Can You Really Break Your Penis? (And Answers To 8 Other Candid Sex Questions)
If human penises don't have any bones in them, can they really break during sex or other intense activities? That's one of the questions sent in by a listener and tackled on the latest episode of the HuffPost Love+Sex Podcast. "You can break your penis," Dr. Zhana Vrangalova, sex expert, writer and professor at New York University, told me and my co-host, Carina Kolodny. "It is a very real thing and it’s a very unfortunate thing but technically it’s not a bone that breaks... The lining that goes around the erectile tissue of the penis -- the corpus cavernosum -- can tear." The...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 5, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

SEATTLE: University president wants to improve health around the globe
SEATTLE — University of Washington President Ana Mari Cauce is challenging the people and companies in the Puget Sound area to come up with solutions to improve the health of people in the region and across the country. She announced Tuesday she is creating a population health leadership council. The group will be charged with developing a 25-year vision for making the university and the Puget Sound region a global hub for improving population health. "We start by doubling down on our commitment… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 5, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

Tension-sensitive molecule helps cells divide chromosomes accurately
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) A tension-sensitive 'fail safe' protein helps make sure that when our cells divide the two resulting cells inherit the normal number of chromosomes. Chromosome separation errors, leading to too few or too many chromosomes, is the most common genetic abnormality in cancer cells. This latest finding in cell division biology may guide the development of new chemotherapeutic drugs that target the machinery of cell division. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 5, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Two-minute warnings make kids' 'screen time' tantrums worse
(University of Washington) Giving young children a two-minute warning that 'screen time' is about to end makes transitions away from tablets, phones, televisions and other technological devices more painful, a new University of Washington study has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 5, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Researchers develop algorithm to turn any phone into a clinically-accurate spirometer
A research team from the University of Washington has adapted a smartphone-based spirometry test to work with any kind of phone, including feature phones and landline phones, and to deliver clinically accurate results.  (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - May 4, 2016 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Mind over back pain
To the surprise of doctors and patients alike, accumulating research suggests that most chronic back pain isn’t actually the result of illness or injury. Study after study indicates instead that back pain is very often caused by our thoughts, feelings, and resulting behaviors. And an exciting new study now demonstrates that treatments aimed at our beliefs and attitudes can really help. When our back hurts, it’s only natural to assume that we’ve suffered an injury or have a disease. After all, most pain works this way. When we cut our finger, we see blood and feel pain. When our throat hurts, it’s us...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - May 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ronald D. Siegel, Psy.D. Tags: Back Pain Behavioral Health Mental Health Stress Source Type: news

UW president: Place of birth or ethnicity should not determine your health
University of Washington President Ana Mari Cauce is challenging the people and companies in the Puget Sound area to come up with solutions to improve the health of people in the region and across the country. She announced Tuesday she is creating a population health leadership council. The group will be charged with developing a 25-year vision for making the UW and the Puget Sound region a global hub for improving population health. "We start by doubling down on our commitment to reducing health… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 4, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

Keytruda (Pembrolizumab) Shows Promise for Advanced Merkel Cell Carcinoma
By Stacy SimonResults of a small clinical trial show that more than half the patients with Merkel cell carcinoma, a rare but aggressive type of skin cancer, improved when they took the immunotherapy drug Keytruda (pembrolizumab). And the improvement appears to be lasting longer than would be expected with standard treatment. This is a significant finding because there are currently no drugs that have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat Merkel cell carcinoma. Researchers studying Keytruda and other drugs are trying to provide more treatment options for people with this type of skin cancer.Whi...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - May 3, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Skin Cancer - Merkel Cell Source Type: news

Excessive Daytime Sleepiness -- Why Do You Feel Sleepy in the Afternoon
Conclusion Daytime sleepiness is a known condition that is experienced by the global population. Working adults are known to be less productive after lunch hours while students tend to snooze during afternoon classes. Investigative studies done by medical professionals have yielded several causes of this phenomenon and provided viable measures to eliminate its prevalence. For instance, changes in dietary plans and the implementation of a regular sleep schedule can effectively help individuals eliminate daytime sleepiness from their daily routine. ON the other hand, scientists have also discovered that patients with a histo...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Prevalent cancer-associated mutations detected in apparently healthy group
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) In a study of 36 women -- 16 diagnosed with ovarian cancer and a control group of 20 with no cancer diagnosis -- nearly all of the women were found to carry cancer-associated gene mutations. The study was an early test of DNA duplex sequencing, a technology developed at the University of Washington. Duplex sequencing independently tags molecules along both strands of DNA. In terms of a prospective diagnostic, its accuracy is thought to be unmatched. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 2, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Health sensing tool measures lung function over a phone call, from anywhere in the world
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers have developed SpiroCall, a new health sensing tool that can accurately measure lung function from anywhere in the world over a simple phone call. It is designed to work with older mobile phones and landlines, not just smartphones. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 2, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

'Walk-DMC' aims to improve surgery outcomes for children with cerebral palsy
(University of Washington) A University of Washington mechanical engineer has developed a new assessment of motor control in children with cerebral palsy which could help predict which patients are -- or are not -- likely to benefit from invasive surgical interventions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 27, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Allen Institute releases powerful new data on the aging brain and traumatic brain injury
(Allen Institute) The Allen Institute for Brain Science has announced major updates to its online resources available at brain-map.org, including a new resource on Aging, Dementia and Traumatic Brain Injury in collaboration with UW Medicine researchers at the University of Washington, and Group Health. The resource is the first of its kind to collect and share a wide variety of data modalities on a large sample of aged brains, complete with mental health histories and clinical diagnoses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 26, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

May 2016: 8 new labs joining the community
8 new labs have registered with WormBase and the CGC. Please join us in welcoming these labs to the community! Alex Mendenhall ARM wam University of Washington, Seattle, WA Hiroaki Miki CRB dcr Osaka University, Osaka, Japan website Megan Hwa Brewer MHB nna Sydney Medical School, Concord, NSW, Australia Suhong Xu SHX zju Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China website Tamara Mikeladze-Dvali TMD mik Biozentrum der LMU Mnchen, Planegg-Martinsried, Germany website Matt Crook TWP mxc Whitman College, Walla Walla, WA Anna K Allen WDC ana Howard University, Washington, DC website Wolfgang Fischle WFK cbd M...
Source: WormBase - April 25, 2016 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Todd Harris Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

States with punitive justice systems have higher rates of foster care, study finds
(American Sociological Association) The number of children in foster care across the country is driven not solely by child abuse and neglect, but by states' varying politics and approaches to social problems, a new University of Washington study finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

First Salish Sea-wide shoreline armoring study shows cumulative effects on ecosystem
(University of Washington) A new University of Washington study shows that impacts associated with shoreline armoring can scale up to have cumulative, large-scale effects on the characteristics of Salish Sea shorelines and the diversity of life they support. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pandemic E. coli strain H30 cloaks its stealth strategies
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) The difficulty in subduing the pandemic strain of drug-resistant E. coli H30 may go beyond patient vulnerability or antibiotic resistance. It may have an intrinsic ability to cause persistent, harmful, even deadly infections. No other type of E. coli causes as much widespread damage worldwide. H30 can go unnoticed at first because it begins as a subtle, hard-to-detect infection, usually of the urinary tract. Then it later causes complications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 19, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Effect on prices minimal 1 year after Seattle's $15 minimum wage law implementation
(University of Washington) Most Seattle employers surveyed in a University of Washington-led study said in 2015 that they expected to raise prices on goods and services to compensate for the city's move to a $15 per hour minimum wage. But a year after the law's April 2015 implementation, the study indicates such increases don't seem to be happening. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 18, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Informed Consent in a Dangerous Medical Resident Hours Study
In a recent post in this space, I wrote about the iCOMPARE research study that is comparing the effects of increasing medical residents' consecutive duty hours with observing the currently prescribed limits on their shifts. According to the study protocol, the primary hypothesis of the research addresses the safety of patients: that mortality under the increased residents' duty hours will not significantly exceed patient mortality under the current mandated standard for medical residents on duty. I argued that the study design is unethical based on what is known about sleep deprivation. The study's goal -- seeing whether m...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Worries Mount Over Potential Link Between Artificial Turf And Cancer
The federal government launched a new effort in February to study health concerns related to synthetic turf, as worries grow about possible cancer risks to the millions of athletes who play on artificial fields across the country. Now, a former top soccer player who helped convince the feds to investigate the issue says more than 200 athletes have reached out to her after being diagnosed with cancer. Amy Griffin, a goalkeeper for the U.S. National team that won the first women’s World Cup in 1991, has been informally tracking American soccer players with cancer since 2009, when she noticed a “stream of kids&rdq...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 14, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Global spending on health is expected to increase to $18.28 trillion worldwide by 2040
Global inequities in health spending are expected to persist and intensify over the next 25 years, according to a new study that estimates total health financing in countries around the world. Published in The Lancet on April 13, 2016 "National spending on health by source for 184 countries between 2013 and 2040" draws from a joint research collaboration between the World Bank Group and the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - April 13, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Outreach Committee Expands Radiology ’s Reach in Patient-Centered Care
Discussions Strategies in Imaging the Moving Child & mdash; Imaging 3.0 What We Can Learn From Our Customers: Perspectives From Three Non-Radiologists (and One Radiologist) ### About the American College of Radiology The A merican College of Radiology (ACR), founded in 1924, is a professional medical society dedicated to serving patients and society by empowering radiology professionals to advance the practice, science and professions of radiological care. (Source: American College of Radiology)
Source: American College of Radiology - April 12, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Two undergrads win Lemelson-MIT Student Prize for gloves that translate sign language
(University of Washington) Two University of Washington undergraduates have won a $10,000 Lemelson-MIT Student Prize for their "SignAloud" invention -- gloves that can translate American Sign Language into text or speech. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 12, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

This UW research center has gone from 3 to 1,000 workers in 9 years
Seattle has no lack of institutes, companies and organizations collecting data to answer important health care questions. Juno Therapeutics, Adaptive Biotechnologies and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center are only a few of the region's organizations on the cutting edge of cancer research. The University of Washington and Dr. Leroy Hoods's Institute for Systems Biology are world-renown for their work in genomics. As outlined in a recent Puget Sound Business Journal cover story, all of that… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 11, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

This UW research center has gone from 3 to 1,000 workers in 9 years
Seattle has no lack of institutes, companies and organizations collecting data to answer important health care questions. Juno Therapeutics, Adaptive Biotechnologies and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center are only a few of the region's organizations on the cutting edge of cancer research. The University of Washington and Dr. Leroy Hoods's Institute for Systems Biology are world-renown for their work in genomics. As outlined in a recent Puget Sound Business Journal cover story, all of that… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 11, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

Amid Clinic Closures, Young Doctors Seek Abortion Training
Even as scores of U.S. abortion clinics have shut down, the number of doctors trained to provide the procedure has surged – but only in some parts of the country. Two little-known training programs say they have expanded rapidly in recent years, fueled by robust private funding and strong demand. Launched nearly a quarter century ago amid protest and violence, the programs now train more than 1,000 doctors and medical students annually in reproductive services, from contraception to all types of abortion, according to interviews with Reuters. But their impact is limited. Most of the doctors end up working near where ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

OHSU senior VP of research Dorsa to retire
Dan Dorsa, who has served as Oregon Health & Science University’s vice president for research since 2001, plans to retire at the end of the year. Dorsa, who is senior VP for research, was recruited from the University of Washington. OHSU’s internal announcement on Dorsa’s retirement notes that he presided over an enormous growth in research at OHSU. The university brought in $167 million in research revenue in 2000 and $376 million in 2015. Dorsa stewarded the Oregon Opportunity funds, composed… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 7, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

OHSU senior VP of research Dorsa to retire
Dan Dorsa, who has served as Oregon Health & Science University’s vice president for research since 2001, plans to retire at the end of the year. Dorsa, who is senior VP for research, was recruited from the University of Washington. OHSU’s internal announcement on Dorsa’s retirement notes that he presided over an enormous growth in research at OHSU. The university brought in $167 million in research revenue in 2000 and $376 million in 2015. Dorsa stewarded the Oregon Opportunity funds, composed… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 7, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

UW team stores digital images in DNA -- and retrieves them perfectly
(University of Washington) University of Washington and Microsoft researchers have developed one of the first complete systems to store digital data in DNA -- enabling companies to store data that today would fill a Walmart supercenter in a space the size of a sugar cube. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 7, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

JEMS Honors Mickey Eisenberg, MD
JEMS Editor-in-Chief, A.J. Heightman and several close friends and colleagues of Mickey Eisenberg, MD, celebrated his work at a dinner in his honor recently in Seattle. The group met not only to celebrate decades of Eisenberg's contributions to EMS, but also his semi-retirement. Eisenberg is professor of medicine at the University of Washington and director of Medical QI at King County EMS. He serves as co-director of the Resuscitation Academy and has authored "Resuscitate! How Your Community Can Improve Survival from Sudden Cardiac Arrest," now in its second edition. Eisenberg has been measuring and improving EM...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - April 5, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

JEMS Honors Mickey Eisenberg, MD
JEMS Editor-in-Chief, A.J. Heightman and several close friends and colleagues of Mickey Eisenberg, MD, celebrated his work at a dinner in his honor recently in Seattle. The group met not only to celebrate decades of Eisenberg's contributions to EMS, but also his semi-retirement. Eisenberg is professor of medicine at the University of Washington and director of Medical QI at King County EMS. He serves as co-director of the Resuscitation Academy and has authored "Resuscitate! How Your Community Can Improve Survival from Sudden Cardiac Arrest," now in its second edition. Eisenberg has been measuring and improving EM...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - April 5, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

JEMS Honors Mickey Eisenberg, MD
JEMS Editor-in-Chief, A.J. Heightman and several close friends and colleagues of Mickey Eisenberg, MD, celebrated his work at a dinner in his honor recently in Seattle. The group met not only to celebrate decades of Eisenberg's contributions to EMS, but also his semi-retirement. Eisenberg is professor of medicine at the University of Washington and director of Medical QI at King County EMS. He serves as co-director of the Resuscitation Academy and has authored "Resuscitate! How Your Community Can Improve Survival from Sudden Cardiac Arrest," now in its second edition. Eisenberg has been measuring and improving EM...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - April 5, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

JEMS Honors Mickey Eisenberg, MD
JEMS Editor-in-Chief, A.J. Heightman and several close friends and colleagues of Mickey Eisenberg, MD, celebrated his work at a dinner in his honor recently in Seattle. The group met not only to celebrate decades of Eisenberg's contributions to EMS, but also his semi-retirement. Eisenberg is professor of medicine at the University of Washington and director of Medical QI at King County EMS. He serves as co-director of the Resuscitation Academy and has authored "Resuscitate! How Your Community Can Improve Survival from Sudden Cardiac Arrest," now in its second edition. Eisenberg has been measuring and improving EM...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - April 5, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

NN/LM PNR cooperative agreement in 2016-2021
On April 1, 2016, the National Library of Medicine announced the award of a five-year cooperative agreement to the University of Washington Health Sciences Library to serve as both the Regional Medical Library (RML) for the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Pacific Northwest Region (NN/LM PNR), and the NN/LM Evaluation Office. The University of Washington Health Sciences Library is one of eight RMLs in the NN/LM. There are now five national coordinating offices that support the NN/LM mission. They are the NN/LM Evaluation Office (NEO), the NN/LM Training Office (NTO), the NN/LM Web Services Office (NWSO), the NN/L...
Source: Dragonfly - April 5, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Catherine Burroughs Tags: News From NN/LM PNR Source Type: news

The Twittersphere does listen to the voice of reason -- sometimes
(University of Washington) In the maelstrom of information, opinion and conjecture that is Twitter, the voice of truth and reason does occasionally prevail. According to new University of Washington research, tweets from 'official accounts' can slow the spread of rumors on Twitter and correct misinformation that's taken on a life of its own. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 4, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Bilingual baby brains show increased activity in executive function regions
(University of Washington) New findings from the University of Washington show that babies raised in bilingual households show brain activity associated with executive functioning as early as 11 months of age. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 4, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Washington White Nose Bat Death Becomes First West Of Rockies
A disease that has decimated bat populations in the eastern U.S. has made a shocking jump to the West, putting the winged mammals in peril and threatening to drastically alter ecosystems in the region. A little brown bat with white nose syndrome was found by hikers on a trail east of Seattle in mid-March, the first time the deadly fungus has been detected west of the Rockies. The immobilized bat was taken to an animal shelter, where it died two days later. The discovery was announced Thursday by the Department of Fish and Wildlife and the U.S. Geological Survey.  David Blehert, branch chief of the USGS National W...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 3, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

How hostile states' immigration policies changed Latino migration in the late 2000s
(Dartmouth College) For many immigrants in this country, anti-immigration rhetoric is not just something that you hear on the campaign trail but a reality. In fact, about a third of US states, have had restrictive laws directed at undocumented immigrants in place since the late 2000s. As a result, many Latinos have become averse to moving to these states according to a new University of Washington - Dartmouth study just published in the Annals of the American Association of Geographers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 29, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

New Research Offers Much-Needed Hope For Our Oceans
Earth's fisheries are in bad shape -- populations of some stocks, including tuna and mackerel, declined 74 percent between 1970 and 2010. A new study, however, offers a glimmer of hope of what we could expect in the not-so-distant future if global action is taken. The study, published in Monday's issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, finds that with better fishing practices, the majority of the world's fisheries -- 77 percent, to be exact -- could recover to a healthy state within a decade. And by 2050, global fish populations could double, resulting in a 204 percent profit increase for the wo...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 28, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Icy Fire Beneath Norway's Seabed
This article originally appeared on Arctic Deeply. For weekly updates about Arctic geopolitics, economy, and ecology, you can sign up to the Arctic Deeply email list. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 25, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

UW recieves grant for mobile heath care technology in Africa
The University of Washington received a $250,000 grant this week to continue a project that allows pregnant women in remote Africa to access health care through text message. Dr. Jennifer Unger, an assistant professor at UW, has been working on this mobile health care technology since 2012. She is the primary investigator on the Mobile WACh program, which is named for the UW’s Global Center for Integrated Health of Women, Adolescents and Children. The new grant, awarded by Saving Lives at Birth,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 24, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

Mindfulness may be effective for treating lower back pain
Conclusion This RCT aimed to review the alternative mind-body therapy of MBSR for the treatment of chronic lower back pain. The trial has many strengths, including: delivery of both interventions by trained and experienced professionals long follow-up period blinded assessment of outcomes using validated scales adequate sample size – prior calculations were performed to ensure sufficient people were recruited to make the outcome assessment reliable intention to treat analysis – where all people were assessed in their assigned groups, regardless of whether they completed the interventio...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Medical practice Mental health Source Type: news

U.S. News & World Report's 2017 Best Graduate Schools Rankings
This article was originally published by U.S. News & World Report. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

U.S. News & World Report's 2017 Best Graduate Schools Rankings
This article was originally published by U.S. News & World Report. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 21, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Better safe than sorry: Babies make quick judgments about adults' anger
(University of Washington) New research from the University of Washington finds that babies form generalizations about adults' anger and try to appease those they think might be anger-prone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 21, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Homo Sapiens' Sex With Extinct Species Was No One-Night Stand
WASHINGTON, March 18 (Reuters) - Our species, Homo sapiens, has a more adventurous sexual history than previously realized, and all that bed-hopping long ago has left an indelible mark on the human genome. Scientists said on Friday an analysis of genetic information on about 1,500 people from locations around the world indicated at least four interbreeding episodes tens of thousands of years ago, three with our close cousins the Neanderthals and one with the mysterious extinct human species known as Denisovans. People living on the remote equatorial islands of Melanesia represented the only population found to possess an a...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 19, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Gene Tests May Help Predict Outcomes in Advanced Ovarian Cancer
SATURDAY, March 19, 2016 -- A special genetic test might help gauge outcomes for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer, a new study suggests. As researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle explained, advanced ovarian cancer doesn't progress... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 19, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

I Am My Mother's Chimera. Chances Are, So Are You.
For years the concept of a "genetic chimera" -- an individual with two genetically distinct cells lines in his/her body -- has sparked the imagination of writers: from Stephen King to Michael Crichton, from CSI to The Office. The idea that an individual could harbor his/her own twin is creepy and intriguing at the same time. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have allowed us to probe much deeper into a person's genome, to the point that today scientists believe that chimerism could be far more common than what we originally thought. Chances are, you could be your own twin. But how surprised would you ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 18, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

I Am My Mother's Chimera. Chances Are, So Are You.
For years the concept of a "genetic chimera" -- an individual with two genetically distinct cells lines in his/her body -- has sparked the imagination of writers: from Stephen King to Michael Crichton, from CSI to The Office. The idea that an individual could harbor his/her own twin is creepy and intriguing at the same time. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have allowed us to probe much deeper into a person's genome, to the point that today scientists believe that chimerism could be far more common than what we originally thought. Chances are, you could be your own twin. But how surprised would you b...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 18, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news