Many wildlife-vehicle collisions preventable
(University of Waterloo) A new study from the University of Waterloo has found that Ontario could save millions by implementing simple measures to help prevent vehicle accidents involving wildlife. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study debunks Dale Carnegie advice to 'put yourself in their shoes'
(American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) The researchers debunk the theories canonized in Dale Carnegie's How to Win Friends and Influence People that assuming you understand someone else's thoughts, feelings, attitude, or mental state is a correct approach to interpersonal insight. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New medicare model produces expert nurses to address shortage of primary care
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) In an article published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania researchers call for modernizing the way Medicare pays for training nurses, and highlight a successful new model of cost-effectively training more advanced practice nurses to practice community-based primary care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Crumple up this keyboard and stick it in your pocket
(American Chemical Society) Bendable portable keyboards for use with computers and other electronic devices are already on the market, but they have limited flexibility, and they're fairly sizable when rolled up for transport. Now researchers have crafted an inexpensive keyboard that is so tough, flexible and thin that it can be crumpled up and tucked in a pocket without damaging it. The study appears in the journal ACS Applied Materials& Interfaces. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Double jeopardy: The high costs of living in Nairobi's slums
(University at Buffalo) Tenants in the slums of Nairobi, Kenya, receive drastically inferior household services and pay more rent compared to those in its formal settlements, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why 9 to 5 isn't the only shift that can work for busy families
(University of Washington) A new study from the University of Washington finds that the impacts of parent work schedules on children vary by age and gender, and often reflect which shift a parent works. Rotating shifts -- a schedule that varies day by day or week by week -- can be most problematic for children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The seed that could bring clean water to millions
(College of Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University) Carnegie Mellon University's Biomedical Engineering and Chemical Engineering Professors Bob Tilton and Todd Przybycien recently co-authored a paper with Ph.D. students Brittany Nordmark and Toni Bechtel, and alumnus John Riley, further refining a process that could soon help provide clean water to many in water-scarce regions. The process, created by Tilton's former student and co-author Stephanie Velegol, uses sand and plant materials readily available in many developing nations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How physics explains the evolution of social organization
(Duke University) A scientist at Duke University says the natural evolution of social organizations into larger and more complex communities exhibiting distinct hierarchies can be predicted from the same law of physics that gives rise to tree branches and river deltas -- a concept called the constructal law. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Intervention shows promise for treating depression in preschool-aged children
(NIH/National Institute of Mental Health) Children as young as 3-years-old can be diagnosed with clinical depression. Although young children are sometimes prescribed antidepressants, a psychotherapeutic intervention is needed. Researchers adapted Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), (a validated treatment for disruptive behavioral disorders in children), by adding new emotional development content. PCIT-ED treatment resulted in significant improvements in depression for both children and their parents, suggesting PCIT-ED as a powerful and low-risk approach to the treatment of preschool depression. (Source: EurekAlert!...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Using bloodstains at crime scenes to determine age of a suspect or victim
(American Chemical Society) From the spatter analysis made famous in the TV show Dexter to the frequent DNA profiling of CSI and the real cases covered in the FBI Files, blood tests are ubiquitous in forensic science. Now, researchers report in ACS Central Science that a new blood test, which could be performed at a crime scene, could help determine the age of a suspect or victim within just an hour. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Focusing on next 10 years could lead to better use of recommendations for cancer screening
(Society for Personality and Social Psychology) In a recent study, asking participants to decide on a screening schedule for the next 10 years, instead of just making a single decision for an upcoming appointment, nearly doubled the number of participants who followed evidence-based recommendations for cervical cancer screening. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Birds have time-honored traditions, too
(Duke University) By faithfully copying the most popular songs, swamp sparrows create time-honored song traditions that can be just as long-lasting as human traditions, finds a new study. The results show that creating traditions that pass the test of time doesn't necessarily require exceptional smarts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is it their own fault?! How people judge the exclusion of others
(University of Basel) The way people view the social exclusion of others varies -- depending on how much they think the excluded person is to blame. However, this is heavily influenced by how similar the group members are to each other, as a research team from the University of Basel writes in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Reading risk behavior in the brain
(Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena) Anxious people take fewer risks -- in itself this is not a surprising observation. However, a team of psychologists from the University of Jena, together with partners from W ü rzburg (Gerrmany) and Victoria (Canada) have succeeded in making this decision process visible in the brain, allowing them to predict the behaviour of individuals. To this end, they conducted an experiment to measure the risk behaviour of participants while using electroencephalography (EEG) to observe their brain activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mega-cruises are becoming copies of the great Las Vegas resorts
(University of Seville) The productive improvements and innovations in the shipyards, which have made the mega ships possible, have made the cruise ship operators look for a leisure model that fills the abundant space that these new floating cities offer. In many of these ships, the classic model of luxury has been abandoned to copy, with great precision, the theme parks of the great casino resorts of Las Vegas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dogs understand what's written all over your face
(Springer) Dogs are capable of understanding the emotions behind an expression on a human face. The study in Springer's journal Learning& Behavior is the latest to reveal just how connected dogs are with people. The research also provides evidence that dogs use different parts of their brains to process human emotions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People who feel threatened by vegetarianism more likely to care less about animals
(University of Kent) New research suggests that if people perceive the rise of vegetarianism as a threat to their way of life they are more likely to care less for some animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New screening tool could help diagnose early cognitive decline in dementia from home
(City University London) An international team of scientists have developed a new way to screen for age-related cognitive decline at home using a test which asks people to detect sounds and flashes on their laptop or phone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Around the world, people have surprisingly modest notions of the 'ideal' life
(Association for Psychological Science) It seems reasonable that people would want to maximize various aspects of life if they were given the opportunity to do so, whether it's the pleasure they feel, how intelligent they are, or how much personal freedom they have. In actuality, people around the world seem to aspire for more moderate levels of these and other traits, according to findings published inPsychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Multiracial congregations have nearly doubled in the United States
(Baylor University) The percentage of multiracial congregations in the United States has nearly doubled, with about one in five American congregants attending a place of worship that is racially mixed, according to a Baylor University study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brainhealth: Financial decision-making capacity need not decline in healthy advanced aging
(Center for BrainHealth) New research from The Center for BrainHealth ® at The University of Texas at Dallas shows that advancing age alone is not the defining factor in impaired financial decision-making. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Age limit for federal food assistance program impacts reading scores, learning
(University of Missouri-Columbia) Nearly 1 million children face food insecurity simply because they were born late in the year. No safety net coverage exists for these children when they age out of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and they are not yet eligible to attend kindergarten. Irma Arteaga, assistant professor in the Truman School of Public Affairs at the University of Missouri, has found that not only does the coverage gap impact overall food insecurity, it reduces reading scores at kindergarten entry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Popular streaming playlists can boost a song's revenue by up to $163k
(European Commission Joint Research Centre) Artists lucky enough to find their song on Spotify's most popular playlists could see could see considerable increases in streams and revenue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Political leaning influences city water policies as strongly as climate
(Vanderbilt University) Researchers examined city water policies over the course of four years to create a database of water conservation policies. They also developed an associated index of the number of different categories of policies each city adopted and gathered data on the climate, water sources, population, economy and political leanings of each city and its surrounding metropolitan statistical area -- as reflected in the 2008 and 2012 presidential elections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FSU researchers find religious involvement deters recreational and medical marijuana use
(Florida State University) FSU Associate Professor Amy Burdette and her team found that individuals who regularly attend church and report that religion is very important in their daily decision making are less likely to use marijuana recreationally and medically. The study was recently published in the Journal of Drug Issues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Having stress-related disorder associated with increased risk of developing autoimmune disease
(JAMA Network) Stress-related disorders brought on by traumatic or stressful life events were associated with increased risk of developing an autoimmune disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Good primary lowers ED use for those with intellectual and developmental disabilities
(St. Michael's Hospital) One in three adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) visit the emergency department annually but effective primary care could reduce these numbers, suggests a new study led by St. Michael's Hospital and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Monash research provides insights into why older people respond poorly to cancer treatment
(Monash University) Researchers may have found a group of immune cells that increase in number with age but are too worn out to fight diseases. The accumulation of dysfunctional virtual memory T cells, in addition to the loss of true na ï ve T cells, may explain why older people have reduced immune responses to cancer and vaccines, why cancer immunotherapy is less successful in the elderly, and may help to tailor cancer immunotherapy treatments specifically for older patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

D for danger! Speech sounds convey emotions
(Bocconi University) Individual speech sounds -- phonemes -- are statistically associated with negative or positive emotions in several languages, new research published in the journal Cognition by Bocconi Professor Zachary Estes, his Warwick colleague James Adelman and Bocconi student Martina Cossu shows. These associations help us quickly avoid dangers, because the phoneme-emotion associations are strongest at the beginning of the word and the phonemes that are spoken fastest tend to have a negative association (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The significance of voice arose in Russian literature due to Tolstoy
(University of Tyumen) Leo Tolstoy was the first Russian writer to make voice a distinctive individual, professional and social feature. He created a new stereotypical vocabulary. Tolstoy's voice stereotypes have since been adopted by other Russian writers and still influence them today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Kids grasp that you get what you pay for
(University of Michigan) From a young age, children have a nuanced understanding of fairness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Drones could be used to detect dangerous 'butterfly' landmines in post-conflict regions
(Binghamton University) Drones could be used to detect dangerous 'butterfly' landmines in remote regions of post-conflict countries, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Advancing study of the mind should be a global priority
(Sheridan College) Nathaniel Barr, Sheridan College and Gordon Pennycook, Yale University have synthesized a large body of research to reveal how the study of reason is related to the most pressing issues of our time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Teachers view immigrant, minority parents as less involved in their children's education
(University of Pennsylvania) A study from the University of Pennsylvania revealed that such perspectives from educators can end up hampering the academic trajectory of the students involved. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows approach can help English learners improve at math word problems
(University of Kansas) University of Kansas education professors have published a study showing that a comprehension-based strategy can help English learners improve their math word-problem solving abilities. The approach boosts reading comprehension and problem solving as well. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers gain insight into infant handling by young bonobos
(University of Oregon) University of Oregon anthropologist Klaree Boose followed her intuition about her observations of bonobos at a US zoo. She now theorizes that young females of the endangered ape species prepare for motherhood and form social bonds by helping mothers take care of infants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Liberals do drink more lattes, but maybe not for the reasons you think
(University of Pennsylvania) Do liberals really drink more lattes? According to a new study from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, liberals in America are indeed more likely than conservatives to drink lattes. The researchers believe this is because liberals are more open to globalization and products associated with other countries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

RFK's assassination: A medical analysis of his injuries and neurosurgical care
(Journal of Neurosurgery Publishing Group) Covers the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy. The authors 'review the eyewitness reports of the mechanism of injury, the care rendered for three hours prior to the emergency craniotomy, the clinical course, and, ultimately, the autopsy.' The discussion of autopsy findings is supplemented by an artist's depiction of the extent of Senator Kennedy's head injury. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Parents' explanations of peer interactions affect how children interpret peers' behavior
(Society for Research in Child Development) New research in the journal Child Development shows that parents can help their children perceive less hostility in their social world by framing social situations in a positive way, and thus, reduce their likelihood of behaving aggressively. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Good relationships with siblings may buffer the effects of family conflict
(Society for Research in Child Development) A new longitudinal study finds that having a good relationship with a sibling may help buffer the distress of ongoing hostility between parents. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Twenty-five per cent of seafood sold in Metro Vancouver is mislabelled
(University of British Columbia) A new UBC study used DNA barcoding to determine that 70 of 281 seafood samples collected in Metro Vancouver between September 2017 and February 2018 were mislabelled. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Methadone and buprenorphine decrease mortality after nonfatal overdose
(Boston Medical Center) new study out of Boston Medical Center's Grayken Center for Addiction on opioid overdose survivors indicates that two FDA approved medications to treat opioid use disorder save lives, but only three out of 10 overdose survivors receive them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why being left-handed matters for mental health treatment
(Cornell University) Treatment for the most common mental health problems could be ineffective or even detrimental to about 50 percent of the population, according to a radical new model of emotion in the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Virtual reality headsets significantly reduce children's fear of needles
(Florida Atlantic University) Almost anyone can relate to being afraid of needles and injections. A pilot study is the first to use a 3D virtual reality headset to test this tool as a distraction method in a pediatric setting. Children were given the choice of a roller coaster ride, helicopter ride or a hot-air balloon ride. Results show that anticipated versus actual pain and fear were reduced in 94.1 percent of the pediatric study subjects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Overuse of agricultural chemicals on China's small farms harms health and environment
(University of Melbourne) The size of farms in China is a key contributor to the overuse of agricultural chemicals, and as a result they may be too small to be environmentally sustainable, a new study has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Be personal and appreciative': Research shows effective responses to online feedback
(University of Plymouth) As more patients leave feedback on online platforms including social media, new research shows how health and social care organisations can offer value in their response. The study was led by University of Plymouth researcher Rebecca Baines and colleagues in collaboration with James Munro at online platform Care Opinion, and they will be sharing the full findings at a webinar on Thursday, June 21. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lots of news and lots of contacts at ZPID Twin Conference
(Leibniz Institute for Psychology Information (ZPID)) The Leibniz Institute for Psychology Information (ZPID) had organized the two conferences from June 7-12 at its seat in Trier, Germany. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Russian scientists created 'flying' gas chromatograph
(Samara University) A lightweight and compact device will make it possible to turn a conventional drone into an air chemical laboratory. Scientists of Samara University have tested 'flying laboratory' in field conditions. A gas microchromatograph reached the required altitude, collected samples and analyzed them online. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When consumers don't want to talk about what they bought
(Ohio State University) One of the joys of shopping for many people is the opportunity to brag about their purchases to friends and others. But new research found one common situation in which people would rather not discuss what they just bought: when they're feeling like money is a little tight. In a series of studies, researchers found that consumers who felt financially constrained didn't want to talk about their purchases, large or small, with friends or strangers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nature programs could put a spring in your step
(Anglia Ruskin University) A new study shows that watching films set in a natural environment boosts body image. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news