200 000 years ago, humans preferred to kip cozy
(University of the Witwatersrand) Researchers in South Africa's Border Cave have found evidence that people have been using grass bedding to create comfortable areas for sleeping and working on at least 200 000 years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH-supported scientists demonstrate how genetic variations cause eczema
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) New research supported by the National Institutes of Health delineates how two relatively common variations in a gene called KIF3A are responsible for an impaired skin barrier that allows increased water loss from the skin, promoting the development of atopic dermatitis, commonly known as eczema. This finding could lead to genetic tests that empower parents and physicians to take steps to potentially protect vulnerable infants from developing atopic dermatitis and additional allergic diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Navigation preferences across people with a diverse range of disabilities
(University of Maryland Baltimore County) Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have collaborated to create a universal design schema for navigation technologies to better support people with disabilities in getting from place to place. For this study, researchers worked with technology users with a broad and diverse range of disabilities to find similarities and differences in their navigation preferences. They then used those findings to create a schema that can inform the design of future technologies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Linking sight and movement
(Harvard University) Harvard researchers found that image-processing circuits in the primary visual cortex not only are more active when animals move freely, but that they receive signals from a movement-controlling region of the brain that is independent from the region that processes what the animal is looking at. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gene variants help explain connection between skin disorder and food allergy risk
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) Two common variants in the KIF3A gene increase the risk of young children having a dysfunctional skin barrier and developing the skin condition atopic dermatitis, according to study led by scientists at Cincinnati Children's. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

An AI algorithm to help identify homeless youth at risk of substance abuse
(Penn State) While many programs and initiatives have been implemented to address the prevalence of substance abuse among homeless youth in the United States, they don't always include data-driven insights about environmental and psychological factors that could contribute to an individual's likelihood of developing a substance use disorder. Now, an artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm developed by researchers at Penn State could help predict susceptibility to substance use disorder among young homeless individuals, and suggest personalized rehabilitation programs for highly susceptible homeless youth. (Source: EurekAler...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study identifies social connection as the strongest protective factor for depression
(Massachusetts General Hospital) Study says social connection as the strongest protective factor for depression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

For pregnant patients, number of clinic visits not tied to risk of getting COVID-19
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) In an analysis of the data collected during that time, a team of investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital found no association between the number of in-person health care visits and risk of infection with SARS-CoV-2. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Climate stabilization: Lessons from the corona crisis
(Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)) Highlighting the parallels between the global health and the climate emergency, a team of researchers from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) has analyzed what policy makers and citizens can learn from the corona outbreak and how to apply it to the global effort of reducing CO2 emissions. Their proposal: A Climate Corona Contract that unites the younger and the older generations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Historical redlining linked to premature births, lower birth weight babies
(University of California - Berkeley) Adverse birth outcomes -- including premature births, low birth weight babies and babies who are small for their gestational age -- are more likely to occur in neighborhoods that were once redlined, finds a new study by University of California, Berkeley, researchers. The results indicate that past discriminatory housing practices may be partly to blame for the disparities in infant and maternal health faced by people of color in the US. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

TGen review suggests postmenopausal women at risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
(The Translational Genomics Research Institute) NAFLD is the most common cause of liver damage, and can lead to liver cirrhosis and death. It affects nearly 1 in 4 people across the globe. It often is associated with obesity, abnormally high amounts of lipids in the blood, and type 2 diabetes. In the US, the number of NAFLD cases is expected to grow to more than 100 million within the next decade, annually costing an estimated at $292 billion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Preexisting drug shows promise in fight against COVID-19
(University of Chicago) A team of researchers at the Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering (PME) at the University of Chicago used state-of-the-art computer simulations to identify a preexisting drug that could fast-track a solution to the worldwide pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Watching changes in plant metabolism -- live
(University of M ü nster) Almost all life on Earth, e.g. our food and health, depend on metabolism in plants. To understand how these metabolic processes function, researchers at M ü nster University with the participation of the University of Bonn are studying key mechanisms in the regulation of energy metabolism. A new method of in vivo biosensor technology has enabled them to monitor in real time what effects environmental changes have on the central metabolism of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

PARP inhibitor becomes new treatment option for some men with advanced prostate cancer
(University of Chicago Medical Center) Results from an international clinical trial found that men with advanced prostate cancer who have mutated BRCA1/BRCA2 genes can be treated successfully with a targeted therapy known as rucaparib. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows frequently used serology test may not detect antibodies that could confirm protection against reinfection of COVID-19
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Two different types of detectable antibody responses in SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) tell very different stories and may indicate ways to enhance public health efforts against the disease, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Antibodies to the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein receptor binding domain (S-RBD) are speculated to neutralize virus infection, while the SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein (N-protein) antibody may often only indicate exposure to the virus, not protections against reinfection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pregnant mother's immunity tied to behavioral, emotional challenges for kids with autism
(University of California - Davis Health) Children with autism born to mothers who had immune conditions during their pregnancy are more likely to have behavioral and emotional problems, a UC Davis Health study has found. Offspring sex may also interact with maternal immune conditions to influence outcomes, particularly in terms of a child's cognition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Exploring connections between ovarian cancer and blood cells
(Texas A&M University) Recent discoveries made by researchers at Texas A&M University could change the way ovarian cancer is understood and treated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Using infrared eye tracking to study infant behavior
(Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology) Researchers have adapted infrared technology to automate the tracking of visual tasks in infants in order to more accurately measure memory and cognitive behavior. The technique can help improve cognition studies in infants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Big dogs face more joint problems if neutered early
(University of California - Davis) Heavier mixed-breed dogs have higher health risks if neutered or spayed early, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Unread second-opinion radiology reports waste health care resources
(American Roentgen Ray Society) According to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), 537 of 4,696 second-opinion reports--11.4%, likely underestimated, too--were not read by a clinician. The imaging modality with the highest rate of not being read was sonography (62.5%), the requesting specialty with the highest rate was pediatrics (33.8%), and the radiologic subspecialty with the highest rate was interventional radiology (52.2%). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Many medical 'rainy day' accounts aren't getting opened or filled, study finds
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) One-third of the people who could benefit from a special type of savings account to cushion the blow of their health plan deductible aren't doing so, a new study finds. And even among people who do open a health savings account, half haven't put any money into it in the past year. This means they may be missing a chance to avoid taxes on money they can use to pay for their health insurance deductible and other costs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Employers reject transgender people
(Link ö ping University) Employers in Sweden more often reject job applications from transgender people -- especially in male-dominated occupations. Moreover, transgender people face discrimination from two different grounds for discrimination. This is according to a study from Link ö ping University that was recently published in the journal Labour Economics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Independent search engines respect your privacy but give more visibility to misinformation
(University of Sussex) Anti-vaccine websites, which could play a key role in promoting public hesitancy about a potential COVID vaccine, are far more likely to be found via independent search engines than through an internet giant like Google. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

EULAR: Amputations of body parts: The combination of diabetes and gout significantly increases
(European League Against Rheumatism) Compared to the average population, people suffering from both gout and diabetes have a 25 times higher risk of requiring an amputation of peripheral limbs such as feet, toes or lower legs. This is the result of a study presented by experts from the US at the virtual annual congress of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) 2020. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Global deaths due to smokeless tobacco are up by a third, according to new study
(University of York) The number of deaths globally due to smokeless tobacco has gone up by a third in 7 years to an estimated 350,000 people, a new study suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Strict diet explains metabolic effect of gastric bypass surgery
(Lund University) In many studies, bariatric surgery has been highlighted as an almost magical method for weight loss and reversing type 2 diabetes. One question that has remained largely unanswered is how the effect of surgery differs from the effects of a strict low-calorie diet. This question has now been examined by researchers at Lund University in Sweden in a study published in the journal Diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How do we prioritize what we see?
(New York University) It is known that different regions of the brain help us prioritize information so we can efficiently process visual scenes. A new study by a team of neuroscientists has discovered that one specific region, the occipital cortex, plays a causal role in piloting our attention to manage the intake of images. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How a protein stops cells from attacking their own DNA
(Ecole Polytechnique F é d é rale de Lausanne) Scientists at EPFL have demonstrated the mechanism that allows cells to fight off viral DNA without triggering an immune response against their own genetic material. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When you're smiling, the whole world really does smile with you
(University of South Australia) From Sinatra to Katy Perry, celebrities have long sung about the power of a smile -- how it picks you up, changes your outlook, and generally makes you feel better. But is it all smoke and mirrors, or is there a scientific backing to the claim? Groundbreaking research from the University of South Australia confirms that the act of smiling can trick your mind into being more positive, simply by moving your facial muscles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists sound the alarm: Lockdowns may escalate the obesity epidemic
(University of Copenhagen The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences) Emotional stress, economic anxiety, physical inactivity and social distance - locking down society to combat COVID-19 creates psychosocial insecurity that leads to obesity, warn three Danish researchers. Counter measures are needed if we are to keep the public both metabolically healthy and safe from the coronavirus (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence recognizes deteriorating photoreceptors
(University of Bonn) A software based on artificial intelligence (AI), which was developed by researchers at the Eye Clinic of the University Hospital Bonn, Stanford University and University of Utah, enables the precise assessment of the progression of geographic atrophy (GA), a disease of the light sensitive retina caused by age-related macular degeneration (AMD). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sufficiently distant parks and public services facilitate older adults' physical activity
(University of Jyv ä skyl ä - Jyv ä skyl ä n yliopisto) Outdoor mobility facilitating parks, walking trails, and public services at greater distances increased physical activity, according to a study conducted at the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences of the University of Jyv ä skyl ä . (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The larynx has evolved more rapidly in primates
(PLOS) The larynx is larger, more variable in size, and has undergone faster rates of evolution in primates than in carnivores, according to a study published August 11, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Daniel Bowling of Stanford University, W. Tecumseh Fitch of the University of Vienna, and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Radiology reveals alarming rise in intimate partner violence during COVID-19 pandemic
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) Investigators assessed the incidence, pattern and severity of injuries related to Intimate Partner Violence in patients at the Brigham during the COVID-19 pandemic. When they compared IPV injuries from the spring of 2020 to injuries over the previous three years, they found an alarming increase in physical injuries associated with IPV. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

USC scientists identify the order of COVID-19's symptoms
(University of Southern California) COVID-19 has some symptoms in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tracts that may help doctors rule out flu or other illnesses and hasten treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study shows increase in domestic violence injuries during COVID-19
(Radiological Society of North America) There was a higher incidence and severity of physical intimate partner violence (IPV) among patients seen at a large, academic medical center in the US during the COVID-19 pandemic compared with the prior three years, according to a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Task force examines role of mobile health technology in COVID-19 pandemic
(University of Massachusetts Amherst) An international task force, including two University of Massachusetts Amherst computer scientists, concludes in new research that mobile health (mHealth) technologies are a viable option to monitor COVID-19 patients at home and predict which ones will need medical intervention. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FEFU scientists propose to restore neural tissue with hydrogels based on modified pectins
(Far Eastern Federal University) Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) scientists have developed implantable hydrogels based on plant polysaccharides (pectins). They can play the role of an artificial extracellular matrix, a special network of molecules that fills the space between body cells. The development to be used as a medium for growing tissues and organs, as well as for drug delivery and brain recovery after removal of malignant tumors glioblastomas. A related article appears in the International Review of Neurobiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Single-cell analysis provides new insights into mitochondrial diseases
(Massachusetts General Hospital) Investigators led by a team at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have made discoveries at the single cell level to uncover new details concerning mitochondrial diseases-- inherited disorders that interfere with energy production in the body and currently have no cure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study suggests new potential approach against fatal childhood brain cancer
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) In mouse models of DIPG, a fatal childhood brain cancer, simultaneously attacking two metabolic pathways led to significant improvements in survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Recalling memories from a third-person perspective changes how our brain processes them
(University of Alberta) Adopting a third-person, observer point of view when recalling your past activates different parts of your brain than recalling a memory seen through your own eyes, according to a new paper. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Child disability can reduce educational outcomes for older siblings
(Oxford University Press USA) A recent paper published in The Economic Journal indicates that, in families with disabled children, the second born child is more adversely affected cognitively than the first-born child. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Studying how skin cancer starts
(Case Western Reserve University) New research by Ortiz-Rodr í guez and mentor Carlos Crespo, a professor and lead researcher in the The Crespo Group lab, reveals for perhaps the first time how quickly certain pre-cancerous lesions can form on the DNA of our skin when exposed to sunlight. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pollution linked to antibiotic resistance
(University of Georgia) Antibiotic resistance is an increasing health problem, but new research suggests it is not only caused by the overuse of antibiotics. It's also caused by pollution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Characteristics of COVID-19 patients during initial peak and resurgence in Houston
(Houston Methodist) A major Houston health care system saw a significant increase in younger and Hispanic COVID-19 patients from the first surge to the second surge after Texas phased in reopening. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stanfill inducted into American Academy of Nursing 2020 class of new fellows
(University of Tennessee Health Science Center) Ansley Grimes Stanfill, PhD, RN, associate dean of Research for the UTHSC College of Nursing, has been selected for the American Academy of Nursing's 2020 Class of Fellows. Dr. Stanfill is also an alumna of UTHSC, earning her PhD in Nursing Science at the university in 2014. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

First in Human Study with Novel Antisense Oligonucleotide
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A single intravenous dose of MRG-110, an anti-microRNA drug, significantly reduced miR-92a levels in the blood of healthy humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists win grant to unravel mystery of how animals track scent
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) Seeking to unravel the mystery of how animals follow scent, a team of scientists from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, the University of Colorado Boulder and Columbia University, have won a grant to peer deeply inside the brain as the process takes place. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Boston Medical Center receives HRSA grant to expand addiction fellowship programs
(Boston Medical Center) Boston Medical Center's Grayken Center for Addiction has received a five-year, $3.7 million grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration to expand its fellowship programs in addiction medicine and addiction psychiatry. Effective July 1, this grant supports the training of 48 fellows to specialize in addiction medicine or addiction psychiatry, who will then provide evidence-based, high-quality prevention and treatment services for people with substance use disorders who are vulnerable to health inequities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Unlocking how cellular proteins control cancer spread
(McGill University) A new insight into cell signals that control cancer growth and migration could help in the search for effective anti-cancer drugs. A McGill-led study reveals key biochemical processes that advance our understanding of colorectal cancer, the third most common cancer among Canadians. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news