The geoengineering of consent: How conspiracists dominate YouTube climate science content
(Frontiers) Using YouTube to learn about climate-change-related topics will expose you to video content that mostly opposes worldwide scientific consensus. That's the finding of a new study, which also reveals that conspiracy theorists have 'hijacked' some scientific terms, such as 'geoengineering,' so that searches provide entirely non-scientific content. Scientists could counteract this by forming alliances with influential YouTubers, politicians and those in popular culture, to ensure scientifically accurate video content reaches the widest-possible audience. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Little helpers for the rainforest
(Deutsches Primatenzentrum (DPZ)/German Primate Center) Primate researchers show how monkeys contribute to the regeneration of tropical forests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Missile strike false alarm most stressful for less anxious Hawaiians, study finds
(American Psychological Association) After learning that a warning of a missile headed to Hawaii was a false alarm, the most anxious local Twitter users calmed down more quickly than less anxious users, according to a study of tweets before, during and after the event, published by the American Psychological Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tobacco-21 laws can lower smoking prevalence in the 18-20 age group
(Society for the Study of Addiction) A new study published today by the scientific journal Addiction found that raising the legal age of sale of cigarettes from 18 to 21 in the US was associated with a 39% reduction in the odds of regular smoking in 18- to 20-year-olds who had experimented with cigarettes. The reduction was even greater (50%) in those who had close friends who smoked when they were 16. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When a fix for one vision problem causes another
(University of Pennsylvania) Aging diminishes the ability of the eyes ability to focus up close. Research from Johannes Burge of the University of Pennsylvania found that monovision, which uses lenses with different power in each eye, can cause dramatic misperceptions of distance and 3D direction for moving objects. This could have real implications for public health and public safety. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brains work in sync during music therapy -- study
(Anglia Ruskin University) For the first time researchers have been able to demonstrate that the brains of a patient and therapist become synchronised during a music therapy session, a breakthrough that could improve future interactions between patients and therapists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Preschool teachers ask children too many simple questions
(Ohio State University) When preschool teachers read books in their classrooms, the questions they ask play a key role in how much children learn, research has shown.But a new study that involved observing teachers during class story times found that they asked few questions -- and those that they did ask were usually too simple. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Attitudes toward race, immigration underscored vote switching in 2016 election
(University of California - Riverside) It's estimated that around 9% of voters who supported Barack Obama in 2012 crossed party lines to endorse Donald Trump in 2016 -- but why? According to a team of researchers that included Loren Collingwood, an associate professor of political science at the University of California, Riverside, the reasons behind so-called " vote switching " might be more complicated than originally expected. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Preventing people from abandoning exotic pets that threatened biodiversity
(University of Barcelona) Abandoning exotic pets is an ethical problem that can lead to biological invasions that threaten conservation of biodiversity in the environment. An article published in the journal Biological Invasions, whose first author is the researcher Alberto Maceda Veiga, from the Biodiversity Research Institute of the University of Barcelona (IRBio), reveals that the release of invasive species in the environment has not been reduced despite the regulation that prohibits the possession of these species since 2011. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

3D slave ship model brings a harrowing story to life
(Lancaster University) A 3D model of an 18th century slave ship, which captures the cramped, dirty and stifling conditions experienced by enslaved Africans, has been launched as a new digital teaching tool. The idea came from Lancaster University lecturer and historian of the Atlantic World Dr Nicholas Radburn working with scholars and technicians from Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Working memory is structured hierarchically
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Researchers in cognitive psychology at HSE University have experimentally demonstrated that the colors and orientations of objects are stored and processed independently in working memory. The results of the experiment were published in Acta Psychologica journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Trash talk' really can put players off their game
(University of Connecticut) A study of 200 adults conducted by a graduate student confirmed the ability of trash talk to negatively affect the game performance of a competitor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is your favorite brand authentic?
(Society for Consumer Psychology) Researchers recently discovered that stories about the origins of a company influence whether consumers believe a brand is authentic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers develop new technology for multiple sclerosis diagnosis and treatment
(Center for BrainHealth) Researchers at the Center for BrainHealth ® , part of The University of Texas at Dallas, in collaboration with a team from UT Southwestern, have developed technology for a novel diagnostic method for multiple sclerosis (MS). The new approach has the potential to determine which damaged regions in an MS patient's brain have the capacity to heal themselves, and which do not. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dangers of the blame game
(Society for Consumer Psychology) The moral character of a victim of a product or service failure can influence how much consumers blame the victim for their suffering, which in turn affects how much consumers hold companies responsible. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Could & #945;-Klotho be a potential biomarker of stress?
(Osaka University) Researchers at Osaka University elucidated an interesting association between psychological stress and serum levels ofα-Klotho (αKl). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NEC Laboratories Europe and IMDEA Networks launch Joint Research Unit in 5G technologies
(IMDEA Networks Institute) IMDEA Networks Institute (Madrid, Spain) and NEC Laboratories Europe (Heidelberg, Germany) announce the launch of a Joint Research Unit (JRU) in 5G technologies. The JRU will foster multidisciplinary joint team work in 5G research and development projects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genes underscore five psychiatric disorders
(University of Queensland) A group of international doctors has uncovered the genes that contribute to the development of ADHD, autism spectrum disorder, bipolar disorder, major depression and schizophrenia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pottery related to unknown culture was found in Ecuador
(Far Eastern Federal University) Archaeologists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Institute of Archeology and Ethnography SB RAS (Russia), Escuela Superior Polit é cnica del Litoral (ESPOL) (Ecuador), and Tohoku University (Japan) found shards of ceramic vessels referred to the cultural sediments of early periods of Real Alto site. Findings date back to 4640 - 4460 BC, this period borders with Valdivia, one of the oldest pottery-featured cultures in North and South America. A related article is published in Antiquity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sisters improve chances of reproduction in Asian elephants
(University of Turku) Researchers at the University of Turku found that the presence of a maternal sister was positively and significantly associated with annual female reproduction in a population of working elephants in Myanmar. In addition, an age-specific effect was found: young females were more sensitive to the presence of sisters and even more likely to reproduce when living near a sister. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Decoding the causes of motor neuron disease: A new study shows the impact of genetics
(Trinity College Dublin) Researchers from Trinity College Dublin have conducted the largest ever study involving 1117 people diagnosed with motor neurone disease to address the question of " nature versus nurture " in the causes of MND. The team from the Trinity MND Research Group found that one in 347 men and one in 436 women can be expected to develop motor neurone disease (MND) during their lifetime. Their research has been published in the American medical journal JAMA Neurology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genome research shows that the body controls the integrity of heritable genomes
(University of Cologne) Writing in Developmental Cell, scientists at the University of Cologne presented new findings that challenge established concepts of genetic inheritance. They have proven that somatic cells of the roundworm C. elegans influence heredity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Artificial throat could someday help mute people 'speak'
(American Chemical Society) Most people take speech for granted, but it's actually a complex process that involves both motions of the mouth and vibrations of folded tissues, called vocal cords, within the throat. If the vocal cords sustain injuries or other lesions, a person can lose the ability to speak. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed a wearable artificial throat that, when attached to the neck like a temporary tattoo, can transform throat movements into sounds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

To prevent another world war, researcher suggests changing how we think
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) Is another world war inevitable? A US Army researcher studying complex phenomena says yes, unless people stop thinking in terms of either/or outcomes. Dr. Bruce West, a senior scientist at the Army Research Office, an element of US Army Combat Capabilities Development Command's Army Research Laboratory, authored a book that uses mathematical modeling to understand how the people -- and the military -- must think to gain advantage in today's society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Findings from CARE Consortium added to global repository for brain injury data
(Indiana University School of Medicine) Data from the CARE Consortium, the world's most comprehensive concussion study is now publicly available in a repository aimed at providing traumatic brain injury researchers access to a wealth of new knowledge. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Visits to the dentist decline in old age, especially among minorities
(New York University) Visits to the dentist drop significantly after adults turn 80, finds a new study by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hair could be the key to better mental-illness diagnosis in teens
(Ohio State University) It's possible that a lock of hair could one day aid in the diagnosis of depression and in efforts to monitor the effects of treatment, said the author of a new study examining cortisol levels in the hair of teens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH establishes network to improve opioid addiction treatment in criminal justice settings
(NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse) The National Institutes of Health will award 12 grants to form the Justice Community Opioid Innovation Network (JCOIN) to support research on quality addiction treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD) in criminal justice settings nationwide. The awards, totaling an estimated $155 million from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, part of NIH, will support the multi-year innovation network, including 10 research institutions and two centers that will provide supportive infrastructure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research has potential for 'unpacking' complex simultaneous emotions in adolescence
(University of Chichester) Shows for the first time that complex, mixed simultaneous emotions in adolescents could be assessed using an Analogue Emotion Scale. Potential to supplement traditional emotional assessments where emotions are complex and people 'may not have the words'. Next step: trials to test the findings in practice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New grant-funded educator misconduct database used as research and prevention tool
(University of Texas at San Antonio) David Thompson, a professor in the University of Texas at San Antonio Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, and Catherine Robert '17, Ed.D, an assistant professor of educational leadership and policy studies at the University of Texas at Arlington, are developing a database with information about Texas certified educators who have engaged in sexual misconduct during the last two decades (1999-2019) to provide empirical data on educator sexual misconduct (ESM) that can inform education policymakers at the national and state levels. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study explains a secret to more efficient learning
(Dartmouth College) A new study could hold the key to learning languages, teaching children colors or even studying complex theories. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Coping skills program helps social service workers reduce stress, trauma after disasters
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, News Bureau) University of Illinois social work professors Tara Powell and Kate Wegmann found that a mental health intervention called Caregivers Journey of Hope can bolster social service workers' emotional resilience and ability to cope with the stress and trauma associated with disasters such as Superstorm Sandy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New data fills research gaps on weight loss experiences for minority groups
(The Obesity Society) The use of intensive lifestyle interventions focused on altering dietary and physical activity habits using behavioral strategies can produce sustained weight loss among African-Americans and Hispanics who have type 2 diabetes (T2D), according to a new study published online today in Obesity, the flagship journal of The Obesity Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Buying local? Higher price means higher quality in consumers' minds
(Indiana University) Why are we willing to pay much more for a six pack of craft beer, a locally produced bottle of wine or a regional brand item, often choosing them over national brands? It's because when people prefer to 'buy local,' they more frequently base their decisions on price as a perception of quality, research shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What motivates people to join -- and stick with -- citizen science projects?
(University of Washington) After more than 20 years, the UW's Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team, or COASST, is itself the subject of scientific study. Social scientists are studying the program's success to extract lessons for all citizen science efforts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Marrying science, math and humanities: WVU faculty to research 'holistic engineering'
(West Virginia University) If you're an engineer, you can probably build a bridge or a car or an app. But can you effectively communicate? Can you market your ideas or comprehend the business side of your work? WVU researchers have earned a $200,000-NSF grant to add those sorts of tools to the toolbox of tomorrow's engineers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Type of stent affects immediate and long-term outcomes
(Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery) A new study comparing the outcomes of different types of stents used to treat cerebral aneurysms shows that the type of stent used affects a patient's immediate and long-term health outcomes. The study was presented at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's (SNIS) 16th Annual Meeting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Climate changes faster than animals adapt
(Forschungsverbund Berlin) Although animals do commonly respond to climate change, such responses are in general insufficient to cope with the rapid pace of rising temperatures and sometimes go in wrong directions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Suicidal thoughts can be reduced among Indigenous people; this new study finds the factors
(University of Toronto) New nationally representative Canadian study from the University of Toronto and Algoma University finds that 3-quarters of formerly suicidal Indigenous adults who are living off-reserve had been free from suicidal thoughts in the past year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Presence of hoarding symptoms does not negatively impact CBT response in youth with OCD
(Elsevier) Hoarding can often be a debilitating problem for adults and is often associated with poorer mental health functioning and response to treatment. For children however, that may not be the case. A new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reveals that cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) can be successful for youth with hoarding symptoms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

White-tailed deer were predominant in pre-Columbian Panama feasts
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) An analysis of white-tailed deer remains at an archaeological site in Panama revealed signs of 'feasting behavior' associated with this animal among pre-Columbian populations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Lady Astronauts, Lady Engineers, and Naked Ladies'
(De Gruyter) The book 'Lady Astronauts, Lady Engineers, and Naked Ladies,' by Karin Hilck, is the fifth book published by De Gruyter in its series 'Family Values and Social Change.' It is a gender history of the American space community and by extension a social history of American society during the Cold War. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Exposure to air pollution among women in Mozambique greatly intensified by the use of kerosene lamps
(Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)) Study shows that women living in the Manhi ç a region are breathing air with much higher concentrations of black carbon than those found in Europe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows new moms may be vulnerable to 'sharenting'
(University of Tennessee at Knoxville) Two related studies found evidence that women's feelings of vulnerability about being a mother are linked to their posting on social media -- and those posts sometimes include their children's personally identifiable information, such as names, birthdates, and photographs.The researchers suggest the need for enhanced governmental guidance to protect children's online privacy from commercial entities, as well as more parental education about the consequences of sharing children's personal information. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is Instagram behavior motivated by a desire to belong?
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Does a desire to belong and perceived social support drive a person's frequency of Instagram use? (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Facebook can help college students with lower confidence build relationships
(Binghamton University) Facebook can help first-semester college students maintain relationships with high school friends and assist them in creating new friendships, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Medicare for All unlikely to cause surge in hospital use: Harvard study
(Physicians for a National Health Program) Despite some analysts' claims that Medicare for All would cause a sharp increase in health care utilization, a new study finds the two biggest coverage expansions in US history -- Medicare and the ACA -- caused no net increase in hospital use. A slight increase in care for poor and sick Americans was offset by a slight reduction in care among wealthier and healthier patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When you spot one driving hazard, you may be missing another
(North Carolina State University) When people notice one traffic hazard, they are less likely to see a simultaneous second hazard, according to new research from North Carolina State University. The finding has potential applications for both driver training and the development of automated, in-vehicle safety technologies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

College spending habits may predict when 'adulting' starts
(University of Arizona) How well you manage your money in college may determine when you'll ultimately achieve 'adult identity,' according to a new study led by the University of Arizona. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UNM scientists document late Pleistocene/early Holocene Mesoamerican stone tool tradition
(University of New Mexico) In new research published recently in PLOS One titled Linking late Paleoindian stone tool technlogies and populations in North, Central and South America, scientists from The University of NewMexico led a study in Belize to document the very earliest indigenous stone tool tradition in southern Mesoamerica. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news