Research shows how single celled algae rotate as they swim towards the light
(University of Exeter) Scientists have made a pivotal breakthrough in the quest to understand how single-cell green algae are able to keep track of the light as they swim. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A gene provides both protection and destruction
(University of Freiburg) Researchers at Freiburg University discover new function of the widely disseminated, yet little understood ENDOU enzyme (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists describe earliest primate fossils
(University of Washington) A new study published Feb. 24, 2021 in the journal Royal Society Open Science documents the earliest-known fossil evidence of primates. These creatures lived less than 150,000 years after the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction event that killed off non-avian dinosaurs and saw the rise of mammals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Record-high Arctic freshwater will flow to Labrador Sea, affecting local and global oceans
(University of Washington) The Arctic Ocean's Beaufort Sea has increased its freshwater content by 40% over the past two decades. When conditions change this freshwater will travel to the Labrador Sea off Canada, rather than through the wider marine passageways that connect to seas in Northern Europe. This has implications for local marine environments and global ocean circulation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Bearded seals are loud - but not loud enough
(Cornell University) But in the rapidly changing Arctic soundscape, where noise from industrial activities is predicted to dramatically increase in the next 15 years, bearded seals may need to adjust their calling behavior if they are going to be heard above the noise generated by ships and commercial activities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Tool that more efficiently analyzes ocean color data will become part of NASA program
(Stevens Institute of Technology) Researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have developed a new machine learning-powered platform, known as OC-SMART, that can process ocean color in satellite images 10 times faster than the world's leading platform. The work, which will be adopted by NASA, is one of the first machine learning-based platforms in ocean color analysis that can process both coastal and open ocean regions globally to reveal data on sea health and the impact of climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Paleontologists discover new insect group after solving 150-year-old mystery
(Simon Fraser University) An SFU-led research team has solved a 150-year-old-mystery after uncovering how fossil dragonfly relatives have been misclassified due to their striking similarity. The researchers have named a new suborder and 16 new species related to damselflies and dragonflies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Over 80% of Atlantic Rainforest remnants have been impacted by human activity
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Researchers estimated biodiversity and biomass losses in the biome using data from 1,819 forest inventories. In terms of carbon storage, the losses correspond to the destruction of 70,000 km ² of forest. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The risks of communicating extreme climate forecasts
(College of Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University) Apocalypse now? The all-too-common practice of making climate doomsday forecasts is not just bad science, it's also a terrible way to communicate important information. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

After Hurricane Irma, soundscape reveals resilient reef ecosystem
(North Carolina State University) The soundscapes of coral reef ecosystems can recover quickly from severe weather events such as hurricanes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ancient skeletal hand could reveal evolutionary secrets
(Texas A&M University) Evolutionary expert Charles Darwin and others recognized a close evolutionary relationship between humans, chimps and gorillas based on their shared anatomies, raising some big questions: how are humans related to other primates, and exactly how did early humans move around? Research by a Texas A&M University professor may provide some answers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study finds human-caused North Atlantic right whale deaths are being undercounted
(New England Aquarium) A study co-authored by scientists at the New England Aquarium has found that known deaths of critically endangered North Atlantic right whales represent a fraction of the true death toll. This comes as the death of a calf and recent sightings of entangled right whales off the southeastern United States raise alarm. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Bearded seals are loud -- but not loud enough
(Cornell University) A study conducted by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's Center for Conservation Bioacoustics aims to understand how resilient bearded seals can be to changes in ambient underwater noise. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fantastic voyage: Nanobodies could help CRISPR turn genes on and off
(Stanford University School of Engineering) " CRISPR can precisely locate specific genes, " says Lacramioara Bintu, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford. " What we did was attach CRISPR to nanobodies to help it perform specific actions when it reached the right spot on DNA. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Baby mice have a skill that humans want - and this microchip might help us learn it
(University of New South Wales) A new microchip could help scientists uncover secrets of heart regeneration in baby mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New discoveries on the containment of COVID-19 finds travel bans are of limited value
(NYU Tandon School of Engineering) new research aimed at providing a decision support system to Italian policy makers, recently published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, suggests that reducing individual activity (i.e., social distancing, closure of non-essential business, etc.) is far superior in controlling the dissemination of Sars-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UM scientists achieve breakthrough in culturing corals and sea anemones cells
(University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine& Atmospheric Science) Researchers have perfected the recipe for keeping sea anemone and coral cells alive in a petri dish for up to 12 days. The new study, led by scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, has important applications to study everything from evolutionary biology to human health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New shape-changing 4D materials hold promise for morphodynamic tissue engineering
(University of Illinois at Chicago) New hydrogel-based materials that can change shape in response to psychological stimuli, such as water, could be the next generation of materials used to bioengineer tissues and organs, according to a team of researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mangrove forests store more carbon when they're more diverse
(British Ecological Society) Mangrove forests with greater species diversity can store more carbon, according to new research published in the British Ecological Society journal Functional Ecology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Buckyballs on DNA for harvesting light
(Frontiers) Researchers from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology show that DNA can serve as a scaffold for light-harvesting supramolecules, where fluorescent dyes work as electron donors and buckyballs as electron acceptors. The DNA's regular 3D structure increases the light-to-electrons conversion efficiency by reducing so-called self-quenching. Such DNA-based supramolecules could be used in future organic solar cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Measuring carbon nanotubes taken up by plants
(American Society of Agronomy) Measuring carbon nanotubes taken up by plants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Dingo effects on ecosystem visible from space
(University of New South Wales) Satellite images taken over three decades show that keeping dingoes out comes at a price. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Oxidation processes in combustion engines and in the atmosphere take the same routes
(Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS)) Alkanes, an important component of fuels for combustion engines and an important class of urban trace gases, react via another reaction pathways than previously thought. These hydrocarbons, formerly called paraffins, thus produce large amounts of highly oxygenated compounds that can contribute to organic aerosol and thus to air pollution in cities. The results of this interdisciplinary work provide crucial information about oxidation processes both in combustion engines and in the atmosphere. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

'Missing ice problem' finally solved
(Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research) During glacial periods, the sea level falls, because vast quantities of water are stored in the massive inland glaciers. To date, however, computer models have been unable to reconcile sea-level height with the thickness of the glaciers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Microbiome boost may help corals resist bleaching
(King Abdullah University of Science& Technology (KAUST)) Providing corals with cocktails of natural probiotics could enhance their tolerance to stress and reduce mortality in coral bleaching events. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cre-controlled CRISPR: Conditional gene inactivation just got easier
(Technische Universit ä t Dresden) The ability to turn a gene off only in a specific cell type is essential to modern life science. Thanks to the Cre-Controlled CRISPR it has just became simpler. The new method developed by researchers from the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD) at TU Dresden with support from the DRESDEN-concept Genome Center (DCGC) offers a fast and easy approach for conditional gene inactivation. The findings were published in the journal " Nature Communications. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Kittens could hold key to understanding deadly diarrheal disease in children
(North Carolina State University) Kittens could be the model for understanding infectious, sometimes deadly, diarrheal disease in both animals and children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Protective ship coatings as an underestimated source of microplastic pollution
(University of Oldenburg) Shipping traffic can be a major source of microplastics, especially out in the open ocean. In a new study, a team of environmental geochemists from the University of Oldenburg (Germany) for the first time provides an overview of microplastics mass distribution in the North Sea. The scientists found that most of the plastic particles in water samples taken in the south-eastern North Sea originate from binders used in marine paints. Their hypothesis is that ships leave a kind of 'skid mark' in the water. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A memory without a brain
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Having a memory of past events enables us to take smarter decisions about the future. Researchers at the Max-Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (MPI-DS) and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now identified how the slime mold Physarum polycephalum saves memories - although it has no nervous system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

'Problem of missing ice' finally solved by movement of the earth's crust
(Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research) An international team of scientists published a study in Nature Communications today. This new reconstruction revolutionizes what is thought about the global continental ice mass during the Last Ice Age. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UMD partners with industry to improve rainbow trout filet production via genomic selection
(University of Maryland) The University of Maryland was recently awarded a grant from the United States Department of Agriculture to explore genomic selection as a method of increasing fillet quality and yield in rainbow trout. While genomic selection has been widely adopted in livestock programs, it is yet to be adopted in aquaculture. UMD and collaborators across academia and industry are taking the lead in showcasing the benefits of genomic selection in rainbow trout and beyond. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Like wine, environmental conditions impact flavor of whiskey, study finds
(Oregon State University) Flavor differences in whiskey can be discerned based solely on the environment in which the barley used to make the whiskey is grown, a new study co-authored by an Oregon State University researcher found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Agile underwater glider could quietly survey the seas
(Purdue University) Autonomous underwater vehicles have become versatile tools for exploring the seas. But they can be disruptive to the environment or have trouble traveling through confined spaces. Purdue University researchers are studying an alternative: highly maneuverable, low-cost underwater gliders that operate silently. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UIC researchers invent new gene-editing tool
(University of Illinois at Chicago) Researchers have discovered a new gene-editing technique that allows for the programming of sequential cuts -- or edits -- over time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Breaking the infertility cycle: Sheep could show us the way
(Texas A&M AgriLife Communications) A Texas A&M AgriLife study with sheep may soon help address fertility problems in women, if it can discover ways to break the chain of generational transfer of polycystic ovary syndrome, PCOS -- one of the most common infertility disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New comprehensive study on feeding patterns of tiger mosquitos in Europe
This study, published recently in the international journal Insects, was conducted by researchers from the University of Granada, the Do ñ ana Biological Station, and the Biomedical Research Networking Centre for Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP) (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Targeted delivery of highly toxic anti-cancer drug to brain tumors
(University of Houston) University of Houston biomedical researcher Sheeren Majd is reporting the development and testing of a new nano-carrier as a potential treatment to deliver highly toxic medicine to glioblastomas, the most common and aggressive form of primary brain tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Geometallurgist and NSF CAREER awardee breaks down barriers
(University of Arizona College of Engineering) Mined materials like copper and uranium are more important than ever as the world moves toward sustainable technologies such as solar panels and windmills.Isabel Barton is an assistant professor of mining and geological engineering at the University of Arizona and a recipient of the NSF CAREER Award who aims to improve the efficiency and sustainability of mining. She's also using a historical framework to educate (and even excite!) non-scientists about the world of mineral resources, which impacts all of our daily lives. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Climate-friendly foam building insulation may do more harm than good
(Green Science Policy Institute) The use of the polymeric flame retardant PolyFR in 'eco-friendly' foam plastic building insulation may be harmful to human health and the environment, according to a new commentary in Environmental Science& Technology. The authors' analysis identifies several points during the lifecycle of foam insulation that may expose workers, communities, and ecosystems to PolyFR and its potentially toxic breakdown products. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers reveal genetic predisposition to severe COVID-19
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) HSE University researchers have become the first in the world to discover genetic predisposition to severe COVID-19. The results of the study were published in the journal Frontiers in Immunology. http://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2021.641900 (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

SLAS and The Pistoia Alliance partner to promote life sciences startup companies
(SLAS (Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening)) The Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening (SLAS) is pleased to announce a collaboration with the Pistoia Alliance to support and promote innovative life sciences start-ups and emerging companies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Air pollution puts children at higher risk of disease in adulthood
(Stanford University) First of its kind study reveals evidence that early exposure to dirty air alters genes in a way that could lead to adult heart disease, among other ailments. The findings could change the way medical experts and parents think about the air children breathe and inform clinical interventions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Silver and gold nanowires open the way to better electrochromic devices
(Institut national de la recherche scientifique - INRS) A Canadian team from the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) developed a new approach for foldable and solid devices. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

'Jumping genes' repeatedly form new genes over evolution
(Cornell University) A study, 'Recurrent Evolution of Vertebrate Transcription Factors by Transposase Capture,' published Feb. 19 in Science, investigates how genetic elements called transposons, or " jumping genes, " are added into the mix during evolution to assemble new genes through exon shuffling. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Antibiotic tolerance study paves way for new treatments
(Cornell University) The study in mice, 'A Multifaceted Cellular Damage Repair and Prevention Pathway Promotes High Level Tolerance to Beta-lactam Antibiotics,' published Feb. 3 in the journal EMBO Reports, reveals how tolerance occurs, thanks to a system that mitigates iron toxicity in bacteria that have been exposed to penicillin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

DARPA backs Rice sensor to detect COVID-19 virus in air
(Rice University) Researchers at Rice University and the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have received funding for up to $1 million to develop a real-time electronic sensor able to detect minute amounts of the airborne virus that causes COVID-19 infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A dynamic forest floor
(University of California - Santa Barbara) Walk along the beach after a winter storm and you'll see a shore littered with wracks of giant kelp, some 30 to 40 feet long -- evidence of the storm's impact on coastal kelp forests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists use machine-learning approach to track disease-carrying mosquitoes
(Utah State University) A team of researchers from Utah State University, University of California, Davis and Yale University are using a machine-learning approach to map landscape connectivity of the species Aedes aegypti, the so-called Yellow Fever mosquito, which is a primary vector for transmission of viruses causing dengue fever, chikungunya and Zika. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Traditional hydrologic models may misidentify snow as rain, new citizen science data shows
(Desert Research Institute) Normally, we think of the freezing point of water as 32 ° F - but in the world of weather forecasting and hydrologic prediction, that isn't always the case. In the Lake Tahoe region of the Sierra Nevada, the shift from snow to rain during winter storms may actually occur at temperatures closer to 39.5 ° F, according to new research from the Desert Research Institute (DRI), Lynker Technologies, and citizen scientists from the Tahoe Rain or Snow project. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Salmon scales reveal substantial decline in wild salmon population & diversity
(Simon Fraser University) The diversity and numbers of wild salmon in Northern B.C. have declined approximately 70 per cent over the past century, according to a new Simon Fraser University study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news