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Deaf children learn words faster than hearing children
(Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences) Each year many deaf children get a cochlear implant to connect to the world of sounds. So far, it was not clear which processes take place in these children when they start to learn language -- and why they differ in the level of language they achieve. Now, the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences found that deaf children with a cochlear implant learn words even faster than those with normal hearing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Large study finds higher rates of early substance use among children with ADHD
(University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences) Children with ADHD engaged in substance use at a younger age and had a significantly higher prevalence of regular marijuana and cigarette use as adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Arizona State to grow human neurons, test treatments for neurodegenerative diseases
(Arizona State University) Lab-grown human neurons will be used to develop and test treatments for devastating neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researcher to study blunt use among African-American young adults using social media
(University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center) A new study at the University of Cincinnati Addiction Sciences Division at the College of Medicine will use Twitter to engage blunt users in discussion about the health effects of smoking marijuana and tobacco. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Vascular bypass grafting: A biomimetic engineering approach
(University of Pittsburgh) The National Institutes of Health awarded Jonathan Vande Geest, professor of bioengineering at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering, and his multi-institutional research team $672,682 for his one-year study, 'Preclinical assessment of a compliance matched biopolymer vascular graft.' His research builds upon his work at Pitt's Soft Tissue Biomechanics Laboratory designing newly engineered materials that mechanically and microstructurally behave the same way as the body's native tissues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Plotting the downward trend in traditional hysterectomy
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) Fewer women are getting hysterectomies in every state across the country. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTA researcher receives $441,000 NIH grant to develop technology for cardiovascular health
(University of Texas at Arlington) A UTA researcher will use a National Institutes of Health grant to build new imaging technology that will study blood vessel function in patients with heart failure that could lead to quicker diagnosis and life-saving treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

$3.6 million NIH grant to UA-led international research consortium seeks precision medicine solutions
(University of Arizona Health Sciences) Dr. Stefano Guerra, a University of Arizona respiratory therapist, will lead an international effort to target deficits of a specific protein found in lung cells as an indicator of persistence of asthma from childhood into adulthood. Results could lead to personalized therapies for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

WSU study to test sleep technology in chronic insomnia
(Washington State University) A new, three-year project led by scientists in Washington State University's Sleep and Performance Research Center may soon bring relief to those who toss and turn. In collaboration with the University of Washington, the researchers will test the effectiveness of a novel, low-cost sleep measurement technology with built-in sleep coaching functionality in individuals with chronic insomnia. Insomnia is considered chronic if disrupted sleep occurs at least three nights a week for more than three months. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Personality changes during transition to developing mild cognitive impairment
(American Geriatrics Society) Personality changes and behavior problems that come with Alzheimer's disease are as troubling as memory loss and other mental difficulties for caregivers and those living with the condition. Mayo Clinic researchers wondered if personality changes that begin early, when MCI memory loss becomes noticeable, might help predict Alzheimer's disease at its earliest stages. The researchers created a study to test their theory and published their findings in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Reaching the breaking point
(University of Utah) To better understand why many elderly people are prone to break a bone in a fall (known as bone fragility fractures), perhaps doctors and researchers should look at the human skeleton in much the same way civil engineers analyze buildings and bridges, according to a new study from a University of Utah mechanical engineering professor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When the eyes move, the eardrums move, too
(Duke University) Simply moving the eyes triggers the eardrums to move too, even in the absence of sound, says a new study by Duke University neuroscientists. The findings, which were replicated in both humans and rhesus monkeys, provide new insight into how the brain coordinates what we see and what we hear. It may also lead to new understanding of hearing disorders, such as difficulty following a conversation in a crowded room. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

$8.9 million collaborative grant to understand how dangerous virus 'hides' to attack another day
(University of Arizona Health Sciences) Dr. Felicia Goodrum and several of the nation's most prominent human cytomegalovirus researchers have been awarded a five-year, $8.9 million collaborative grant to investigate how the virus lies dormant until it activates and poses life-threatening disease risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Coagulation Sciences selects Enercon as its contract manufacturer
(Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory) Coagulation Sciences, a medical device startup that is being incubated at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, has announced that it has selected Enercon Technologies of Gray, Maine, to be its contract manufacturing partner for its Multiple Coagulation Test SystemTM (MCTS), a desktop device that enables caregivers to quickly analyze the causes of blood clotting disorders at the point of care. The device reduces costs and risks associated with unnecessary blood transfusions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Earth BioGenome project to sequence all life
(University of California - Davis) In an effort to protect and preserve the Earth's biodiversity and kick-start an inclusive bio-economy, the World Economic Forum today announced a landmark partnership between the Earth BioGenome Project, chaired by Harris Lewin, distinguished professor at UC Davis and the Earth Bank of Codes to map the DNA of all life on Earth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain reorganization supports recovery of function in hand transplant recipients
(University of Missouri-Columbia) When a person loses a hand, nerves that control sensation and movement are severed. This trauma deprives sensory and movement areas of the brain of stimulation, causing them to reorganize their functions. Researchers at the University of Missouri, reports that higher-level regions of the brain may compensate for reorganizational changes in brain areas responsible for hand sensation and movement. The scientists received a $1.7 million DOD grant to further study the results. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Leading medical organizations update lung cancer guideline
(International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer) Rapid advancements in the molecular diagnostic testing of lung cancer have led to new treatments and greater hope for patients battling lung cancer, the most common cause of cancer death worldwide.To ensure that clinicians stay apace and provide optimal patient care, three leading medical societies-- the College of American Pathologists (CAP), the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), and the Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP)--have updated their 2013 evidence-based guideline. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New approach attacks 'undruggable' cancers from the outside in
(University of California - San Francisco) Cancer researchers have made great strides in developing targeted therapies that treat the specific genetic mutations underlying a patient's cancer. However, many of the most common cancer-causing genes are so central to cellular function throughout the body that they are essentially 'undruggable'. Now, researchers at UC San Francisco have found a way to attack one of the most common drivers of lung, colorectal, and pancreatic cancer by targeting the proteins it produces on the outside of the cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A new theory on reducing cardiovascular disease risk in binge drinkers
(University of Illinois at Chicago) A new study shows that binge drinkers have increased levels of a biomarker molecule -- microRNA-21 -- that may contribute to poor vascular function. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tennessee's Tyson Raper named 2018 Outstanding Young Cotton Physiologist
(University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture) Tyson Raper received the Dr. J. Tom Cothren Outstanding Young Cotton Physiologist Award at the 2018 Cotton Beltwide Conferences. The award goes young scientists who have already made significant research contributions in cotton physiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Live tissue vs synthetic tissue training for critical procedures: No difference in performance
(Society for Academic Emergency Medicine) Training on the synthetic training model (STM) or live tissue (LT) model does not result in a difference in subsequent performance for five of the seven critical procedures examined: junctional hemorrhage wound packing, tourniquet, chest seal, nasopharyngeal airway, and needle thoracostomy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Food scientists are developing a low-cost tool for detecting bacteria in food, water
(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) Food scientist Lili He and colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Amherst report that they have developed a new, rapid and low-cost method for detecting bacteria in water or a food sample. Once commercially available, it should be useful to cooks using fresh fruits and vegetables, for example, and aid workers in the field responding to natural disasters, He says. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome have less bacterial diversity in gut
(University of California - San Diego) Women who have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a common hormone condition that contributes to infertility and metabolic problems, such as diabetes and heart disease, tend to have less diverse gut bacteria than women who do not have the condition, according to researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, in collaboration with colleagues at Poznan University of Medical Sciences in Poland and San Diego State University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Number of older people with four or more diseases will double by 2035, say researchers
(Newcastle University) A study published today in Age and Ageing, the scientific journal of the British Geriatrics Society, reports that the number of older people diagnosed with four or more diseases will double between 2015 and 2035. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Civic engagement can help teens thrive later in life
(Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center) Want to help your teenagers become successful adults? Get them involved in civic activities - voting, volunteering and activism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Discovery of the 'pioneer' that opens the genome
(University of Montreal) Researchers explain a cell differentiation mechanism in Nature Genetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Paul Farmer to receive National Academy of Sciences' most prestigious award
(National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine) The National Academy of Sciences is presenting its 2018 Public Welfare Medal to physician, anthropologist, and humanitarian Paul Farmer for 'pioneering enduring, community-based treatment strategies that demonstrate the delivery of high-quality health care in resource-poor settings in the US and other countries.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cutting edge technology reveals how to dig
(American Society for Horticultural Science) Musculoskeletal modeling applied to horticultural workers engaged in digging to predict risk of injury. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study may improve strategies for reducing nutrient runoff into Mississippi River
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) Every summer, the Gulf of Mexico is flooded with excess nitrogen and phosphorus from wastewater treatment plants and farm fields along the Mississippi River basin. And every summer, those nutrients create a 'dead zone' in the Gulf. To address the issue, the US Environmental Protection Agency formed a task force and required 12 states to develop strategies to reduce agricultural runoff. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Feedback enhances brainwave control of a novel hand-exoskeleton
(Ecole Polytechnique F é d é rale de Lausanne) EPFL scientists are developing a lightweight and portable hand exoskeleton that can be controlled with brainwaves. The device enhances performance of brain-machine interfaces and can restore functional grasps for the physically impaired. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Blavatnik Family Foundation provides $10 million to promote engineering innovations in health
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) Columbia Engineering announces a $10 million grant from the Blavatnik Family Foundation to fund innovative research at the intersection of engineering and health and to expedite the development, application, and commercialization of breakthrough discoveries. The gift supports the Blavatnik Fund for Engineering Innovations in Health, which will invest in attracting graduate student talent, promote early-stage interdisciplinary research, and accelerate the translation of research from the laboratory to applications in the marketplace to improve people's lives. (...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Powerful food-derived antioxidant can halt, prevent fatty liver disease in mice
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) As obesity continues to rise in the US, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become a major public health issue, increasingly leading to cancer and liver transplants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Use of dirty heating oil in NYC concentrated uptown
(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) Residential buildings that continued to burn residual fuel oil were concentrated in Northern Manhattan and the Bronx, as of late 2015. Compared to cleaner heating sources such as natural gas, these dirty fuels produce high levels of particulate matter, exposure to which is linked to asthma, obesity, developmental delays, and other health problems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FRAX intervention and assessment thresholds for seven Latin American countries
(International Osteoporosis Foundation) Newly published Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX ® ) -based intervention thresholds for the following seven Latin American countries represent a substantial advance in the detection of individuals at high risk of fracture: Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico and Venezuela. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Use evidence to inform Isle of Man draft abortion bill debate, urge researchers
(BMJ) The most up to date evidence shows that women in the Isle of Man need full spectrum, accessible abortion services, free of any age or timing restrictions, conclude researchers in an editorial, published online in BMJ Sexual and Reproductive Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU: Marijuana use does not lower chances of getting pregnant
(Boston University School of Medicine) Marijuana use -- by either men or women -- does not appear to lower a couple's chances of getting pregnant, according to a new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Small hydroelectric dams increase globally with little research, regulations
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers have published the first major assessment of small hydropower dams around the world -- including their potential for growth -- and highlight the incredibly variability in how dams of varying sizes are categorized, regulated and studied. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Prescription drug abuse prevention at CU Anschutz receives $1.5 million
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) The Colorado Health Foundation has invested more than $1.5 million to advance Colorado's efforts to fight substance abuse and the opioid epidemic plaguing the state. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How very low birth weight affects brain development
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Children born with very low birth weights are at an increased risk of cognitive, emotional and behavioral problems throughout their lives. But what exactly happens in the brain to cause these problems? (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Placental accumulation of flame retardant chemical alters serotonin production in rats
(North Carolina State University) An NC State-led research team has shown a connection between exposure to a widely used flame retardant chemical mixture and disruption of normal placental function in rats, leading to altered production of the neurotransmitter serotonin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hungry for solutions: New research tackles college hunger
(University of Houston) If you're too hungry to study, can you learn? University of Houston's Daphne Hernandez launches a study of hunger among college students and evaluates a local intervention, food scholarships. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dietary fiber protects against obesity and metabolic syndrome, study finds
(Georgia State University) Consumption of dietary fiber can prevent obesity, metabolic syndrome and adverse changes in the intestine by promoting growth of 'good' bacteria in the colon, according to a study led by Georgia State University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study reveals abnormalities in infants born in withdrawal after opioid exposure in utero
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) A new study of infants born in withdrawal due to opioid exposure in utero shows a dramatic increase in torticollis -- an abnormal twisting of the neck. Many of the infants also had plagiocephaly -- a flattening of the head often seen in conjunction with torticollis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cavity prevention approach effectively reduces tooth decay
(University of California - San Francisco) A scientifically based approach that includes a tooth-decay risk assessment, aggressive preventive measures and conservative restorations can dramatically reduce decay in community dental practices, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Depression education' effective for some teens
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) In an assessment of their 'depression literacy' program, which has already been taught to tens of thousands, Johns Hopkins researchers say the Adolescent Depression Awareness Program (ADAP) achieved its intended effect of encouraging many teenagers to speak up and seek adult help for themselves or a peer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Finding unravels nature of cognitive inflexibility in Fragile X syndrome
(New York University) Mice with the genetic defect that causes Fragile X syndrome (FXS) learn and remember normally, but show an inability to learn new information that contradicts what they initially learned, shows a new study by a team of neuroscientists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Double trouble: Moisture, not just heat impacts sex of sea turtle hatchlings
(Florida Atlantic University) Male sea turtles are disappearing and not just in Australia. FAU researchers found that 97 to 100 percent of hatchlings in southeast Florida have been female since 2002. They are the first to show why and how moisture conditions inside the nest in addition to heat affect the development and sex ratios of turtle embryos, using a novel technique they developed to estimate sex ratios with a male-specific, transcriptional molecular marker Sox9. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Virus shown to be likely cause of mystery polio-like illness
(University of New South Wales) A major review by UNSW Sydney medical researchers has identified strong evidence that a virus called Enterovirus D68 is the cause of a mystery polio-like illness that has paralysed children in the US, Canada and Europe. The study is published in the journal Eurosurveillance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Not just a stem cell marker
(King Abdullah University of Science& Technology (KAUST)) The protein CD34 is predominantly regarded as a marker of blood-forming stem cells but it helps with migration to the bone marrow too. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Alcohol consumption in late teens can lead to liver problems in adulthood
(Elsevier) Alcohol is the leading cause of liver cirrhosis and liver-related deaths. Results of a large long-term study in Sweden have confirmed that drinking during late adolescence could be the first step towards liver problems in adulthood and that guidelines for safe alcohol intake in men might have to be revised downwards, reports the Journal of Hepatology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news