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Depression strongly linked to higher long-term risk of early death for both women and men
(Canadian Medical Association Journal) Despite increased awareness about mental illness, depression remains strongly linked to a higher risk of early death -- and this risk has increased for women in recent years -- according to results from the 60-year Stirling County Study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

An app for rating public transport in real time
(Ecole Polytechnique F é d é rale de Lausanne) EPFL researchers have developed a smartphone app for passengers to evaluate their experience in real time and view other users' ratings. It will be tested this fall by Lausanne's public transport authority. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

LSU Health no to study exercise to reduce metabolic disorders risk in HIV+ people who drink
(Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center) Patricia Molina, MD, PhD, Professor and Head of Physiology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, has been awarded a grant in the amount of $390,532 over two years to test the effectiveness of physical exercise to improve the regulation of blood sugar levels in people living with HIV/AIDS who also use alcohol. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism awarded the competitive grant. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Barry Simon wins 2018 Dannie Heineman Prize for mathematical physics
(American Institute of Physics) AIP and APS announced that Barry Simon of Caltech is the recipient of the 2018 Dannie Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics, which is awarded annually to honor significant contributions to the field. In recognizing Simon, the two organizations cited him 'For his fundamental contributions to the mathematical physics of quantum mechanics, quantum field theory, and statistical mechanics, including spectral theory, phase transitions, and geometric phases, and his many books and monographs that have deeply influenced generations of researchers.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pollution responsible for 16 percent of deaths globally -- Lancet Commission report
(Simon Fraser University) Diseases caused by pollution were responsible in 2015 for an estimated 9 million premature deaths -- 16 percent of all deaths worldwide, according to a report by The Lancet Commission on Pollution and Health. SFU health sciences professor Bruce Lanphear is a commissioner and author. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Physical inactivity and restless sleep exacerbate genetic risk of obesity
(American Society of Human Genetics) Low levels of physical activity and inefficient sleep patterns intensify the effects of genetic risk factors for obesity, according to results of a large-scale study presented at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2017 Annual Meeting in Orlando, Fla. These results confirm and strengthen previous findings based on self-reported activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Waterside lighting drastically disrupts wildlife in the surrounding ecosystem
(Frontiers) Researchers in Germany find that streetlights near waterways attract flying insects from the water and change the predator community living in the grass beneath the lights. The findings show that artificial night-time lighting could have implications for the surrounding ecosystem and biodiversity, which should be considered when designing new lighting concepts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Correcting position errors in spherical near to far-field transformation for long antennas
(Bentham Science Publishers) The experimental validation of an efficient iterative technique for compensating known position errors in a spherical near to far-field transformation (NTFFT) for elongated antennas using a minimum number of near-field (NF) measurements has been provided. This transformation exploits a non-redundant sampling representation of the voltage detected by the probe obtained by modeling a long antenna with a prolate ellipsoid. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ICCV 2017 International Conference on Computer Vision
(Universit à Ca' Foscari Venezia) ICCV is the premier international computer vision event comprising the main conference and several co-located workshops and tutorials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Academic exchange with Africa strengthens with Freiburg's help
(University of Freiburg) The University of Freiburg will receive a subsidy for the " Merian International Centre for Advanced Studies in Africa " , making it the hub for African studies in Germany. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New book explores chasing the American dream in rural trailer parks
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) In the new book, Singlewide: Chasing the American Dream in a Rural Trailer Park, anthropologist and ethnographer Sonya Salamon and co-author Katherine MacTavish discuss how the American housing dream in rural trailer parks is often just that -- a dream -- that is rarely realized by those working poor families who call these parks home. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Space greens beat the blues
(De Gruyter Open) Plants in space are important to grow food, but they may also play a key role in maintaining the psychological well-being of space crews. The next frontier of space plant experimentation is to examine the psychological impact of plant life on astronauts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Parents have an even greater impact on the well-being off young people than expected
(Academy of Finland) According to a recent study, parental support for the autonomy of young people promotes the well-being of the latter in all major educational transitions: from primary to lower secondary school, from basic education to upper secondary school, and from upper secondary school to university. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Help sought from complementary and alternative medicine to remedy health problems
(University of Helsinki) It found that complementary and alternative medicine is being used in connection with various health problems, particularly in situations where help provided by conventional medicine is considered inadequate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'The father of the 2 degrees limit': Schellnhuber receives Blue Planet Prize
(Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)) Hans Joachim Schellnhuber is the Director of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), a member of the Leibniz Association. The Blue Planet Prize honors outstanding thinkers who help to meet challenges of planetary dimensions. It is awarded by the Asahi Glass Foundation and handed over in presence of Japan's Imperial Prince and Princess. Schellnhuber received the prize for establishing a new field of science, Earth System Analysis, and introducing most influential concepts including the notion of tipping elements in the climate system. (Source: EurekAlert...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ERC, Ca' Foscari wins two grants
(Universit à Ca' Foscari Venezia) Ca' Foscari University of Venice won two ERC Starting Grants as a host institution specifically chosen by the researchers for the first time, with a total fund of about 3 million euros. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Too many care practitioners guilty of applying traditional values to same-sex adoption
(University of Huddersfield) '...too many professionals involved in the adoption and fostering process are clinging on to traditional ideas of what constitutes a family...' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Itsy bitsy spider: Fear of spiders and snakes is deeply embedded in us
(Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences) Snakes and spiders evoke fear and disgust in many people, even in developed countries where hardly anybody comes into contact with them. Until now, there has been debate about whether this aversion is innate or learnt. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig have recently discovered that it is hereditary: Even babies feel stressed when seeing these creatures - long before they could have learnt this reaction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study examines the effects of sexual harassment, assault on researchers' careers
(Wiley) Investigators who previously reported on sexual harassment and assault during academic fieldwork have now shed light on the effects of such violations on individuals and their career trajectories. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What the Balkans can teach other states in conflict
(University of Kent) What the Balkans can teach other states in conflict Research at the University of Kent into how areas like the Balkans have developed ways to address the challenges of their past -- including ethnic cleansing -- offers a toolkit for others facing similar conflict. the section includes contributions from around the world and focuses on consultation processes and innovative methods to examine the views of victims. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Optical communications innovators to deliver keynote presentations at OFC 2018
(The Optical Society) OFC is pleased to announce the outstanding lineup of innovative keynote speakers for 2018 in San Diego. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The SAGE International Encyclopedia of Travel and Tourism presents insight on the industry
(SAGE) The travel and tourism industry is predicted to grow at an average rate of 3.9% every year over the next decade, according to the World Travel& Tourism Council. In the newly launched SAGE International Encyclopedia of Travel and Tourism, scholars from around the world present challenges and opportunities that the industry faces as it continues to grow. The encyclopedia consists of more than 500 entries that address social, economic, environmental, and policy issues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research on the impact of war on electoral behavior in Balkan states receives ERC Grant
(University of Luxembourg) Prof Josip Glaurdic of the University of Luxembourg has been awarded a Starting Grant from the European Research Council (ERC) for the research project ELWar, a five-year venture assessing the impact of war on political behavior in South-east Europe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CCNY psychologists develop new model that links emotions and mental health
(City College of New York) For decades psychologists have studied how people regulate emotions using a multitude of ways to conceptualize and assess emotion regulation. Now a recent study published this week in the journal PLOS ONE by Elliot Jurist and David M. Greenberg of The City College of New York, shows how a new assessment model can give clinicians an exciting new way to think about clinical diagnoses including anxiety, mood, and developmental disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New interventions could help improve student academics and behavior
(University of Missouri-Columbia) In a new guidebook, faculty members from the University of Missouri offer research-backed, practical strategies to help students and parents identify and fix problems. The guide, in its third edition, helps to bridge the gap between research and practice, with support and advice for educators, parents, counselors and social workers working with children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

IU business law scholars: Leidos case shouldn't have reached Supreme Court
(Indiana University) One of the most anticipated cases to be argued before the US Supreme Court this term -- Leidos v. Indiana Public Retirement System -- was settled Monday. But two professors in Indiana University's Kelley School of Business continue to raise serious questions as to why the case ever would have come before the nation's highest court. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Eye-catching labels stigmatize many healthy foods
(University of Delaware) Labels such as organic, fair-trade and cage free may be eye-catching but are often free of any scientific basis and stigmatize many healthy foods, a new University of Delaware-led study found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists pinpoint jealousy in the monogamous mind
(Frontiers) Scientists find that in male titi monkeys, jealousy is associated with heightened activity in the cingulate cortex, an area of the brain associated with social pain in humans, and the lateral septum, associated with pair bond formation in primates. A better understanding of jealousy may provide important clues on how to approach health and welfare problems such as addiction and domestic violence, as well as autism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The best hedge fund managers are not psychopaths or narcissists, according to new study
(Society for Personality and Social Psychology) When it comes to financial investments, hedge fund managers higher in 'dark triad' personality traits -- psychopathy, narcissism, and Machiavellianism -- perform more poorly than their peers, according to new personality psychology research. The difference is a little less than 1 percent annually compared to their peers, but with large investments over several years that slight underperformance can add up. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dogs are more expressive when someone is looking
(University of Portsmouth) Dogs produce more facial expressions when humans are looking at them, according to new research from the University of Portsmouth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ben-Gurion U. introduces israel's first underwater robotic vehicle
(American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) 'The autonomous HydroCamel II integrates state-of-the-art technologies, including high-level maneuvering in six degrees of freedom and an ability to dive almost vertically,' says Prof. Hugo Guterman of the BGU Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and head of LAR. 'Until now, these capabilities were limited to remotely operated underwater vehicles (ROVs), which must be tethered by an umbilical cable to a host ship for its power and air source. The HydroCamel II is completely autonomous.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Phones keeping students from concentrating during lectures
(Stellenbosch University) Daily, people spend over three hours on their phones. While ever-smarter digital devices have made many aspects of our lives more efficient, a growing body of evidence suggests that, by continuously distracting us, they are harming our ability to concentrate. Studies across the world show that students constantly use their phones when they are in class. A strong body of evidence suggests that media use during lectures is associated with lower academic performance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Want to control your dreams? Here's how you can
(University of Adelaide) New research at the University of Adelaide has found that a specific combination of techniques will increase people's chances of having lucid dreams, in which the dreamer is aware they're dreaming while it's still happening and can control the experience. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mapping migrant communities across Europe to support local integration
(European Commission Joint Research Centre) The JRC has launched a data challenge to crowdsource policy ideas for integration, inviting researchers to use a new visual dataset mapping migrants in Europe. The maps show residential patterns at high resolution across 8 EU countries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

White working-class Americans feel in nation's 'slow lane', new study shows
(Coventry University) America's white working-class communities feel they are being kept in the 'slow lane' of social mobility while other groups speed past, according to a year-long study by UK and US researchers into their social and political views. Communities in five cities were interviewed and their thoughts captured during a period spanning part of the 2016 presidential race, which heralded the most dramatic shift in political dynamics in recent US history. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mating induces sexual inhibition in female jumping spiders
(PLOS) After mating for the first time, most females of an Australian jumping spider are unreceptive to courtship by other males, and this sexual inhibition is immediate and often lasts for the rest of their lives, according to a study published Oct. 18, 2017, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Vivian Mendez from Macquarie University, Australia, and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research sheds new light on early turquoise mining in Southwest
(University of Arizona) Researchers are blending archaeology and geochemistry to get a more complete picture of turquoise's mining and distribution in the pre-Hispanic Southwest. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Online resource enables open data sharing for rare Mendelian diseases
(American Society of Human Genetics) MyGene2, a new open data resource, helps patients with rare genetic conditions, clinicians, and researchers share information, connect with one another, and enable faster gene discovery, according to results presented at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2017 Annual Meeting in Orlando, Fla. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Duplications of noncoding DNA may have affected evolution of human-specific traits
(American Society of Human Genetics) Duplications of large segments of noncoding DNA in the human genome may have contributed to the emergence of differences between humans and nonhuman primates, according to results presented at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2017 Annual Meeting in Orlando, Fla. Identifying these duplications, which include regulatory sequences, and their effect on traits and behavior may help scientists explain genetic contributions to human disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Supervisor support critical to employee well-being and workforce readiness
(American Psychological Association) Nearly half of American workers are concerned about the changing nature of work, and although most report that they have the skills they need to perform their current job well, those without supervisor support for career development are more likely to distrust their employer and plan on leaving within the next year, according to a new survey released by the American Psychological Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Amazon threat? Deforestation from mining
(University of Vermont) Sprawling mining operations in Brazil have caused roughly 10 percent of all Amazon rainforest deforestation between 2005 and 2015 -- much higher than previous estimates -- says the first comprehensive study of mining deforestation in the iconic tropical rainforest. Surprisingly, the majority of mining deforestation (a full 90 percent) occurred outside the mining leases granted by Brazil's government, the new study in Nature Communications finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nature or nurture? Innate social behaviors in the mouse brain
(California Institute of Technology) The brain circuitry that controls innate, or instinctive, behaviors such as mating and fighting was thought to be genetically hardwired. Not so, neuroscientists now say. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gentle touch soothes the pain of social rejection
(University College London) The gentle touch of another individual soothes the effects of social exclusion, one of the most emotionally painful human experiences, according to new UCL research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Are the policies of promoting bicycle use socially profitable?
(University of Seville) A study by the University of Seville states that the socio-economic profitability of the construction of the network of cycle paths in Seville, for the period 2006-2032, will be about 130 percent, with a net profit for the city of 550 million euros. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Police satisfaction in developing countries dependent on less corruption
(University of Kent) Improving police satisfaction in developing nations will require a reduction in corruption and greater public security and safety, a new study by researchers at the universities of Kent and Utrecht has shown. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dutch courage -- Alcohol improves foreign language skills
(University of Liverpool) A new study published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, conducted by researchers from the University of Liverpool, Maastricht University and King's College London, shows that bilingual speakers' ability to speak a second language is improved after they have consumed a low dose of alcohol. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

3-D imaging to help protect American heritage sites from hurricanes and natural disasters
(University of South Florida (USF Health)) Happening today: (Wednesday) The nation's oldest masonry fort is facing serious erosion problems and natural disasters, such as hurricanes, are making it even worse. Researchers at the University of South Florida in Tampa are at the Castillo de San Marcos and Fort Matanzas in St. Augustine today using 3-D imaging technology to record the historic sites, assisting the National Park Service in preservation efforts and engineers in future repair. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Poll: Despite mobile options and cord-cutting, sports fans still turn on the TV
(University of Massachusetts Lowell) Despite the growth of mobile technology and viewing options, when sports fans want to watch a game, they turn to traditional live TV, according to results of a UMass Lowell-Washington Post poll released today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mass killings happen randomly, yet rate has remained steady, study finds
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Mass killings may have increasing news coverage, but the events themselves have happened at a steady rate for more than a decade, according to a new study by University of Illinois researchers. Furthermore, some types of mass-killing events seem to occur randomly over time, making prediction difficult and response crucial. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is 3-D printing living up to the hype?
(American Chemical Society) The growth in 3-D printing is allowing manufacturers to reduce production time and save money. Metal fabrication shops, industrial firms and engineers are also capitalizing on the technology. But the predicted mass production of 3-D printed products for consumers has not yet come to pass. An article in Chemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society, explains how industry is using the technology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news