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The InterAcademy Partnership (IAP), a global network of academies of sciences and medicine, has released a summary of the workshop on "Assessing the Security Implications of Genome Editing Technology" that was held in Germany in October 2017 and convened by the IAP, US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, the European Academies Science Advisory Council, and the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. The international workshop brought together global experts in genetic engineering, security studies, and public policy to discuss strategies to mitigate potential security concerns posed...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Philadelphia boy donates bone marrow to baby twin brothers
Four-year-old Michael Pownwall of Philadelphia is donating bone marrow to both of his twin brothers. The transplant will give the boys the immunity they were born without due to a rare genetic disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fathers Can Pass Ovarian Cancer Risk To Their Daughters
BOSTON (CBS) – A new study finds that a higher risk of ovarian cancer can be passed from father to daughter. Researchers at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY looked at data from the Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry and discovered a genetic mutation passed from a father to his daughter on the X-chromosome that puts her at higher risk for ovarian cancer. The research team is looking for what the Ovarian Cancer gene looks like. (WBZ-TV) When we think of hereditary ovarian cancer, we often think of the BRCA genes that raise the risk of both ovarian cancer and breast cancer in first degree female relatives,...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Cancer Risk Dr. Mallika Marshall Genes ovarian cancer Source Type: news

What role does genetics play in opioid addiction?
Our DNA plays a key role in determining who develops addiction and who doesn't, experts say. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Progeria Often Comes with Silent LV Dysfunction
(MedPage Today) -- Ultra-rare genetic aging syndrome offers clues to'epidemic'condition (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - February 22, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Arrival of Beaker folk changed Britain for ever, ancient DNA study shows
At least 90% of the ancestry of Britons was replaced by a wave of migrants, who arrived about 4,500 years ago, say researchersThe largest ever study on ancient DNA has shown that Britain was changed forever by the arrival of the Beaker folk, a wave of migrants about 4,500 years ago who brought with them new customs, new burial practices, and beautiful, distinctive bell-shaped pottery.Related:First modern Britons had 'dark to black' skin, Cheddar Man DNA analysis revealsContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Archaeology Genetics Science Source Type: news

Genetic roots of opioid addiction in European Americans uncovered
An increased risk of addiction in European Americans appears to be associated with a variant of the gene RGMA, which is involved in cell death and nerve damage. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - February 22, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

When every fish counts
(University of California - Davis) Genetic analysis by UC Davis showed about one-third of endangered delta smelt were misidentified in surveys of the Yolo Bypass. Their study found that genetic tools can be a powerful complement to visual identification of endangered fish. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Biomarker, clues to possible therapy found in novel childhood neurogenetic disease
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) Researchers studying a rare genetic disorder that causes severe, progressive neurological problems in childhood have discovered insights into biological mechanisms that drive the disease, along with early clues that an amino acid supplement might offer a targeted therapy. The disorder, called TBCK-encephalopathy, disrupts autophagy, an important cellular waste-disposal process. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sweet, bitter, fat: Genetics play a role in kids' snacking patterns, study finds
(University of Guelph) The types of snacks a child chooses could be linked to genetics, a University of Guelph study found.The study investigated whether genetic variants in taste receptors related to sweet, fat and bitter tastes influence the snacks preschoolers choose and found nearly 80 per cent carried at least one of these genotypes that could predispose them to poor snacking habits.These findings could help parents tailor their kids' diets based on their genetics of taste. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Toenail fungus gives up sex to infect human hosts
(Duke University) The fungus that causes athlete's foot and other skin and toenail infections may have lost its ability to sexually reproduce as it adapted to grow on human hosts. The discovery that this species may be asexual -- and therefore nearly identical at the genetic level -- uncovers potential vulnerabilities that researchers could exploit in designing better antifungal medications. The findings appear online in Genetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 22, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

GWAS identifies genetic alteration associated with opioid dependence
(Elsevier) A genome-wide association study has identified a new genetic alteration in European-Americans with opioid dependence. The study, published in Biological Psychiatry, included over 3,000 opioid-exposed people. The new findings provide insight into the biological origins of opioid dependence, which has become an epidemic of historical proportions in the US, driven by dangerous use of prescription painkillers and heroin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Arrival of Beaker folk changed Britain forever, ancient DNA study shows
At least 90% of the ancestry of Britons was replaced by a wave of migrants, who arrived about 4,500 years ago, say researchersThe largest ever study on ancient DNA has shown that Britain was changed forever by the arrival of the Beaker folk, a wave of migrants about 4,500 years ago who brought with them new customs, new burial practices, and beautiful, distinctive bell-shaped pottery.Related:First modern Britons had 'dark to black' skin, Cheddar Man DNA analysis revealsContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Archaeology Genetics Science Source Type: news

'Extinct' Caribbeans have living descendants
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Wade, L. Tags: Evolution, Genetics In Depth Source Type: news

Single-cell bioluminescence imaging of deep tissue in freely moving animals
Bioluminescence is a natural light source based on luciferase catalysis of its substrate luciferin. We performed directed evolution on firefly luciferase using a red-shifted and highly deliverable luciferin analog to establish AkaBLI, an all-engineered bioluminescence in vivo imaging system. AkaBLI produced emissions in vivo that were brighter by a factor of 100 to 1000 than conventional systems, allowing noninvasive visualization of single cells deep inside freely moving animals. Single tumorigenic cells trapped in the mouse lung vasculature could be visualized. In the mouse brain, genetic labeling with neural activity se...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Iwano, S., Sugiyama, M., Hama, H., Watakabe, A., Hasegawa, N., Kuchimaru, T., Tanaka, K. Z., Takahashi, M., Ishida, Y., Hata, J., Shimozono, S., Namiki, K., Fukano, T., Kiyama, M., Okano, H., Kizaka-Kondoh, S., McHugh, T. J., Yamamori, T., Hioki, H., Maki Tags: Cell Biology reports Source Type: news

HealthWatch: Low-Carb Vs. Low-Fat? Probably Doesn ’ t Matter
This study also looked specifically at the subjects’ genetics when it comes to metabolizing fat and carbohydrates, as well as, how their bodies secrete insulin and found that neither of those things seemed to matter when it came to weight loss with the two different diets. Scientists have wondered whether some diets fit a person’s biology better than others and this is an area which will continue to be studied. In the meantime, it’s probably best to find a meal plan that you can stick to. (Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire)
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Diet Dr. Mallika Marshall Healthy Eating Low Carb Diets Low Fat Source Type: news

Directions to Weight Loss? Don't Ask Your Genes
An important new study suggests genetic customizing of diet for weight loss is not ready for prime time. But that's OK, because we already know how to get there from here. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - February 21, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: David L. Katz, Contributor Source Type: news

Rejecting the Solutrean hypothesis: the first peoples in the Americas were not from Europe
A recent Canadian documentary promoted a fringe idea in American archaeology that ’s both scientifically wrong and racist Last month ’s release ofThe Ice Bridge, an episode in the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation seriesThe Nature of Things has once again revived public discussion of a controversial idea about how the Americas were peopled known as the“Solutrean hypothesis”. This idea suggests a European origin for the peoples who made the Clovis tools, the first recognized stone tool tradition in the Americas. As I was one of the experts appearing on the documentary, I want to share my thoughts abo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jennifer Raff Tags: Archaeology Americas Genetics Native Americans Science Biology Canada Documentary Source Type: news

Healthy eating, and not genetic predisposition, is what influences weight loss
The quantity and type of food consumed, rather than genetics, are what leads to weight loss, according to a study in theJournal of the American Medical Association.The Guardian (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - February 21, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Heavy drinking can treble the risk of getting dementia
Genetics remain the main cause of dementia, but research by the Translational Health Economics Network in Paris revealed alcohol is the biggest lifestyle risk. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Precision cancer therapy effective in both children and adults
(Children's Hospital Los Angeles) Three quarters of patients, both adults and children, with a variety of advanced cancers occurring in different sites of the body responded to larotrectinib, a novel therapy that targets a specific genetic mutation. Results of a phase 1/2 trial have been published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Unlike most cancer therapies, this oral treatment is based on the genetic traits of the tumor and not the organ where the cancer originated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 21, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New analytical method provides an insight into additional chromosomes
(AKSON Russian Science Communication Association) A new technique promises to identify additional chromosomes involved in carcinogenesis. A method for analyzing additional chromosomes was proposed by a team of scientists at the Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology and the Institute of Cytology and Genetics (Siberian branch of Russian Academy of Sciences), NSU Laboratory of Structural, Functional and Comparative Genomics and the University of Belgrade (Serbia) and published in the journal Chromosoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 21, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New research sheds light on prehistoric human migration in europe
(University of Wyoming) The first farmers of northern and western Europe passed through southeastern Europe with limited hunter-gatherer genetic admixture, which occurs when two or more previously isolated populations begin interbreeding. However, some groups that remained mixed extensively -- without the male-biased, hunter-gatherer admixture that prevailed later in the North and West. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 21, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New glaucoma drugs yield large, lasting reductions in intraocular pressure
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Two novel ocular hypotensive agents that have just been approved for use in humans -- netarsudil and latanoprostene bunod (LBN) -- greatly reduce intraocular pressure, with lasting results in various animal models of glaucoma and in humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research fails to support efficacy of desvenlafaxine for treating MDD in adolescents
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) New studies in children and adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) reported negative outcomes, failing to support the effectiveness of desvenlafaxine (Pristiq, Pfizer) compared to placebo. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Five novel genetic changes linked to pancreatic cancer risk
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) In what is believed to be the largest pancreatic cancer genome-wide association study to date, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and the National Cancer Institute, and collaborators from over 80 other institutions worldwide discovered changes to five new regions in the human genome that may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 21, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Zika virus could help combat brain cancer
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Study by Brazilian researchers shows infection by Zika caused death of cells from glioblastoma, the most common and aggressive kind of malignant brain tumor in adults. Scientists foresee the use of genetic engineering to neutralize Zika virus' infectious whilst preserving the viral particles which induce the death of tumoral cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 21, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Your DNA won't determine the best diet to help you lose weight
Trying to lose weight? Researchers have some good news: You can chose either a low-fat or low-carb diet. As long as you stick with it, you can slim down no matter what your genetic make-up or metabolic particulars.And here ’s an added bonus: You won’t even have to count your calories.Thefindings... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Weight loss linked to healthy eating not genetics, study finds
Participants who ate the most vegetables and consumed the fewest processed foods, sugary drinks and unhealthy fats shed the most kilogramsThe amount and quality of food and not a person ’s genetics will lead to weight loss, a US study has found.It has been suggested that variations in genetic makeup make it easier for some people to lose weight than others on certain diets.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Australian Associated Press Tags: Diets and dieting Health US news Medical research Science Nutrition Australia news & wellbeing Genetics Source Type: news

Optra Health launches Alexa-powered AI genomics platform
Optra Health, which produces AI-driven iPhronesis analysis platform for healthcare and life sciences clients, today announced the launch of a new genetics-focused product specially designed for consumers, genetic counselors, and other genomics researchers. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - February 20, 2018 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Humans evolving a gene that may stop us drinking alcohol
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania analysed a library of genetic data, finding that new gene variants that have arisen in Asia and Africa seem to protect people against alcoholism. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dementia Drug for Alcohol-Related Brain Damage? Dementia Drug for Alcohol-Related Brain Damage?
Heavy alcohol use in teens leads to long-lasting structural and genetic changes in the brain that may be reversed with a short course of donepezil, early research suggests.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news

Genes might not predict success of low-fat or low-carb diet
(Reuters Health) - People who try to avoid junk food may lose similar amounts of weight on a low-carb or low-fat diet even when their genetics suggest that one of these options should be better for them, a U.S. study found. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Which Is Better for Weight Loss, a Low-Fat Diet or a Low-Carb Diet?
There’s long been debate over whether low-fat or low-carb diets are better for weight loss. Some dieters swear by plans that eliminate grains, fruits and other carbohydrates, while others defend diets that cut down on red meat, dairy and other fatty foods. So who’s right? Both — and neither, according to new research published in JAMA. In a 600-person, year-long study, the two eating styles helped dieters drop almost exactly the same number of pounds — and there didn’t seem to be much rhyme or reason as to who succeeded on which plan, explains study author Christopher Gardner, director of nut...
Source: TIME: Health - February 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Green toads with multiple genomes have ancestors that are only distantly related
(Forschungsverbund Berlin) Dr. Matthias Stoeck from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and researchers from the University of Lausanne (Switzerland) and the Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) have just published an extensive phylogenetic tree for the Eurasian green toads. This phylogenetic tree shows that polyploid species are hybrids and only descend from parental species with a very high degree of genetic divergence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genes activated in metastasis also drive the first stages of tumour growth
(Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)) Researchers headed by Jordi Casanova at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) now demonstrate that genes activated during metastasis are also able to initiate primary tumour development, and they explain the molecular mechanism involved. Made using the fly model Drosophila melanogaster, this finding has been published in PloS Genetics this week. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Typhoid outbreak: Genetic cause of extensive drug-resistance found
This study shows the typhoid strain causing the outbreak acquired an additional piece of DNA to become resistant to multiple antibiotics, including a third-generation antibiotic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Clues to obesity's roots found in brain's quality control process
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) Around the clock, cells deep in the brain produces a 'grandfather' form of several hormones that help us regulate our appetite and eating. Now, a new discovery sheds new light on how that grandfather molecule gets produced -- and more important, what can go wrong and raise the risk of overeating and obesity. The findings could pave the way for new approaches to treating forms of obesity, especially those with genetic roots. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cedars-Sinai and Emulate, Inc. advance precision medicine with organs-on-chips, stem cells
(The Yates Network) Scientists at Cedars-Sinai and Emulate, Inc. are pioneering a Patient-on-a-Chip program to help predict which disease treatments would be most effective based on a patient's genetic makeup and disease variant-a new approach to precision medicine. The collaboration leverages innovative stem cell science from the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute and Emulate's Human Emulation System, which uses Organs-on-Chips technology to re-create true-to-life biology outside the body. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Reconstruction of vehicle-human crash accident and injury analysis based on 3D laser scanning, multi-rigid-body reconstruction and optimized genetic algorithm - Sun J, Wang T, Li ZD, Shao Y, Zhang ZY, Feng H, Zou DH, Chen YJ.
OBJECTIVES: To reconstruct a vehicle-bicycle-cyclist crash accident and analyse the injuries using 3D laser scanning technology, multi-rigid-body dynamics and optimized genetic algorithm, and to provide biomechanical basis for the forensic identification o... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Blood, Urine Test Could Help Diagnose Autism Earlier In Children
This study does not tell us how effectively this measure can differentiate between autism and other neurodevelopmental or mental health conditions such as ADHD and anxiety.” Autism is a developmental disorder that mainly affects social interaction, causing a wide spectrum of behavioral problems, including hyperactivity, anxiety or speech disturbances. An estimated 30% of cases have been found to have genetic causes. The remaining 70% are thought to be caused by a combination of environmental factors, mutations and genetics, according to the study. Currently, if a child is suspected of having autism, doctors carry out...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Autism Local TV Source Type: news

Team identify genetic targets for autism spectrum disorder
(University of Missouri-Columbia) Early detection of autism in children is key to producing the best outcomes; however, searching for the genetic causes of autism is complicated by various symptoms found within the spectrum. Now, a multi-disciplinary team of researchers at the University of Missouri created a new computational method that has connected several target genes to autism. Discoveries could lead to screening tools for young children and could help doctors determine correct interventions when diagnosing autism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In living color: Brightly-colored bacteria could be used to 'grow' paints and coatings
(University of Cambridge) Researchers have unlocked the genetic code behind some of the brightest and most vibrant colors in nature. The paper, published in the journal PNAS, is the first study of the genetics of structural color -- as seen in butterfly wings and peacock feathers -- and paves the way for genetic research in a variety of structurally colored organisms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study identifies traces of indigenous 'Ta í no' in present-day Caribbean populations
(St John's College, University of Cambridge) A thousand-year-old tooth has provided the first clear genetic evidence that the Ta í no -- the indigenous people whom Columbus first encountered on arriving in the New World -- still have living descendants today, despite erroneous claims in some historical narratives that these people are extinct. The findings are likely to have particular resonance for people in the Caribbean and the US who claim Ta í no ancestry, but have until now been unable to prove definitively that such a thing is possible. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Duplicate genes help animals resolve sexual conflict
(University of Chicago Medical Center) Duplicate copies of a gene shared by male and female fruit flies have evolved to resolve competing demands between the sexes. New genetic analysis by researchers at the University of Chicago describes how these copies have evolved separate male- and female-specific functions that are crucial to reproduction and fertility. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fifteen new genes identified that shape our face
(KU Leuven) Researchers from KU Leuven (Belgium) and the universities of Pittsburgh, Stanford, and Penn State (US) have identified fifteen genes that determine our facial features. The findings were published in Nature Genetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New test can detect autism in children, scientists say
Blood and urine test, believed to be first of its kind, could lead to earlier diagnosis of autism spectrum disordersScientists in Britain say they have developed a blood and urine test that can detect autism in children.Researchers at the University of Warwick said the test, believed to be the first of its kind, could lead to earlier diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in children who could then be given appropriate treatment much earlier in their lives.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Autism Medical research Genetics Biology Science Society UK news Source Type: news

China ’s great leap forward in science
Chinese investment is paying off with serious advances in biotech, computing and space. Are they edging ahead of the west?I first met Xiaogang Peng in the summer of 1992 at Jilin University in Changchun, in the remote north-east of China, where he was a postgraduate student in the department of chemistry. He told me that his dream was to get a place at a top American lab. Now, Xiaogang was evidently smart and hard-working – but so, as far as I could see, were most Chinese science students. I wished him well, but couldn’t help thinking he’d set himself a massive challenge.Fast forward four years to when, a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Philip Ball Tags: Genetics Physics Space China 5G Biology Science Technology Source Type: news

George Church: "Genome sequencing is like the internet back in the late 1980s."
The pioneering geneticist on why he wants us to earn money by sharing our genomic data, his plans to resurrect the woolly mammoth and how narcolepsy helps him generate ideas• How can I make money from my DNA?A new genetic testing company calledNebula Genomics wants to help people profit from their own genomes. The Observer talks to Harvard University DNA sequencing pioneer George Church about his latest venture, what ’s cooking in his lab and how falling asleep on the job can sometimes be a godsend.What is the value of getting your genome sequenced? Why do it?One very compelling argument that I think justifies a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zo ë Corbyn Tags: Genetics Science Biology Medical research Stem cells Source Type: news

How can I make money from my DNA?
If you have your DNA sequenced, someone somewhere will be making money from the data. A new start-up aims to make sure that you get your share• A share in the future of DNA: Prof George Church Q&AIf you unlock the secrets of your DNA by paying a company to read your genes, behind the scenes it is probably making money by selling on your data for research. Companies like23andMe andAncestryDNA charge consumers under £150 to learn about their health and/or origins, while others do whole genome sequencing for a little over £1,000 (although in the US it is cheaper at just under $1,000). The model works like...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zo ë Corbyn Tags: Genetics Science Medical research Genealogy Human Genome Project Source Type: news