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How serious is binge drinking among college students with disabilities?
(SAGE) A new study finds that college students with disabilities binge drink more often than their non-disabled student peers. The study, providing the first picture of alcohol use and binge drinking by US college students with disabilities, is out today in Public Health Reports, a SAGE Publishing journal and the official journal of the Office of the US Surgeon General and the US Public Health Service. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brisbane Airport named Australia's first dementia-friendly airport at guide launch
(Queensland University of Technology) Brisbane Airport was named Australia's first dementia-friendly airport by Alzheimer's Australia at the launch today in the International Terminal of a new guide to the airport for travellers with dementia.The QUT-based Dementia Centre for Research Collaboration: Carers and Consumers (DCRC-CC) has been working with the airport since 2015 to improve the experience of air travel for people with dementia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FAU launches new approach to preventing dementia
(Florida Atlantic University) Is it possible to prevent dementia from happening in the first place? That's what a leading FAU neuroscientist plans to prove using an innovative approach that defies the idea that 'one-size-fits-all' when it comes to battling Alzheimer's disease, Lewy Body Dementia, Parkinson's disease and other related disorders. Using a personalized approach and precision medicine to reduce risk, this center is one of only a handful of centers in the world that focuses on dementia prevention. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stereotypes still affect females' career aspirations in STEM topics
(Frontiers) Study investigates the impact of stereotypes and the role of family, school and society on the self-concept of females already studying these scientific subjects and found that these stereotypes do impact the self-concept of females already studying these scientific subjects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Adulthood wellbeing lower for single-parent kids -- new research
(University of Warwick) People who grew up in single-parent families have lower levels of wellbeing and life satisfaction in adulthood, according to new research by the University of Warwick. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Authenticity key to landing a new job
(University College London) At job interviews, relax and be yourself -- if you're good, being yourself may be the best way to secure a job offer, according to a new study involving UCL researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Negative tweets can trash TV programs for other viewers
(Penn State) Negative social media comments about a television show tend to lower enjoyment for other viewers, while positive comments may not significantly boost their enjoyment, according to researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

On polygamous females and single-parent males
(Bielefeld University) On polygamous females and single-parent males Behavioral researchers at Bielefeld University are studying ploversMale plovers survive more successfully in the wild than females. Behavioral researchers at Bielefeld University have studied how sex biases develop across the life span of the plover. They report on the consequences of the surplus of males for rearing chicks in the research journal 'Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences'. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Quantum thermometer or optical refrigerator?
(National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) In an arranged marriage of optics and mechanics, physicists have created microscopic structural beams that have a variety of powerful uses when light strikes them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

White people show race bias when judging deception
(Association for Psychological Science) When making judgments about who is lying and who is telling the truth, new research shows that White people are more likely to label a Black person as a truth-teller compared with a White person, even though their spontaneous behavior indicates the reverse bias. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Science sets sail
(University of Erlangen-Nuremberg) FAU explores new research horizons with voyage of scientific discovery on the Baltic Sea (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study examines gun policy preferences across racial groups
(University of Illinois at Chicago) Support for all forms of gun control is stronger among Latinos and blacks than whites, according to researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Starting school young can put child wellbeing at risk
(University of Exeter) A study led by the University of Exeter Medical School which investigated more than 2,000 children across 80 primary schools in Devon, has found that children who are younger than their peers when they start school are more likely to develop poorer mental health, as rated by parents and teachers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Can courts solve everything?
(Goethe University Frankfurt) A new Emmy Noether Independent Junior Research Group has started work at the Faculty of Law of Goethe University Frankfurt. The team headed by Dr. Anuscheh Farahat is dealing with the role played by constitutional courts in transnational solidarity conflicts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Identified brain circuitry bridges neural and behavioral roles in PTSD
(NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine) Specific cerebral circuitry bridges chemical changes deep in the brain and the more outward behavioral expressions associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which could lead to more objective biomarkers for the disorder, according to a comprehensive review of rapidly changing data published June 22 in the New England Journal of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New 3-D display takes the eye fatigue out of virtual reality
(The Optical Society) A new type of 3-D display could solve the long-standing problem eye fatigue when using VR and AR equipment by greatly improving the viewing comfort of these wearable devices. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Late premature birth increases risk of recurrent hospitalization for respiratory illness
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study of children up to 2 years of age showed that those born late preterm (34-36 weeks) had a significantly greater risk of recurrent hospitalization due to respiratory illness compared to those who were born full term (>37 weeks). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

An end to population aging in China, Germany, USA
(International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis) New measures of aging, combined with UN population projections, show that population aging is likely to end before 2100 in China, Germany, and the USA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New flood study reveals America's most vulnerable communities
(Louisiana State University) Floods are the natural disaster that kill the most people. They are also the most common natural disaster. As the threat of flooding increases worldwide, a group of scientists at LSU have gathered valuable information on flood hazard, exposure and vulnerability in counties throughout the US (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In organizations, bullying begets whining, study finds
(Northern Illinois University) In organizations, bullying within decision-making groups appears to go hand in hand with whining, according to a new study. 'In other words, when some people act dominant by bullying, others respond by being submissive and whining,' says David Henningsen, a Northern Illinois University professor of communication who led the study. The researchers found that both reported bullying and whining behaviors negatively impacted group perceptions of cohesiveness and decision-making effectiveness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Common water treatments could damage DNA
(University of East Anglia) Scientists are warning that a water treatment widely used in developing countries could be damaging the DNA of those drinking it.Despite poor evidence of their effectiveness as a water disinfectant, colloidal silver and silver nanoparticles are increasingly being promoted for treating potentially contaminated drinking water in low income countries.A study led by the University of East Anglia has concluded that there is a risk these treatments could in fact cause genotoxicity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NJIT's center for pre-college programs receives upward bound federal grants
(New Jersey Institute of Technology) The United States Department of Education (USDOE) has awarded the Center for Pre-College Programs (CPCP) at New Jersey Institute of Technology two grants for its Upward Bound program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTSA Center for Community and Business Research releases Eagle Ford Shale study
(University of Texas at San Antonio) Commissioned by the South Texas Energy and Economic Roundtable (STEER), The University of Texas at San Antonio's (UTSA) Center for Community and Business Research (CCBR) completed the latest Eagle Ford Shale (EFS) study in June. The study titled, " Economic Impact of the Eagle Ford Shale, Business Opportunities and the New Normal " provides new trend data and updated economic impact analysis across 2014, 2015 and, 2016. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Perceptions about body image linked to increased alcohol, tobacco use for teens
(University of Missouri-Columbia) Virginia Ramseyer-Winter, assistant professor of social work, found negative body image is associated with increased tobacco and alcohol use, with implications for both young men and women. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Addressing refugee and immigrant women's stress
(Wiley) Refugee and undocumented immigrant women may experience unique and ongoing stress following migration, in addition to the pre- and post-migration traumatic events all immigrants may experience. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Feelings of power change people's non-verbal responses to dominance displays
(University of Kent) Feelings of power determine how people respond non-verbally to dominance displays such as a staring gaze, new research led by a psychologist at the University of Kent, UK, has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Oral storytelling skills impact reading differently for African-American boys and girls
(Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute) The oral storytelling skills of African-American preschoolers make a difference in how quickly their reading skills develop, according to a new study from the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute (FPG) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Researchers say the effect is much different for girls and boys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Strategic studying limits the costs of divided attention
(Association for Psychological Science) Multitasking while studying may impair overall memory for the study material, but your ability to strategically identify and remember the most important information may stay intact, according to new findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Wild monkeys use loud calls to assess the relative strength of rivals
(University of Michigan) Gelada males -- a close relative to baboons -- pay attention to the loud calls of a rival to gain information about his relative fighting ability compared to themselves, a new study indicated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New approach to teaching music improvisation enhances creativity
(Frontiers) New research looks at developing processes for musical improvisation that enhance creativity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

German cities traumatized in WWII show distinct psychological resilience today
(Saarland University) German Angst is a term commonly used to characterize the perceived tendency of Germans to be pessimistic. But is there anything to it and what are potential historical sources? A team of psychologists led by Martin Obschonka have addressed the issue in a study. To the surprise of the researchers, the data showed that those German cities that had suffered from more severe strategic bombing than other cities show more, not less, psychological resilience today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

To work or not to work: Moms' well being rests on what she wants
(Arizona State University) The center of a mother's life tends to be her children and her family, but if mom is unhappy about staying home with the kids or about working outside the home then she (and anyone close to her) may suffer, according to new research from Arizona State University. The research showed that the best adjusted mothers were the ones who pursued the lifestyle they wanted. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds most people aren't as happy as their friends on social media
(Indiana University) A study led by computer scientists at Indiana University has found that people with the most connections on social media are also happier. This may cause most social media users to not only regard themselves as less popular than their friends but also less happy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Buyer beware: Antimicrobial products can do more harm than good
(Green Science Policy Institute) Are you buying antimicrobial or antibacterial soaps? According to over 200 scientists and medical professionals, you may want to save your money. A consensus statement published today in the peer-reviewed scientific journal Environmental Health Perspectives concludes that common antimicrobial products do not provide health benefits and cause health and environmental harm. The statement also calls for greater caution in using antimicrobial chemicals in everyday products. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Journal of Hepatology cited over 30,000 times in 2016
(European Association for the Study of the Liver) The Journal of Hepatology achieved its highest impact factor score yet, making it the fifth most highly cited journal in the field of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Taking stock early on is crucial for working late in life
(University of Gothenburg) Do you want to keep working until you're 70, or even 75? Then, it's good to give this some thought before you turn 50. New research now calls for early planning, and at the same time shoots down prejudices against working seniors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scottish independence -- 'it was wrong then and it's wrong now'
(University of Huddersfield) Lecturers at the University of Huddersfield have contributed to a new book about an embattled Tory Prime Minister beset by political crises -- including Europe -- and facing the possibility of electoral meltdown. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tennis cheats may be predicted by their moral standards
(Frontiers) A new study, published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Psychology, examines these personal characteristics and links them to direct observations of cheating during tennis matches. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How a girl is raised can influence her adult sporting success
(Frontiers) A new study, published in the open-access journal, Frontiers in Psychology, instead looks at the motivation level of successful female footballers and whether their upbringing influences this desire to succeed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New findings reverse hypothesis of GABA neurodevelopment in schizophrenia
(Elsevier) New research by scientists at the University of Pittsburgh provides an unprecedented level of resolution and insight into disturbances in cortical GABAergic microcircuits, which are thought to underlie cognitive impairments in schizophrenia. Published in Biological Psychiatry, the study led by Dr. Kenneth Fish reveals new detailed understanding about alterations in neurocircuitry that point to abnormal neurodevelopment in the disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Plant reveals anti-Alzheimer's compounds
(Frontiers) Japanese scientists have developed a method to isolate and identify active compounds in plant medicines, which accurately accounts for drug behavior in the body. Using the technique, they have identified several active compounds from Drynaria Rhizome, a traditional plant medicine, which improve memory and reduce disease characteristics in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ancient skulls shed light on migration in the Roman empire
(North Carolina State University) Skeletal evidence shows that, hundreds of years after the Roman Republic conquered most of the Mediterranean world, coastal communities in what is now south and central Italy still bore distinct physical differences to one another -- though the same could not be said of the area around Rome itself. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

No evidence of gender bias in philosophy
(Frontiers) Despite being a male-dominated field, a recent study found no evidence for gender bias against women in philosophy, in terms of securing tenure-track positions as college professors. So why are there less women in philosophy overall? Some studies show that less women are choosing to major in philosophy at the undergraduate level, and so other factors may be turning them off the discipline at an early stage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Familiar faces look happier than unfamiliar ones
(University of California - San Diego) It's a cheesy pick-up line: 'Haven't I seen you somewhere before?' It might also be something that profoundly alters how we perceive other people. According to research from UC San Diego, familiar faces look happier to us than unfamiliar ones, even when faces are objectively expressing the same emotion to the same degree. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Students of all races feel safer in ethnically diverse middle schools, UCLA study says
(University of California - Los Angeles) Middle school students -- African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans and Caucasians -- felt safer and less bullied, reported more tolerance and less prejudice toward students of other ethnicities and believed teachers treated all students more fairly and equally in more diverse schools, UCLA researchers report today in the journal Child Development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: While trust is inherited, distrust is not
(University of Arizona) Research has shown that how trusting a person is may depend, at least in part, on his or her genes. However, distrust does not appear to be inherited in the same way, according to a new study led by the University of Arizona. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mathematical biology tackles destructive plant virus
(National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS)) Plant diseases pose a serious threat to global food security, especially in developing countries, where millions of people depend on consuming what they harvest.In sub-Saharan Africa, one plant disease in particular -- maize lethal necrosis -- is ravaging one of the region's preferred crops for food, feed and income. But understanding its biology in order to manage the disease is difficult because the disease arises from two viruses interacting -- which is where mathematics comes into play. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Students of all races & ethnicities benefit from ethnically diverse middle schools
(Society for Research in Child Development) More than half of school-age youth in the United States are members of ethnic minority groups, yet the nation's public schools are becoming less ethnically diverse. Recognizing these conflicting trends and the lack of research on the effects of ethnic diversity, a new study sought to determine how the diversity of middle school students and classrooms shapes students' self-reported well-being and their views on race. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Positive engagement in preschool key to developmental gains
(Society for Research in Child Development) Many interventions and programs designed to improve low-income children's lives focus on providing high-quality early-childhood education. Preschool classrooms that are emotionally supportive, well-organized, and cognitively stimulating can help boost children's learning and development. Yet for the most part, focusing on the quality of early-childhood education has emphasized teachers, often missing the central role that children play in their own development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Boyhood violence victims are more likely to commit similar acts on intimate partners
(Case Western Reserve University) According to new research, 60 percent of college-aged men reported being both victims and perpetrators of violence with an intimate partner in the year before their participation in the study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news