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Study reveals most impactful neuroscience research
(Frontiers) A study of the 100 most-cited neuroscience articles has revealed that 78 of these papers cover five topics, including neurological disorders, the prefrontal cortex, brain connectivity, brain mapping and methodology studies. The study allows scientists, policy-makers and investors to quickly identify the most-cited articles and impactful research in neuroscience. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 21, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

$1.9 million NIH grant to Wayne State to research genetic disease that causes blindness
(Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research) A team of Wayne State University researchers recently received a $1.9 million grant from the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health to better understand leukodystrophies (LD) and genetic Leukoencephalopathies (gLE), rare genetic disorders affecting the white matter -- myelin -- in the central nervous system. Patients diagnosed with a leukodystrophy experience a gradual decline in development, including a progressive loss in gait, body tone, vision, hearing, swallowing and/or ability to eat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 21, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How enzymes produce hydrogen
(Ruhr-University Bochum) Researchers at Ruhr-Universit ä t Bochum and the Freie Universit ä t Berlin have clarified the crucial catalytic step in the production of hydrogen by enzymes. The enzymes, called [FeFe]-hydrogenases, efficiently turn electrons and protons into hydrogen. They are thus a candidate for the biotechnological production of the potential energy source. 'In order to produce hydrogen on an industrial scale with the aid of enzymes, we must precisely understand how they work,' says Professor Thomas Happe, one of the authors of the study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 21, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sparkling springs aid quest for underground heat energy sources
(University of Edinburgh) Studies of naturally carbonated mineral water have given scientists insight on how to locate hot water springs -- potential sources of sustainable geothermal energy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 21, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The way of change is important!
(Bentham Science Publishers) However, a new research mind has to emerge in our minds from recent research article 'The Relationship Between Green Building and Regional Economy: A Case Study in Guangdong, China,' published in The Open Civil Engineering Journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 21, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

On the path to vitamin A in rice
(University of Freiburg) Biochemists from the University of Freiburg have elucidated the structure of an enzyme that supplies carotenoid. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 21, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Holographic imaging could be used to detect signs of life in space
(California Institute of Technology) Caltech engineer Jay Nadeau says a method called digital holographic microscopy could be used to detect living microbes in space. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mountain glaciers recharge vital aquifers
(University of Alaska Fairbanks) Small mountain glaciers play a big role in recharging vital aquifers and in keeping rivers flowing during the winter, according to a new study published in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.The study also suggests that the accelerated melting of mountain glaciers in recent decades may explain a phenomenon that has long puzzled scientists -- why Arctic and sub-Arctic rivers have increased their water flow during the winter even without a correlative increase in rain or snowfall. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Native leech preys on invasive slug?
(Hokkaido University) Citizen science has revealed the spread of the invasive giant slug Limax maximus and its potential native predator in Japan, providing new insights into predator-prey dynamics between introduced prey and native predators. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Shale gas development spurring spread of invasive plants in Pennsylvania forests
(Penn State) Vast swaths of Pennsylvania forests were clear-cut circa 1900 and regrowth has largely been from local native plant communities, but a team of researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences has found that invasive, non-native plants are making significant inroads with unconventional natural gas development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists seek to engineer chatter among cells
(Rice University) Rice and University of Houston scientists win federal backing to learn how large colonies of cells communicate with each other and coordinate their activities. The work could lead to synthetic colonies that can help cure or manage diseases, among other tasks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

USDA announces $4.6 million for nanotechnology research
(National Institute of Food and Agriculture) The US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced 13 grants totaling $4.6 million for research on the next generation of agricultural technologies and systems to meet the growing demand for food, fuel, and fiber. The grants are funded through NIFA's Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI), authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Art inspiring ecological science, inspiring art
(Ecological Society of America) Art and Science in dialog: sessions at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America in Portland, Ore., feature 5-minute presentations on collaborative projects that fuse contemporary art and ecological science to make new work that's not possible within each discipline alone. Explore artwork created by the session speakers in the Art:Sci Gallery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The way rivers function reflects their ecological status and is rarely explored
(University of the Basque Country) A study conducted by a UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country research group within the framework of the European Globaqua project proposes going beyond the study of river ecosystems and incorporating into the studies routinely carried out a set of processes that regulate not only the fluxes of matter but also the fluxes of energy within an ecosystem. In a recently published paper, the group is proposing a new working framework to study the status of rivers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mixed outcomes for plants and animals in warmer 2080s climate
(University of York) More than three quarters of plants and animals in England are likely to be significantly affected by climate change by the end of the century, say researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Semiliquid chains pulled out of a sea of microparticles
(Faculty of Physics University of Warsaw) An electrode brought to the surface of a liquid that contains microparticles can be used to pull out surprisingly long chains of particles. Curiously enough, the particles in the chains are held together by a thin layer of liquid that covers them. This spectacular phenomenon, discovered with the involvement of Polish scientists and described in the prestigious journal Nature Communications, holds promise for a broad variety of applications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A sodium surprise
(Washington University in St. Louis) Irregular heartbeat -- or arrhythmia -- can have sudden and often fatal consequences. A biomedical engineering team at Washington University in St. Louis examining molecular behavior in cardiac tissue recently made a surprising discovery that could someday impact treatment of the life-threatening condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study finds restoration at Illinois prairie is working in the soil, too
(Northern Illinois University) A Northern Illinois University study finds that tallgrass prairie restoration at a large Illinois preserve is working at a foundational level -- in the soil. Bacteria in the soil are recolonizing and recovering on their own to resemble soil found in remnant prairies. The study shows that a carefully managed restoration can produce successes even beyond plant and animal biodiversity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Molting feathers may help birds deal with environmental contaminants
(Wiley) Mercury is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant that affects the health of birds and other wild animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Could sharks help save shipping industry billions?
(University of Portsmouth) Whales, sharks, butterflies and lotus leaves might together hold the secret to saving the shipping industry millions and help save the planet, according to a marine biologist at the University of Portsmouth, UK. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Reciprocal effects
(University of California - Santa Barbara) Postdoctoral research fellow Julia Buck discovers a new paradigm for describing trophic cascades caused by infectious agents. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Shale gas development spurring spread of invasive plants in Pa. forests
(Penn State) Vast swaths of Pennsylvania forests were clear-cut circa 1900 and regrowth has largely been from local native plant communities, but a team of researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences has found that invasive, non-native plants are making significant inroads with unconventional natural gas development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Human in vitro fertilization could evolve thanks to piglet study
(University of Missouri-Columbia) It is estimated that parents seeking to have children through in vitro fertilization (IVF) spend between $12,000 and $15,000 each session plus the cost of medications, which could average between $3,000 and $5,000. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri publishing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science have made a discovery that could decrease the costs associated with IVF in humans--and it all started with piglets. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Supramolecular materials with a time switch
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Materials that assemble themselves and then simply disappear at the end of their lifetime are quite common in nature. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now successfully developed supramolecular materials that disintegrate at a predetermined time -- a feature that could be used in numerous applications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Why are dogs such doting companions? It's in their genes
(Oregon State University) Researchers have identified a genetic difference in domesticated dogs and wolves that could explain the canines' contrasting social interaction with humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cornell researchers uncover fresh role for nitric oxide
(Cornell University) Cornell University chemists have uncovered a fresh role for nitric oxide that could send biochemical textbooks back for revision. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Damming and lost connectivity for fish in northeastern ecosystems
(American Institute of Biological Sciences) Fish that migrate between freshwater and sea ecosystems play a multitude of ecological roles. In the centuries since Europeans first colonized the Americas, damming and other disruptions to river connectivity have greatly decreased the migration opportunities of these species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Gu and Paranthaman named ORNL Corporate Fellows
(DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Researchers Baohua Gu and Parans Paranthaman have been named Corporate Fellows of the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A common underlying genetic basis for social behavior in dogs and humans
(Princeton University) In a new study published in the journal Science Advances, an interdisciplinary team of researchers, including those from Princeton University, identified genetic changes that are linked to dogs' human-directed social behaviors and suggest there is a common underlying genetic basis for hyper-social behavior in both dogs and humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

'Nano-in-micro' stem cell delivery could rescue blood flow after injury
(American Chemical Society) When blood flow is reduced or cut to tissues, cells are deprived of oxygen and nutrients, which can lead to cell death if blood flow isn't efficiently restored. Stem cells are promising treatments, but they do not tend to stay at the site or survive long enough to heal the damage. Today in ACS Central Science, researchers combine micro and nano approaches to improve stem cell therapies and outcomes after ischemia, or inadequate blood supply. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Personalized 'earable' sensor monitors body temperature in real time
(American Chemical Society) Wireless, wearable sensors are all the rage with millions of people now sporting fitness trackers on their wrists. These devices can count footsteps, monitor heart rate and other vital signs. Now researchers report in the journal ACS Sensors that they have developed a 3-D printed sensor worn on the ear that measures one of the most basic medical indicators of health in real time: core body temperature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sea cave preserves 5,000-year snapshot of tsunamis
(Rutgers University) An international team of scientists digging in a sea cave in Indonesia has discovered the world's most pristine record of tsunamis, a 5,000-year-old sedimentary snapshot that reveals for the first time how little is known about when earthquakes trigger massive waves. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Silk 'micrococoons' could be used in biotechnology and medicine
(St John's College, University of Cambridge) Microscopic versions of the cocoons spun by silkworms have been manufactured by a team of researchers. The tiny capsules, which are invisible to the naked eye, can protect sensitive molecular materials, and could prove a significant technology in areas including food science, biotechnology and medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Understanding genetic synergy in cleft palate
(Children's National Health System) Like mechanics fixing a faulty engine, Youssef A. Kousa, M.S., D.O., Ph.D., says researchers will not be able to remedy problems related to IRF6, a gene implicated in cleft palate, until they better understand how the gene works. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New harmless radiopaque glue to seal bleeding and guide surgery
(Institute for Basic Science) First nanoparticle-based adhesive with imaging contrast effect in CT and ultrasound was successfully tested in animals and showed less toxicity than the FDA-approved glue CA-Lp. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UBC researchers test 3-D-printed water quality sensor
(University of British Columbia Okanagan campus) Researchers at UBC's Okanagan campus have designed a tiny device -- built using a 3-D printer -- that can monitor drinking water quality in real time and help protect against waterborne illness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pangolins at huge risk as study shows dramatic increases in hunting across Central Africa
(University of Sussex) The true scale of the problem facing world's most illegally traded mammal has been revealed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A new application for enhanced oil recovery has been developed by University scientists
(Swansea University) A new class of materials which are suitable agents for oil displacing in enhanced oil recovery have been developed by scientists in the Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI) at Swansea University and scientists at Islamic Azad University in Iran. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Titanium dioxide nanoparticles can exacerbate colitis
(University of Zurich) Titanium dioxide, one of the most-produced nanoparticles worldwide, is being used increasingly in foodstuffs. When intestinal cells absorb titanium dioxide particles, this leads to increased inflammation and damage to the intestinal mucosa in mice with colitis. Researchers at the University of Zurich recommend that patients with colitis should avoid food containing titanium dioxide particles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UK Biobank partners with the EGA
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory - European Bioinformatics Institute) UK Biobank has established a partnership with the European Genome-phenome Archive (EGA), a joint resource developed by EMBL-EBI and the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG).- UK Biobank, which manages health information on over 500,000 individuals, will share its genetic data in its first release via EGA.- Distribution of the data via the EGA will ensure long-term data security, accessibility and sustainability, which will help researchers to better understand human disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Birds avoid crossing roads to prevent predation
(Frontiers) It was once believed that roads posed no problem to birds because of their ability to fly. A new study finds that they can find these man-made structures problematic, especially small, forest-dwelling species. Their hesitance to cross roads could restrict their positive effects on the natural environment, such as seed dispersal, pollination and insect control. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Innovative nanosensor for disease diagnosis
(The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)) A research group at KAIST has developed diagnostic sensors using protein-encapsulated nanocatalysts, which can diagnose certain diseases by analyzing human exhaled breath. This technology enables early monitoring of various diseases through pattern recognition of biomarker gases related to diseases in human exhalation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Is bone strength hereditary?
(Wiley) A new study indicates that bone strength may be inherited and that its genetic determinants are to some extent shared with bone mineral density. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New treatment options for common debilitating skin disease Hidradenitis suppurativa
(Trinity College Dublin) The research team behind the study pinpointed 'Th17' cells as mediating the disease (HS). A number of existing treatments target the same cellular pathway and may also be effective in treating HS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Are sugary drink interventions changing people's behavior?
(University of Leeds) An evaluation of efforts designed to reduce how many sugary drinks we consume shows some success in changing younger people's habits but warns they cannot be the only way to cut consumption. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Growing better trees faster
(University of Oxford) Using a breeding technique called 'genomic selection', researchers from the Universities of Oxford and Edinburgh and from Forest Research, an agency of the Forestry Commission, hope to accurately identify, at a very early age, fast growing trees with superior timber quality. In doing so, the 'Sitka Spruced' research initiative could improve the economic value of future spruce plantations in the UK. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Robotics-based study provides insight into predator-prey interactions
(American Institute of Physics) A research team led by New York University professor Maurizio Porfiri put forth a robotics-based study to control information flow in predator-prey interactions, as well as test the validity of transfer entropy when attempting to understand causal influences of the system. They report their findings this week in the journal Chaos, from AIP Publishing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Five ways ISS National Lab enables commercial research
(NASA/Johnson Space Center) A growing number of commercial partners use the International Space Station National Lab. With that growth, we will see more discoveries in fundamental and applied research that could improve life on the ground. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Treated hydraulic fracturing wastewater may pollute area water sources for years
(Penn State) Given Pennsylvania's abundant natural resources, it's no surprise that the Commonwealth has become a mecca for hydraulic fracturing. Researchers, however, have recently discovered that releasing millions of gallons of treated hydraulic fracturing wastewater each year into area surface waters may have longer-lasting effects than originally thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Arts-based groups benefit individuals with mental health conditions
(Wiley) A new study found that participation in arts-based groups -- such as those that involve choir singing and creative writing -- benefits the emotions of both healthy adults and those experiencing mental health conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news