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For a better 'I,' there needs to be a supportive 'we'
(University of Michigan) If you're one of those lucky individuals with high motivation and who actively pursues personal growth goals, thank your family and friends who support you. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Studies support reduced risk potential of the Vype ePen e-cigarette
(R&D at British American Tobacco) Tests on Vype ePen, a commercially available e-cigarette, reveal the relatively simple nature of Vype ePen vapor compared to cigarette smoke, that it has little or no impact on human cells in certain lab-based tests and that it effectively delivers nicotine to the userThe results of one test are important, but the combined results of all these tests build a picture of a product with the potential to be substantially reduced-risk compared to cigarettes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How aerial thermal imagery is revolutionizing archaeology
(Dartmouth College) A Dartmouth-led study has demonstrated how the latest aerial thermal imagery is transforming archaeology due to advancements in technology. Today's thermal cameras, commercial drones and photogrammetric software has introduced a new realm of possibilities for collecting site data-- field survey data across a much larger area can now be obtained in much less time. The findings in Advances in Archaeological Practice serve as a manual on how to use aerial thermography. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

First large scale study of cocaine users leads to breakthrough in drug testing
(University of Surrey) Scientists from the University of Surrey have developed a rapid and highly sensitive fingerprint test that can take just seconds to confirm whether someone has used cocaine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

On the contrary: Smarter than conventional stock market wisdom?
(World Scientific) This book examines the nature of the stock market and its implications for corporate management, and provides an incisive approach to core issues in finance. The authors' critical and scholarly look at the subject is presented in this book in a light-hearted style does not undermine the serious impact that the thoughtful insights has raised. Instead, it that allows experts and students alike to easily comprehend and appreciate the underlying concepts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Solidarity between good and justice keeps a society together
(Soka University) Soka University researcher Isamu Okada and his collaborators Tatsuya Sasaki (University of Vienna) and Yutaka Nakai (Shibaura Institute of Technology) have found that the solidarity of philanthropism and reciprocity is necessary to maintain cooperative societies. Their paper was published in Scientific Reports on Aug. 29, 2017. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ancient textiles reveal differences in Mediterranean fabrics in the 1st millennium BC
(University of Cambridge) Analysis of Iron Age textiles indicates that during c. 1000-400 BC Italy shared the textile culture of Central Europe, while Greece was largely influenced by the traditions of ancient Near East. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ultrafast 5G mobile broadband thanks to millimeter-wave band technology
(IMDEA Networks Institute) The great ambition of the networked society is to connect everything, everywhere, all the time. But the ideal of seamless communications poses fundamental challenges to legacy networks that the new 5G communication networks currently under development need to solve. One of such challenges is supporting the significant growth of traffic demands. Next generation services such as mobile cloud service, gaming, social-networking applications and 3-D immersive applications require massive capacity and higher data rates than current 4G networks are unable to sustain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

700-year-old saint myth has been proven (almost) true
(University of Southern Denmark) Scientists confirm that the age and content of an old sack is in accordance with a medieval myth about Saint Francis of Assisi. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Twitter bots for good: USC ISI study reveals how information spreads on social media
(University of Southern California) Twitter bots have earned a bad reputation -- but not all bots are bad, suggests a new study co-authored by Emilio Ferrara, a USC Information Sciences Institute computer scientist and a research assistant professor at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering's Department of Computer Science with a team from the Technical University of Denmark. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chronic migraine cases are amplified by jawbone disorder, according to research
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) A study conducted by researchers in Brazil shows patients with chronic migraine are three times as likely to suffer from severe temporomandibular disorder. Though not a primary cause, the disorder is thought to accentuate and perpetuate sensitivity to pain; therefore, researchers recommend in chronic migraine clinical practice the assessement of the disorder's symptoms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why do people in new democracies stop voting?
(University of Montreal) An exhaustive study of legislative elections in all 91 democracies that were born around the world from 1939 to 2015 finds that in half of them, there was a substantial decline in voter turnout. But what actually caused people to stay home depended on what country they lived in and how democratization had happened there. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Are you happy you voted -- or didn't?
(University of Montreal) An analysis of 22 election-period surveys in five countries shows that people who cast a ballot are much more glad they did than people who abstain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Politically driven: How today's advances in science & technology come about
(World Scientific) The 1980s witnessed technologies focus on reducing costs and improving performance. However, at the turn of 21st century, there appeared to have been a paradigm shift; moving scientific and technological innovation into the age of 'Politico-Engineering' (i.e. politically initiated engineering), with an emphasis on sustainable and crisis-managing technologies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Neandertal skeleton reveals the growth pattern of our extinct cousins
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) A new analysis of a well-preserved Neandertal child's skeleton reveals that Neandertals may have had extended period of brain growth compared to modern humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

If at first adults don't succeed, babies are more likely to try, try again
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Babies who observe adults push through failure and repeatedly attempt to achieve a goal are more likely to persist when faced with their own difficult tests, scientists report. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Toilets for $10 or less are accelerating progress towards a major goal: Sanitation for all
(Grand Challenges Canada) The Water Innovation Engine, a pioneering partnership led by the Australian Government's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) to stimulate bold new ideas and approaches in the water sector, today launched the global " Urban Sanitation Challenge " with the announcement of a multi-million dollar investment in five projects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why poison frogs don't poison themselves
(University of Texas at Austin) Poison frogs harbor some of the most potent neurotoxins we know, yet scientists have long wondered -- how do these frogs keep from poisoning themselves? With a new paper published in the journal Science, scientists are a step closer to resolving that head-scratcher. And the answer has potential consequences for the fight against pain and addiction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

We must accelerate transitions for sustainability and climate change, experts say
(University of Sussex) We must move faster towards a low-carbon world if we are to limit global warming to 2 degrees C this century, experts have warned. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

IUPUI study links juveniles' views of police with likelihood of aggressive behavior
(Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis School of Science) A new Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis study of juvenile offenders finds that when youth perceive police injustice, it affects not only how they view the justice system, but also their rates of aggression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New technique accurately digitizes transparent objects
(The Optical Society) A new imaging technique makes it possible to precisely digitize clear objects and their surroundings, an achievement that has eluded current state-of-the-art 3-D rendering methods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Restoring wetlands and our environment
(American Society of Agronomy) Wetlands, including the Everglades, are important to the health of the environment. Restoring their ability to process water is the topic of several talks at a scientific meeting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ancient DNA data fills in thousands of years of human prehistory in Africa
(Cell Press) By sequencing the ancient genomes of 15 individuals from different parts of Africa, researchers reporting in the journal Cell on Sept. 21 have reconstructed the prehistory of humans on the continent, going back thousands of years. The findings shed light on which human populations lived in eastern and southern Africa between 8,000 and 1,000 years ago, the researchers say. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The surprising, ancient behavior of jellyfish
(California Institute of Technology) The discovery that primitive jellyfish sleep suggests that sleep is an ancient, evolutionarily conserved behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How the views of liberals evolved from the 19th century to the present day
(RUDN University) Scientists from the RUDN University have analyzed historical sources and revealed the foreign policy views of Russian liberals from the 1850s to the early 1890s. The researchers came to the conclusion that the views of modern liberals have nothing to do with the views of their predecessors. The study is published in The International History Review. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Springer and Graz University Press enter new co-publishing agreement
(Springer) Springer and Graz University Press have signed a new co-publishing agreement to publish co-branded books in English. Through this cooperation, the University of Graz Press will be able to provide its authors with international distribution via SpringerLink, where all content is made available electronically in a digital format. Springer will benefit from the addition of further influential titles to its comprehensive book program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

WWF and UCF study wildlife rangers, what motivates them?
(University of Central Florida) Wildlife rangers are on the front lines protecting our most iconic species -- tigers, elephants, gorillas and many others. But their challenges involve more than confrontations with wild animals and poachers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Many YouTube videos glorify alcohol
(Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs) YouTube videos featuring alcohol are heavily viewed and nearly always promote the 'fun' side of drinking. That's the finding of a study in September issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

No magic pill to cure alcohol dependence yet
(Society for the Study of Addiction) A new study published by the scientific journal Addiction has found no reliable evidence for using nalmefene, naltrexone, acamprosate, baclofen or topiramate to control drinking in patients with alcohol dependence or alcohol use disorder. At best, some treatments showed low to medium efficacy in reducing drinking, but those findings were from studies with a high risk of bias. None demonstrated any benefit on health outcomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Palau ocean sustainability linked to tourist consumption of reef fish
(Nippon Foundation-Nereus Program) Reducing tourist consumption of reef fish is critical for Palau's ocean sustainability, finds a new Nippon Foundation-UBC Nereus Program study published today in Marine Policy. While climate change is expected to lead to sharp declines in Palau's reefs, the best tourism management strategy includes a more than 70 per cent reduction in reef fish consumption by visitors. These findings are highly relevant for sustainable development in small island developing states under climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Smokers who quit have metabolite levels that resemble those of nonsmokers
(American Chemical Society) Even after years of smoking, the body has a remarkable ability to repair itself. Now in a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research, scientists report that certain metabolic changes occur soon after quitting, and these changes could help explain how some ill-effects of smoking might be reversible. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chemists speak out on sexual harassment in academia
(American Chemical Society) Sexual misconduct on college campuses is an age-old problem that continues to plague students and faculty, and is now the subject of renewed debate. It can traumatize those who are harassed, and change the course of people's careers. The cover article in Chemical& Engineering News, the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society, shares how sexual harassment has affected chemistry students and faculty, and what universities and scientific societies are doing about it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brown to study music program for nursing home residents with dementia
(Brown University) Researchers at Brown's Center for Long-Term Care Quality and Innovation landed a $3.7 million grant to conduct a pragmatic cluster randomized trial of the MUSIC& MEMORY program at as many as 60 nursing homes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Guess who? Facial expressions can cause confusion
(University of Bristol) Photos of the same person can look substantially different. For example, your passport photo may look quite different from your driving license, or your face in holiday photos. Research has shown when photos of an individual's face are judged too dissimilar to go together, people will tend to think they show several different identities. Scientists from the University of Bristol tested this concept further by exploring what happens when the photos show faces with different expressions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research provides clues to treat depression, autism and other neuropsychiatric disorders
(Florida Atlantic University) Alterations in a naturally occurring chemical in the brain called serotonin have been linked to a number of neuropsychiatric disorders including depression, anxiety and autism. A team of researchers is revealing critical insights into the mechanisms that can drive diminished serotonin signaling during development and in adulthood to provide new ways of treating several widespread neuropsychiatric disorders associated with perturbed serotonin signaling. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Using AI, citizen science and disaster response to help victims of Hurricane Irma
(University of Oxford) A highly unusual collaboration between information engineers at Oxford, the Zooniverse citizen science platform and international disaster response organization Rescue Global is enabling a rapid and effective response to Hurricane Irma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Real or fake? Creating fingers to protect identities
(Michigan State University) MSU biometric expert Anil Jain and doctoral student Joshua Engelsma have for the first time designed and created a fake finger containing multiple key properties of human skin. Commonly called a spoof, this fake finger has been used to test two of the predominant types of fingerprint readers to help determine their resilience to spoof attacks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

EU life science research institutes want a more balanced Framework Programme 9
(Center for Genomic Regulation) EU-LIFE, the alliance of 13 leading life science research institutes in Europe announced their key priorities for the next Framework Programme for Research and Innovation that will run from 2021 to 2027. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How Teotihuacan's urban design was lost and found
(De Gruyter Open) The paper outlines how the urban design of the city of Teotihuacan differed from past and subsequent cities, only to be rediscovered and partially modelled on many centuries later by the Aztecs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Kessler study shows behavioral approach reduces cognitive fatigue in multiple sclerosis
(Kessler Foundation) MS researchers describe a new nonpharmacological approach to reducing cognitive fatigue in MS. Using functional neuroimaging, they showed the prospect of monetary reward stimulates the fronto-striatal network and reduces cognitive fatigue in MS and controls. This is the first study to demonstrate this effect in an MS population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Voters reward -- or punish -- school board incumbents based on white students' achievement
(Baylor University) Voters reward or punish incumbent school board members based on the achievement of white students in their district, while outcomes for African-American and Hispanic students get relatively little attention at the ballot box, according to a study co-authored by a Baylor University scholar. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Parents: How you manage conflict has an impact on your kids
(University of Arizona) It's not always bad for children to be exposed to their parents' disagreements. It's how those disagreements are handled that really matters, according to a University of Arizona study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Life differences make women less risk tolerant when investing
(University of Missouri-Columbia) Prior research has long shown that women are less risk tolerant in their financial decisions than men. Now, a researcher from the University of Missouri has found that men and women do not think about investment risks differently. Instead, income uncertainty affects men and women differently, which leads to differences in risk tolerance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Motivation may be less limited than we think
(University of Toronto) Although we tire at specific tasks, study finds motivation to work may be stable throughout the day (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Army research center maps LA Coliseum in 3-D for Homeland Security
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) The US Army Research Laboratory's university partner - the University of Southern California Institute for Creative Technologies, in collaboration with the Aerospace Corporation and Department of Homeland Security, created a three-dimensional reconstruction of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum to help ensure the safety of its visitors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

3-D analysis of dog fossils sheds light on domestication debate
(Cornell University) In an effort to settle the debate about the origin of dog domestication, a technique that uses 3-D scans of fossils is helping researchers determine the difference between dogs and wolves. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Seniors with Type 2 diabetes may have increased risk for fracture
(Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research) Though seniors with type 2 diabetes (T2D) tend to have normal or higher bone density than their peers, researchers have found that they are more likely to succumb to fractures than seniors without T2D. In a new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, researchers from Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research found older adults with type 2 diabetes had deficits in cortical bone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What will become of English in a post-Brexit European Union?
(Wiley) How might the Brexit process affect the status of the English language within the European Union? Without Britain, will English even cease to be a language of the Union? A new article in World Englishes explores these questions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

India has avoided 1 million child deaths since 2005, new study concludes
(St. Michael's Hospital) India has avoided about 1 million deaths of children under age five since 2005, driven by significant reductions in mortality from pneumonia, diarrhea, tetanus and measles, according to new research published today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Political polarization? Don't blame the web, Brown study says
(Brown University) Despite the popular narrative that the web is to blame for rising political polarization, a study by a Brown University economist has found that recent growth in polarization is greatest for demographic groups in which individuals are least likely to use the internet and social media. This means that data does not support the claim that the internet is the most significant driver of partisanship. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news