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High-dose influenza vaccine leads to lower hospitalizations in nursing home residents
(University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center) In the largest nursing home study to date on the effect of a high-dose flu vaccine, researchers found that vaccines with four times the antigen of standard flu vaccines significantly reduced the risk of respiratory and all-cause hospitalization during flu season. The study found a 12.7 percent relative reduction in the incidence of hospitalization for respiratory illness and an 8.5 percent reduction of all-cause hospitalizations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sunny, rainy, or cloudy: New study shows how weather impacts response to mobile ads
(Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences) Among the many factors that impact digital marketing and online advertising strategy, a new study in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science provides insight to a growing trend among firms and big brands ... weather-based advertising. According to the study, certain weather conditions are more amenable for consumer responses to mobile marketing efforts, while the tone of your ad content can either help or hurt such response depending on the current local weather. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds gene variant increases risk for depression
(University of Central Florida) A University of Central Florida study has found that a gene variant, thought to be carried by nearly 25 percent of the population, increases the odds of developing depression.People with apolipoprotein-E4, called ApoE4 for short, have a 20 percent greater chance of developing clinically significant depressive symptoms later in life compared to those who don't have the gene variant, said Rosanna Scott, lead author of the study published in The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

USDA announces $15.1m for research on renewable energy, biobased products, agroecosystems
(National Institute of Food and Agriculture) The USDepartment of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced 34 grants totaling $15.1 million for research on agricultural systems and production of biomaterials and fuels, socioeconomic implications and public policy challenges of bioenergy and bioproducts market development and expansion, understanding nutrient cycling in agricultural systems, and the management of agricultural ecosystems. The grants are funded through NIFA's Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI), authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill. (Source: EurekAlert! - S...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research uncovers a cause of schizophrenia
(University of Copenhagen The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences) A new study from the University of Copenhagen shows that genetic defects may damage the supporting cells of the brain -- the glial cells -- which may lead to a number of brain disorders, including schizophrenia. The study is based on groundbreaking tests with mice whose brains were colonized with human glial cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A mission without borders
(NASA/Johnson Space Center) Originally designed to address the growing 21st-century concern regarding pediatric obesity, the program has evolved into a platform of international communication that has grown past merely health and fitness. This year alone, 38 countries have united under the Mission X banner. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Sound' research shows slower boats may cause manatees more harm than good
(Florida Atlantic University) Slower boat speeds reduce risks to manatees. Or do they? Not exactly, according to research conducted at Florida Atlantic University. In fact, the very laws enacted to slow down boats in manatee habitats may actually be doing more harm than good. However, an innovative alerting device is proving to deliver a better solution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Reintroduced Przewalski's horses have a different diet
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) The preferred fodder of horses is grass. This is true for domestic horses and wild horses in the Gobi Desert. Researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna found out through tail hair analysis that before their extinction in the wild Przewalski's horses had been on a different diet than today. Thanks to improved societal attitude, the horses have now access to richer pastures. In former times, the wild horses were hunted and chased away. Published in Scientific Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why was MacronLeaks' influence limited in the French election?
(University of Southern California) A research leader at the University of Southern California's Information Sciences Institute has found that #Macronleaks was mostly shared by foreigners outside of France. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nutrition advice aimed at children also improves parents' diets
(European Society of Cardiology) Nutrition advice aimed at children also improves parents' diets, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Social scientists reveal structure of AIDS denialist online communities
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) HSE researchers examined the structure of online communities of Russian AIDS denialists -- people who deny the reality of HIV and AIDS -- and the manner in which they spread their ideas. The findings are published in American Behavioral Scientist (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Probiotics: Novel biosynthetic tool to develop metallic nanoparticles
(Bentham Science Publishers) Probiotics, being live microbes, exert numerous beneficial health effects on the host cells. Such probiotics are commercially available as dietary supplements, foods, pharmaceutical formulations. Yakult, Activia yogurt, DanActive fermented milk provide health benefits like boosting up the immune system, treating digestive problems, mental illness, neurological disorders, cancer, etc. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Novel approach to treating post-traumatic stress disorder
(Cardiff University) A novel approach of using visual and physical stimulus to help military veterans address their traumatic experiences could soon play a significant role in helping British veterans overcome post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), thanks to a new Cardiff University research project. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sexual health clinics should ask about abuse
(Queen Mary University of London) Training clinicians to proactively ask patients about domestic violence is feasible for sexual health clinics to implement and could increase referrals to specialist services, according to a study by Queen Mary University of London and the University of Bristol involving over 4,300 women. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Family factors may influence a child's temperament
(Wiley) A new article addresses ongoing conversations about bridging the gap between practice and research within the field of family therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A healthy lifestyle increases life expectancy by up to 7 years
(Max-Planck-Gesellschaft) Maintaining a normal weight, not smoking, and drinking alcohol at moderate levels are factors that add healthy years to life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Want to win at sports? Take a cue from these mighty mice
(Wake Forest University) As student athletes hit training fields this summer to gain the competitive edge, a new study shows how the experiences of a tiny mouse can put them on the path to winning. Scientists examined how surges of testosterone both before and after aggressive encounters led the male California mouse to win in future matches. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hiring risk executives to protect US banks backfired, contributing to 2008 crash
(University of Toronto) Why did America's biggest banks become heavily exposed to high-risk derivatives in the lead-up to the recent credit crisis? Researchers found the trend wasn't just driven by banks' enthusiasm for profits. Instead, government efforts to dampen bank risk-taking backfired by putting champions of risk into power. Chief Risk Officers put in place to oversee risk management encouraged banks to increase their exposure to the riskiest kinds of derivatives in the years ahead of the crisis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A plastic planet
(University of California - Santa Barbara) Industrial ecologist Roland Geyer measures the production, use and fate of all the plastics ever made, including synthetic fibers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Examining the forces behind political conduct: The SAGE Encyclopedia of Political Behavior
(SAGE) What fuels government leaders and constituents into political action, such as attacking the media or marching and protesting, and how do these acts influence political outcomes and public policy debates? What makes democracy appealing to one society and socialism appealing to the country next door? As political passions and polarization escalate, The SAGE Encyclopedia of Political Behavior launches an exploration into the intersections of psychology, political science, sociology, and human behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In making decisions, are you an ant or a grasshopper?
(University of Connecticut) Findings in a recent publication by UConn psychology researcher Susan Zhu and colleagues add to a growing body of evidence that, although it may seem less appealing, the ant's gratification-delaying strategy should not be viewed in a negative light. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Artifacts suggest humans arrived in Australia earlier than thought
(University of Washington) A team of researchers, including a faculty member and seven students from the University of Washington, has found and dated artifacts in northern Australia that indicate humans arrived there about 65,000 years ago -- more than 10,000 years earlier than previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Kakadu find confirms earliest Australian occupation
(University of Queensland) Aboriginal people have been in Australia for at least 65,000 years -- much longer than the 47,000 years believed by some archaeologists. The discovery, by a team of archaeologists and dating specialists led by Associate Professor Chris Clarkson from The University of Queensland School of Social Science, has been detailed in the Nature journal this week. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Teaching without training
(Brigham Young University) Despite efforts from No Child Left Behind to promote 'highly qualified' teaching, recent research shows that just 36 percent of new secondary science teachers are teaching only in their trained subject. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Shadow network' keeps communities safe from deadly volcano
(University of East Anglia) New research by the University of East Anglia (UEA) shows that 'shadow networks' linking volunteers with authorities can help keep some of the millions of people living near dangerous volcanoes safer.These informal networks see community members working in close collaboration with scientists and government officials on monitoring, communications, training and evacuation processes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

President Tong joined students in service-learning in Kyrgyzstan
(The Hong Kong Polytechnic University) Professor Timothy W. Tong, President of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU), joined a Service-Learning trip with 34 students to serve the local community in Kyrgyzstan on July 16, 2017 and then signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Nazarbayev University in Kazakhstan on July 19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How off-line retailers can fight back
(Journal of Retailing at New York University) For concrete thinkers, product touch is important; for abstract thinkers, not so much. The offline retailer who can mine the wealth of consumer research data available through the internet to pinpoint these concrete thinkers, the authors suggest, can target them with appropriate marketing strategies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Privacy, please: Why surveiling shoppers can inhibit sales, and how to fix it
(Journal of Retailing at New York University) The authors designed a series of studies and field experiments that tested shoppers' reaction to being watched while shopping and found that when they feel their privacy or freedom of behavior is threatened, they will back off. Simple solutions are available to retailers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Major communication gaps between doctors and home health care nurses revealed
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found serious gaps in communication between physicians and home health care agencies responsible for caring for often elderly patients discharged from hospitals. The problem, the study said, can contribute to hospital readmissions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Aging power plants provide Trump administration with risks and opportunities
(Carnegie Mellon University) When it comes to the current plans to retire US power plants, Carnegie Mellon University researchers believe we are 'running towards a cliff with no fence.'They found that power plant retirement trends will complicate achieving long-term carbon dioxide emission reduction targets and require a significant increase in capital investments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

PETA journal article lays out steps to end flea/tick infestation tests on dogs and cats
(People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) An article just published in the peer-reviewed journal Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, authored by scientists from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), calls on companies to stop testing experimental flea and tick control products on dogs and cats. The article lays out steps that companies can take to make the transition to non-animal test methods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heat tweet: Users flock to Twitter when temperatures rise
(Florida State University) A new study by Florida State University researchers examines the impact rising temperatures have on Twitter activity, and how government officials use the social media tool to warn the general public of heatwave conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Supreme Court decision complicates prosecuting child abusers
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Nearly 42 percent of the prosecutors who participated in a national online survey reported that the US Supreme Court's 2004 decision in Crawford v. Washington increased the need for abuse victims to testify in court and decreased their prosecutions of child abuse cases either 'greatly' or 'somewhat.' University of Illinois social work senior research specialist Theodore P. Cross and independent child abuse research Debra Whitcomb co-wrote the paper. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study looks at physicians who prescribe methadone
(St. Michael's Hospital) A small number of physicians prescribe the majority of the drugs used to treat people in Ontario who are battling opioid addictions, a new study has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NanoVelcro microchips could someday noninvasively diagnose prenatal conditions
(American Chemical Society) Many pregnant women undergo some form of prenatal testing before their children are born. The information that expectant mothers gain from these tests vary, from the baby's gender to genetic defects. But the tests are often invasive, which can potentially harm the fetus and the mother. Now, one group reports in ACS Nano that they have developed a device that provides sensitive results, but in a less invasive way: a blood test. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Antiplatelet drugs are often inappropriately prescribed in older patients
(Wiley) A study has found that antiplatelet drugs, such as aspirin, are often inappropriately prescribed in acutely hospitalized older people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The dangers of driving after restricted sleep and moderate alcohol intake
(Wiley) In a recent study, combining moderate alcohol consumption (within legal limits for driving) and moderate sleep restriction led to greater drowsiness and increased deficits in attention, compared with either sleep restriction or alcohol intake alone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How poverty may affect children's behavior
(Wiley) In a recent study of young children experiencing homelessness, high-quality parenting was associated with better peer relationships and protection from internalizing problems in the context of family adversity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why some women are more likely to feel depressed
(The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)) It's no secret that the risk of depression increases for women when their hormones are fluctuating. Especially vulnerable times include the menopause transition and onset of postmenopause. There's also postpartum depression that can erupt shortly after childbirth. But why do some women feel blue while others seem to skate through these transitions? One answer is provided through study results being published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Finding leaks while they're easy to fix
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) An MIT-developed system can inspect water or gas pipes from the inside and find even tiny leaks. The robotic device enters the pipes via a fire hydrant, avoiding the need to dig up streets. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Republicans and Democrats tend to follow news in similar ways
(NORC at the University of Chicago) Republicans and Democrats are very much alike in the ways they follow the news despite their differing opinions of the media, according to a report released today by the Media Insight Project, a collaboration of the American Press Institute and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Health insurance costs threaten farm viability
(University of Vermont) A new USDA funded study found that 64 percent of American farmers have preexisting conditions. Lack of access to affordable health insurance is a major worry and a significant risk factor for farmers, the study found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Investments in conservation easements reap benefits for Colorado
(Colorado State University) A new analysis from Colorado State University found that each dollar invested by the state for these easements produced benefits of between $4 and $12 for Coloradans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rude customers linked to workers' shopping binges
(Michigan State University) Service workers who face verbal abuse from customers during the workday are more likely to go on unnecessary shopping sprees in the evening, indicates new research co-authored by a Michigan State University business expert. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Reduction in hospital readmission rate not associated with increased risk of death following discharge
(The JAMA Network Journals) Although there has been the concern that the reduction in hospital readmission rates may possibly result in an increase in mortality rates after discharge, a new study published by JAMA finds that among Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized for heart failure, heart attack or pneumonia, reductions in hospital 30-day readmission rates were associated with a reduction in 30-day mortality rates following discharge. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

27 Phase III and 8 Phase II Alzheimer's drugs on track to launch in next 5 years
(Amplify Public Affairs) Twenty-seven Alzheimer's drugs in Phase III clinical trials and eight drugs in Phase II clinical trials may launch in the next five years, according to a revised Alzheimer's pipeline analysis presented today at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) by ResearchersAgainstAlzheimer's (RA2), an UsAgainstAlzheimer's network. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Empowering robots for ethical behavior
(Frontiers) Scientists at the University of Hertfordshire in the UK have developed a concept called Empowerment to help robots to protect and serve humans, while keeping themselves safe. Rather than trying to make a machine understand complex ethical questions, the concept is based on robots always seeking to keep their options open, and doing the same for the humans around them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The UN actually does prevent war, according to study of General Assembly votes
(Dartmouth College) The first quantitative study of UN voting records shows that the world body is more effective at achieving its mandate of avoiding wars than many experts think. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UC3M heads cooperation project to promote renewable energies in Cuba and Haiti
(Universidad Carlos III de Madrid) In collaboration with other educational institutions in Cuba and Haiti, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) is leading an international cooperation project destined to strengthen higher education in both Latin American countries in the field of renewable energies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Madoff rip-off shattered trust, changed investment behavior
(Cornell University) Notorious financier Bernie Madoff bilked more than 10,000 investors out of billions of dollars in the 1990s and 2000s in the largest financial fraud in US history. After the fraud was discovered, people who knew Madoff victims or who lived in areas where victims were concentrated lost trust in the financial system and dramatically changed their investment behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news