Slender face identified as novel marker for left-handedness
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Individuals with a slender lower face are about 25 percent more likely to be left-handed. This unexpected finding was identified in 13,536 individuals who participated in three national surveys conducted in the United States. This association may shed new light on the origins of left-handedness, as slender jaws have also been associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis, a disease that has shaped human evolution and which today affects 2 billion people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 27, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Instagram may help users track food intake
A study by the University of Washington analyzed how Instagram users turn to posting photos of the food they eat to track intake and meet weight loss goals. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - April 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Food photos help Instagram users with healthy eating
(University of Washington) People are turning to Instagram as a place where they can log food intake and track healthy eating behaviors by posting photos of everything they eat -- and being held accountable by followers for sticking to their goals, a new study finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 26, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Video Games Help Model Brain ’ s Neurons
A video game is being used to help understand the structure of neurons, which could aid in treatment of diseases like Alzheimer ’ s or Parkinson ’ s. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICK WINGFIELD Tags: Computers and the Internet Computer and Video Games Brain University of Washington Source Type: news

Scientific discovery game significantly speeds up neuroscience research process
(University of Washington) A new scientific discovery game called Mozak is allowing video gamers to significantly speed up reconstructing the intricate architecture of brain cells, a fundamental task in 21st century brain science. These citizen scientists have outperformed computers in tracing the intricate shapes of neurons, a first step in understanding how our brain circuitry works. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Military service boosts resilience, well-being among transgender veterans
(University of Washington) Transgender people make up a small percentage of active-duty US military personnel, but their experience in the service may yield long-term, positive effects on their mental health and quality of life. A study from the University of Washington finds that among transgender older adults, those who had served in the military reported fewer symptoms of depression and greater mental health-related quality of life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Conservation not an effective tool for reducing infectious disease in people, study finds
(University of Washington) A new study finds that improved human health is not a benefit of conservation -- at least when health is measured through the lens of infectious disease. The paper analyzed the relationship between infectious diseases and their environmental, demographic and economic drivers in dozens of countries over 20 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Henrietta Lacks' Cells Are Still Helping Protect Women From Cervical Cancer
When Henrietta Lacks was being treated for cervical cancer more than 60 years ago, her cells were taken for medical research without her consent. This ethical controversy became the subject of a 2010 best-selling book, Rebecca Skloot’s The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks, and now an HBO movie of the same name starring Oprah Winfrey. Despite radiation therapy and surgery, Lacks died from the cancer in 1951. But her cells, known to scientists as HeLa cells, have played a role in many scientific advancements ― and have helped protect other young women from the cervical cancer that took Lacks’ lif...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Henrietta Lacks' Cells Are Still Helping Protect Women From Cervical Cancer
When Henrietta Lacks was being treated for cervical cancer more than 60 years ago, her cells were taken for medical research without her consent. This ethical controversy became the subject of a 2010 best-selling book, Rebecca Skloot’s The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks, and now an HBO movie of the same name starring Oprah Winfrey. Despite radiation therapy and surgery, Lacks died from the cancer in 1951. But her cells, known to scientists as HeLa cells, have played a role in many scientific advancements ― and have helped protect other young women from the cervical cancer that took Lacks’ lif...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 22, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Opinion: UW's proposed new building would encourage innovative teaching methods
You might think physicians, nurses, pharmacists and other caregivers collaborate naturally, working in harmony toward the common goal of the patient ’s health. The truth is that generations of health sciences students have trained in silos and, frankly, proceeded to their professions to work in silos. For 10 years, I have helped lead the University of Washington’s initiative to rethink how we train these clinical providers. Our aim is to g et students to think outside of these silos – and by… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 21, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Brenda Zierler co-directs the University of Washington Center for Health Sciences Interprofessional Education, Research and Practice, and directs faculty development at the WWAMI Institute for Simulation in Healthcare. Source Type: news

Opinion: UW's proposed new building would encourage innovative teaching methods
You might think physicians, nurses, pharmacists and other caregivers collaborate naturally, working in harmony toward the common goal of the patient ’s health. The truth is that generations of health sciences students have trained in silos and, frankly, proceeded to their professions to work in silos. For 10 years, I have helped lead the University of Washington’s initiative to rethink how we train these clinical providers. Our aim is to g et students to think outside of these silos – and by… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 21, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Brenda Zierler co-directs the University of Washington Center for Health Sciences Interprofessional Education, Research and Practice, and directs faculty development at the WWAMI Institute for Simulation in Healthcare. Source Type: news

More than recess: How playing on the swings helps kids learn to cooperate
(University of Washington) The measured, synchronous movement of children on the swings can encourage preschoolers to cooperate on subsequent activities, University of Washington researchers have found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 19, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Microsoft expands deal with biotech to store data in DNA
Microsoft Corp. is expanding its deal with pioneering synthetic biology company Twist Bioscience to buy 10 million strands of DNA for deeper studies into data storage using the molecules that store the genetic code for humans and most other organisms. The deal builds on an earlier purchase of DNA produced by San Francisco-based Twist that resulted in Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT) and University of Washington researchers storing 200 megabytes of data, including the Universal Declaration of Human Rights… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 17, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ron Leuty Source Type: news

Bases loaded: Microsoft, S.F. syn-bio company expand deal to store data in DNA
Microsoft Corp. is expanding its deal with pioneering synthetic biology company Twist Bioscience to buy 10 million strands of DNA for deeper studies into data storage using the molecules that store the genetic code for humans and most other organisms. The deal builds on an earlier purchase of DNA produced by San Francisco-based Twist that resulted in Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT) and University of Washington researchers storing 200 megabytes of data, including the Universal Declaration of Human Rights… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 17, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ron Leuty Source Type: news

Microsoft expands deal to use DNA for data storage
Microsoft is expanding its deal with pioneering synthetic biology company Twist Bioscience to buy 10 million strands of DNA for deeper studies into data storage using the molecules that store the genetic code for humans and most other organisms. The deal builds on an earlier purchase of DNA produced by San Francisco-based Twist that resulted in Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) and University of Washington researchers storing 200 megabytes of data, including the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 100… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 17, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Ron Leuty Source Type: news

Bases loaded: Microsoft, S.F. syn-bio company expand deal to store data in DNA
Microsoft Corp. is expanding its deal with pioneering synthetic biology company Twist Bioscience to buy 10 million strands of DNA for deeper studies into data storage using the molecules that store the genetic code for humans and most other organisms. The deal builds on an earlier purchase of DNA produced by San Francisco-based Twist that resulted in Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT) and University of Washington researchers storing 200 megabytes of data, including the Universal Declaration of Human Rights… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 17, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Ron Leuty Source Type: news

New many-toothed clingfish discovered with help of digital scans
(University of Washington) Scientists at the University of Washington, Texas A&M University and the Western Australian Museum have discovered and named a new genus and species of clingfish after stumbling upon a specimen preserved in a jar dating back to the 1970s. High-resolution scans and 3-D printing helped the researchers make their discovery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Does YOUR child have a crooked bite? They may die early
Youngsters with bites that don't quite match up on either side show signs of early life stress, scientists at the University of Washington believe. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

As People Age, The Factors That Drive Depression May Shift
(Reuters Health) – Different types of problems are most likely to afflict people at different times of life, so common risk factors for depression change over the years, too, Dutch researchers say. But when a risk factor is uncommon among peers – like widowhood or poor health in youth – it can have an outsized effect on depression risk, the study team reports in The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. “A wide range of risk factors for depression is relevant across the entire life span,” said lead author Roxanne Schaakxs of VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam. “However, some r...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Crooked bite may indicate early life stress
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Research has shown that the first 1,000 days after conception strongly influence a person's life expectancy and disease susceptibility. The primary marker used to identify early life stress is low birth weight. But low birth weight is a marker only until birth -- far short of a measurement useful for the first thousand days. New research suggests that an asymmetric lower face is a novel marker that captures early life stresses that occur after birth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 13, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Married LGBT older adults are healthier, happier than singles, study finds
(University of Washington) Same-sex marriage has been the law of the land for nearly two years -- and in some states for even longer -- but researchers can already detect positive health outcomes among couples who have tied the knot, a University of Washington study finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 13, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Why treating animals may be important in fighting resurgent tropical disease
(University of Washington) As the World Health Organization steps up its efforts to eradicate a once-rampant tropical disease, a University of Washington study suggests that monitoring, and potentially treating, the monkeys that co-exist with humans in affected parts of the world may be part of the global strategy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 12, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Smoking causes 1 in 10 deaths across the world
And more than half of the tobacco-related deaths occurred in just four countries - China, India, the US and Russia, according to researchers from the University of Washington in Seattle. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: Neuro-implants restore motion to quadriplegic patient ’ s arm
This study is groundbreaking as the first report of a person executing functional, multi-joint movements of a paralysed limb with a motor neuro-prosthesis. However, this treatment is not nearly ready for use outside the lab. The movements were rough and slow and required continuous visual feedback, as is the case for most available brain-machine interfaces, and had restricted range due to the use of a motorised device to assist shoulder movements… Thus, the study is a proof-of-principle demonstration of what is possible, rather than a fundamental advance in neuro-prosthetic concepts or technology. But it is an excit...
Source: Mass Device - March 29, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Neurological Prosthetics Source Type: news

Parents who play Pok é mon GO with kids: 'It wasn't really about the Pok é mon'
(University of Washington) In the first study to survey and interview parents who play 'Pok é mon GO' with their children, families report a number of side benefits, including increased exercise, more time spent outdoors and opportunities for family bonding. However, some guilt about screen time persisted. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Parsley and vanilla beans are being used as cellular scaffolding to grow stem cell tissues for human implants
(Natural News) Researchers at the University of Washington-Madison were able to grow skin, brain, bone marrow and blood vessels on plants using a highly-specialized, natural scaffolding from plants like parsley. The team observed that certain plant species possess strength, rigidity and porosity as well as low mass and surface area. These characteristics make for a... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Patient lives are at stake,' Fred Hutch president says of 'devastating' Trump cuts
President Donald Trump ’s 2018 budget proposal slashes funding by 18 percent for the National Institutes of Health, a critical funding source for Seattle's world-renowned research centers. Thanks in large part to organizations like the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, the University of Washington and Benaroya Re search Institute, Washington state and the Pacific Northwest have become known as the place where groundbreaking cancer research is done. Those researchers depend on funding from… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - March 16, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

'Patient lives are at stake,' Fred Hutch president says of 'devastating' Trump cuts
President Donald Trump ’s 2018 budget proposal slashes funding by 18 percent for the National Institutes of Health, a critical funding source for Seattle's world-renowned research centers. Thanks in large part to organizations like the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, the University of Washington and Benaroya Re search Institute, Washington state and the Pacific Northwest have become known as the place where groundbreaking cancer research is done. Those researchers depend on funding from… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 16, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

Why YOU really should cook at home
Adults who had their dinner in the comfort of their own living room six times a week had a higher intake of fruit and vegetables, new research from the University of Washington shows. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Adrian Raftery receives Ireland's St. Patrick's Day Medal for contributions to statistics
(University of Washington) On March 15, Prime Minister Enda Kenny of Ireland presented Adrian Raftery, a professor of statistics and sociology at the University of Washington, with the St. Patrick's Day Medal for his diverse contributions to the field of statistics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 15, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

How to conserve polar bears -- and maintain subsistence harvest -- under climate change
(University of Washington) A properly-managed subsistence harvest of polar bears can continue under climate change, according to analysis that combines sea-ice forecasts with a polar bear population model. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 15, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cooking at home tonight? It's likely cheaper and healthier, study finds
Researchers from the University of Washington School of Public Health have been peeking into kitchens - via interviews - for years now. They've just published results showing people who cook at home more often are likely to eat a healthier overall diet. The measurement used to define a healthy diet is called the Healthy Eating Index. It gauges whether a person's diet is giving them the right combination of fruits, vegetables and other elements. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - March 14, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Poor Diets Linked to 400,000 U.S. Deaths
“Healthy breakfast with eggs while camping” by Jakub Kapusnak is licensed under CC0. March is National Nutrition Month, so it comes at the perfect time that the results from a study are released explaining that a poor diet was a contributor to 400,000 U.S. premature deaths in 2015. The study suggested that poor diets are caused not only by not avoiding certain things–like trans fat and salt–but also not incorporating other foods, like vegetables, nuts and seeds. Cardiovascular disease is the number one leading cause of death in the U.S., and a poor diet is the top risk factor, according to Dr. Ashk...
Source: Network News - March 14, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Sara Goodwin Tags: Consumer Health General (all entries) Source Type: news

In times of plenty, penguin parents keep feeding their grown offspring
(University of Washington) A research team led by University of Washington biology professor Dee Boersma reports that fully grown Galapagos penguins who have fledged -- or left the nest -- continue to beg their parents for food. And sometimes, probably when the bounty of the sea is plentiful, parents oblige and feed their adult offspring. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 14, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Cooking at home tonight? It's likely cheaper and healthier, study finds
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) People who cook at home more often, rather than eating out, tend to have healthier overall diets without higher food expenses. Lack of time often prevents people from preparing their own nutritious meals. People with larger households and more children were more likely to cook at home. Income and education did not influence who was more likely to eat fast food. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 14, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Rapid decline of Arctic sea ice a combination of climate change and natural variability
(University of Washington) The dramatic decline of Arctic sea ice in recent decades is caused by a mixture of global warming and a natural, decades-long atmospheric hot spot over Greenland and the Canadian Arctic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 13, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

This May Explain Why You Get Sick When You're Overtired
This study is the first one that Watson and his colleagues are aware of that looks at what happens to the immune system’s DNA when you’re not getting adequate sleep. “It’s further evidence of how important sleep is to human health and physiology,” Watson said.  Just an hour of lost sleep can cause cellular damage The researchers followed 11 pairs of identical twins for the study. One twin reported sleeping at least seven hours per night, while the other slept approximately one hour less per night. Looking at identical twins helped control for the fact that sleep needs vary by person, Wat...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 10, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

This May Explain Why You Get Sick When You're Overtired
This study is the first one that Watson and his colleagues are aware of that looks at what happens to the immune system’s DNA when you’re not getting adequate sleep. “It’s further evidence of how important sleep is to human health and physiology,” Watson said.  Just an hour of lost sleep can cause cellular damage The researchers followed 11 pairs of identical twins for the study. One twin reported sleeping at least seven hours per night, while the other slept approximately one hour less per night. Looking at identical twins helped control for the fact that sleep needs vary by person, Wat...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Challenging tradition: Can appendicitis be treated solely with medication?
For 130 years, surgery has been the standard treatment for appendicitis — inflammation of the appendix, a short tube extending from the colon.After all, it ’s best to remove an infected body part that is not essential to survival rather than risk a rupture that spews bacteria into the abdomen. Right? Maybe not.UCLADr. David TalanDr. David Talan, professor in the department of emergency medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, is helping to lead a $12-millionclinical trial to determine whether treating appendicitis solely with antibiotics can be a safe, effective and less expensive alternative to...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 9, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

'Black swan' events strike animal populations
(University of Washington) A new analysis by the University of Washington and Simon Fraser University is the first to document that 'black swan' events also occur in animal populations and usually manifest as massive, unexpected die-offs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 7, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fee increase key to YMCA's WSU branch plans
Ronn McMahon had a hand in bringing the University Y Student Center to the campus of the University of Washington Tacoma. Now, the CEO of the Greater Wichita YMCA is involved in a similar effort locally. The YMCA is developing plans for its 10th location, this one as part of the innovation campus at Wichita State University. McMahon is quick to emphasize a proposal to construct a 60,000-square-foot health and fitne ss center is not yet a done deal, though he has been involved with talks with university… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - March 1, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Josh Heck Source Type: news

Fred Hutch researcher aims to cure HIV with 'ninja warrior' cells
Dr. Larry Corey hopes to find a way to harness a person's own immune system to cure HIV and other chronic viral infections, much like the immunotherapy treatments already being developed to treat cancer at biotechnology companies like Juno Therapeutics. He received a $2.6 million grant last month to explore this immunotherapy option and will work with other experts at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research, University of Washington, Oregon Health& Science University as well as Juno on the project. Corey… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 1, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

Fred Hutch researcher aims to cure HIV with 'ninja warrior' cells
Dr. Larry Corey hopes to find a way to harness a person's own immune system to cure HIV and other chronic viral infections, much like the immunotherapy treatments already being developed to treat cancer at biotechnology companies like Juno Therapeutics. He received a $2.6 million grant last month to explore this immunotherapy option and will work with other experts at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research, University of Washington, Oregon Health& Science University as well as Juno on the project. Corey… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - February 28, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

Braille Smartwatch Lets Users Feel Time, Texts And GPS Directions
It’s about time. Facebook, texting and GPS are commonplace tech that most of us use. But these apps, which help to bring many of us closer together, can be incredibly alienating for the visually impaired and blind. Small font sizes and glitch-y text-to-speak functions make keeping up with the way society communicates increasingly difficult and frustrating to those who have visual disabilities. But a South Korean company has invented a new smartwatch that promotes inclusivity and accessibility. The Dot smartwatch, which one could connect to a smartphone via Bluetooth, has a touch display where rising and falling dots...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

43rd Annual Meeting of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
(European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation) During its 43rd Annual Meeting, the EBMT will acknowledge the work that stems from the pioneering observations made by E. Donnall Thomas, also known as the father of bone marrow transplantation. At the Opening Session, Rainer Storb from the faculty of both, the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington School of Medicine, will give a keynote lecture entitled, '60 years of HSCT: progress from bone marrow transplantation to the first cellular and gene therapies.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How do polar bears respond to climate change, subsistence hunting?
(University of Washington) A new, two-part project led by the UW's Kristin Laidre aims to explore the interacting effects of climate change and subsistence hunting on polar bears, while also illuminating the cultural value of the species to indigenous peoples and the role they play in conservation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sorting out risk genes for brain development disorders
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Gene discovery research is uncovering similarities and differences underlying a variety of disorders affecting the developing brain, including autism, attention deficits, tics, intellectual impairments, developmental delays and language difficulties. Researchers found some genes are more closely associated with autism and others with intellectual impairments, but many times there is overlap, indicating some genes pose broader risks. Certain genes were detected only in males with high-functioning autism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Anthropologist psychiatrist sees global health through a cultural prism
As a pre-med major at UC San Diego studying biochemistry, Ippolytos Kalofonos discovered his future career while listening to a guest lecturer at an undergraduate seminar.Here was a field that wove together his interests in health, medicine and social context, he learned after listening to the medical anthropologist. Kalofonos was always interested in broader issues beyond the lab where he worked. He volunteered at a Red Cross emergency room in Tijuana, and was struck by the various forms of inequality “that were swirling around me” locally, nationally and globally.“I was really excited by the idea of med...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 21, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Debrief and Discuss -BD2K Fundamentals of Data Science – This week ’ s topic: Unsupervised Machine Learning
  Dear Network member data geeks or those interested in learning neat things about data and how it will save the planet… Please consider joining a 30 minute debrief/discussion shortly following the BD2K Guide to the fundamentals of Data Science weekly webinars. The debriefing/discussion will start after a 10 minute break after the series session ends. If you attend both the debriefing and BD2K GFDS can earn you 2 MLA CE contact hours. No registration is required. If you can’t attend the live sessions, you can participate asynchronously. This week’s topic is: Unsupervised Machine Learn...
Source: MCR News - February 21, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: liaison Tags: Community College/Academic Libraries Data Science Health Sciences Webinars and Training Source Type: news

Liberal college claims American grammar is “racist” and an unjust language structure
(Natural News) The University of Washington, Tacoma’s Writing Center wants to convince its students, as well as society, that American grammar is “racist” and an “unjust language structure.” A poster created by the director, staff, and tutors of the writing center claims that “Linguistic and writing research has shown clearly for many decades that there... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news