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Hospital staff experience 'sea change' in addressing substance use disorder
(Oregon Health& Science University) Despite high need, most hospitals lack systems to engage people with substance use disorder, initiate life-saving treatment or connect people to care after hospitalization. This causes tremendous distress among health care providers and patients alike. A new study to be published April 25 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine describes a 'sea change' in attitudes after implementation of a hospital-based addiction medicine intervention project. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nanowires could make lithium ion batteries safer
(American Chemical Society) From cell phones and laptops to electric vehicles, lithium-ion batteries are the power source that fuels everyday life. But in recent years, they have also drawn attention for catching fire. In an effort to develop a safer battery, scientists report in the ACS journal Nano Letters that the addition of nanowires can not only enhance the battery's fire-resistant capabilities, but also its other properties. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

As tellurium demands rise, so do contamination concerns
(American Chemical Society) As technology advances, demands for tellurium, a rare element, are on the rise. Some forms of tellurium are toxic, so as the element finds applications in solar panels, rubber production, electronics and more, researchers are becoming concerned about possible environmental contamination. Now, one group reports in ACS' Environmental Science& Technology that by studying lake sediments they can construct a history of tellurium as it was deposited in the environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Purdue archaeologists on ancient horse find in Nile River Valley
(Purdue University) An ancient horse burial at Tombos along the Nile River Valley shows that a member of the horse family thousands of years ago was more important to the culture than previously thought, which provides a window into human-animal relationships more than 3,000 years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

One in every six deaths in young adults is opioid-related: Study
(St. Michael's Hospital) One out of every six deaths among young adults in Ontario is related to opioids, suggests a study led by researchers at St. Michael's Hospital and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Exposure to domestic violence costs US government $55 billion each year
(Case Western Reserve University) The federal government spends an estimated $55 billion annually on dealing with the effects of childhood exposure to domestic violence, according to new research by social scientists at Case Western Reserve University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rhythm crucial in drummed speech
(Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology) An international team of researchers, including Frank Seifart and Sven Grawunder of the former Department of Linguistics at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and Julien Meyer from the Universit é Grenoble Alpes carried out research into the drummed speech system of the Bora people of the Northwest Amazon. They found the Boras not only reproduce the melody of words and sentences in this endangered language, but also their rhythm. This suggests the crucial role of linguistic rhythm in language processing has been underestimated. (Source: EurekAl...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research explains link between exercise and appetite loss
(Albert Einstein College of Medicine) Ever wonder why intense exercise temporarily curbs your appetite? In research described in today's issue of PLOS Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers reveal that the answer is all in your head -- more specifically, your arcuate nucleus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows newspaper op-eds change minds
(Yale University) Researchers have found that op-ed pieces have large and long-lasting effects on people's views among both the general public and policy experts. The study, published in the Quarterly Journal of Political Science, also found that Democrats and Republicans altered their views in the direction of the op-ed piece in roughly equal measure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Feelings of ethical superiority can lead to workplace ostracism, social undermining: Study
(Baylor University) A new Baylor study published in the Journal of Business Ethics suggests that feelings of ethical superiority can cause a chain reaction that is detrimental to you, your coworkers and your organization. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Children are as fit as endurance athletes
(Frontiers) Researchers discover how young children seem to run around all day without getting tired: their muscles resist fatigue and recover in the same way as elite endurance athletes. The study, which compared energy output and post-exercise recovery rates of young boys, untrained adults and endurance athletes, can be used to develop athletic potential in children and improve our knowledge of how disease risk, such as diabetes, increases as our bodies change from childhood to adulthood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gender inequality is 'drowning out' the voices of women scientists
(University of Cambridge) A University of Cambridge researcher is calling for the voices of women to be given a fairer platform at a leading scientific conference. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Climate change not the key driver of human conflict and displacement in East Africa
(University College London) Over the last 50 years climate change has not been the key driver of the human displacement or conflict in East Africa, rather it is politics and poverty, according to new research by UCL. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Escalation of competition leads to conflict in competitive networks of F1 drivers
(The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)) A new study has revealed that people with similar social status in similar age groups are more likely to clash with each other. This rivalry could likely lead to taking more risks in fair weather conditions. A research team of KAIST, the US Treasury, INSEAD, and the European School of Management and Technology examined the link between status similarity and conflict as well as the conditions under which this link holds by using panel data on Formula 1 races from 1970 through 2014. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Thousands of mobile apps for children might be violating their privacy
(IMDEA Networks Institute) Thousands of the most popular apps and games available, mostly free of charge, in the Google Play Store, make potentially illegal tracking of children's use habits, according to a large-scale international study co-authored by Narseo Vallina-Rodriguez, a researcher at the IMDEA Networks Institute in Madrid and ICSI, the International Computer Science Institute at the University of California, Berkeley (USA). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Power of negative example
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) While peers are significant, family remains highly important for adolescents as well, according to HSE researchers. However, many young people do not see their parents as role models. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stricter gun control could stop violent men killing their partners and themselves
(Springer) Men who use guns to kill their partner are also likely to commit suicide. Those planning to commit suicide are not deterred by severe penalties, and therefore the most successful way of preventing such homicides is to restrict gun access to batterers. So says Sierra Smucker of Duke University Sanford School of Public Policy in the US. She is the lead author of a study in Springer's Journal of Urban Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Comments on social networks also reinforce socialization during adolescence
(University of C ó rdoba) Without overlooking the risks of using social networks in adolescence, a study analyzes little known information about cybergossiping among high school students/ (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

2.7 billion tweets confirm: Echo chambers on Twitter are very real
(Aalto University) A recent study of more than 2.7 billion tweets between 2009 and 2016 confirms that Twitter users are exposed mainly to political opinions that agree with their own. It is the largest study to characterize echo chambers by both the content in them and the networks they comprise. The findings indicate a strong correlation between biases in the content people both produce and consume. In other words, echo chambers are very real on Twitter. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

User control and transparency are key to trusting personalized mobile apps
(Penn State) As concerns about privacy increase for people using mobile apps, users' trust and engagement may hinge on perceptions about how the app uses their data and whether it seeks user input before delivering personalized services, according to researchers. However, their reactions may also depend on how familiar a user is with technology, they added. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

M ΓΌ nster researchers identify factors promoting physical activity in childhood
(University of M ü nster) Researchers at M ü nster University (Germany) show in a study published in the 'Scientific Reports' journal that the more accurately children assess their motor competences, the more positive is the effect on their physical activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Imagining a positive outcome biases subsequent memories
(Association for Psychological Science) Imagining that an event will go well 'colors' how people remember that event after learning how it actually went, according to findings in published in Psychological Science. The findings showed that participants were more likely to mistakenly identify positive details from the event as 'true' if they had previously imagined the event going well. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Where you live is more influential than where you worship in shaping racial attitudes
(Baylor University) Whites in multiracial congregations have more diverse friendship networks and are more comfortable with minorities -- but that is more because of the impact of neighbors and friends of other races than due to congregations' influence, a Baylor University study has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fifth Annual Science Day at NIH
(NIH/National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities) More than 500 students--many of them African American or Hispanic -- will tour NIH and participate in presentations from a diverse group of scientists and program officers about biomedical research career options. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Doctors prescribe opioids at high rates to those at increased overdose risk
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) The number of first-time prescriptions for opioid drugs has not risen since about 2010. However, patients taking a class of drug known to increase the risk for overdoses were likelier to receive a first-time opioid prescription -- a combination that could be linked to the current surge in opioid-related deaths. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sense of control and meaning helps protect women from anxiety
(University of Cambridge) People who feel in control of their lives and who find purpose and meaning in life are less likely to have anxiety disorders even when going through the toughest times, according to a study led by the University of Cambridge. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Telling job seekers how many other people have applied could boost diversity
(Tufts University) Telling job applicants how many people applied for a job on LinkedIn - regardless of whether the number of applicants was high or low - increased the number of applications, a finding that could help companies that are seeking more diverse applicant pools, according to new research from Tufts University economist Laura Gee. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Middle East energy subsidy reform updates 'patronage-based autocratic governance'
(Rice University) A series of converging trends provided political cover for the reforms of long-standing energy subsidies launched by oil-exporting states in the Middle East and North Africa, according to a new paper by an expert in the Center for Energy Studies at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy. These subsidies are thought to be an important source of legitimacy for autocratic regimes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Meditation and aerobic exercise helps women recover after sexual assault
(Rutgers University) Women who are sexually assaulted and suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can learn to decrease negative thoughts and enhance self-worth by a combination of meditation and aerobic exercise. A combination of mental and physical training with meditation and aerobic exercise done for one hour twice a week over a six-week period significantly reduced post-traumatic and ruminative thoughts in women with a history of sexual violence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Girls more likely than boys to struggle with social, behavioral, academic needs
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) The more failing grades students have during eighth grade, the more likely they are to experience social-emotional learning problems, academic difficulties and behavioral problems during their freshman year in high school, University of Illinois social work professor Kevin Tan found in a new study.And despite the gender stereotype that boys are more likely to be the problem children in school, the researchers found that girls constitute the majority of youths who struggled the most academically, socially and behaviorally. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Landmark paper finds light at end of the tunnel for world's wildlife and wild places
(Wildlife Conservation Society) A new WCS paper published in the journal BioScience finds that the enormous trends toward population stabilization, poverty alleviation, and urbanization are rewriting the future of biodiversity conservation in the 21st century, offering new hope for the world's wildlife and wild places. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Market failure, fake news and the First Amendment
(Duke University) The rise of social media and fake news challenge long-held assumptions about the First Amendment and are undermining the functioning of the 'the marketplace of ideas,' a Duke professor argues in a new article. Much of our thinking about the First Amendment assumes that the answer to false speech is more speech, or counter-speech, and that the truth will triumph in the marketplace of ideas, he says. That may be changing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why have all Western-owned digital firms failed in China?
(City University London) Cass Business School publishes new study examining the failures of Western-owned digital firms in China and why this phenomenon is singularly prevalent in this region. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A neurobiological link between PTSD and addiction
(Society for Neuroscience) Recalling traumatic memories enhances the rewarding effects of morphine in male rats, finds new research published in JNeurosci. These findings may help to explain the co-occurrence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and addiction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Let it go: Mental breaks after work improve sleep
(American Psychological Association) If you've had a bad day at work thanks to rude colleagues, doing something fun and relaxing after you punch out could net you a better night's sleep. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

IBS patients obtain robust, enduring relief from home-based treatment program
(University at Buffalo) In the largest federally funded non-drug clinical trial for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), patients with the most severe and persistent symptoms achieved robust and sustained relief by learning to control symptoms with minimal clinician contact. Led by University at Buffalo researchers in collaboration with colleagues at New York University and Northwestern University, the study was published online before print in Gastroenterology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers identify brain mechanism linking PTSD and opioid addiction
(University of Western Ontario) Researchers at Western University have shown that the recall of traumatic memories enhances the rewarding effects of morphine, shedding light on the neurobiological link between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and opioid addiction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research modernizes rammed earth construction
(University of British Columbia Okanagan campus) A building method as old as dirt is being re-examined as a 'new' and viable modern construction material.Compressed soil, also known as rammed earth, is a method of construction that dates back centuries. UBC Okanagan engineering professor Sumi Siddiqua, who has been researching the resurgence in rammed earth, says conventional cement is still the go-to for modern engineers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Animal cyborg: Behavioral control by 'toy' craving circuit
(The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)) Children love to get toys from parents for their birthday present. This craving toward items also involves object hoarding disorders and shopping addiction. However, the biological meaning of why the brain pursues objects or items has remained unknown. Part of the answer may lie with a neural circuit in the hypothalamus associated with 'object craving,' says neuroscientist Daesoo Kim from the Department of Biological Sciences at KAIST. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists create innovative new 'green' concrete using graphene
(University of Exeter) A new greener, stronger and more durable concrete that is made using the wonder-material graphene could revolutionise the construction industry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Russian Journal of Economics finds a new publishing home on ARPHA platform
(Pensoft Publishers) Russian Journal of Economics (RuJE) is the latest renowned journal to join the ranks of the open access titles published on ARPHA. Having taken advantage of the platform's white-label publishing solution, the journal accommodates a long list of high-tech innovations and novelties which benefit the authors, readers and editors alike. Themed 'The Austrian School of Economics: Its Reception in European Countries,' the first issue in collaboration with ARPHA is live on RuJE's new website. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What the oldest peace treaty in the world teaches us
(Cluster of Excellence " Religion and Politics ") Today's peace symbols go back to antiquity -- According to archaeologists, peace images were widespread, especially during wars, despite glorification of war -- Oldest peace treaty attests to long negotiations instead of triumphant victory -- Bronze-colored statue of Eirene shown for the first time -- International Peace Conference of the Cluster of Excellence " Religion and Politics " in May presents new research - Exhibition " Peace. From Antiquity to the Present Day " at five locations in M ü nster (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH funds research consortium to address firearm deaths among US children and teens
(Michigan State University) More than 20 researchers at 12 universities and health systems across the nation are working to address firearm deaths among US children and teens with a recent $5 million grant. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Special Eurobarometer: How fair do Europeans think life in the EU is?
(European Commission Joint Research Centre) A new poll shows most Europeans think life is generally fair, but have concerns over justice, political decisions and income inequality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

David Kaplan wins 2018 Gemant Award from the American Institute of Physics
(American Institute of Physics) The American Institute of Physics announced today that particle physicist and movie producer David Kaplan has won the 2018 Andrew Gemant Award, an annual prize recognizing contributions to the cultural, artistic and humanistic dimension of physics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Opioid use linked to increased risk of falls, death in older adults
(Canadian Medical Association Journal) Opioid use linked to increased risk of falls, death in older adults. Recent opioid use is associated with an increased risk of falls in older adults and an increased risk of death, found new research in CMAJ. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Potential gender bias against female researchers in peer review of research grants
(Canadian Medical Association Journal) Is peer review biased? Female health researchers who applied for grants from Canada's major health research funder were funded less often than male counterparts because of potential bias, and characteristics of peer reviewers can also affect the result, found a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Black parents can help bridge cultural divide between students and white teachers
(Binghamton University) Bringing black parents into school settings can work toward shifting and closing the cultural disconnects between black families and predominantly white school personnel, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New UTSA study shows wearable technology also contributes to distracted driving
(University of Texas at San Antonio) A new study by Murtuza Jadliwala, assistant professor of computer science at The University of Texas at San Antonio, examines wearable technology and whether it affects drivers' concentration. Jadliwala and his collaborators discovered that while a driver texting with a wearable device can marginally reduce their level of distraction, it ultimately makes texting while driving just as dangerous as with an ordinary cell phone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers discover potential source of gender differences in migraines
(Experimental Biology 2018) Findings from a new study conducted in rats reveal that females may be more susceptible to migraines and less responsive to treatment because of the way fluctuations in the hormone estrogen affect cells in the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news