New measure of social determinants of health may improve cardiovascular health assessment
(American Academy of Family Physicians) The authors of this study developed a single risk score derived from multiple social determinants of health that predicts county-level cardiovascular disease mortality. The authors conclude that their multivariable SDoH risk score can identify counties with high CVD risk and has the potential to improve CVD risk prediction and interventions for vulnerable populations at the county level. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

International conference on social determinants of health identified change needs
(American Academy of Family Physicians) In November 2019, clinicians, health administrators, educators and researchers from around the world gathered in Toronto to discuss how to best address social determinants of health from a primary care perspective. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Participants in CPC+ are diverse but not representative of all primary care practices
This study analyzes patterns of participation in the Comprehensive Primary Care Plus initiative which is the largest voluntary primary care payment and delivery reform model tested to date. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

LGBT-friendly medical practices improve STD/HIV screening rates for vulnerable populations
This report--describing the first national quality improvement collaborative focused on providing culturally affirming care for LGBT people--finds that making primary care practices more LGBT-friendly and inclusive may improve STD and HIV screening rates among this vulnerable population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New french prescribing rules result in decreased prescribing of certain sleep drugs
(American Academy of Family Physicians) In France, the implementation of new prescribing rules for the sedative-hypnotic drug zolpidem led to an important and immediate decrease in use. This decline was partially compensated for by a rise in the use of a nonbenzodiazepine drug called zopiclone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Graduates of family medicine residencies are likely to enter and remain in family medicine
This study provides an overview of the characteristics of physicians who completed family medicine residency training from 1994 to 2017. It serves to update the only previous comprehensive national review of this kind, conducted in 1996, which covered family medicine graduates from 1969 through 1993. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The earliest cat on the Northern Silk Road
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Dr. Irina Arzhantseva and Professor Heinrich Haerke from the Centre for Classical and Oriental Archaeology (IKVIA, Faculty of Humanities, HSE University) have been involved in the discovery of the earliest domestic cat yet found in northern Eurasia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Report calls for government to 'level up' Stoke-on-Trent economy
(Staffordshire University) Stoke-on-Trent faces an increased threat of poverty and destitution due to the COVID-19 crisis, a new report reveals. The research has been carried out by Staffordshire University Business School for the Stoke-on-Trent Hardship Commission and highlights the considerable work to be still done by central government to 'level-up' the Stoke-on-Trent economy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The plight of the Kalahari San
(University of Chicago Press Journals) San (Bushmen) communities in southern Africa continue to call upon their governments and international organizations to recognize their human rights and protect their welfare. They have lived in southern Africa for 20,000 to 40,000 years, yet they remain politically and economically marginalized in relation to other social groups. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds hidden emotions in the sound of words
(Cornell University) In the midst of the COVID-19 crisis, it's common to feel stress levels rise every time we hear the word " virus. " But new Cornell-led research reveals that the sound of the word itself was likely to raise your blood pressure - even before " corona " was added to it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mismatched caregiver-infant interactions during feeding could boost babies' risk of later obesity
(Society for Research in Child Development) A new integrative review examined evidence related to infants' self-regulation of behavior and emotion, and how that relates to interactions when they are fed by their caregivers, including how those interactions may derail infants' ability to regulate their intake of food. The review found that infants who are fed in the absence of hunger or beyond fullness may develop skewed perceptions of hunger and fullness, which could increase their risk of obesity and related health problems later in life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dream on
(Washington University in St. Louis) Daydreaming can be a significant asset to employees in a workplace, depending upon certain attributes of the wanderer -- specifically, if they identify with their profession or organization. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Meditation linked to lower cardiovascular risk
(Veterans Affairs Research Communications) Meditation was linked to lower cardiovascular risk in a large database study by Veterans Affairs researchers and colleagues. The team looked at data on more than 61,000 survey participants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows humans are optimists for most of life
(Michigan State University) Researchers from Michigan State University led the largest study of its kind to determine how optimistic people are in life and when as well as how major life events affect how optimistic they are about the future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mental health units in correctional facilities: Scarce data but promising outcomes
(Wolters Kluwer Health) Specialized mental health units (MHUs) may be critical to managing the high rates of serious mental illness in incarcerated populations. But research data on unit characteristics, services provided, and outcomes achieved by MHUs in correctional facilities are scarce, according to a report in the July/August issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why are memories attached to emotions so strong?
(Columbia University Irving Medical Center) Multiple neurons in the brain must fire in synchrony to create persistent memories tied to intense emotions, new research from Columbia neuroscientists has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

McLean hospital study examines the cost-effectiveness of esketamine
(McLean Hospital) A paper authored by researchers from McLean Hospital has determined that esketamine, a nasal spray to treat severe depression, is currently too expensive for widespread use. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

5,000 years of history of domestic cats in Central Europe
(Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun) The history of human and cat relationships began 10,000 years ago. Its origins, however, still remain a mystery mainly due to scarcity of research material. Gaps in our knowledge in the subject are successfully filled by a group of researchers from the Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toru?. Dr Magdalena Krajcarz has made an attempt to find ancestors of domestic cats in Neolithic Central Europe. An article discussing the topic has recently been published in PNAS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Consumer-created social media visuals capture consumer brand perceptions
(Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences) CATONSVILLE, MD, July 13, 2020 - New research has found that there is a strong link between the visual portrayal of a brand in online imagery created by consumers and the larger brand perceptions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Black women often ignored by social justice movements
(American Psychological Association) Black women are often less likely to be associated with the concept of a 'typical woman' and are viewed as more similar to Black men than to white women, which may lead to some anti-racist and feminist movements failing to advocate for the rights of Black women, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Breast cancer deadlier in heart attack survivors
(NYU Langone Health / NYU School of Medicine) Breast Cancer patients are 60 percent more likely to die of cancer after surviving a heart attack, a new study finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Comparing health in middle-aged adults in US, England by income
(JAMA Network) Various health outcomes were compared among high- and low-income adults age 55 to 64 in the US and England in this observational study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Association of state-level opioid-reduction policies with opioid poisonings in kids
(JAMA Network) Researchers compared the rate of opioid poisonings in children and teens before and after implementation of state-level policies intended to decrease the amount of opioid medications prescribed and distributed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is delirium associated with long-term cognitive decline?
(JAMA Network) The results of 23 studies were combined to examine whether an episode of delirium is a risk factor for long-term cognitive decline. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Association of plant, animal protein with long-term mortality
(JAMA Network) Dietary information from more than 400,000 U.S. adults was used to look at the association between consuming plant and animal protein and the risk of death over 16 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Delirium may cause long term cognitive decline
(Columbia University Irving Medical Center) A new meta-analysis of 24 observational studies from researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons found that delirium may cause significant long-term cognitive decline. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study links attraction to 'tyrannical' leaders to dysfunctional family dynamics
(San Francisco State University) An SF State Assistant Professor of Management found a link between dysfunctional family conflict and the types of leaders people follows as adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The monster is us: Jordan Peele's Get Out exposes society's horrors
(Lehigh University) As a horror film, Jordan Peele's 2017 film Get Out certainly broke new ground. Yet, the film is firmly rooted in what Dawn Keetley refers to as " ...the longstanding tradition of the political horror film " which is " ...driven by very human monsters. " Keetley, Professor and Chair of the Department of English at Lehigh University, edited a recently-published collection of sixteen essays about the critically-acclaimed film, the first scholarly publication to examine the film. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers find the worst reason to give a gift
(Ohio State University) Here's a good way to make sure a friend hates a gift from you: Say it will save him money.In a series of studies, researchers found that people reacted negatively to gifts that they were told - or that they inferred - were given to help them save money. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How to strengthen New Zealand's proposed cannabis legalization and control bill
(Society for the Study of Addiction) In advance of a widely-watched national referendum vote to be held this September, two drug policy experts from Massey University have identified gaps and challenges in New Zealand's proposal for legalizing recreational cannabis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Family caregiving may not harm health of caregivers after all
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) For decades, family caregiving has been thought to create a type of chronic stress that may lead to significant health risks or even death, alarming potential caregivers and presenting a guilt-ridden obstacle for those needing help. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Military personnel at risk of suicide store firearms unsafely
(Rutgers University) Military personnel who are at a greater risk of suicide are more likely to unsafely store firearms in unlocked cabinets where they can access them easily, according to a Rutgers researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mothers' paid work suffers during pandemic, study finds
(Washington University in St. Louis) New research from Washington University in St. Louis finds early evidence that the pandemic has exacerbated -- not improved -- the gender gap in work hours, which could have enduring consequences for working mothers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Alliance for regenerative rehabilitation and training receives $5 million NIH grant
(University of Pittsburgh) The National Institutes of Health has renewed a five-year grant for $5 million for the Alliance for Regenerative Rehabilitation and Training (AR3T) to continue its work expanding scientific knowledge, expertise and methodologies focused on science and regenerative medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Trade wars with China could cost US universities $1.15 billion
(University of California - San Diego) Uncertainties around the trade war between the US and China have hurt businesses and weighed on the global economy. However, new research from the University of California San Diego also shows lesser known consequence: up to $1.15 billion in reduced tuition to US universities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study calls for action to protect BAME and migrant groups from economic impact of COVID-19
(Lancaster University) The COVID-19 lockdown has had a disproportionate economic impact on Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) migrants in the UK, new research, which also calls for racial justice, reveals today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Medicaid expansion meant better health for the most vulnerable low-income adults
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) The most vulnerable residents of the nation's 10th most populous state say their health improved significantly after they enrolled in Michigan's expanded Medicaid program, a new study finds. Michiganders with extremely low incomes, those with multiple chronic health problems, and those who are Black, got the biggest health boosts year over year among enrollees in the safety-net health coverage program. But participants of almost all ages, backgrounds and geographic regions reported improvements in health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Construction: How to turn 36 seconds into USD 5.4 billion
(Aarhus University) A team of researchers from Aarhus University have, for the first time ever, linked 40 years of productivity data from the construction industry with the actual work done. The results show that productivity in the construction industry has been declining since the 1970s. The results also explain the decline and how to achieve far more efficient construction in North America and Europe. The study has just been published in the scientific journal Construction Engineering and Management. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is gender equality achievable in the Russian family?
(Lobachevsky University) Distribution of rights and obligations in the family, opportunities and responsibilities in performing the main family functions is one of the most controversial, but at the same time one of the most important issues in the modern context.Scientists from the Department of General Sociology and Social Work of the Faculty of Social Sciences at Lobachevsky University have been engaged in research on parenthood and the distribution of parental functions for many years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study warns of misinformation about opt-out organ donation
(University of Nottingham) A new study has warned of the power of a type of behaviour dubbed the 'lone wolf' effect which could result in people 'opting out' of supporting organ donation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sobering reminder about liver disease
(Flinders University) Alcohol's popularity and its central place in socialising in Australia obscures the dangers of excessive drinking and possible liver disease, Flinders University experts warn. As Dry July awareness month highlights the various health risks, the Head of Hepatology and Liver Transplantation at Flinders Medical Centre Associate Professor Alan Wigg says alcohol misuse remains a major health challenge in Australia as seen by high in rates of life-threatening liver disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New biomarker for dementia diagnosis
(Flinders University) Medical researchers in the UK and Australia have identified a new marker which could support the search for novel preventative and therapeutic treatments for dementia. In an innovative new study, coordinated by Flinders University and University of Aberdeen, the researchers investigated the role of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), a blood marker associated with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease in epidemiological studies, on temporal changes in cognition in an established cohort of human ageing (the 1936 Aberdeen Birth Cohort). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research uncovers COVID-19's impact on college student mental health and well-being
(Boston University) In college students, COVID-19 has increased depression rate and raised new barriers to mental healthcare. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Theft law needs reform to reduce the risk of judgements which lack 'common sense'
(University of Exeter) Theft law needs reform so the crime is based on consent not dishonesty - reducing the risk of judgements which lack 'common sense' -- a new study warns. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Collective behavior research reveals secrets of successful football teams
(University of Konstanz) Collective behaviour researchers have applied a new tool for analysing the movement of football players that goes beyond looking at individual athletes to capturing how the team operates as a whole. The tool, which comes from statistical physics but has never been used for sports analysis, finds clear differences in collective dynamics between winning and losing teams and can even predict the market value of players. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Amygdala changes in male patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder
(Kumamoto University) Researchers in Japan have revealed that DNA methylation occurs in the serotonin transporter gene that regulates neurotransmitter transmission in schizophrenia and bipolar patients. Particularly prominent in males and patients with certain genetic polymorphisms, this methylation is inversely correlated to amygdala volume. This work is expected to lead to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. It may also help to develop therapeutic agents and diagnostic/therapeutic markers that target epigenetic conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Parents' smartphone use does not harm parent/child relationships
(Edith Cowan University) Contrary to popular views, parental smartphone use is rarely associated with poor parenting, and more often than not, tends to be associated with warm and attached parenting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Movement ecology bears fruits: ATLAS supports map-based navigation of wild bats
(The Hebrew University of Jerusalem) Hebrew University and Tel Aviv University researchers collaborated on tracking wild bats' foraging habits in their natural habitat. They found evidence that the animals navigate using an advanced cognitive map. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Psychologists pinpoint psychological factors of refugee integration
(University of M ü nster) According to the latest UN report, the number of displaced persons and refugees has surged, again, by several millions. Most of them will not be able to return to their homes in the foreseeable future. Psychologists at M ü nster University have developed a model of the psychological factors affecting the successful integration of refugees. The model has been published in the journal " Perspectives on Psychological Science " . (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Medical cannabis put to test in first ever real-world evidence clinical trial led by UHN
(University Health Network) Medical cannabis is finally being put under the microscope, in a first-of-its-kind real world evidence study led by Dr. Hance Clarke, Director, Pain Services, Toronto General Hospital. In the Medical Cannabis Real-World Evidence (MC-RWE) clinical trial patients using the online portal created by Medical Cannabis by Shoppers, will know exactly what is in their product and if it's effective. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news