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Reimbursement for integrative health care suggests violation of non-discrimination law
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study shows that the likelihood of health insurance reimbursement for some common clinical services differs significantly depending on whether they are provided by a complementary healthcare service provider or a primary care physician. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Female STEM leaders more likely to back policies aiding women
(Frontiers) A national study of college and university administrators has found that female department chairs, deans and provosts have different attitudes and beliefs than their male counterparts about how to retain women professors in STEM fields. It also supports the assertion that placing women in administrative roles creates greater emphasis on the importance of enacting policies to attract and retain women in STEM. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds that sleep disorders affect men and women differently
(American Academy of Sleep Medicine) A new study suggests that men and women are affected differently by sleep disorders. Results show that women are more likely than men to have more severe symptoms of depression, trouble sleeping at night, and excessive daytime sleepiness. Women also have a higher degree of difficulty concentrating and remembering things due to sleepiness or tiredness. In contrast, male snoring was more likely than female snoring to force bed partners to sleep in different rooms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New findings on formation and malformation of blood vessels
(Karolinska Institutet) In diseases like cancer, diabetes, rheumatism and stroke, a disorder develops in the blood vessels that exacerbates the condition and obstructs treatment. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet now show how blood vessels can normally change their size to create a functional circulatory system and how vascular malformation during disease can occur. In the study, published in Nature Cell Biology, the researchers managed to treat vascular malformation in mice, a discovery of potential significance to numerous vascular diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New cancer drug can prevent reactions to common airborne allergens
(Northwestern University) A cancer drug for patients with certain types of leukemia and lymphoma can also prevent reactions to some of the most common airborne allergies, according to a recent Northwestern Medicine study. The promising data from this pilot study could have greater implications for adults with food allergies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

South African team performs second successful penis transplant
(Stellenbosch University) A team from Stellenbosch University and the Tygerberg Academic Hospital has performed a second penis transplant, making it the first medical centre in the world to successfully perform this procedure twice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Preterm birth linked to higher risk of heart failure
(Karolinska Institutet) Babies born preterm run a higher risk of heart failure during childhood and adolescence than those born at full term, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report. The registry-based study is published in The Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mindfulness takes practice
(Aarhus University) Mindfulness meditation practice is set at 45 minutes a day at home, as well as weekly group sessions with the teacher. And the 45 minutes is every day, six days a week as long as the course lasts. These are the guidelines for students taking part in the standard Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy or Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction courses, but an average course student practices only 30 minutes. Nevertheless, this practice is related to positive benefit. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The secret to combating pancreatic cancer may lie in suppression of a common protein
(University of Southern California - Health Sciences) Research indicates that in mice with a KRAS mutation, present in 90 percent of pancreatic cancer patients, expressing only half the amount of the glucose-regulated protein GRP78 is enough to halt the earliest stage of pancreatic cancer development, resulting in delayed tumor development and prolonged survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Taking a closer look at genetic switches in cancer
(California Institute of Technology) Caltech biochemists have uncovered details of a protein that controls blood cell production in an aggressive form of leukemia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Obamacare support: When polls mention repeal it seals the deal
(Cornell University) Does the American public want former President Obama's health care law repealed and replaced? It depends on how you ask the question. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Extreme preterm infant death or disease may be predicted by biomarker
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) Tests of cells collected from the umbilical cord blood vessel walls at birth can predict death or poor pulmonary outcomes in extremely preterm infants, say researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research suggests eating beans instead of beef would sharply reduce greenhouse gasses
(Loma Linda University Adventist Health Sciences Center) If Americans would eat beans instead of beef, the United States would immediately realize approximately 50 to 75 percent of its GHG reduction targets for the year 2020. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

RIT team creates high-speed internet lane for emergency situations
(Rochester Institute of Technology) Rochester Institute of Technology are developing a faster and more reliable way to send and receive large amounts of data through the internet. By a creating a new network protocol, called Multi Node Label Routing protocol, researchers are essentially developing a new high-speed lane of online traffic, specifically for emergency information. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ATS 2017: New COPD action plan outlines strategies for improved care
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) A Michigan Medicine researcher is a part of the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute group that recently created a new COPD National Action Plan. Released at the American Thoracic Society's International Conference in Washington, D.C., it outlines key goals, including raising public awareness of COPD, advancing research, improving patient care and health delivery, and developing management strategies for patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

3.3 million-year-old fossil reveals the antiquity of the human spine
(University of Missouri-Columbia) An international research team has found a 3.3 million Australopithecus afarensis fossilized skeleton, possessing the most complete spinal column of any early fossil human relative. The vertebral bones, neck and rib cage are mainly intact. This new research, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science demonstrates that portions of the human skeletal structure were established millions of years earlier than previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genes responsible for severe congenital heart disease identified by Pitt researcher
(University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences) Genes responsible for hypoplastic left heart syndrome identified using mouse models. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SAEM 2017: EM physicians should stay current on studies to up their critical care game
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) Reviewing studies can be a tedious task, but one Michigan Medicine physician explains the importance of staying up to date on medical literature, even outside of one's primary field of medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Discovery of an alga's 'dictionary of genes' could lead to advances in biofuels, medicine
(University of California - Los Angeles) A team of plant biologists and biochemists has produced a gold mine of data by sequencing the genome of a tiny, single-celled green alga that could be used as a source of sustainable biofuel and has health implications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study identifies RNA molecule that shields breast cancer stem cells from immune system
(Princeton University) Researchers from Princeton University's Department of Molecular Biology have identified a small RNA molecule that helps maintain the activity of stem cells in both healthy and cancerous breast tissue. The study, which will be published in the June issue of Nature Cell Biology, suggests that this 'microRNA' promotes particularly deadly forms of breast cancer and that inhibiting the effects of this molecule could improve the efficacy of existing breast cancer therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers suppress fibrosis chemical signal to block haywire healing
(Mayo Clinic) An injured body always seeks to heal. But that process is far from simple. A host of cells organize to restore what was damaged. Then, critically, the process tapers off. And when it doesn't, the effects can be disastrous. Fibrosis is the thickening and scarring of tissue due to an overactive healing response. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Intensive blood pressure can reduce risk of harm to heart muscle
(Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center) A new study by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center has shown that aggressive lowering of blood pressure in people with hypertension reduced the risk of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). This condition, the enlargement and thickening of the walls of the heart's main pumping chamber, is the most common complication of high blood pressure and greatly increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why fewer blood cancer patients receive hospice care
(Wiley) Research has shown that patients with blood cancers are less likely to enroll in hospice care than patients with solid cancers, and the findings from a national survey suggest that concerns about the adequacy of hospice may prevent blood cancer specialists from referring their patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

National study looks at tobacco advertising and susceptibility to use tobacco among youth
(University of California - San Diego) Among 12- to 17-year-olds who have never used tobacco products, nearly half were considered receptive to tobacco marketing if they were able to recall or liked at least one advertisement, report researchers at University of California San Diego Moores Cancer Center and Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center, in a new national study. Receptivity to tobacco ads is associated with an increased susceptibility to smoking cigarettes in the future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rise in lung adenocarcinoma linked to 'light' cigarette use
(Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center) A new study shows that so-called 'light' cigarettes have no health benefits to smokers and have likely contributed to the rise of a certain form of lung cancer that occurs deep in the lungs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Temple study shows baby boxes & sleep education reduced bed-sharing in 1st week of infancy
(Temple University Health System) Bed-sharing, the unsafe practice in which parents sleep in the same bed as their babies, is associated with sleep-related deaths in infants, including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed. Researchers at Temple University Hospital have now found that face-to-face postpartum education about safe infant sleep, combined with the distribution of a baby box, a cardboard bassinet, reduced the rates of bed-sharing during babies' first 8 days of life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Graphene-based sensor could improve evaluation, diagnosis and treatment of asthma
(Rutgers University) Rutgers University-New Brunswick scientists have created a graphene-based sensor that could lead to earlier detection of looming asthma attacks and improve the management of asthma and other respiratory diseases, preventing hospitalizations and deaths. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New therapy for atherosclerosis developed by Ben-Gurion University
(American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) 'Our E-selectin-targeting polymer reduces existing plaque and prevents further plaque progression and inflammation, preventing arterial thrombosis, ischemia, myocardial infarction, and stroke,' says Prof. Ayelet David of the BGU Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Pharmacology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study describes standardized assessment for students graduating from UK medical schools
(Wiley) A new study describes a standardized assessment that ensures that students who graduate from UK medical schools have achieved a minimum standard of knowledge and skill related to prescribing medications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New hope for patients with severe lung disease
(NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Guy ’ s and St Thomas ’ and King ’ s College London) Patients suffering from severe lung disease could see their lives transformed thanks to a 'game-changing' clinical trial carried out by UK experts and led by the team from the Lane Fox Respiratory Service based at Guy's and St Thomas' in London.The HOT-HMV trial (Home Oxygen Therapy-Home Mechanical Ventilation), which involved giving selected patients a breathing machine to be used in their home in addition to oxygen therapy, was found to reduce readmissions to hospital following an acute infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Addition of in-home noninvasive ventilation to oxygen therapy improves outcomes following COPD exacerbation
(The JAMA Network Journals) Among patients with an excess of carbon dioxide in their blood (persistent hypercapnia) following a flare-up (acute exacerbation) of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), in-home use of a mask and machine to support breathing in addition to home oxygen therapy prolonged the time to hospital readmission or death, according to a study published by JAMA. The study is being released to coincide with its presentation at the 2017 American Thoracic Society International Conference. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Accuracy of physician and nurse predictions for survival, functional outcomes after an ICU admission
(The JAMA Network Journals) Physicians were more accurate in predicting the likelihood of death and less accurate in predicting cognitive abilities in six months for critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients; nurses' predictions were similar or less accurate, according to a study published by JAMA. The study is being released to coincide with its presentation at the 2017 American Thoracic Society International Conference. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Angiotensin II shows promise in helping critically ill patients with low blood pressure
(Cleveland Clinic) Sixty years after Cleveland Clinic researchers first isolated the role of angiotensin II in controlling blood pressure, a new international study led by Cleveland Clinic researchers shows that the compound can safely improve blood pressure among critically ill patients who are experiencing life-threatening hypotension, or low blood pressure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heart failure and stroke identified as lethal combination
(European Society of Cardiology) Heart failure and stroke has been identified as a lethal combination in research presented today at EuroHeartCare 2017. Heart failure patients with previous stroke had greater risks of depression, hospitalization and death than those without a history of stroke. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tablet helps heart failure patients manage their disease including drug dosages
(European Society of Cardiology) A novel tablet is helping heart failure patients to manage their disease including drug dosages, according to research presented today at EuroHeartCare 2017. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hay fever map of Britain published to help sufferers avoid hotspots
(University of Exeter) A hay fever map of Britain -- with the first ever guide to the location of plants in the UK that can trigger the allergy -- has been produced to help sufferers cope, and warn them which 'hotspots' to avoid. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tau prevents synaptic transmission at early stage of neurodegeneration
(VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)) Tau proteins are involved in more than twenty neurodegenerative diseases, including various forms of dementia. These proteins clump together in patients' brains to form neuronal tangles: protein aggregation that eventually coincides with the death of brain cells. Prof. Patrik Verstreken's research team (VIB-KU Leuven) has now discovered how tau disrupts the functioning of nerve cells, even before it starts forming tangles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stressing the brain through technology may reduce age-related disease
(Bentham Science Publishers) In this Opinion paper the researchers discuss how a meaningful and intentional integration with technology, which hormetically challenges our cognition, may redress the conflict for resources between the soma and the germline, and result in a reduction of age-related dysfunction in participating humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New biomarkers of multiple sclerosis pathogenesis
(Kazan Federal University) Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic debilitating inflammatory disease targeting the brain. The pathogenesis of MS remains largely unknown. It is believed that brain tissue damage is due to immune cells targeting and breaking up the myelin basic protein (MBP), which is essential for nerve cells function. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Disrupted fat breakdown in the brain makes mice dumb
(University of Bonn) A study led by the University of Bonn opens a new perspective with regard to the development of dementia. The scientists blocked the breakdown of a certain fat molecule in the mouse brain. As a result the animals exhibited learning and memory problems. Also the quantity of Alzheimer-specific proteins in their brains increased significantly. The researchers now have a clue as to why the mice become dumb. The results are published in the journal 'Autophagy'. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

To curb medical errors, physicians must be better trained to admit mistakes
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The medical community has made strides to normalize and encourage error disclosure for physicians and medical trainees in order to improve patient safety and health care outcomes, but these guidelines fall short when it comes to addressing the social psychology that influences how and when physicians and medical trainees disclose errors and how they manage the consequences of those errors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Understanding the architecture of our 'second brain'
(The Francis Crick Institute) Scientists have made an important step in understanding the organisation of nerve cells embedded within the gut that control its function -- a discovery that could give insight into the origin of common gastrointestinal diseases, including irritable bowel syndrome and chronic constipation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds need for educating older adults on outdoor fall prevention
(New York University) Many older adults have fallen outdoors but lack an understanding of the risks for falling and how to prevent them, warranting efforts for outdoor fall prevention, finds a new study by New York University researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Alzheimer's disease-associated A & #946;42 peptide
(Bentham Science Publishers) In this paper, the researchers report on a straightforward expression and purification protocol to obtain [U-15N] and [U-2H,13C,15N] Aβ42. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Adopted' embryo program produces new style extended families
(University of Huddersfield) Experts at the University of Huddersfield are researching the emergence of a new style of family creation that sees couples 'adopt' embryos and, after the child is born, remain in contact with the donors and in many cases develop a special relationship with them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists to develop life-transforming drugs for Huntington's disease sufferers
(University of Sussex) Scientists at the University of Sussex have started work on a multi-million pound project to develop drugs to treat the debilitating loss of cognitive function associated with Huntington's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Blood discovery could benefit preemies, help end platelet shortages
(University of Virginia Health System) A new discovery may be the key to stopping shortages of vital blood-clotting cells that can represent the difference between life and death. The finding also could offer big benefits for premature babies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Epigenetics takes center stage with this year's Addiction Science Awards
(NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse) A project applying the science of epigenetics to demonstrate the health dangers of hookah smoke won a first-place Addiction Science Award at the 2017 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF)--the world's largest science competition for high school students. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

GU licenses use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases
(Georgetown University Medical Center) Georgetown University today announces it has exclusively licensed worldwide intellectual property (IP) rights to develop and commercialize uses of tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibitors for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases to Axovant Sciences GmbH. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Can omega-3 help prevent Alzheimer's disease? Brain SPECT imaging shows possible link
(IOS Press) The incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is expected to triple in the coming decades and no cure has been found. Recently, interest in dietary approaches for prevention of cognitive decline has increased. In particular, the omega-3 fatty acids have shown anti-amyloid, anti-tau and anti-inflammatory actions in the brains of animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news