Scientists print sensors on gummi candy
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Microelectrodes can be used for direct measurement of electrical signals in the brain or heart. These applications require soft materials, however. With existing methods, attaching electrodes to such materials poses significant challenges. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now succeeded in printing electrodes directly onto several soft substrates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 21, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Hundreds of thousands of genomes shed light on psychiatric disorders
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) A massive undertaking by the Brainstorm Consortium to analyze the genomes of nearly 900,000 people has revealed important insights into the genetic overlap among some psychiatric diseases, as well as among personality traits. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 21, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New guide for using mechanical stimulation to improve tissue-engineered cartilage
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Tissue-engineered articular cartilage (AC) for repairing cartilage damaged by trauma or disease can be made to more closely mimic natural AC if mechanical stimulation of particular magnitude and duration is applied during the development process. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 21, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Three new species and important taxonomic insights featured in PhytoKeys issue 100
(Pensoft Publishers) Eight years, more than 500 articles and no less than 13 000 pages since its launch, Pensoft's flagship botanical title Phytokeys, celebrates its 100th issue. In its anniversary issue the journal features two new species and taxonomic revisions on families Brassicaceae, Zamiaceae and Menispermaceae. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 21, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers solve major challenge in mass production of low-cost solar cells
(NYU Tandon School of Engineering) A team led by led by Andr é D. Taylor of NYU Tandon School of Engineering and Yifan Zheng of Peking University solved a major fabrication challenge for perovskite cells -- the intriguing potential challengers to silicon-based solar cells. In a cover article in the June 28, 2018 issue of Nanoscale, a publication of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the team reveals a new scalable means of applying the compound PCBM, a critical component, to perovskite cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 21, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NSF funds Natural History Museum of Utah, College of Ed to develop online curriculum
(University of Utah) NSF has awarded a grant with total funding expected to reach $1.3 million this month to the Natural History Museum of Utah and the College of Education at the University of Utah. This project, titled Engaging Practices for Inquiry with Collections in Bioscience, uses authentic research investigations of objects from the museum's digitized collections to provide students, particularly traditionally underserved populations, with access to museum objects and engaging STEM investigations to improve critical thinking skills. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 21, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New study finds US oil & gas methane emissions 60 percent higher than estimated
(University of Colorado at Boulder) The US oil and gas industry emits 13 million metric tons of the potent greenhouse gas methane from its operations each year, 60 percent more than estimated by the US Environmental Protection Agency, according to a new study published today in the journal Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 21, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UC Davis to lead national cow genomics effort
(University of California - Davis) The U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture has awarded the University of California, Davis, $2.5 million over four years for a national cow genomics project. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 21, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Heated dilemmas
(University of California - Santa Barbara) Short-term management responses to climate change-mediated disasters can be maladaptive in the long-term. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cooler computing through statistical physics?
(Santa Fe Institute) Recent breakthroughs in nonequilibrium statistical physics have   revealed opportunities to advance the 'thermodynamics of computation,' a   field that could have far-reaching consequences for how we understand, and engineer, our computers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fossils show ancient primates had grooming claws as well as nails
(University of Florida) Humans and other primates are outliers among mammals for having nails instead of claws. But how, when and why we transitioned from claws to nails has been an evolutionary head-scratcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists find evidence of 27 new viruses in bees
(Penn State) An international team of researchers has discovered evidence of 27 previously unknown viruses in bees. The finding could help scientists design strategies to prevent the spread of viral pathogens among these important pollinators. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

When cozying up with would-be predators, cleaner shrimp follow a dependable script
(Duke University) It's a mystery how cleaner shrimp partner with would-be fish predators -- sometimes even climbing in their mouths -- without getting eaten. A new study reveals how the shrimp convinces fish not to eat them, and the fish conveys that it's a friend and not a foe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Encrypted messages in biological processes
(Aarhus University) RNA modifications can encrypt the RNA code and are responsible for a very sophisticated control of RNA function. A Danish-German research team has shown that modified RNA bases have a great impact on the dynamics of gene expression from DNA to functional RNA. The study yields important new insight into how the basis of RNA modifications can affect the function of mature RNA molecules. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Aquinnah Pharmaceuticals receives $3.4 million grant from NINDS to advance new therapies for ALS
(MacDougall Biomedical Communications, Inc.) Aquinnah Pharmaceuticals, leaders in stress granule biology, an exciting new target for the development of neurodegenerative therapeutics, announced today that it has been awarded $3.4 million from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) in a competing grant to advance novel therapeutic drug candidates towards the clinic for treating patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

University of Michigan researchers use gene silencing to alleviate common ataxia
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) In what researchers are calling a game changer for future ataxia treatments, a new study showed the ability to turn down the disease progression of the most common dominantly inherited ataxia, Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), also known as Machado-Joseph disease. A single gene mutation causes this neurodegenerative disease, making it an ideal target for researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Planned movements and spontaneous reactions are processed differently in the brain
(Deutsches Primatenzentrum (DPZ)/German Primate Center) Scientists from the German Primate Center - Leibniz Institute for Primate Research (DPZ) have been able to show in their recently published study of two rhesus monkeys that planned and spontaneous gripping movements have the same brain activity during the movement but that the preceded brain activity differs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

News from Molecular & Cellular Proteomics
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) In recent articles, scientists optimize experimental design for understanding potential chemotherapeutic agents, delve into crop responses to salt-water stress, and present a better way to ensure consistency in long-term proteomics studies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Simple sugar delays neurodegeneration caused by enzyme deficiency
(Baylor College of Medicine) The sugar trehalose increases cellular waste disposal and improves the neurological symptoms in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidoses IIIB . (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New tissue-imaging technology could enable real-time diagnostics, map cancer progression
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) A new microscope system can image living tissue in real time and in molecular detail, without any chemicals or dyes, report researchers at the University of Illinois. It enables researchers to study concurrent processes within cells and tissue, and could give cancer researchers a new tool for tracking tumor progression and physicians new technology for tissue pathology and diagnostics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Rethinking recycling
(American Chemical Society) Recycling plastic water bottles has never been more convenient, with bins available almost everywhere. Although Americans are recycling in record numbers, millions of tons of plastic trash continue to accumulate in the environment. Solving this problem will require new solutions for breaking plastics down and reusing them, according to a three-part cover story inChemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Key molecule of aging discovered
(German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ)) Every cell and every organism ages sooner or later. But why is this so? Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg have now discovered for the first time a protein that represents a central switching point in the aging process. It controls the life span of an individual -- from the fly to the human being. This opens up new possibilities for developing therapies against age-related diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Robot bloodhound tracks odors on the ground
(American Chemical Society) Bloodhounds are famous for their ability to track scents over great distances. Now researchers have developed a modern-day bloodhound -- a robot that can rapidly detect odors from sources on the ground, such as footprints. The robot, reported in ACS Sensors, could even read a message written on the ground using odors as a barcode. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fetal T cells are first responders to infection in adults
(Cornell University) Cornell University researchers have discovered there is a division of labor among immune cells that fight invading pathogens in the body. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

University of Louisville launches the Envirome Institute with $5 million gift
(University of Louisville) The University of Louisville today announced a $5 million gift to establish the Envirome Institute at the School of Medicine. The gift, from the Owsley Brown II Family Foundation, supports the first institute dedicated to the study of the human envirome. Taking a holistic approach to researching how the human-environment interrelationship impacts peoples' lives, the institute will build on the pioneering work of Aruni Bhatnagar, Ph.D., the institute's director, in the field of environmental cardiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Do bats adapt to gates at abandoned mines?
(Wiley) Abandoned mines can serve as roost sites for bats, but because the mines pose serious risks to humans, officials often install gates at their entrances. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Innovative autonomous system for identifying schools of fish
(IMDEA Networks Institute) The University of Haifa (Israel) and two teams from the IMDEA Networks Institute have developed an innovative autonomous system, SYMBIOSIS, to monitor real-time schools of fish. This system, which combines optical and acoustic technologies, will be environmentally friendly and will provide reliable information about the condition of marine fish stocks, something that at the moment is practically impossible to achieve without investing enormous resources. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Whether wheat weathers heat waves
(American Society of Agronomy) Unlike humans, crops in a field can't move to air conditioning to endure a heat wave. Scientists in Australia are working to understand how heat waves impact wheat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Can evolution explain why the young are often more susceptible than adults to infection?
(University of Bath) In many species, including humans, the young are often more susceptible to infection than adults, even after accounting for prior exposure to infection. From an evolutionary perspective this may seem puzzling, as dying young or becoming infertile due to infection means organisms will be unable to reproduce. However, new research from the University of Bath suggests that many species may have evolved to prioritise growth over immunity while maturing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

ESA announces the recipients of the 2017 Student Awards
(Ecological Society of America) The Ecological Society of America recognizes Michael T. Kohl, Benjamin J. Wilson, and Emily E. Ernst for awards for outstanding student research. The Murray F. Buell and E. Lucy Braun awards are given for exceptional presentations at the 102nd Annual Meeting of the Society in Portland, Oregon in August 2017. The Forest Shreve Research Fund award supports graduate or undergraduate student ecological research in the hot deserts of North America. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Game-changing finding pushes 3D-printing to the molecular limit
(University of Nottingham) New University of Nottingham research proves that advanced materials containing molecules that switch states in response to environmental stimuli such as light can be fabricated using 3D printing.The study findings have the potential to vastly increase the functional capabilities of 3D-printed devices for industries such as electronics, healthcare and quantum computing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Museum collection reveals distribution of Carolina parakeet 100 years after its extinction
(Pensoft Publishers) While 2018 marks the centenary of the death of the last captive Carolina parakeet -- North America's only native parrot, a team of researchers have shed new light on the previously known geographical range of the species. Their data paper, published in the open access Biodiversity Data Journal, is the most comprehensive occurrence dataset for the species ever produced. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Is the sky the limit?
(University of Vienna) What stops a species adapting to an ever-wider range of conditions, continuously expanding its geographic range? The biomathematician Jitka Polechov á , an Elise Richter Fellow at the University of Vienna, has published a paper in PLoS Biology which explains the formation of species' range margins. The theory shows that just two compound parameters, important for both ecology and evolution of species, are fundamental to the stability of their range: the environmental heterogeneity and the size of the local population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Responses of the tropical atmospheric circulation to climate change
(Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) An international team describes the climate change-induced responses of the tropical atmospheric circulation and their impacts on the hydrological cycle. It also depicts the theoretically predicted changes and diagnose physical mechanisms for observational and model-projected trends in large-scale and regional climate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Army plans to license nanogalvanic aluminum powder discovery
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) The US Army Research Laboratory plans to license its discovery of a nanogalvanic aluminum powder for hydrogen generation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Light pollution a reason for insect decline
(Forschungsverbund Berlin) Climate change, pesticides and land use changes alone cannot fully explain the decline in insect populations in Germany. Scientists from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have now discovered that regions that have experienced a sharp decline in flying insects also have high levels of light pollution. Many studies already suggest that artificial light at night has negative impacts on insects, and scientists should pay greater attention to this factor when exploring the causes of insect population declines in the future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study: Climate action can limit Asia's growing water shortages
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Even 'modest' action to limit climate change could help prevent the most extreme water-shortage scenarios facing Asia by the year 2050, according to a new study led by MIT researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New model for gauging ice sheet movement may improve sea-level-rise predictions
(University of Kansas) University of Kansas researchers discovered friction -- or 'basal drag' -- between ice sheets and the hard bed underneath has no influence on how fast glaciers flow. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

An unlikely marriage among oxides
(Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)) Sebastian Siol is looking for new materials with unusual properties that were so far not accessible in experiments. To do this, he connects partners who don't really fit together: One partner forces the other into a state that would not be possible without the unlikely pairing. Siol also makes sure that the crystal bonds last in everyday life. Only then are they interesting for industrial applications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Science writers: On your mark, get set, go to Indianapolis for 500 stories
(Geological Society of America) Media registration is now open for The Geological Society of America's 130th Annual Meeting& Exposition, to be held November 4-7, 2018 at the Indiana Convention Center in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ocean's heat cycle shows that atmospheric carbon may be headed elsewhere
(Princeton University) A Princeton University-led study in the journal Nature Geosciences examined the global carbon cycle and suggests that scientists may have misgauged how carbon is distributed around the world, particularly between the northern and southern hemispheres. The results could change projections of how, when and where the currently massive levels of atmospheric carbon will result in environmental changes such as ocean acidification. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

'Artificial blubber' protects divers in frigid water
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) A treatment that infuses a conventional neoprene wetsuit with a heavy inert gas can improve a diver's survival time in frigid waters by a factor of three, according to scientists and others. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study finds reduction in sulfur emissions from power plants in China
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Air pollution has smothered China's cities in recent decades. In response, the Chinese government has implemented measures to clean up its skies. But are those policies effective? Now an innovative study co-authored by an MIT scholar shows that one of China's key antipollution laws is indeed working -- but unevenly, with one particular set of polluters most readily adapting to it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cementless fly ash binder makes concrete 'green'
(Rice University) Rice University engineers have developed a composite binder made primarily of fly ash, a byproduct of coal-fired power plants, that can replace Portland cement in concrete. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Joint paper identifies one of Mesoamerica's last intact forest blocks
(Wildlife Conservation Society) The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and Yale University have created a plan to preserve one of the last intact forest strongholds for the jaguar and other iconic species in Central America: the Moskitia Forest Corridor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How to track and trace a protein: Nanosensors monitor intracellular deliveries
(University of Basel) Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have developed a method for tracing the movement of proteins within the cell. They tagged proteins with tiny nanosensors, so-called nanobodies, which enable the scientists to live track and trace the proteins' pathway through the cell. The method described in the current issue of PNAS is suitable for a wide range of research purposes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers explore whether smarter animals are bigger troublemakers
(University of Wyoming) A new paper in the journal Animal Behaviour examines whether smarter animals might be better at learning to live in cities -- but, at the same time, also may come into more conflict with humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Addgene keeps flow of CRISPR plasmids fast and affordable
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) As a key global enabler of the revolutionary genome editing technology known as CRISPR, the nonprofit organization Addgene has made available more than 100,000 CRISPR plasmids (circular DNA fragments) to 3,400 laboratories worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Two new creatures discovered from dawn of animal life
(University of California - Riverside) UCR researchers have discovered two new Ediacaran era fossil animals. Their names honor President Barack Obama and Sir David Attenborough. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Life, death and carbon in the open ocean
(University of California - Santa Barbara) Oceanographic campaign plunges into 'twilight zone' to investigate how the ocean's food web sequesters carbon (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news