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Huntington's disease provides new cancer weapon
(Northwestern University) Patients with Huntington's disease, a fatal genetic illness that causes the breakdown of nerve cells in the brain, have up to 80 percent less cancer than the general population. Scientists have discovered why Huntington's is so toxic to cancer cells and harnessed it for a novel approach to treat cancer, a new study reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Altering Huntington's patients' skin cells into brain cells sheds light on disease
(Washington University School of Medicine) Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have transformed skin cells from patients with Huntington's disease into the type of brain cell affected by the disorder. The resulting mass of neurons serves as a new tool to study the degenerative and eventually fatal neurological condition, according to the researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Uncovering the early origins of Huntington's disease
(Rockefeller University) The symptoms of Huntington's disease typically appear in middle age, but new research shows that neural abnormalities are evident much earlier, in the first steps of embryonic development. The findings suggest that treating the disease earlier may be beneficial. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Should I find out?
Huntington's disease runs through Jackie Harrison's family, but should she take a test which will tell her if she will get it too? (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researcher discovers commonalities in brains of people with HD and PD
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new study strongly suggests that the brains of people who have died of Huntington's disease (HD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) show a similar response to a lifetime of neurodegeneration, despite being two very distinct diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Your body wants a schedule: Researchers find that eating at the same time every day helps fight cognitive decline
(Natural News) We’ve often been told that we shouldn’t skip meals, but did you know that following a regular eating schedule can help fight dementia? According to a study, “regular meals improve gene expression in the region of the brain associated with body control, which often degenerates in Huntington’s disease (HD); a form of dementia.” Simply... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Neurodegenerative disease: Restricting eating times may boost life quality
In a study of mouse models with Huntington's disease, researchers found that eating at the same time every day improved motor skills and sleep quality. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

BU researchers identify possible biomarker for Huntington's disease
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new discovery of a potential biomarker for Huntington's disease (HD) could mean a more effective way of evaluating the effectiveness of treatments for this neurological disease. The findings may provide insight into treatments that could postpone the death of neurons in people who carry the HD gene mutation, but who do not yet show symptoms of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Terminally ill Hengoed parents fundraise for daughters
Dawn Wilson, 35, from Hengoed, South Wales, suffers from an incurable tumour while the father of her two daughters, has Huntington disease, a degenerative brain condition. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Suicidal ideation and suicidal behavior according to the C-SSRS in a European cohort of Huntington's disease gene expansion carriers - van Duijn E, Vrijmoeth EM, Giltay EJ, Bernhard Landwehrmeyer G.
BACKGROUND: Huntington's disease (HD) gene expansion carriers are at an increased risk of suicide, but so far, no studies have investigated the full spectrum of suicidality, including suicidal ideation, suicidal behavior and self-injurious behavior. ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Suicide and Self-Harm Source Type: news

mGluR5 antagonism increases autophagy and prevents disease progression in the zQ175 mouse model of Huntingtons disease
Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by an expansion in the huntingtin protein (also called Htt) that induces neuronal cell death with age. We found that the treatment of 12-month-old symptomatic heterozygous and homozygous zQ175 huntingtin knockin mice for 12 weeks with CTEP, a negative allosteric modulator of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), reduced the size and number of huntingtin aggregates, attenuated caspase-3 activity, and reduced both neuronal apoptosis and neuronal loss in brain tissue. Both motor and cognitive impairments were improved in CTEP-treated zQ175 mice. The r...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - December 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Abd-Elrahman, K. S., Hamilton, A., Hutchinson, S. R., Liu, F., Russell, R. C., Ferguson, S. S. G. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

FDA to target homeopathic drugs that pose safety risks
The Food and Drug Administration proposed a tougher enforcement stance Monday toward homeopathic drugs, saying it would target products that pose the greatest safety risks, including those that contain potentially harmful ingredients or that are being marketed for serious diseases without proven benefits. Homeopathy is based on an 18th-century idea that substances that cause disease […]Related:He was a renowned surgeon — until a doctor found his initials burned on a patient’s liverA baby was born with her heart outside her body — and survived‘Phenomenal’ trial results may lead to a trea...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA takes more aggressive stance toward homeopathic drugs
The Food and Drug Administration on Monday proposed a tougher enforcement policy toward homeopathic drugs, saying it would target products posing the greatest safety risks, including those containing potentially harmful ingredients or being marketed for cancer, heart disease and opioid and alcohol addictions. Homeopathy is based on an 18th-century idea that substances that cause disease […]Related:He was a renowned surgeon — until a doctor found his initials burned on a patient’s liverA baby was born with her heart outside her body — and survived‘Phenomenal’ trial results may lead to a ...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Stunning gene therapy breakthrough driven by great dedication and graft | Robin McKie
We need more than ever to celebrate advances in medical science – though they may take years to emergeThere has been a surprising outbreak of the use of the c-word among medical researchers over the past few days. Normally cautious in their language, they have nevertheless been wielding the term “cure” when discussing the long-term potential of two separate treatments for inherited ailments that were announced last week. Such enthusiasm is striking.In one case, scientists based at St Bartholomew ’s, London – who have been working on the inherited bleeding disorder haemophilia A –outlined...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Tags: Medical research Science Genetics Biology Cystic fibrosis Society Huntington's disease Alzheimer's Dementia Source Type: news

Lab notes: Dracula, weird sex and hunting for aliens – a B-movie week in science
The biggest and most exciting news this week is, of course, that remarkable success in adrug trial for Huntington ’s disease meanswe may be at a turning point in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the stories that have most captured reader imagination are, naturally, the ones to do with thediscovery of the first solar system with as many planets as our own, scanning ‘Oumuamuafor signs that it might be an alien spacecraft and another story aboutweird monkey-deer sex (following on fromJanuary ’s monkey-deer sex revelation). Add to that anenormous ancient penguin,Dracula, the bloodsucking ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 15, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Tash Reith-Banks Tags: Science Source Type: news

This may be a turning point in treating neurodegenerative diseases
Success in trials for Huntington ’s and Spinal Muscular Atrophy raises hopes that diseases such as Alzheimer’s and ALS could be tackled using a new class of drugsThey are diseases that threaten more than physical health: memories, personality, and the ability to move and speak are incrementally stolen. And until this year neurodegenerative diseases, from Alzheimer ’s toALS, had been entirely unstoppable.However, abreakthrough in Huntington ’s disease this week suggests this bleak picture could be about to change. The landmark trial was the first to show that the genetic defect that causes Huntington...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 15, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Medical research Neuroscience Alzheimer's Motor neurone disease Parkinson's disease Genetics Drugs Health Biology Source Type: news

He was a renowned surgeon — until a doctor found his initials burned on a patient ’ s liver
Patients often can't help but wonder what doctors and nurses are doing while they're sedated. Some suspect trash talking. Others are wary of racially-charged comments. On Wednesday, a British surgeon gave patients something new to worry about: Getting their doctors' initials burned into their organs while they are unconscious. Simon Bramhall, 53, pleaded guilty to two counts of assault […]Related:A baby was born with her heart outside her body — and survived‘Phenomenal’ trial results may lead to a treatment for Huntington’s disease, experts sayTrump reportedly drinks 12 ca...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UK DRI invests £1.5 million into Huntington’s Disease
A progressive new research programme has just been funded by UK Dementia Research Institute (UK DRI), in its first investment in Huntington ’s disease since the Institute was established last year. (Source: Alzheimers Society)
Source: Alzheimers Society - December 14, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Source Type: news

A baby was born with her heart outside her body — and survived
Immediately after Vanellope Hope Wilkins was born, she was put in sterile plastic to protect her heart — which was beating outside her tiny chest. It was a moment that her parents, Dean Wilkins and Naomi Findlay, had hoped for but were not certain would actually come — a moment in which their baby girl would come into the world, and live. […]Related:‘Phenomenal’ trial results may lead to a treatment for Huntington’s disease, experts sayTrump reportedly drinks 12 cans of Diet Coke each day. Is that healthy?New CDC head faces questions about financial co...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘ Phenomenal ’ trial results may lead to a treatment for Huntington ’ s disease, experts say
The discovery of a drug that may treat the fatal disease known as Huntington's is being hailed as “historic” by Louise Vetter, president and CEO of the Huntington's Disease Society of America, and “phenomenal” and “fantastically promising” by Huntington's researchers, including the woman who discovered the genetic mutation that causes the disease. “I'm ecstatic,” said Nancy Wexler, […]Related:Trump reportedly drinks 12 cans of Diet Coke each day. Is that healthy?New CDC head faces questions about financial conflicts of interestSurge in gun sales after Sandy H...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘Phenomenal’ trial results may lead to a treatment for Huntington ’ s disease, experts say
The discovery of a drug that may treat the fatal disease known as Huntington's is being hailed as “historic” by Louise Vetter, president and CEO of the Huntington's Disease Society of America, and “phenomenal” and “fantastically promising” by Huntington's researchers, including the woman who discovered the genetic mutation that causes the disease. “I'm ecstatic,” said Nancy Wexler, […]Related:A baby was born with her heart outside her body — and survivedTrump reportedly drinks 12 cans of Diet Coke each day. Is that healthy?New CDC head faces questions a...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dementia cure ‘conceivable’ after Huntington’s disease breakthrough, scientists claim
DEMENTIA could one day be cured, scientists have claimed, after they revealed a major breakthrough in understanding the cause of Huntington ’s disease. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Advance in Huntington's Disease
New Drug a 'Ground-Breaking' Advance in Huntington's Disease (Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - December 12, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Paper of note in Science Translational Medicine 9 (419)
This week’s article describes a way to potentially reduce neurodegeneration in patients with Huntington’s disease. (Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment)
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - December 12, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ferrarelli, L. K. Tags: STKE Editors ' Choice Source Type: news

Excitement as trial shows Huntington's drug could slow progress of disease
Hailed as ‘enormously significant’, results in groundbreaking trial are first time a drug has been shown to suppress effects of Huntington’s genetic mutationA landmark trial for Huntington ’s disease has announced positive results, suggesting that an experimental drug could become the first to slow the progression of the devastating genetic illness.The results have been hailed as “enormously significant” because it is the first time any drug has been shown to suppress the effects of the Huntington’s mutation that causes irreversible damage to the brain. Current treatments only help...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 11, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Huntington's disease Medical research Science Neuroscience Alzheimer's Parkinson's disease Health Society Genetics Source Type: news

New Drug a'Ground-breaking' Advance in Huntington's Disease New Drug a'Ground-breaking' Advance in Huntington's Disease
An experimental antisense drug led to significant dose-dependent reductions in mutant Huntingtin protein in patients with Huntington's disease, a finding being characterized as'ground-breaking'and'historic.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Drug trial shows promising results in Huntington's disease fight
For the first time, an experimental drug has reduced levels of the toxic protein that causes Huntington's disease in humans. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - December 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Ground-breaking' new drug gives hope in Huntington's disease
LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists have for the first time fixed a protein defect that causes Huntington's disease by injecting a drug from Ionis Pharmaceuticals into the spine, offering new hope for patients with the devastating genetic disease. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

A cure for Huntington's disease could be in the pipeline
University College London scientists gave 46 patients an experimental drug. They discovered the pill  lowered their levels of toxic proteins in the brain - which is responsible for the disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What is Huntington’s disease? Scientists find 'groundbreaking' CURE for fatal condition
HUNTINGTON ’S DISEASE may finally have a cure after scientists discovered how to correct a DNA defect. What are the symptoms, causes and treatment options? (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Huntington’s disease CURE: The symptoms, causes and treatment for the DEADLY disease
HUNTINGTON ’S DISEASE may finally have a cure after scientists discovered how to correct a DNA defect. What are the symptoms, causes and treatment options? (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'You know that you ’re gradually lessening': life with Huntington's
Huntington ’s patient Peter Allen and his siblings – who also carry the gene – watched their mother and grandmother slowly die from the disease. Buta new trial has given the family a glimmer of hopeHuntington ’s has blighted Peter Allen’s family for generations. He watched his mother, Stephanie, slowly die from the disease and before that his grandmother, Olive, fell victim to the same illness. At 51 years old, Peter is the first of his generation to show signs of the illness, but his sister, Sandy, and brother, Frank, know they are also carrying the gene.The onset of Huntington ’s is in...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 11, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Tags: Huntington's disease Science Medical research Genetics Health Society Neuroscience Source Type: news

Huntington pledges $2M to support behavioral health program at Nationwide Children's
A Nationwide Children's Hospital project is getting a $2 million shot in the arm from Huntington Bank. The 10-year gift, announced Friday, will support Nationwide Children's Partners for Kids program, which serves children and adolescents in 34 counties, connecting about 330,000 children receiving care under the state’s five Medicaid Managed Care Plans to mental health services. About 1,000 phys icians participate in the program. It's estimated behavioral health diagnoses are made in 1 in 5 children,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - December 8, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Tristan Navera Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Huntington's disease: Could a cancer drug hold the key?
A drug that is used to treat advanced skin lymphomas may also be effective in treating Huntington's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Huntington's Disease Source Type: news

Chloe Fernandez, 10: 2017 WebMD Health Hero, Advocate
WebMD honors Chloe Fernandez of Huntington Beach, CA, as one of its 2017 Health Heroes. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - December 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

People with Huntington's want more openness around assisted dying
(Lancaster University) Research has shown that better communication around assisted dying is needed between clinician and patients diagnosed with Huntington's disease.This is the first study in the UK (where assisted dying is illegal) into the attitudes of people with the condition, which usually leads to dementia and inability to coordinate movement.Because it is inherited, people with a diagnosis will often have witnessed the suffering of a parent. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Existing cancer medication offers potential to treat Huntington's disease
(Duke Department of Neurology) A drug already used to treat certain forms of cancer appears to be an effective therapy for Huntington's disease, and offers a potential pathway to treat other neurodegenerative diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BGRF and SILS scientists analyze viability of shRNA therapy for Huntington's Disease
(Biogerontology Research Foundation) Researchers from the Biogerontology Research Foundation, Department of Molecular Neuroscience at the Swammerdam Institute for Life Sciences at the University of Amsterdam, and the Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society at the Karolinska Institute announce the publication of a paper in Translational Neurodegeneration, a BioMedCentral journal, titled RNAi mechanisms in Huntington's disease therapy: siRNA versus shRNA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists sniff out new treatment for Alzheimer's; new research suggests brain cells can be protected by stimulating the sense of smell
(Natural News) A study published in the journal Science Signaling has revealed that teaching roundworms to sniff out a certain type of bacterium has lead them to develop a defense mechanism to preserve their brain cells. The findings show potential as a drug-free intervention against neurodegenerative diseases such as dementia and Huntington’s disease, the researchers have stated.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lab notes: skin makes me cry, plus a zombie supernova in the sky
In a world full of sad news and“harmless” radioactive clouds drifting over Europe, one piece this week stood as a beacon of hope, warmed the cockles of our hearts and mixed any other metaphor you ’d care to chuck in there. The story of scientists saving the life of a seven-year-old Syrian boy bygrowing a whole new skin for him was incredibly moving – and just plain incredible science-wise. That plus a“transformational” new prenatal DNA test that detects Down ’s, Edwards and Patau syndromes with 95% accuracy means that it’s been a pretty darn good week for medical research. An...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 10, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Tash Reith-Banks Tags: Science Source Type: news

Could Facial Recognition Studies in Sheep Help Understand Huntington's Disease?
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 -- If you ever find yourself in the company of sheep, don't be surprised if they seem to recognize you. Researchers trained eight sheep to identify celebrity faces from photographs. The investigators also found that the... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 8, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Is it ... Baa-rack Obama? Sheep able to recognise celebrities, say neuroscientists
Sheep able to distinguish pictures of celebrities from unfamiliar faces with near-human accuracy, with implications for research into Huntington ’s diseaseIt has all the makings of a pub quiz teaser: what do Barack Obama, Emma Watson, Jake Gyllenhaal and the British TV presenter Fiona Bruce have in common? The answer, courtesy of neuroscientists in Cambridge, is that all have been recognised by sheep.The unlikely connection emerges from work on the face recognition skills of a Welsh Mountain breed that belongs to a university flock. Having trained the animals on mugshots of the four, scientists found the sheep could ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Medical research Science Genetics Neuroscience Biology Source Type: news

Saliva Test May Flag Early Huntington's Disease Saliva Test May Flag Early Huntington's Disease
A simple saliva test that detects the protein Htt, which plays a key role in Huntington's disease, may provide an early marker of onset and progression of the disorder, new research shows.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

The humble roundworm offers hope for dementia sufferers
A study from the University of Iowa found that when worms were taught to sniff danger it protected neurons. This could lead to non-pharmaceutical treatment for dementia and  Huntington's disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

You won ’t believe what happened this morning
When I got to the office this morning, several of my employees were in a state of near-panic… I couldn’t imagine what might have happened… and I was alarmed. Turns out, the coffee maker was on the fritz. Coffee is the “drug” of choice for many of the people on my staff. And they’re not alone… An astounding 80% of Americans use the caffeine in coffee to boost their energy. The buzz helps them wake up every morning and gets their day going. And older adults drink coffee more than anyone else. In fact, in a survey by the National Coffee Association, 20% of people over 64 said they ...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news

Opioid overdose outbreak - West Virginia, August 2016 - Massey J, Kilkenny M, Batdorf S, Sanders SK, Ellison D, Halpin J, Gladden RM, Bixler D, Haddy L, Gupta R.
On August 15, 2016, the Mayor's Office of Drug Control Policy in Huntington, West Virginia, notified the Cabell-Huntington Health Department (CHHD) of multiple calls regarding opioid overdose received by the emergency medical system (EMS) during 3 p.m.-8 p... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Opioid Overdose Outbreak - West Virginia, August 2016
An investigation of a nonfatal opioid overdose outbreak that occurred in Huntington, West Virginia, on August 15, 2016, identified 20 cases during a 53-hour period (14 overdoses occurred within 5 hours) and provided evidence that a novel, high-potency synthetic opioid was introduced into a community of persons who use illicit opioids. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH awards $2.5M grant for Huntington's disease wearable monitor
BioSensics, a Cambridge, Massachusetts-based developer of wearable health sensors, has received more than $2.5 million in NIH grant funding for its Huntington ’s disease (HD) monitoring device. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - September 20, 2017 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Pediatric exposures to topical benzocaine preparations reported to a statewide poison control system - Vohra R, Huntington S, Koike J, Le K, Geller RJ.
INTRODUCTION: Topical benzocaine is a local anesthetic commonly used to relieve pain caused by teething, periodontal irritation, burns, wounds, and insect bites. Oral preparations may contain benzocaine concentrations ranging from 7.5% to 20%. Pediatric ex... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news