Predictors of refugee adjustment: The importance of cognitive skills and personality
(Saarland University) An increased willingness to take risks, reciprocating friendliness, and a conviction that they are in control of their own lives lead to refugees gaining a foothold in Germany faster. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Children of both young and old parents share risk for certain neurodevelopment disorders
(Elsevier) Results of a new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports that parental age is linked to the risk for the development of neuropsychiatric disorders in children, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD); attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); and Tourette's disorder/chronic tic disorder (TD/CT). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The cultural significance of carbon-storing peatlands to rural communities
(University of Cambridge) A group of UK and Peruvian researchers have carried out the first detailed study of how rural communities interact with peatlands in the Peruvian Amazon, a landscape that is one of the world's largest stores of carbon. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Global climate change emergency leads to first World Forum on Climate Justice
(Elsevier) Elsevier and the Glasgow Caledonian University Centre for Climate Justice are pleased to announce a partnership that will provide the platform to discuss the impacts of climate change on weather forecasting, people trafficking and growing spread of mosquito-borne malaria, among other topics, at the first World Forum on Climate Justice, June 19-21, 2019 at Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Implicit measures' better assess vocabulary for those with autism than standard tests
(University of Vermont) In a new study, researchers demonstrate that assessment tools capturing implicit signs of word knowledge among those with severe autism like eye movement can be more accurate than traditional assessments of vocabulary, pointing the way toward better inventions and spurring much needed new research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Successful HIV effort prompts call for clinics to expand mental health services on site
(University of Virginia Health System) Increasing access to mental health services improves HIV outcomes among vulnerable patients, a new study suggests. Based on their findings, the researchers are urging HIV clinics to expand their mental health services on site. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Discrimination against older people needs attention, study says
(University of Alberta) Ever cracked a joke about old people? It might seem funny, but in a world where the population aged 60 or over is growing faster than all younger age groups, ageism is no laughing matter, says a University of Alberta researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Testifying while black: A linguistic analysis of disparities in court transcription
(Linguistic Society of America) A new study has found that court reporters transcribe speakers of African American English significantly below their required level of accuracy. The study 'Testifying while black: An experimental study of court reporter accuracy in transcription of African American English,' by Taylor Jones (University of Pennsylvania), Jessica Kalbfeld (New York University), Ryan Hancock (Philadelphia Lawyers for Social Equity), and Ryan Clark (University of Pennsylvania) will be published in the forthcoming June 2019 issue of the scholarly journal Language. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTA research addresses evolving learning needs
(University of Texas at Arlington) George Siemens, UTA professor of psychology, has received a grant from The Boeing Company to construct an integrated data infrastructure that will centralize digital learning and engagement tools. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Want to eliminate workplace bias? Watch your rating system, study says
(University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management) A new study looking at student ratings of university teaching performance shows that a substantial gender gap under a 10-point system disappears when the system used only has six points. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

PSU wins $1 million contract to empower Vietnam's provincial capacity and performance
(Portland State University) PSU's Mark O. Hatfield School of Government will serve as the lead academic partner for a newly awarded USAID Strengthening Provincial Capacity (SPC) contract to support economic and political governance reform in Vietnam. Chemonics International Inc., an international development organization in Washington, D.C., will serve as prime contractor for the five-year, $13.3 million award, in a partnership that also includes J.E. Austin Associates Inc. of Arlington, Va. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flamingoes, elephants and sharks: How do blind adults learn about animal appearance?
(Johns Hopkins University) They've never seen animals like hippos and sharks but adults born blind have rich insight into what they look like, a new Johns Hopkins University study found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Food insecurity in Nunavut increased after Nutrition North Canada introduced
(Joule Inc.) Food insecurity, meaning inadequate or insecure access to food because of a lack of money, has worsened in Nunavut communities since the introduction of the federal government's Nutrition North Canada program in 2011, found research published in CMAJ. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New podcast explores why 'statistically significant' is so misunderstood
(Taylor& Francis Group) It's a controversial topic. Probability values (p-values) have been used as a way to measure the significance of research studies since the 1920s, with thousands of researchers relying on them since. With this reliance, though, comes misunderstanding and, therefore, misuse.This misunderstanding is what the latest episode of the How Researchers Changed the World podcast explores, in conversation with statistician Ron Wasserstein. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CBD reduces craving and anxiety in people with heroin use disorder
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) Mount Sinai study highlights the potential of cannabidiol as a treatment option for opioid abuse. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penguins and their chicks' responses to local fish numbers informs marine conservation
(British Ecological Society) Endangered penguins respond rapidly to changes in local fish numbers, and monitoring them could inform fisheries management and marine conservation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bad marketing encourages consumers to opt for lower quality products
(ESMT Berlin) A new framework to enable retailers to better position their products to consumers has been devised by Tamer Boyaci and Frank Huettner at ESMT Berlin together with Yalcin Akcay from Melbourne Business School. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chinese-Americans abused earlier in life face greater abuse risk as elders
(Rutgers University) Chinese-Americans who were victims of child abuse or intimate partner violence are at a greater risk of abuse when they are elderly, according to a Rutgers study in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The healing power of a smile: A link between oral care and substance abuse recovery
(University of Utah Health) A new study links the benefits of comprehensive oral care to the physical and emotional recovery of patients seeking treatment for substance use disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Farmers have less leisure time than hunter-gatherers, study suggests
(University of Cambridge) Hunter-gatherers in the Philippines who adopt farming work around ten hours a week longer than their forager neighbours, a new study suggests, complicating the idea that agriculture represents progress. The research also shows that a shift to agriculture impacts most on the lives of women. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Statin use associated with reduced risk of dementia after concussion in older adults
(JAMA Network) Concussion is a common brain injury. This observational study of nearly 29,000 adults (66 and older) diagnosed with concussion examined whether statin use was associated with risk of long-term dementia after a concussion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence system spots lung cancer before radiologists
(Northwestern University) Artificial intelligence was able to detect malignant lung nodules on low-dose chest computed tomography scans with a performance meeting or exceeding that of expert radiologists, reports a new study from Google and Northwestern Medicine.This deep-learning system provides an automated image evaluation system to enhance the accuracy of early lung cancer diagnosis that could lead to earlier treatment. Lung cancer is most common cause of cancer deaths in US and is harder to treat when diagnosed at advanced stages. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Using AI to remix radio for people living with dementia
(University of Plymouth) A £ 2.7m project is to use artificial intelligence to adapt and personalise live radio, with the aim of transforming life for people living alone with dementia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Anxious people quicker to flee danger
(California Institute of Technology) By better understanding anxiety circuits in our brain, researchers may one day learn what goes awry in people with anxiety disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers receive $1.94 million to study connection between autism, microbiome
(Oregon State University) An Oregon State University researcher is part of a $1.94 million grant to look for possible connections between the human microbiome and autism spectrum disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Crime fighting just got easier as burglars reveal all
(University of Portsmouth) First study of burglars committing crime in virtual reality could change the way we protect our homes from burglars. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Australian drivers ready to embrace phone restriction apps -- if they can still talk
(Queensland University of Technology) Almost 70 per cent of drivers would be willing to install smartphone apps that block texting and browsing according to new Australian research from Queensland University of Technology -- but only if they can still do hands-free calls and listen to Bluetooth music. The national survey of 712 drivers also found one in six admitted to texting, browsing and even writing emails while behind the wheel. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mindfulness helps mothers with opioid use disorder combat depression
(Thomas Jefferson University) The discovery highlights alternative treatment options to pharmaceutical medications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Film images of war ruins
(Goethe University Frankfurt) How did post-war non-fiction films -- newsreels and documentaries -- represent wartime deconstruction and reconstruction efforts? How did these films influence the formation of European post-war societies? These issues are the focus of a research project in film studies at Goethe University in cooperation with colleagues in Italy, France and the Czech Republic, due to launch next week. The project is being funded at approximately € 1 million within the framework of the European HERA programme. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Seasonal clock changing helps to synchronize human sleep/wake cycle across latitude
(University of Seville) In winter, the sleep/wake cycle is dominated by sunrise. Wake-up times tend to occur during the winter twilight regulated by the circadian photorecpetive mechanism. Bedtimes tend to occur eight hours earlier or sixteen hours later, in the middle of the winter night, regulated by the homeostatic mechanism that make us feel tired after a prolonged wake. This setting delays the sleep/wake cycle as latitude increases following the delay in the winter sunrise time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bonobo mothers help their sons to have more offspring
(Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology) In many social animal species individuals share child-rearing duties, but new research from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, finds that bonobo mothers go the extra step and actually take action to ensure their sons will become fathers. This way bonobo mothers increase their sons' chance of fatherhood three-fold. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sex sells: how masculinity is used as currency to buy sperm donors' time
(City University London) Sperm banks in the United Kingdom and Australia use images and phrases associated with masculinity to attract donors because laws prohibit them from paying for sperm. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Young children willing to punish misbehavior, even at personal cost, new research shows
(New York University) Children as young as three years old are willing to punish others' bad behavior, even at personal cost, finds a new study by psychology researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Infant deaths highlight danger of misusing car seats, other sitting devices
(University of Virginia Health System) Car safety seats are vital to protect children while traveling, but a new infant death study underlines the need to follow the seats' instructions and to use them only for their intended purpose. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

California law led to an increase in childhood vaccination rates
(George Washington University) A first of its kind analysis published today by researchers at the George Washington University (GW) found that a 2016 California vaccine law boosted protective coverage against measles and other serious childhood diseases compared to states that acted as statistical controls. At the same time, the data also revealed a sharp increase in medical exemptions to the vaccine mandate, concentrated in a few California counties. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

High-quality jadeite tool discovered in underwater ancient salt works in Belize
(Louisiana State University) Anthropologists discovered a tool made out of high-quality translucent jadeite with an intact rosewood handle at a site where the ancient Maya processed salt in Belize. The discovery of these high-quality materials -- jadeite and rosewood -- used as utilitarian tools, demonstrates that salt workers played an important role in the Classic Maya marketplace economy more than 1,000 years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Professor rethinks living spaces for refugee camps
(University of Tennessee at Knoxville) New technologies have made the world smaller. Rana Abudayyeh, a professor of interior architecture, asks how architects respond to shifting perspectives of space for displaced people. 'A Syrian refugee living in a Jordanian camp, or an immigrant to the US, will have multiple associations with place,' said Abudayyeh. 'They carry archival images of their home with them on smart devices, and that will influence the way they interact with their physical space.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New risk scores help physicians provide better care for high-risk pulmonary patients, study finds
(Intermountain Medical Center) Study of more than 17,000 patients finds new laboratory-based method of estimating outcomes for patients with a severe pulmonary disorder that has no cure can help physicians better provide proper care, referrals, and services for patients at the end of life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Men ignore serious health risks of steroid abuse in pursuit of the body beautiful
(European Society of Endocrinology) Many men continue to abuse steroids despite knowing that they have serious, life-limiting and potentially lethal side effects, according to findings to be presented in Lyon, at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2019. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Restaurant acoustics that schmeckt
(Acoustical Society of America) Acoustics consultant Klaus Genuit says that new ISO guidelines for defining, measuring and evaluating soundscapes are a big step forward in guiding the creation of audibly fine restaurants. 'A soup might be delicious or not, but you can't answer this by knowing the temperature of the soup. It is the same with restaurant soundscapes -- you need a lot more information than just noise level,' he said. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds narrowing gender gap in youth suicides
(MediaSource) New research from Nationwide Children's Hospital finds a disproportionate increase in youth suicide rates for females relative to males, particularly in younger youth aged 10-14 years. The report, which describes youth suicide trends in the United States from 1975 to 2016, appears this week in JAMA Network Open. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Human capital benefits of military boost economy by billions
(North Carolina State University) A recent study finds that US government spending on military personnel has a positive impact on the nation's human capital -- essentially improving the American workforce. The study estimates the economic impact of this human capital improvement to be $89.8 billion for 2019 alone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ernst Haeckel: Pioneer of modern science
(Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena) Evolutionary biologist Ernst Haeckel became the first person to define the term ecology in his work published in 1866, entitled 'General Morphology of Organisms'. Science historians and biologists from the Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany) have now worked out just how close his original classification is to our modern understanding of ecology -- at the invitation of the renowned journal Trends in Ecology& Evolution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study examines consequences of workplace bullying
(University of East Anglia) New research reveals how frequently being the target of workplace bullying not only leads to health-related problems but can also cause victims to behave badly themselves. The study, led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) in collaboration with Uninettuno Telematic International University in Italy, found that in some cases this is characterised by a lack of problem solving and high avoidance coping strategies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How we make complex decisions
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT neuroscientists have identified a brain circuit that helps break complex decisions down into smaller pieces. The study sheds light on how the brain reasons about probable causes of failure after a hierarchy of decisions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study reveals that some over reported stress after 2016 election to support political party
(SAGE) In a new study, researchers found that many Democrats may have over reported mental stress after the 2016 election. By comparing personal online searches made by Democrats, Republicans and Spanish-Speaking Latinos with public surveys, their study claims those not directly targeted by Trump's campaign claimed more stress than experienced. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fearful customers sensitive to size and scope of a data breach while angry customers are not
(Binghamton University) Customers who feel afraid in the wake of a data breach care more about the size and scope of the breach than do angry customers, according to research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Children describe technology that gives them a sense of ambiguity as 'creepy'
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers have defined for the first time what children mean when they say technology is 'creepy.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Antibiotic treatment alleviates Alzheimer's disease symptoms in male mice, study reveals
(Rockefeller University Press) Researchers at The University of Chicago have demonstrated that the type of bacteria living in the gut can influence the development of Alzheimer's disease symptoms in mice. The study, which will be published May 16, 2019 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that, by altering the gut microbiome, long-term antibiotic treatment reduces inflammation and slows the growth of amyloid plaques in the brains of male mice, though the same treatment has no effect on female animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Regular crosswords and number puzzles linked to sharper brain in later life
(University of Exeter) Older adults who regularly take part in word and number puzzles have sharper brains, according to the largest online study to date. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news