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Why mental illness is only a part of preventing gun violence
President Trump is making mental health a focus of his efforts to curb gun violence. While experts welcome more resources and attention, some say the solutions are more complicated. Psychologist and CBS News contributor Lisa Damour joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss the importance of looking at factors beyond mental health when trying to prevent violent behavior and the gaps in America's mental health services. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - February 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A qualitative investigation of the role of gender in young women's dating violence in the United States - Lehrner A, Allen NE.
The relevance of gender has been a central debate in the intimate partner violence (IPV) literature. The current qualitative study explored the role of gender in shaping the social context, meaning, and reception of young women's IPV in the United States. ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Coal Jobs Have Gone Up Under Trump, But Not Because Of His Policies
The number of U.S. coal jobs rose slightly during the president's first year in office. But energy analysts credit short-term market forces and say they won't stop long-term decline.(Image credit: Dake Kang/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Ludden Source Type: news

Trump's language on shooter's mental health could be harmful
President Trump called the Parkland high school shooter a "sicko." Experts say this kind of language is harmful, and studies show that most people with mental illness are more likely to be victims, not perpetrators. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

EPA Chief Questioned by Democrats at Senate Oversight Hearing
On January 30, 2018, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt testified for the first time since his confirmation hearing last year before the Senate Environmental and Public Works Committee for the first time since his confirmation hearing last year. He faced tough questions and criticisms from the Democrats on the panel. Senator Tom Carper (D-DE) urged Pruitt to come before the committee and meet with lawmakers more often and criticized some of his actions as the EPA chief, such as delaying environmental rules, removing science advisers, and taking down web pages pertaining to climate scienc...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

White House Nominates Retired Astronaut to Lead USGS
The Trump Administration has announced its intent to nominate Dr. James F. Reilly, a former NASA astronaut and exploration geologist, as the next Director of the United States Geological Survey. Reilly currently serves as a technical adviser and subject matter expert on space operations at the U.S. Air Force’s National Security Space Institute in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He worked at NASA for 13 years where he was first selected as an astronaut candidate in 1994. He flew three Space Shuttle missions, conducted 5 spacewalks, and logged over 856 hours in space, with his work primarily focused on assembling the Inte...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Lawmakers Race to Replace Retiring Appropriations Committee Chairman
Representative Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-NJ), the chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, announced that he would retire from Congress at the end of this term. Several lawmakers are already scrambling to replace him, including Representatives Kay Granger (R-TX), Robert Aderholt (R-AL), Mike Simpson (R-ID), and Tom Cole (R-OK). Aderholt currently leads the Agriculture Appropriations Subcommittee and would be next in line based on seniority for the top position on the Committee. He supports cutting discretionary funding and his comments also indicate that he may not support a resurrection of earmarks. Granger is the c...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Short Takes
In congressional testimony, Dan Coats, the Director of National Intelligence, warned of the potential for drastic climate change: “The impacts of the long-term trends toward a warming climate, more air pollution, biodiversity loss, and water scarcity are likely to fuel economic and social discontent - and possibly upheaval - through 2018.” He continued, “Extreme weather events in a warmer world have the potential for greater impacts and can compound with other drivers to raise the risk of humanitarian disasters, conflict, water and food shortages, population migration, labor shortfalls, price shocks, and ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Pruitt's Reform Plan Details Major Reorganization and Workforce Reshaping
In conjunction with the fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget request, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has released a “reform plan” along with its strategic plan. The plan is in response to a Presidential executive order asking for a major reorganization of the federal government and includes eleven projects to streamline EPA operations to ensure faster contracting and permitting and fewer requests for industry information. Administrator Scott Pruitt stated in an internal email, “Together the Strategic Plan and Reform Plan set a roadmap for EPA to better achieve our mission of protecting h...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Trump Budget Offers More Deep Cuts for EPA
The White House plan for fiscal year (FY) 2019 would reduce spending for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) by 25 percent, reducing the budget from $8.1 billion in FY 2017 to $6.1 billion. This would be the smallest budget for the EPA since the 1990s. The proposal would gut funding for climate-change research and reorganize research programs related to clean water, land preservation, and healthy communities. To replace these, the budget would allocate $112 million for “core mission” and $357 million for “Rule of Law and Process.” These new items might provide the agency with some leeway to m...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

President's Budget Slashes NOAA
President Trump’s fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget request would provide $4.6 billion to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), a 20 percent reduction compared to enacted 2017 funding of $5.7 billion. The proposal would slash spending for climate change-related activities across the agency by $40 million, ending competitive grants for climate-change research and studies aimed at understanding the impacts of global warming on the Arctic. The administration seeks to eliminate $273 million in grants, including the National Sea Grant College Program, the National Estuarine Research Reserve System, coas...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Energy Budget Cuts Research Funding, Eliminates ARPA-E
The President’s fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget request would fund the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at $30.6 billion, or a level that is approximately 2 percent below 2017 enacted levels. The administration proposes to increase spending for nuclear weapons while reducing funds for core research programs. The request would provide DOE Office of Science flat funding at $5.4 billion for basic research, which is $1.2 billion or 22 percent more than the amount stated in the original budget proposal. The number increased after Congress struck the budget deal to raise spending caps in FY 2018 and 2019. Basic energy scienc...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Trump's NASA Budget Cancels Space Telescope and Five Earth Science Missions
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) would receive $19.9 billion if Congress adopts the President’s fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget. At this level, the agency would see an increase of about 1.3 percent over the enacted FY 2017 level. Under the President’s budget the White House would cancel numerous missions and a major telescope. The budget would zero out the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope. The orbiting observatory is designed to study dark energy and explore exoplanets. NASA has struggled to keep the costs of the program below a $3.2 billion cap, but the cancellation of a project that ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

President's Budget Would Cut USGS by 21 Percent
The United States Geological Survey (USGS) would be funded at $860 million, a 21 percent cut from the fiscal year (FY) 2017 level. Funding for the water resources program would be reduced by 23 percent to $165 million. The administration’s budget would also reduce support for the natural hazards program by 19 percent. These include programs to monitor earthquakes and volcanoes, which would each be slashed by 21 percent. Other programs would also see deep cuts, with budget for the ecosystems program reduced by 40 percent, core science systems reduced by 20 percent, and science support programs cut by 15 percent. The ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

NIH Budget Remains Flat Under Trump Budget
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) would see roughly flat funding if the President’s fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget request were enacted as proposed. The White House has requested $34.8 billion for NIH, approximately $2 billion below the 2018 enacted appropriation. Late adjustments to the budget reversed an originally proposed 27 percent cut to NIH. The FY 2019 budget for NIH is slated to increase only slightly by $538 million over 2017 levels because it would absorb three agencies under the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that fund research on healthcare quality, occupational health, and disabiliti...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Budget Accord Offers Opportunity to Increase Federal Science Funding
Congress approved a two-year budget plan on February 9 that would increase authorizations for federal spending. The agreement passed in the Senate (71-28) and House (240-186) and was signed into law by President Trump. The bipartisan agreement raised the caps on defense and nondefense discretionary spending by nearly $300 billion over two years, with nondefense discretionary spending - the biggest source of research funding - getting a $63 billion boost in FY 2018 and an additional $68 billion in FY 2019. Congress has yet to complete work on FY 2018 appropriations, however. Appropriations legislation is the legislative ve...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Trump's language on school shooter's mental health could be harmful, experts say
President Trump called the Parkland high school shooter a "sicko." Experts say this kind of language is harmful, and studies show that most people with mental illness are more likely to be victims, not perpetrators. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

HIV Diagnoses Among Persons Aged 13 –29 Years — United States, 2010–2014
HIV diagnoses analyzed by age groups revealed striking differences in rates of diagnosis of HIV infection between ages 13 –21 years. During 2010–2014, HIV infection diagnosis rates per 100,000 population varied substantially with increasing age among persons aged 13–15 years (0.7), 16–17 years (4.5), 18–19 years (16.5), and 20–21 years (28.6). HIV diagnosis rates were higher, but less variable, among person s aged 22–23 years (34.0), 24–25 years (33.8), 26–27 years (31.3), and 28–29 years (28.7). (Source: CDC HIV/AIDS Prevention)
Source: CDC HIV/AIDS Prevention - February 22, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Tiny rocket from recycled parts: Japan’s space agency successfully launches smallest rocket to ever carry a satellite into orbit
(Natural News) Rocket science is not a realm which belongs exclusively to the just the United States and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) anymore. Many other countries besides the U.S. have made significant progress with their rockets and space-bound satellites, and the latest one of note is none other than Japan, which recently... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Endologix CEO: It & #039;s Time for a Leadership Change
It takes a strong leader to admit when his time is up. Endologix CEO John McDermott is that type of leader, which he proved this week with the announcement that he will be stepping down as CEO of the struggling endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) company. "The past couple of years have been difficult for the company, employees, and investors, so it's time for a leadership change," McDermott said during the company's fourth-quarter earnings call, according to Seeking Alpha transcripts. McDermott has been at the Irvine, CA-based company for nearly 10 years. He said he will continue in his role until the board ...
Source: MDDI - February 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Medical Device Business Source Type: news

Urban-Rural County and State Differences in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease — United States, 2015
(Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - February 22, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

HIV Diagnoses Among Persons Aged 13 –29 Years — United States, 2010‒2014
(Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - February 22, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Prevalence of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis — United States, 2014
(Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - February 22, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Prevalence of Self-Reported Hypertension and Antihypertensive Medication Use Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years — United States, 2011–2015
(Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - February 22, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Percentage of Adults Aged ≥65 Years Who Had an Influenza Vaccine in the Past 12 Months, by Poverty Status — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 1999–2001 and 2014–2016
(Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - February 22, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Heavy Drinking Is the Biggest Risk Factor for Dementia, Study Says
Hot on the heels of headlines linking alcohol consumption with longer life comes new research that casts a much more sobering light on drinking. According to an analysis of more than 1 million people—the largest study of its kind to date—scientists say that heavy alcohol use is the biggest modifiable risk factor for dementia, especially early-onset forms of the disease. The findings, which are published in The Lancet Public Health, came as a shock to the researchers involved. “We hypothesized that alcohol would play some role, but I don’t think anyone expected the size of the effect to be so large,&...
Source: TIME: Health - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Research Source Type: news

Another Voice: Trump administration jeopardizing health care for California ’s small businesses
President Donald Trump's administration recently proposed a rule  that would make it easier for insurance companies to sell health insurance across state lines, an idea Trump’s supporters have argued would lower health care costs for small businesses. In reality, however, Trump and his allies are using small businesses as cover for a policy that would weak en the Affordable Care Act and, in turn, the health insurance marketplaces that many California entrepreneurs need to access quality, affordable… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 22, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Mark Herbert Source Type: news

HIV Diagnoses Among Persons Aged 13-29 Years - United States, 2010-2014
During 2010-2014, HIV infection diagnosis rates per 100,000 population varied substantially with increasing age among persons aged 13-15 years (0.7), 16-17 years (4.5), 18-19 years (16.5), and 20-21 years (28.6). HIV diagnosis rates were higher, but less variable, among persons aged 22-23 years (34.0), 24-25 years (33.8), 26-27 years (31.3), and 28-29 years (28.7). (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - February 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Leading Health Indicator Infographic Gallery
The Leading Health Indicators (LHIs) are high-priority health issues in the United States that serve as measures of the Nation's health. Each month HealthyPeople.gov displays 1 or more infographics to visually communicate the existing health disparities for the featured LHI. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - February 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A Framework for Healthcare Disaster Resilience: A View to the Future (February 2018)
Report identifies changes, innovations, and new efforts that could strengthen the country's ability to provide medical care in major disasters. It analyzes a range of disasters that could confront the United States and consider their impacts on the healthcare system, including how medical care would be delivered in those scenarios, both to victims of the disaster and everyone else. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - February 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CDC approves comeback for nasal mist flu vaccine
If you avoided getting a flu vaccine this year because you're needle-phobic, there's good news: the nasal spray is coming back. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices voted 12 to 2 Wednesday to allow FluMist, the only non-injected flu vaccine approved for use in the United States, to return to the disease prevention arsenal for the 2018-2019 flu season after a two-year suspension. The nasal spray had been shelved as an option after… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 22, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Anne Stych Source Type: news

Infant mortality due to unintentional suffocation among infants younger than 1 year in the United States, 1999-2015 - Gao Y, Schwebel DC, Hu G.
Unintentional suffocation is largely preventable, but it caused 87% of deaths due to unintentional injury among children younger than 12 months in the United States in 2015. During the past 2 decades, substantial public and private efforts have been dev... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

An'Onslaught' Of Lawsuits From The Blind Is Happening; Blame Obama's and Trump's DOJ
The U.S. DOJ has yet to release long-promised clarifications on the Americans with Disabilities Act that would help judges handle lawsuits that claim businesses ’ websites are not handicap-accessible - and the blame isn't on just one of the country's last two very different presidents. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - February 22, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Legal Newsline, Contributor Source Type: news

The Journal of Emergency Medical Services Announce the 2018 James O. Page/JEMS Leadership Award
CHARLOTTE, NC – Dr. Walt Stoy, PhD, EMT-P has been awarded the 2018 James O. Page/JEMS Leadership Award at EMS Today 2018 in Charlotte, NC. This award recognized Dr. Walt Stoy, PhD, EMT-P as a leader, professor and visionary to the field and future of emergency medical services (EMS). The James O. Page/JEMS Leadership Award is given to individuals or agencies who have exhibited the drive and tenacious effort necessary to develop improved EMS systems, resolve important EMS issues and bring about positive EMS system changes. Walt Stoy recognized that Emergency Medical care was his calling at the age of 15, when he enro...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - February 21, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Industry News Administration and Leadership EMS Today Source Type: news

The Journal of Emergency Medical Services Announce the 2018 James O. Page/JEMS Leadership Award
CHARLOTTE, NC – Dr. Walt Stoy, PhD, EMT-P has been awarded the 2018 James O. Page/JEMS Leadership Award at EMS Today 2018 in Charlotte, NC. This award recognized Dr. Walt Stoy, PhD, EMT-P as a leader, professor and visionary to the field and future of emergency medical services (EMS). The James O. Page/JEMS Leadership Award is given to individuals or agencies who have exhibited the drive and tenacious effort necessary to develop improved EMS systems, resolve important EMS issues and bring about positive EMS system changes. Walt Stoy recognized that Emergency Medical care was his calling at the age of 15, when he enro...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - February 21, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Industry News Administration and Leadership EMS Today Source Type: news

Phoenix City Council approves funding for University of Arizona technology medical and life science accelerator
The Phoenix City Council voted unanimously to provide seed funding for a technology medical and life science accelerator at the University of Arizona on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus. Potentially to be called InnoVention, the accelerator would be one of 13 such school accelerators in the United States. The city council approved investing $35,000 in seed money to pay for two master's-level MBA students to participate in the program, said Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton. "It's a rel atively small investment… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 21, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Angela Gonzales Source Type: news

FY19 Budget Request: 20% NOAA Cut Targets Research, Forecasters
The Trump administration has proposed to decrease the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ’s budget by 20 percent in fiscal year 2019, echoing many of the cuts to research and other programs requested for fiscal year 2018. The new proposal would cut hundreds of weather forecasting positions while keeping the development of NOAA’s satellite observations programs on track. (Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News)
Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News - February 21, 2018 Category: Physics Authors: awolfe Source Type: news

Phoenix City Council approves funding for University of Arizona technology medical and life science accelerator
The Phoenix City Council voted unanimously to provide seed funding for a technology medical and life science accelerator at the University of Arizona on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus. Potentially to be called InnoVention, the accelerator would be one of 13 such school accelerators in the United States. The city council approved investing $35,000 in seed money to pay for two master's-level MBA students to participate in the program, said Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton. "It's a rel atively small investment… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 21, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Angela Gonzales Source Type: news

Physical and mental multitasking may boost memory, study suggests
FINDINGSPerforming memory training exercises at the same time as pedaling a stationary bike led to better gains in memory than doing the training exercises after working up a sweat, according to a 55-person study led by UCLA researchers. The findings suggest that exercise may temporarily make it easier for the brain to create new memories.BACKGROUNDIn the United States, studies have shown that more than 40 percent of people over age 60 have some memory decline or forgetfulness; it ’s often considered a normal part of aging. Researchers have previously uncovered a handful of lifestyle interventions — including e...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 21, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson to start vertical construction on $18M Lake Nona facility
The  Johnson& Johnson  Human Performance Institute (NYSE: JNJ) in Lake Nona has gotten a building permit from the city of Orlando to begin vertical construction on its $18 million expansion in Lake Nona. The Johnson& Johnson Human Performance Institute does research and provides services for Fortune 500 companies and North American corporations related to mental, physical and spiritual health and well being. The Feb. 8 permit is for the facility to start on new construction of a one-story institutional… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 21, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Veronica Brezina Source Type: news

Bon Secours merging with Ohio's Mercy Health
Bon Secours Health System plans to merge with an Ohio health care giant, creating one of the largest health systems in the United States with combined revenue of $8 billion. Bon Secours of Marriottsville and Cincinnati-based Mercy Health will become the latest health systems to tie the knot amid an ever-changing landscape for hospitals. The merger will create the fifth largest Catholic health system in the U.S., with 43 hospitals and more than 1,000 care sites acros s seven states. Combined, the… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - February 21, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Ryan Sharrow Source Type: news

Paragonix Tech wins CE Mark for heart transport devices
Paragonix Technologies said today it won CE Mark approval in the European Union for its SherpaPak and SherpaPerfusion cardiac transport systems. The SherpaPak system consists of a single-use, disposable device designed for the hypothermic static preservation and transportation of the donor hearts, while the SherpaPerfusion system is a single-use, disposable device designed for hypothermic oxygenated perfusion preservation and transport of donor hearts. “Having followed the extensive research and product development activities at Paragonix Technologies over the past few years, I am impressed by the intuitive designs o...
Source: Mass Device - February 21, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiovascular Regulatory/Compliance Surgical Transplants Paragonix Technologies Source Type: news

U.S. Tobacco Control Policies to Reduce Health Disparities (R01 Clinical Trial Optional
Funding to support observational or intervention research focused on reducing cancer health disparities in tobacco use in the United States. Specifically, this FOA is intended to stimulate scientific inquiry focused on innovative tobacco control policies. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

U.S. Tobacco Control Policies to Reduce Health Disparities (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)
Funding to support observational or intervention research focused on reducing health disparities in tobacco use in the United States. Specifically, this FOA is intended to stimulate scientific inquiry focused on innovative tobacco control policies. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Constitutional attorney Jonathan Emord calls for FEDERAL investigation into link between psych drugs and school shootings
(Natural News) A top-rated lawyer who has beaten the Food and Drug Administration more times in court than any other attorney is calling on the Trump administration to launch a probe into possible links between commonly-prescribed psychiatric drugs and the epidemic of school shootings. “The financial interests of the psychiatric industry is to feed this... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CNN, MSNBC, and Hollywood Leftist kook Michael Moore all helped Russia sow discord by promoting a FAKE anti-Trump rally
(Natural News) Some readers get offended when I talk about the “American Pravda” media being the biggest enemy of the United States these days. Well, when there are numerous examples to back up the claim, I’m not sure what other conclusions a thinking person can make. Here’s another one. Late last week Deputy Attorney General... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Step Towards the Light: Ending Human Trafficking
Children from rural areas and disempowered homes are ideal targets for trafficking in India and elsewhere. Credit: Neeta Lal / IPSBy Tharanga YakupitiyageUNITED NATIONS, Feb 21 2018 (IPS)A new initiative aims to use data to shed light on a pervasive multi-billion dollar criminal industry: human trafficking.Created by the International Organization for Migration and Polaris, the Counter-Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC) is the world’s first human trafficking data portal. It collects data from various counter-trafficking organizations around the world in order to help stakeholders identify and respond to trends.&ld...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tharanga Yakupitiyage Tags: Aid Crime & Justice Education Featured Gender Violence Global Headlines Health Human Rights Migration & Refugees TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

New study suggests hormone therapy helps reduce curvature of the spine
(The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)) The Women's Health Initiative found that hormone therapy (HT) use was associated with a reduction in vertebral fracture risk. A new study shows these same benefits may also guard against a woman's risk of developing hyperkyphosis, an exaggerated curvature of the spine that creates a forward stooped posture. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cracking the connection between pediatric obesity and cancer
Obesity and cancer risk have a mysterious relationship, with obesity increasing the risk for 13 types of cancer. For some cancers — including pediatric cancers — obesity affects survival rates, which are lower for people who are obese.With an increasing population of overweight and obese children in the United States, researchers and physicians are racing to understand this connection – and what to do about it.Dr.Steven Mittelman, chief of pediatric endocrinology atUCLA Mattel Children ’s Hospital, is among those looking for clues to improve children ’s survival and recovery from cancer. But u...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 21, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Shell To Pay $10M To Reduce Excessive Emissions From Industrial Flares
NEW ORLEANS - Shell Chemical LP on Feb. 12 entered into a consent decree in Louisiana federal court with the government and Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ) in which the company agreed to spend $10 million to reduce emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the use of four industrial flares at its Norco, La., facility (United States of America, et al. v. Shell Chemical LP, No. 18-cv-104, E.D. La.). (Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News)
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News - February 21, 2018 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news