Discrimination, PTSD may lead to high preterm-birth rates among African-American women
(University of Washington) African-American women are nearly twice as likely to give birth prematurely as white women. Amelia Gavin, an associate professor in the University of Washington School of Social Work, connects preterm birth to racial discrimination via PTSD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 25, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Hundreds of bubble streams link biology, seismology off Washington's coast
(University of Washington) The first survey of methane vent sites off Washington's coast finds 1,778 bubble columns, with most located along a north-south band that is in line with a geologic fault. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Medical students open the envelopes to their futures on Match Day
You could cut the tension with a scalpel inside UCLA ’s Geffen Hall and across town atCharles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science.It was Match Day 2019 and 150  David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA fourth-year students, along with 25 of their counterparts at Drew University, who were watching via simulcast, were about to learn which hospital has accepted them for residency, or advanced training in their chosen specialty.At precisely 9 a.m., the doctors-to-be poured outside and, surrounded by friends and families, nervously ripped open their acceptance envelopes. Screams and peals of laughter split the ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 16, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Japanese don't have health problems of a 65-year-old until they are 76 (how does your country fare?)
Researchers at University of Washington evaluated how fast people get health problems of a 65-year-old. A 30-year gap separates countries with the highest and lowest ages. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How to train your robot (to feed you dinner)
(University of Washington) Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a robotic system that can feed people who need someone to help them eat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dr. Matt Kaeberlein to present at the 6th Aging Research for Drug Discovery Forum Basel
(InSilico Medicine, Inc.) Insilico Medicine, a Rockville-based company developing the end-to-end drug discovery pipeline utilizing the next generation artificial intelligence, announces the presentation of Matt Kaeberlein, Ph.D., Department of Pathology, University of Washington, at 6th Aging Research, Drug Discovery, and AI Forum during the Basel Life Congress, Sept, 10-12, 2019, Basel, Switzerland. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When coyote parents get used to humans, their offspring become bolder, too
(University of Washington) When coyote parents are habituated to humans, their offspring are more habituated, too -- potentially leading to negative interactions between coyotes and humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Report: FDA hiding millions of adverse event reports from docs, public
The FDA is hiding millions of medical device adverse event and malfunction reports from the public, according to a new report from Kaiser Health News. Since 2016, at least 1.1 million such reports have been ingested into the FDA’s “alternative summary reporting” repository, a system inaccessible to the public and so obscure that former agency head Dr. Robert Califf said he’d “never heard anything about it,” according to the report. The summary reporting repository was originally created as an alternative for issues “well-known and well-documented with the FDA” and covers appr...
Source: Mass Device - March 7, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Featured Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Source Type: news

Computer-designed vaccine elicits potent antibodies against RSV
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) A first-of-its-kind nanoparticle vaccine candidate for respiratory syncytial virus, a major cause of infant mortality worldwide, has been developed through computer design. Animal tests suggest the vaccine could provide potent, durable protection against RSV. The vaccine is being further developed for possible clinical trials. The nanoparticle platform will also be used to design potential vaccines for AIDS, hepatitis C and cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 7, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Genetics Society of America grants 2019 Elizabeth W. Jones Award to Bruce Weir
(Genetics Society of America) Bruce Weir, PhD, of the University of Washington in Seattle is the recipient of the 2019 Genetics Society of America (GSA) Elizabeth W. Jones Award for Excellence in Education, in recognition of his work training thousands of researchers in the rigorous use of statistical analysis methods for genetic and genomic data. The Jones Award recognizes individuals or groups that have had a significant, sustained impact on genetics education at any level. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Return of the wolves: How deer escape tactics help save their lives
(University of Washington) As gray wolves return to Washington state, a new study finds that one species of deer is changing its behavior to spend more time away from roads, at higher elevations and in rockier landscapes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 27, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Public Health Approach to the Opioid Crisis
Source: University of Washington, Northwest Center for Public Health Practice (NWCPH). Published: 2/26/2019. This one-hour webinar explores how public health professionals can take a lead in preventing opioid misuse. Participants will explore how to apply systems thinking methods to analyze the opioid crisis; examine public health ’s role in addressing substance misuse and addiction at the community versus the client or clinical level; and review how to apply a comprehensive, cross-sector approach to the opioid crisis at the local and state levels. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disa...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Predicting how forests in the western US will respond to changing climate
(Carnegie Institution for Science) On the mountain slopes of the western United States, climate can play a major role in determining which tree communities will thrive in the harshest conditions, according to new work from Carnegie's Leander Anderegg and University of Washington's Janneke Hille Ris Lambers. Their findings are an important step in understanding how forest growth will respond to a climate altered by human activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 25, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Spain Tops Italy as World ’s Healthiest Country While U.S. Falls: Report
Maybe it’s something in the gazpacho or paella, as Spain just surpassed Italy to become the world’s healthiest country. That’s according to the 2019 edition of the Bloomberg Healthiest Country Index, which ranks 169 economies according to factors that contribute to overall health. Spain placed sixth in the previous gauge, published in 2017. Four additional European nations were among the top 10 in 2019: Iceland (third place), Switzerland (fifth), Sweden (sixth) and Norway (ninth). Japan was the healthiest Asian nation, jumping three places from the 2017 survey into fourth and replacing Singapore, which dr...
Source: TIME: Health - February 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lee Miller and Wei Lu / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized onetime Spain Source Type: news

UCLA ’s Johnese Spisso named one of top women leaders by Modern Healthcare magazine
Johnese Spisso, president of UCLA Health and CEO of UCLA Hospital System, was honored by Modern Healthcare as one of 2019 ’s Top 25 Women Leaders. The program recognizes leading female health care executives who are influencing policy and care delivery models across the country.“This is a remarkable honor, one I am pleased to share with so many inspiring women,” said Spisso, who is also associate vice chancellor of UCLA Health Sciences. “Closing the leadership gap, whether in health care or any area, is gaining momentum for women across our nation.”A nationally recognized academic health care ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 20, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Common Weed Killer Glyphosate Increases Cancer Risk By 41%, Study Says
(CNN) — Glyphosate, an herbicide that remains the world’s most ubiquitous weed killer, raises the cancer risk of those exposed to it by 41%, a new analysis says. Researchers from the University of Washington evaluated existing studies into the chemical — found in weed killers including Monsanto’s popular Roundup — and concluded that it significantly increases the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), a cancer of the immune system. “All of the meta-analyses conducted to date, including our own, consistently report the same key finding: exposure to GBHs (glyphosate-based herbicides) are asso...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN weed killer Source Type: news

It doesn't take much for soldiers to feel cared for
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Caring texts sent to active-duty military had important findings in reducing suicide. The results were published Feb. 13 in JAMA Psychiatry along with a podcast with the researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

National Academy of Sciences Elects Home Secretary and Councilors
Susan R. Wessler, distinguished professor of genetics and Neil and Rochelle Campbell Presidential Chair for Innovation in Science Education, University of California, Riverside, has been re-elected as home secretary for the National Academy of Sciences. Wessler will continue to be responsible for the membership activities of the Academy during her third four-year term. In addition, four members have been elected to serve on the Academy's governing Council for three years. All terms begin July 1. The new councilors are:• Patricia Kuhl, co-director of the Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences and the Bezos Family Fo...
Source: News from the National Academies - February 13, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Many Arctic lakes give off less carbon than expected
(University of Washington) New research by the University of Washington and US Geological Survey suggests many lakes in the Arctic pose little threat to global carbon levels, at least for now. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 11, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study: Serious health concerns missed in older adults
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Researchers examined the prevalence and impact of six common symptoms (pain, fatigue, depression, anxiety, breathing difficulty, sleep problems) and found that nearly half of adults ages 65 and older have two or more of these symptoms and one-fourth have three or more. But often clinicians miss these symptoms, and the more serious health issues they portend because patients only talk about one of these symptoms during a visit. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rating riverside corridors -- the 'escape routes' for animals under climate change
(University of Washington) While riverside habitats are known to be important for species migrating under climate change, this is the first study to rank riparian areas as targets for restoration and conservation efforts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Age-Standardized Mortality Rate for Suicide Down Since 1990
THURSDAY, Feb. 7, 2019 -- Since 1990, the age-standardized mortality rate for suicide has decreased worldwide, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in The BMJ. Mohsen Naghavi, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., from the University of Washington in... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 7, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Folliculin mutations disrupt embryo implantation
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) New information is unfolding on the genetic controls of an early turning point in pregnancy -- the changes in an embryo's cells that occur as it prepares to lodge in the wall of the uterus. Understanding what can go wrong with these genetic controls is shedding light on implantation failure, a major cause of human infertility. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Parenting in the age of legal pot: Household rules, conversations help guide teen use
(University of Washington) The legalization of marijuana in Washington state in 2012 gave parents the opportunity for a new teachable moment. Many say that as society has become more permissive, they want information and advice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rise in the number of suicide deaths - despite a huge drop in the global rate
A new study, led by the University of Washington in Seattle, has found that the number of suicides deaths globally increased by 6.7 percent from 765,000 in 1990 to 817,000 in 2016. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Early spring rain boosts methane from thawing permafrost by 30 percent
(University of Washington) A UW-led team has found that early spring rainfall warms up a thawing permafrost bog in Alaska and promotes the growth of plants and methane-producing microbes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 4, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

An unexpected mode of action for an antibody
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Studies of human monoclonal antibodies isolated from survivors of coronavirus-induced severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or Middle-East respiratory syndrome (MERS) are unveiling surprising immune defense tactics against fatal viruses. Atomic and molecular information about the workings of the highly potent antibodies may provide insights to prevent these serious and sometimes deadly lung infections. Currently, no vaccines or specific treatments are available for any of the six coronaviruses that can infect humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 31, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Iguana-sized dinosaur cousin discovered in Antarctica
(University of Washington) Scientists have just discovered a dinosaur relative that lived in Antarctica 250 million years ago. The iguana-sized reptile's genus name, Antarctanax, means 'Antarctic king.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 31, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How a one-hour 'planting party' lifts spirits, builds skills among women in prison
(University of Washington) Exposure to nature, even through a brief gardening activity, can improve well-being among women in prison, a UW Tacoma-led study finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Discovering the Biology Education Research Community
When Sarah Eddy began work on her doctoral thesis, she assumed that her main contribution would relate to her field of study—behavioral ecology and the sexual selection of salamanders—but one of her more significant discoveries had nothing to do with amphibians and everything to do with what was going on in the classroom. As a graduate teaching assistant at Oregon State University, she realized how important it was to her to see students truly improve their learning. "It was in trying to figure out how to help students achieve more that I discovered education research literature," she explained. Many ...
Source: Eye on Education - January 24, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: BioScience Source Type: news

Ambient Air Pollution Exposure Linked to Sleep Apnea
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 -- Ambient air pollution exposure is associated with sleep apnea, according to a study recently published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. Martha E. Billings, M.D., from the University of Washington in... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 23, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

World Health Organization is 'underestimating' how many people will die because of global warming
Experts from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the University of Washington say 'many millions' of people will perish by 2050 because of soaring global temperatures. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Salad, soda and socioeconomic status: Mapping a social determinant of health in Seattle
(University of Washington) Seattle residents who live in waterfront neighborhoods tend to have healthier diets compared to those who live along Interstate-5 and Aurora Avenue, according to new research on social disparities from the University of Washington School of Public Health. The study used local data to model food consumption patterns by city block. Weekly servings of salad and soda served as proxies for diet quality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bike share programs show infrequent helmet use, little disparity among neighborhoods
(University of Washington) People riding free-floating bike share rentals in Seattle are wearing helmets infrequently, according to a new analysis conducted by University of Washington researchers. Only 20 percent of bike share riders wore helmets in the study, while more than 90 percent of cyclists wore helmets while riding their own bikes.Different research on the free-floating bike share systems showed that bikes were usually available in all Seattle neighborhoods across economic, racial and ethnic lines. However, more bikes were located in more-advantaged neighborhoods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Another Device Gets Added to the Peritoneal Dialysis Mix
AWAK Technologies has been granted a breakthrough device designation from FDA for a wearable and ultra-portable peritoneal dialysis (PD) device. The Singapore-based company’s AWAK PD device allows dialysis to be performed "on-the-go", overcoming the challenge of long hours of therapy and connection to large-size dialysis machines, currently faced by renal patients. The company said FDA’s designation was granted after reviewing the results from the First-In-Human safety trial of AWAK PD device, which was successfully completed in October 2018 at the Singapore General Hospital, S...
Source: MDDI - January 11, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Business Source Type: news

At Risk for an Opioid OD? There's an App for That
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 -- Drug users suffering an opioid overdose might soon have access to an unusual lifeline -- a smartphone app. University of Washington researchers have developed an app that can detect when a person's breathing dangerously... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 9, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Scientists design protein that prods cancer-fighting T-cells
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Scientists have created a new protein that mimics a key immune regulatory protein, interleukin 2 (IL-2). IL-2 is a potent anticancer drug, but with toxic side effects. In a paper in the Jan. 10 issue of Nature, the researchers report using computer programs to design a protein that they have shown in animal models to have the same ability to stimulate cancer-fighting T-cells as IL-2, but without triggering harmful side effects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 9, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Long-term breastfeeding sheds light on whether an infant becomes right- or left-handed
(University of Washington) Bottle feeding infants is associated with left-handedness, according to a new study from the University of Washington. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

'DeepSqueak' helps researchers decode rodent chatter
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Two scientists at the University of Washington School of Medicine developed a software program called DeepSqueak, which promotes broad adoption of rodent vocalization research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

GMO houseplant filters carcinogens
Researchers at the University of Washington have genetically modified a common houseplant — pothos ivy or devil’s ivy — to remove chloroform and benzene from the air. (Source: PharmaManufacturing.com)
Source: PharmaManufacturing.com - January 4, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

How economic theory and the Netflix Prize could make research funding more efficient
(University of Washington) In a paper published Jan. 2 in PLOS Biology, two scientists at the University of Washington and North Carolina State University use the economic theory of contests to illustrate how the competitive grant-application system has made the pursuit of research funding inefficient and unsustainable -- and that alternative methods, such as a partial lottery to award grants, could relieve pressure on professors and free up time for research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New global migration estimates show rates steady since 1990, high return migration
(University of Washington) Two University of Washington scientists have unveiled a new statistical method for estimating migration flows between countries. Using the so-called pseudo-Bayes approach, they show that rates of migration are higher than previously thought, but also relatively stable, fluctuating between 1.1 and 1.3 percent of global population from 1990 to 2015. In addition, since 1990 approximately 45 percent of migrants have returned to their home countries, a much higher estimate than other methods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Number of People With Dementia Rose Twofold From 1990 to 2016
FRIDAY, Dec. 21, 2018 -- The number of people living with dementia worldwide more than doubled from 1990 to 2016, according to a study published online Nov. 26 in The Lancet Neurology. Emma Nichols, from the University of Washington in Seattle, and... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - December 21, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Data Flash: Some Reading About Library Responses To Research Mandates
Self-promotion–we all are called upon to do it at some time or another.  And my time has arrived!  This post is to let you know that if you’re interested in reading about research mandates, from funders, institutions and publishers, there’s a new book chapter that’s just been come out, by me and Virginia Commonwealth University’s Research Data Librarian Nina Exner.   The title is “Responding to Change: Reinventing Librarian Identities in the Age of Research Mandates” and it appears in the volume Challenging the “Jacks of All Trades but Masters of None” Li...
Source: Dragonfly - December 21, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Ann Glusker Tags: Data Science News From NNLM PNR change management funders institutions librarian roles publishers research data research mandates Source Type: news

Here ’s the Best Way to Boost Your Immune System
Some people seem to breeze through cold-and-flu season without so much as a sniffle. What’s their secret? Regular exercise is a prime candidate. “If you look at all the lifestyle factors that decrease the number of days you suffer from common cold, being a physically active and fit person is the most important,” says David Nieman, a professor of public health and director of the Human Performance Lab at Appalachian State University. Nieman has spent years examining the effect exercise has on human health and immune function. In one of his studies, he and his colleagues found that 30 minutes of brisk walki...
Source: TIME: Health - December 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

Here's the Best Way to Boost Your Immune System
Some people seem to breeze through cold-and-flu season without so much as a sniffle. What’s their secret? Regular exercise is a prime candidate. “If you look at all the lifestyle factors that decrease the number of days you suffer from common cold, being a physically active and fit person is the most important,” says David Nieman, a professor of public health and director of the Human Performance Lab at Appalachian State University. Nieman has spent years examining the effect exercise has on human health and immune function. In one of his studies, he and his colleagues found that 30 minutes of brisk walki...
Source: TIME: Health - December 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

One-quarter of people around the world at risk for a stroke after age 25, study reveals
A new study from the University of Washington in Seattle found a nearly five-fold difference between the regions with the greatest risk, East Asia, and the lowest risk, sub-Saharan Africa. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Doctors Aren ’t Getting Better at Treating Shooting Victims Even As Gun Deaths Rise
In November, after the American College of Physicians published a position paper on firearms and safety in a medical journal, the National Rifle Association publicly warned doctors to “stay in their lane”. Surgeons around the U.S. responded by posting grisly photos and stories of treating shooting victims—and the hashtag #ThisIsOurLane was born. Now, a new study published in JAMA Surgery finds that people who go to the hospital after being shot die from their injuries just as often as they ever have, despite improvements in survival for other types of trauma victims. The researchers compared the numbers o...
Source: TIME: Health - December 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Belinda Luscombe Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Want cleaner air in your home? Researchers modify common houseplant to remove toxins from your rooms
Air filters don't keep small compounds at bay, according to scientists at University of Washington. Lab tests showed the modified ivy used such compounds in the air as food to grow. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news