Medical News Today: Cancer: Even healthy tissue is 'riddled with mutations'
A new study charts the slow build-up of genetic mutations. The researchers are surprised to find that even healthy human tissue carries many mutants. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Roche takes on Loxo, Bayer in gene-defined cancer class
Roche's entrectinib cancer pill was shown to shrink tumors in 57 percent of patients within a group that can only be identified via genetic profiling, as the Swiss drugmaker challenges an alliance of Bayer and Loxo Oncology in a new targeted treatment area. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - October 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Five scientific predictions by Professor Stephen Hawking
From catastrophic climate change to alien invasion, the theoretical physicist ’s thoughts about what might lie ahead were often far from optimisticIn his recently published posthumous collection of articles and essays, Brief Answers to theBigQuestions, Stephen Hawkingforecast that genetic editing techniques will give rise to a breed of “superhumans” – “a race of self-designing beings who are improving at an ever-increasing rate”.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Tucker Tags: Stephen Hawking Technology Science Climate change Artificial intelligence (AI) Computing Consciousness Gene editing Source Type: news

Genetic study improves lifespan predictions and scientific understanding of aging
(American Society of Human Genetics) By studying the effect of genetic variations on lifespan across the human genome, researchers have devised a way to estimate whether an individual can expect to live longer or shorter than average, and have advanced scientific understanding of the diseases and cellular pathways involved in aging. Their findings were presented at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2018 Annual Meeting in San Diego, Calif. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How to fix the 'boys' club' in interventional radiology
Is interventional radiology a "boys' club" dominated by men? That's the suggestion...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Interventional radiology used for Melania Trump procedure SIR touts interventional radiology on Capitol Hill SIR studies show breadth of interventional radiology SIR appoints new president, names new council members SIR: Women unaware of UFE as fibroid treatment optionComments: 10/17/2018 7:11:53 PMHospital-Rad Again appears like exaggeration to me. Nobody denies that there may be bias against female physicians in some setting but statement like this are BS:    Alm...
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - October 19, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Geneticists Criticize Use of Science by White Nationalists to Justify ‘ Racial Purity ’
In a statement, the American Society of Human Genetics said “ there can be no genetics-based support of claiming one group as superior to another. ” (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: AMY HARMON Tags: Genetics and Heredity Race and Ethnicity American Society of Human Genetics Whites Fringe Groups and Movements Research American Journal of Human Genetics White supremacists Source Type: news

Drug Pipeline for Macular Degeneration in Focus at AAO Drug Pipeline for Macular Degeneration in Focus at AAO
Updates from phase 3 trials of VEGF inhibitors for neovascular age-related macular degeneration, and a novel genetic treatment, will be highlighted at the American Academy of Ophthalmology meeting.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ophthalmology News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: 5 strange, rare, and fascinating medical conditions
Our bodies can work in mysterious ways, which sometimes give rise to strange medical conditions. In this Spotlight we look at five of these rare diseases. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics Source Type: news

Ancient Andeans Had Novel Genetic Advantages to Adapt to Altitude
Unlike other populations living at high altitude, Andeans didn’t rely on hypoxia-related genes. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - October 19, 2018 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Latent autoimmune diabetes is connected to other forms of the disease
Research, published inDiabetes Care, reveals a deeper understanding of the genetics involved in latent autoimmune diabetes in adults and the disease’s connection to both type-1 and type-2 diabetes.MedicalXpress (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - October 19, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Congratulations to Charis Eng on receiving the American Cancer Society's Medal of Honor
Our congratulations go to Charis Eng, M.D., Ph.D. on receiving the prestigious American Cancer Society's Medal of Honor award. Dr Eng is the chair of Cleveland Clinic's Genomic Medicine Institute and Editor-in-Chief of Society journal,Endocrine-Related Cancer. She has been recognised as an international physician-scientist in the cancer genetics field, and is among five honourees that received the award at a ceremony in Washington, D.C. on October 18.The ACS Medal of Honor is presented to individuals who have made outstanding and valuable contributions in the field of cancer. This year's other recipien...
Source: Society for Endocrinology - October 19, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

DARPA to weaponize insects to spread viruses across the population... sinister plans exposed by team of scientists
(Natural News) The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is working on an agricultural bio-weapon, and a team of scientists are speaking out about it. For many years, agricultural firms have experimented with plant life, genetically modifying crops to confer desired, profitable traits. This experimentation has largely been conducted in labs, whereas genetic modification is... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ask Well: Are Some People More Sensitive to Drug Side Effects?
Differences in the way your body metabolizes drugs might render you prone to side effects. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: RICHARD KLASCO, M.D. Tags: Genetics and Heredity Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What are 10 risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis?
The exact causes of rheumatoid arthritis are unclear, but researchers have identified several risk factors. These range from genetic predispositions to gum disease. Learn more here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Rheumatoid Arthritis Source Type: news

Why is this African village letting mosquitoes in?
The genetically modified insects are part of a project which aims to tackle malaria in Africa. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - October 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why is this African town letting mosquitoes in?
The genetically modified insects are part of a project which aims to tackle malaria in Africa. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - October 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Advantages of DNA immunization platform for eliciting mAbs in multiple species
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Researchers have taken advantage of the benefits of DNA immunization over traditional protein-based immunization to elicit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against challenging targets in three species -- mouse, rabbit, and human models. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists identify critical cancer immunity genes using new genetic barcoding technology
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) Mount Sinai Scientists developed a novel way to barcode and track different CRISPRs by utilizing synthetic proteins built from combinations of smaller proteins, called epitopes. By being able to mark each CRISPR with a unique identifier, the protein barcodes, or Pro-Codes for short, enable hundreds of CRISPRs to be used together to knockout a multitude of genes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Matter: Researchers Explore a Cancer Paradox
Healthy cells carry a surprising number of cancer-linked mutations, but they don ’ t turn into tumors. What ’ s holding them back? (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARL ZIMMER Tags: Genetics and Heredity DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid) Tumors Cancer Science (Journal) Inigo Martincorena Source Type: news

Medical News Today: How do you treat a droopy eyelid?
Ptosis refers to a droopy eyelid, where the upper eye area lowers downward. Causes include genetics, eye surgery, and excessive rubbing. Treatment can involve surgery, but usually for cosmetic reasons only. Prevention is harder due to genes playing a role. Learn more about this manageable condition here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Eye Health / Blindness Source Type: news

New genetic cause of severe childhood epilepsy identified
A new genetic cause of severe, difficult-to-treat childhood epilepsy syndrome has been identified, offering clues to potential medical treatments. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Veteran War Correspondent's Biggest Battle
(MedPage Today) -- His son's fight with a rare genetic disease (Source: MedPage Today Neurology)
Source: MedPage Today Neurology - October 18, 2018 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

Researchers Want Cancer Patients To Share Their Medical Information In Search of Cures
April Doyle, a single mom from Visalia, Cal., only lets herself look three months into her future. Since she was first diagnosed with breast cancer in 2014, she’s tried a new treatment every three months to keep the cancer from spreading from her breast tissue to other parts of her body. But it returned: this time in her bone. She is almost out of options for her hard-to-treat cancer, but she finds comfort in online support groups where other women with metastatic breast cancer share their experiences. “Eventually we know we will exhaust all of our options until they keep coming up with more treatments,” ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime Source Type: news

Amgen Invests £50 Million ($66 Million) In Oxford Nanopore Technologies
THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. and OXFORD, England, Oct. 18, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN) and Oxford Nanopore Technologies Ltd. today announced Amgen's equity investment of £50 million ($66 million) in Oxford Nanopore, a privately-owned, UK-based company advancing a new generation of portable, real-time genetic sequencing technology. Oxford Nanopore has developed and brought to market a proprietary sequencing technology that uses many nanopores (nano-scale holes made by proteins contained within a synthetic membrane) in combination with electronics to perform direct, real-time sequencing of DNA and RNA. The...
Source: Amgen News Release - October 18, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Genome, Exome, RNA Sequencing Applied to Pediatric Cancer Cases
Combining data from the genetic testing techniques can guide patient care, scientists say. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - October 18, 2018 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Deafness could be reversed? Scientists discover how to regrow lost cells in the ear
Researchers from the University of Rochester found that viruses, genetics and even existing drugs could cause little hairs to regrow in the inner ear. These hairs pick up on noises entering the ear. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Produce ALERT: New EXPERIMENTAL Monsanto Franken-Fruits hit the produce racks soon – watch out for genetically mutated mushrooms, tomatoes, bananas and strawberries
(Natural News) Gene editing of food happens when scientists remove part of a plant or seed’s DNA sequence and replace it with bacteria or pathogens that would normally never grow that way in nature. There is absolutely no science proving this is safe for humans, so anyone who consumes genetically modified foods is playing Russian roulette with... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Genetic behavior reveals cause of death in poplars essential to ecosystems, industry
(DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Scientists studying a valuable, but vulnerable, species of poplar have identified the genetic mechanism responsible for the species' inability to resist a pervasive and deadly disease. Their finding, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could lead to more successful hybrid poplar varieties for increased biofuels and forestry production and protect native trees against infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genetic breakthrough by CU Denver scientists will aid whitebark pine conservation efforts
(University of Colorado Denver) A University of Colorado Denver-led research team for the first time developed reliable genetic markers known as nuclear microsatellites for the whitebark pine, a discovery that could improve the tree's prospects for survival. Whitebark pine, which is declining rapidly nearly range-wide, is currently being considered for listing under the Endangered Species Act. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Managing the complexities and risks of HIV and tuberculosis coinfection
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study identified a significant association between HIV infection and complexities of treating patients with tuberculosis coinfection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists develop DNA molecule that may one day be used as 'vaccine' for prostate cancer
(City of Hope) Researchers from City of Hope have developed a synthetic DNA molecule that is programmed to jump-start the immune system to eradicate genetically distinct types of prostate cancer. Their novel two-step strategy eliminates STAT3 and toll-like receptor 9. The short DNA programmed by City of Hope researchers temporarily lifted the defense shield of tumors and awakened the immune system in human cell and mouse models to eradicate difficult-to-treat prostate cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Environmental associations with genes may yield opportunities for precision medicine
(American Society of Human Genetics) A new approach to genetic analysis finds associations between environmental factors and pharmacogenes -- genes associated with a person's response to drugs -- sparking ideas for new research at the interface of population genetics and medicine. Findings were presented at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2018 Annual Meeting in San Diego, Calif. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cancer-associated mutations are common in normal human esophagus
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Unexpectedly, a new study finds that cancer-associated genetic mutations are surprisingly common in aged, healthy esophageal epithelium tissue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cytokine mediates obesity-related factors linked to colorectal cancer
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study describes the mechanistic relationship between the cytokine interleukin-1 ß , (IL-1 ß ) and obesity, showing that when IL-1 ß levels are increased in obesity, IL-1 receptor signaling activates multiple pathways leading to colon cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

OSU researchers propose CRISPR as influencer of low genetic diversity in deadly bacteria
(Oregon State University) Scientists at Oregon State University have shed light on the evolutionary history of a soil-borne bacteria that is so dangerous to grazing animals it is kept behind lock-and-key to prevent its spread. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Novel DNA vaccine design offers broad protection against influenza-A H3N2
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Researchers developed a novel DNA influenza vaccine based on four micro-consensus antigenic regions selected to represent the diversity of seasonal H3N2 viruses across decades. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

University choice and achievement partly down to DNA
(King's College London) Research from King's College London has shown for the first time that genetics plays a significant role in whether young adults choose to go to university, which university they choose to attend and how well they do. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ANU researchers find new disease
(Australian National University) Researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) have discovered a new genetic disease and a method for detecting more unexplained medical conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 18, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cannabis Use Again Tied to Risk for Psychotic-Like Experiences
(MedPage Today) -- Genetics underlies the association, but heavy use may also play a role (Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry)
Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry - October 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news

Not Just For Cows Anymore: New Cottonseed Is Safe For People To Eat
Cottonseed is full of protein but toxic to humans and most animals. The USDA has approved a genetically engineered cotton with edible seeds. They could eventually feed chickens, fish — or even people.(Image credit: Courtesy of Lacey Roberts/Texas A&M University) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dan Charles Source Type: news

Sperm passes dad's trauma and poor diet to his kids
The study, published today in Nature Communications, is one of the first to explain how a parent's genetic markers have a direct impact on their children. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Baby-saving drug wins $3m prize in 'Oscars for science'
Treatment for rare genetic disease to receive one of seven $3m Breakthrough awards at glitzy ceremonyNew techniques for peering into the intricate innards of cells and a discovery that has given hope for infants with a deadly genetic condition are among the developments that are being lauded in this year ’s “Oscars for science”.The 2019 Breakthrough prize will see seven winning discoveries each celebrated with a $3m award for those behind the research to share, with a further six “New Horizons” prizes of $100,000 also going to young researchers in maths and physics and a $400,000-worth award o...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Science prizes Source Type: news

10 Ways to Keep Your Heart Healthy
No one ever had fun visiting the cardiologist. ­Regardless of how good the doc might be, it’s always a little scary thinking about the health of something as fundamental as the heart. But there are ways to take greater control—to ensure that your own heart health is the best it can be—even if you have a family history of cardiovascular disease. Although 50% of cardiovascular-disease risk is genetic, the other 50% can be modified by how you live your life, according to Dr. Eugenia Gianos, director of Women’s Heart Health at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “This means you can greatly ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Lombardi and Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Baby Boomer Health heart health Source Type: news

Why White Supremacists Are Chugging Milk (and Why Geneticists Are Alarmed)
The appropriation of genetic research by those with extremist views on race has scientists grappling with how to respond. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: AMY HARMON Tags: Genetics and Heredity Race and Ethnicity Fringe Groups and Movements Genealogy DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid) Population Research American Society of Human Genetics Evolution (Biology) Source Type: news

WormBook in GENETICS
From Iva Greenwald: Three years ago, I announced in this column the creation of WormBook in GENETICS, thanks to a generous funding commitment to our community by the Genetics Society of America. Please look at what we’ve done so far and you’ll see what a great resource it is:  http://www.genetics.org/content/wormbook We are really hitting our stride now, and you will see WormBase announcements of new chapters increasing apace.  The more you demonstrate the value of WormBook through viewing, downloading, and especially, citing the articles, the more the GSA will understand the value of their sponsorshi...
Source: WormBase - October 17, 2018 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Ranjana Kishore Tags: brief communication external website news wormbook Source Type: news

St. Jude investigators present novel pediatric cancer genome sequencing data at ASHG
(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) Investigators from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital will present new findings at the American Society of Human Genetics annual meeting this week, including study results focused on the benefit of utilizing whole genome, exome and transcriptome sequencing for pediatric cancer patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Genome sequencing found feasible and informative for pediatric cancer treatment
(American Society of Human Genetics) Comprehensive genetic testing of tumors and non-cancerous tissue from pediatric cancer patients is a feasible and clinically useful approach that can guide patient care, according to findings presented at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2018 Annual Meeting in San Diego, Calif. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Novel method for precise, controllable cell deposition onto tissue engineering constructs
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study presents a novel method of using a microfluidic flow cell array to achieve precise and reproducible control of cell deposition onto engineered tissue constructs to produce tunable cell patterns and generate essential integration zones. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

First GWAS analysis of 'type 1.5 diabetes' reveals links between immune and metabolic disease
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) Scientists who performed the largest-ever genetic study of a puzzling type of adult-onset diabetes have uncovered new connections to the two major types of diabetes, offering intriguing insights into more accurate diagnosis and better treatment. Latent automimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a relatively common disorder that shares features of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Charis Eng, M.D., Ph.D., receives prestigious Medal of Honor from American Cancer Society
(Cleveland Clinic) Charis Eng, M.D., Ph.D., chair of Cleveland Clinic's Genomic Medicine Institute, is receiving the American Cancer Society's Medal of Honor, the organization's highest award. An internationally recognized physician-scientist in the cancer genetics field, Dr. Eng is among five honorees to receive the award at a ceremony in Washington, D.C. on October 18. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news