Researchers successfully train employees to respond to opioid overdose, administer naloxone
(New York University) A small study shows that business managers and staff -- such as those running coffee shops and fast-food restaurants -- can be trained to reverse opioid overdoses, which are known to occur in public bathrooms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research reveals a mitochondrial gene that protects against dementia and other diseases of aging
(University of Southern California) New research from USC has uncovered a previously unknown genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. The study provides insights on how these conditions, and other diseases of aging, might one day be treated and prevented. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Philly refinery fails to include public input in cleanup efforts
This report recommends steps to correct Sunoco's oversight, as well as the need to explore cleanup standards more stringent than those appropriate for ongoing refinery operations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Whose water is it anyway? CSU shares $4.9 million grant for evaluating water rights
(Colorado State University) Climate change, population growth and other factors mean that Western water allocation strategies may benefit from changes over the long term. To bring scientific veracity to these inevitable changes, researchers at Colorado State University, in partnership with the University of Nevada, Reno; Desert Research Institute; Northern Arizona University; and Arizona State University have received a $4.9 million grant from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How will changes in snowpack affect water rights in arid western US?
(Arizona State University) Mountain snowpack is melting earlier, leaving water regulators searching for new approaches and farmers concerned about the risk to their crops. The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Thursday awarded $4.9 million to an interdisciplinary team of researchers from five institutions in three states, to help stakeholders find solutions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Combining multiple CCTV images could help catch suspects
(University of Lincoln) Combining multiple poor quality CCTV images into a single, computer-enhanced composite could improve the accuracy of facial recognition systems used to identify criminal suspects, new research suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Breast milk may be best for premature babies' brain development
(University of Edinburgh) Babies born before their due date show better brain development when fed breast milk rather than formula, a study from the University of Edinburgh has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The extirpation of species outside protected areas
(University College London) Land-based bird populations are becoming confined to nature reserves in some parts of the world -- raising the risk of global extinction -- due to the loss of suitable habitat, according to a report led by UCL. Researchers analyzed biodiversity in the peninsula of Thailand, Borneo, Malaysia, Sumatra, Java and Bali, one of the world's most biologically degraded regions. They found that up to 25 percent of heavy-bodied ground-feeding birds have been made locally extinct in the region. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

EU fisheries failures jeopardize sustainability of small fishing communities
(University of Kent) Traditional artisanal fishing has been harmed by EU fishing policies that favor big businesses and ignores other more sustainable approaches to conserving fish stocks, according to new research from the University of Kent. This is the main finding of research by Dr. Alicia Said, Professor Douglas MacMillan, and Dr Joseph Tzanopoulos of the School of Anthropology and Conservation (SAC) published in the world-leading open-access journal Frontiers in Marine Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Commitment to democratic values predict climate change concern
(Georgia State University) Commitment to democratic values is the strongest predictor of climate change concern globally, Georgia State University faculty have found in a new study comparing climate change attitudes across 36 countries, including the US. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why do people share? It's contagious, six-year study of Hadza people shows
(Cell Press) In the modern world, people cooperate with other people including strangers all the time. We give blood, tip providers of various services, and donate to charity even though there is seemingly nothing in it for us. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on Sept. 20 who've studied Hadza hunter-gatherer people in Tanzania over a six-year period have new and surprising insight into why people work together. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

MDMA (a.k.a. ecstasy) makes octopuses more social too
(Cell Press) When people take MDMA, the drug popularly known as ecstasy, a rush of serotonin, dopamine, and oxytocin produces feelings of emotional closeness and euphoria, making people more interested than normal in connecting with other people. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on Sept. 20 have made the surprising discovery that a species of octopus considered to be primarily solitary and asocial responds to MDMA similarly: by becoming much more interested in engaging with one other. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nomadic hunter-gatherers show that cooperation is flexible, not fixed
(University of Pennsylvania) Why do humans cooperate? For six years, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have worked to answer this great puzzle, focusing on the Hadza, a nomadic hunter-gatherer population in Tanzania. New findings suggest that cooperation is flexible, not fixed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Drug overdose epidemic has been growing exponentially for decades
(University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences) Death rates from drug overdoses in the US have been on an exponential growth curve that began at least 15 years before the mid-1990s surge in opioid prescribing, suggesting that overdose death rates may continue along this same historical growth trajectory for years to come. These findings suggest that, to be successful, prevention efforts must extend beyond control of specific drugs to address deeper factors driving the epidemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Octopuses given mood drug 'ecstasy' reveal genetic link to evolution of social behaviors in humans
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) By studying the genome of a kind of octopus not known for its friendliness toward its peers, then testing its behavioral reaction to a popular mood-altering drug called MDMA or 'ecstasy,' scientists say they have found preliminary evidence of an evolutionary link between the social behaviors of the sea creature and humans, species separated by 500 million years on the evolutionary tree. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

American girls read and write better than boys
(American Psychological Association) As early as the fourth grade, girls perform better than boys on standardized tests in reading and writing, and as they get older that achievement gap widens even more, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers identify a new cause of childhood mitochondrial disease
(Newcastle University) A rapid genetic test developed by Newcastle researchers has identified the first four patients with inherited mutations in a new disease gene, a building block of complex I called NDUFA6. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

EU Fisheries failures jeopardise sustainability of small fishing communities
(University of Kent) Traditional artisanal fishing has been harmed by EU fishing policies that favour big businesses and ignores other more sustainable approaches to conserving fish stocks, according to new research from the University of Kent. This is the main finding of research by Dr Alicia Said, Professor Douglas MacMillan, and Dr Joseph Tzanopoulos of the School of Anthropology and Conservation (SAC) published in the world-leading open-access journal Frontiers in Marine Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Talking with the doctor makes it easier to deal with grief and bereavement
(Aarhus University) In a comprehensive study, researchers from Aarhus University show that grieving patients who receive what is known as talk therapy at the general practitioner shortly after a relative's death, have a lower risk of suicide and psychiatric illness than others. Data from 207,000 million Danes is included in the register-based study, which can contribute to new practices in the preventative area. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Widely used nonprofit efficiency tool doesn't work
(North Carolina State University) A recent study finds that the tool most often used to assess the efficiency of nonprofit organizations isn't just inaccurate -- it is negatively correlated with efficiency. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Private banks do too little to communicate their sustainable investment products
(University of Zurich) More and more private banks are offering sustainable investment options to wealthy clients. How do these products differ from one another? And do the banks' advisory services meet the expectations of investors? A study by the University of Zurich into the products and services of the 15 leading European private banks shows that most still have room for improvement. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Workshy bosses breed contempt and abuse in the workforce, research shows
(University of Exeter) Workshy bosses can promote a contemptuous attitude amongst their staff -- leading to anger, frustration and abuse in the work place, new research has shown. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Out of office: New Baylor study examines relationship between stress and remote work
(Baylor University) Many US employees believe working from home -- or at least away from the office -- can bring freedom and stress-free job satisfaction. A new Baylor University study says, 'Not so fast.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

13th Mainz International Colloquium on Ancient Hebrew
(Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz) The Research Unit on Ancient Hebrew and Epigraphy at the Faculty of Protestant Theology at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in Germany will hold the 13th Mainz International Colloquium on Ancient Hebrew (MICAH) from 2nd November to 4th November 2018. Academics from around the world are invited to come together and use this forum to discuss new findings and the current status of research relating to the ancient Hebrew language, northwest semitic epigraphy, and related subjects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Science is also fun and can be used to solve many of society's needs'
(Universidad Carlos III de Madrid) The Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) is participating in the Madrid European Researchers' Night 2018 with a gathering of academics, artists, scientists and technologists to discuss the relationship between gender and technology in an event that will take place on the afternoon of Friday the September 28 at the Madrid-Puerta de Toledo campus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Where you live might influence how you measure up against your peers
(University of Cologne) Social psychologists uncover important mechanisms of social comparison, showing that it depends on specific, universal social settings and situations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Getting help with parenting makes a difference -- at any age
(University of Oxford) New Oxford University study finds that parenting interventions for helping children with behaviour problems are just as effective in school age, as in younger children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heartbeat paces learning
(University of Jyv ä skyl ä - Jyv ä skyl ä n yliopisto) The processing of external information varies during the phases of the cardiac cycle, shows a new study from the University of Jyv ä skyl ä . (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Hoppy' beer without exploding bottles and too much alcohol
(American Chemical Society) The forgotten art of 'dry-hopping' beer to enhance flavor is back in vogue. But this practice sometimes has undesirable side effects, such as an unexpectedly high alcohol content and high pressures that could cause beer bottles to break. Now, research published in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry explains the biochemical basis of these unintended consequences, which could help brewers create 'hoppy' beverages without the quality-control and safety issues.   (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Going viral: Investors pay more attention to social media stocks
(Michigan Technological University) What is the value of a social media firm? Paying attention to what investors tune into keeps a finger on the pulse of market fluctuations. And a new study finds that retail investors pay attention to social media stocks over other stocks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'The Peace of Westphalia also had its dark side'
(Cluster of Excellence " Religion and Politics ") The 52nd German Historians' Convention (Deutscher Historikertag) is to reevaluate the peace agreement 370 years ago - " It was only with the Peace of Westphalia that the politics of colonization became possible " - " Its global historical dimensions have long been overlooked " - Two years after Steinmeier's speech, the Historians' Convention will also conduct an interim review of the debate " Peace of Westphalia as a model for the Middle East? " (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Outside competition breeds more trust among coworkers: Study
(University of British Columbia) Working in a competitive industry fosters a greater level of trust amongst workers, finds a new study from the University of British Columbia, Princeton University and Aix-Marseille University, published today in Science: Advances. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

If pigeons were brilliant, would they flock?
(University of California - Davis) UC Davis researcher looked at how people behave in simple reasoning games and found that people are usually driven to 'flock,' or behave similarly to others in a given situation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People can handle the truth (more than you think)
(University of Chicago Booth School of Business) New research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business explores the consequences of honesty in everyday life and determines that people can often afford to be more honest than they think. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A little labeling goes a long way
(Northwestern University) New research from Northwestern University reveals that infants can use even a few labeled examples to spark the acquisition of object categories. Those labeled examples lead infants to initiate the process of categorization, after which they can integrate all subsequent objects, labeled or unlabeled, into their evolving category representation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Women who breastfeed for at least five months have more kids
(Cornell University) Cornell University professor of sociology Vida Maralani found in new research that women who breastfeed their first child for five months or longer are more likely to have three of more children, and less likely to have only one child. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research helps to instill persistence in children
(New York University) Encouraging children 'to help,' rather than asking them to 'be helpers,' can instill persistence as they work to fulfill daily tasks that are difficult to complete, finds a new psychology study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study examines how heartfelt guilt affects individuals
(Wiley) For thousands of years, people have closely associated moral cleanliness with acts of physical cleanliness. A recent study published in the Australian Journal of Psychology explored this association by eliciting guilt, a threat to one's moral purity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

College students have unequal access to reliable technology, study finds
(Indiana University) Smartphones and laptops seem ubiquitous at US universities, but there is still a 'digital divide,' with some students less likely than others to have consistent access to reliable technology, according to a study co-authored by an Indiana University sociologist. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

International study suggests ancient globalization
(University of Central Florida) Using energy consumption as a measure, a team of international scientists has found that ancient civilizations engaged in globalization more than previously believed, suggesting that an integrated global economy is nothing new and may have benefited societies for ages. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Making happiness last longer
(Society for Consumer Psychology) The happiness derived from a purchase may last longer for those who set broader goals for the experience. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Do rates of burnout, career-choice regret vary by specialty among resident physicians?
(JAMA Network) Burnout is common among physicians. But do rates of burnout symptoms and career-choice regret vary among physicians in training by clinical specialty? In a study of nearly 3,600 second-year residents who were followed-up with questionnaires since medical school, 45 percent reported burnout symptoms and 14 percent reported regret over their career choice. The frequency of burnout symptoms and career-choice regret varied widely by specialty. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

recommendation statement on behavioral weight loss interventions to prevent obesity-related health problems, death in adults
(JAMA Network) The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that clinicians offer or refer adults with a body mass index of 30 or higher to intensive behavioral interventions that focus on dietary changes and increased physical activity and that provide a variety of components   to support weight loss and to maintain it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hardwired for laziness? Tests show the human brain must work hard to avoid sloth
(University of British Columbia) Society has encouraged people to be more physically active, yet we are actually becoming less active. This new study offers a possible explanation: Our brains may be innately attracted to sedentary behavior. Electroencephalograms showed that test subjects had to summon extra brain resources when trying to avoid physical inactivity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mathematicians calculate the safest way home
(Cardiff University) A mobile app that guides pedestrians along the safest instead of quickest route to their destination is being developed by researchers at Cardiff University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UNIST to accelerate new treatments against incurable diseases
(Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)) South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) celebrates the grand opening ceremony of Cellular Responses to Metabolic Stress Research Center (CRMSRC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why the brain struggles to get off the sofa
(Universit é de Gen è ve) Researchers at UNIGE have studied the neuronal activity of people faced with making the choice between physical activity and doing nothing. They noted that the brain requires far greater resources to escape a general attraction to minimising effort. A struggle then breaks out between the desire to do nothing and the physical activity. The results are consistent with the idea that our ancestors had to avoid unnecessary physical effort to increase their chances of survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Racial/ethnic discrimination associated with lower well-being among adolescents
(American Psychological Association) Racial and ethnic discrimination takes a toll on adolescents and is linked to their depression, poor self-esteem, lower academic achievement, substance use and risky sexual behavior, according to a meta-analysis published in the American Psychological Association's flagship journal, American Psychologist. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Book explores milestones of astronomical discovery
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Marcia Bartusiak's new book, 'Dispatches from Planet 3,' published by Yale University Press, offers a tour of major discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics that digs into the history behind these breakthroughs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is email evil? Bosses are getting boxed in by their inbox
(Michigan State University) New Michigan State University research shows that bosses struggle, like the rest of us, to keep up with email demands. What makes managers unique is that email traffic prevents them from being effective leaders and threatens employee performance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news