to block the effects of heroin and fentanyl in patients with opioid use disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pumping up fitness app features may add muscle to workout commitment
(Penn State) Fitness apps are easy to download and can help motivate people to start workout routines, but that may not be enough to sustain those routines in the long run. However, Penn State researchers suggest there may be ways to tweak those apps to inspire a deeper commitment to a fitness routine and help users hit their fitness goals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Reusable respirators are an effective and viable option for protecting health care personnel
(National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine) Half-facepiece reusable elastomeric respirators are an effective and viable option for protecting health care workers from exposure to airborne transmissible contaminants or infectious agents -- for example, influenza virus -- during day-to-day work or with a sudden or rapid influx of patients, such as during a public health emergency, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Deprescribing can be valuable tool in managing polypharmacy, experts say
(The Gerontological Society of America) Reducing the number of medications older adults use can have surprising benefits, according to research presented in a new issue of the journal Public Policy& Aging Report from The Gerontological Society of America. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Visualizing vitals through video
(Penn State) As biometric systems -- technologies which measure biological information to identify a person -- continue to advance, their potential impact on health care capabilities surge. Via tools such as fingerprint recognition, face recognition, iris and retina recognition, and vein recognition, health care workers are provided with increasingly sophisticated ways to monitor patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Houston Methodist launches real-time flu tracker website
(Houston Methodist) Pathologists at Houston Methodist developed a real-time website to track flu cases, just in time to assist physicians, the CDC and patients for the fall 2018 flu season. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news