Why the children of the identical twin couples will be SIBLINGS
Identical twins share 100 percent of their DNA, so when Brittany and Briana Salyers have children with their new husbands Josh and Jeremy, their kids will be legal cousins, but genetic siblings. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is a Haywire Body Clock Tied to Mood Disorders?
FRIDAY, Aug. 17, 2018 -- There may be a genetic link between mood disorders and the body's internal clock, a new study suggests. Research published earlier this year linked disruptions in the body clock (circadian rhythms) with an increased risk of... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 17, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Genetic Testing for Cancer Lacking for Women on Medicare: Study
FRIDAY, Aug. 17, 2018 -- Testing for gene mutations linked to breast and ovarian cancer is rare among some Medicare patients who have the cancers and qualify for such tests, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data from 12 southeastern states... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 17, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Africa:Take Charge of Your Food - Your Health Is Your Business
[IPS] New Delhi -The minimum we expect from the government is to differentiate between right and wrong. But when it comes to regulating our food, it's like asking for too much. Our latest investigation vouches for this. The Centre for Science and Environment (CSE)'s pollution monitoring laboratory tested 65 samples of processed food for presence of genetically modified (GM) ingredients. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - August 17, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Take Charge of Your Food: Your Health is Your Business
Credit: IPSBy Sunita NarainNEW DELHI, Aug 17 2018 (IPS)The minimum we expect from the government is to differentiate between right and wrong. But when it comes to regulating our food, it’s like asking for too much. Our latest investigation vouches for this. The Centre for Science and Environment (CSE)’s pollution monitoring laboratory tested 65 samples of processed food for presence of genetically modified (GM) ingredients.The results are both bad and somewhat good. Of the food samples tested, some 32 per cent were positive for GM markers. That’s bad. What’s even worse is that we found GM in in...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Sunita Narain Tags: Active Citizens Asia-Pacific Civil Society Development & Aid Food & Agriculture Headlines Health Human Rights Source Type: news

Researchers find pathways that uncover insight into development of lung cancer
(Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center) Lung cancer results from effects of smoking along with multiple genetic components. A new study conducted at Dartmouth identifies two main pathways for the role of chromosome 15q25.1--a leader in increasing susceptibility to lung cancer--in modifying disease risk. One pathway is implicated in nicotine dependence. The other plays a part in biological processes such as nutrient transfer and immune system function. The findings increase our understanding of lung cancer cause and development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A novel synthetic antibody enables conditional 'protein knockdown' in vertebrates
(Technische Universit ä t Dresden) The research groups led by Dr. J ö rg Mansfeld of the Biotechnology Center of the TU Dresden (BIOTEC) and Dr. Caren Norden of the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (MPI-CBG) have developed a novel synthetic antibody that paves the way for an improved functional analysis of proteins. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New research highlights promising treatments, genetic causes of obesity
(American Gastroenterological Association) More than 60 percent of American adults weigh more than is healthy, which results in increased health issues for the patient and high health care costs. The 2018 AGA James W. Freston Conference, taking place Aug. 18-19, 2018, in Arlington, Virginia, will bring together leading physicians and researchers to discuss current research and techniques to help combat the growing epidemic of obesity. Here we summarize three of the most impactful obesity abstracts to be presented as oral presentations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Genetic Test Detects Heart Disease, Diabetes, Cancer
A new genetic scoring system could indicate if one has an increased likelihood of particular diseases. ... This has strong implications for heart disease prevention. (Source: AARP.org News)
Source: AARP.org News - August 17, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Genetic Testing for Cancer Lacking for Women on Medicare: Study
(Source: Cancercompass News: Gynecological Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Gynecological Cancer - August 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Genetic Testing for Cancer Lacking for Women on Medicare: Study
(Source: Cancercompass News: Breast Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Breast Cancer - August 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Moderate carb intake may be best for health and longevity, study finds
Equivalent to 50-55% of energy intake; more or less linked to heightened risk of death Related items fromOnMedica Weight Watchers helped stave off type 2 diabetes Scotland reveals plans to cut impact of type 2 diabetes NHS type 2 Diabetes Prevention Programme exceeds expectations Hospitals in England cutting back on sugary drink/snack sales Low fat vs low carb diet success not linked to genetics (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - August 17, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

How Much Can Genomic Data Really Affect Behavior? How Much Can Genomic Data Really Affect Behavior?
Past studies have suggested that providing genetic risk data to patients is unlikely to change behavior; a new, large study challenges that view.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Internal Medicine News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What are the natural ways to prevent prostate cancer?
Age, genetics, and a poor diet are among the many risk factors for prostate cancer. By taking certain steps, a person may be able to reduce their risk. For example, adding soy products and coffee to the diet may help. Learn about natural ways to prevent prostate cancer here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Prostate / Prostate Cancer Source Type: news

Several Genetic Variants Associated With Increased TNBC Risk
A study using multigene panel testing identified several pathogenic variants associated with an increased risk of triple-negative breast cancer. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - August 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Dave Levitan Source Type: news

How Much Can Genomic Data Really Alter Behavior? How Much Can Genomic Data Really Alter Behavior?
Past studies have suggested that providing genetic risk data to patients is unlikely to change behavior; a new, large study challenges that view.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Internal Medicine News Source Type: news

Can Learning Genomic Risk Really Affect Behavior? Can Learning Genomic Risk Really Affect Behavior?
Past studies have suggested that providing genetic risk data to patients is unlikely to change behavior; a new, large study challenges that view.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Internal Medicine News Source Type: news

Opinion: Consumer DNA Testing Is Crossing into Unethical Territories
Data don’t support many direct-to-consumer products, from telomere assessments to bespoke diets based on genetic sequences. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - August 16, 2018 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Interplay between RGS2 and childhood adversities in predicting anxiety and depressive disorders: Findings from a general population sample - Asselmann E, Hertel J, Schmidt CO, Homuth G, Nauck M, Pan é-Farré CA, Katja BB, Grabe HJ.
BACKGROUND: It remains unresolved whether childhood adversities interact with genetic variation in regulator of G-protein signaling 2 (RGS2) rs4606 in predicting various anxiety and depressive disorders and whether diagnostic specificity exists in these in... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Pfizer bets on biotech flu vaccine in $425 million BioNTech alliance
Pfizer has agreed to pay German biotech firm BioNTech up to $425 million in an alliance to develop more effective influenza jabs, the latest among several major pharma companies to bank on a promising new genetic approach. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

UM Researcher discovers genetic differences in trees untouched by mountain pine beetles
(The University of Montana) A University of Montana researcher has discovered that mountain pine beetles may avoid certain trees within a population they normally would kill due to genetics in the trees. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 16, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New CRISPR technique skips over portions of genes that can cause disease
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) In a new study in cells, University of Illinois researchers have adapted CRISPR gene-editing technology to cause the cell's internal machinery to skip over a small portion of a gene when transcribing it into a template for protein building. Such targeted editing could one day be useful for treating genetic diseases caused by mutations in the genome, such as Duchenne's muscular dystrophy, Huntington's disease or some cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Female mosquitoes get choosy quickly to offset invasions
(North Carolina State University) Certain female mosquitoes quickly evolve more selective mating behavior when faced with existential threats from other invasive mosquito species, with concurrent changes to certain genetic regions, according to new research from North Carolina State University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMD researcher helps to crack the genetic code for wheat for the first time
(University of Maryland) The University of Maryland as part of the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium published findings in Science detailing the full wheat genome, the world's most widely cultivated crop. A companion paper is available in the same issue with UMD and the John Innes Centre, using this sequence to examine gene expression in wheat, specifically relating to heat, drought, and disease. This paves the way for wheat varieties adapted to climate, enhancing yields, nutrition, and sustainability. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Detailed genome maps paths to better wheat
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Pennisi, E. Tags: Genetics In Depth Source Type: news

‘Big Data’ May Help Immunotherapy
Researchers believe an assay may be used to detect and monitor dynamics of genetic mutations of patients treated with immunotherapy. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - August 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: John Schieszer Source Type: news

Carotenoids and omega-3s are crucial for healthy eyes, one of the most metabolically active tissues in the body
(Natural News) Foods rich in carotenoids aren’t the only things that can boost eye health, according to Dr. John Paul SanGiovanni, a federally funded researcher who specializes in the topic. It looks like foods that contain omega-3 fatty acids are also beneficial for optimal vision. SanGiovanni is the chief of the unit on Genetics in Nutritional... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Broad Genetic Testing for NSCLC May Not Improve Survival
Compared with routine genetic testing, no improvement seen in unadjusted mortality rate (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - August 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncology, Pathology, Pulmonology, Journal, Source Type: news

Women whose mothers live to the ripe old age of 90 are 25% more likely to reach the same milestone
Scientists at the University of California, San Diego, believe genetics may play a key role. Yet they also speculate that healthy behaviours passed onto younger generations could explain the link they found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Broad Genetic Testing for NSCLC May Not Improve Survival
WEDNESDAY, Aug. 15, 2018 -- Broad-based genomic sequencing does not improve survival compared to routine genetic testing among patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to a study published in the Aug. 7 issue of the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 15, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Ten tips to prevent stretch marks
Rapid weight or muscle gain, growth spurts, and pregnancy can all cause stretch marks. Genetics may also be a contributing factor. These lines are not harmful to health, but some people dislike their appearance. In this article, learn about ways to help prevent stretch marks and keep the skin looking supple and smooth. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dermatology Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Researchers Investigate Ways Telomeres Could be Useful in Clinical Laboratory Diagnoses of Diseases Associated with Short Telomere Syndrome
Using precision genomics, Mayo researchers hope to develop improved medical laboratory tools for screening, diagnosing, and treating patients with inherited genetic disorders such as accelerated aging Telomeres increasingly are on the radars of physicians and healthcare consumers alike, as researchers gain more knowledge about these critical nucleotides, and doctors continue to indicate their belief that […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - August 15, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Digital Pathology Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing anatomic pathology clinical laboratory comprehensive obstructive pulmonary disorder COPD Dark Daily Source Type: news

Tufts researchers receive award to integrate genomic sequencing into neonatal care
(Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute) Tufts Medical Center researchers have received a five-year grant award for more than $8 million from the National Center For Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study the integration of targeted genomic sequencing into neonatal diagnosis and care. Funding for the national clinical trial, " Precision Medicine in the Diagnosis of Genetic Disorders in Neonates, " begins today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Long-term efficacy of AAV5-based gene therapy   to treat day blind sheep with achromatopsia
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A study of a large animal model of achromatopsia caused by a mutation in the CNGA3 gene that was treated with a single injection of CNGA3 gene therapy delivered using an AAV5 vector revealed findings reported long-term follow-up findings that show promise for the efficacy and safety of this therapeutic approach. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How gene hunting changed the culture of science
(University of Houston) A University of Houston researcher reports that 15 years after the end of the Human Genome Project, which mapped the human genetic blueprint, the project is still making news because it forever changed the way scientists work. Among the findings, the literature published by teams of scientists fared better than those published by single authors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genetic Tests Miss ROS1 Status in Some Advanced NSCLC Cases Genetic Tests Miss ROS1 Status in Some Advanced NSCLC Cases
Orthogonal assays are recommended for fusion testing to make sure patients get optimal targeted therapy.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Multi-gene test may find risk of heart disease and more
Researchers say a new way of analyzing genetic test data may one day help identify people at high risk of a youthful heart attack ​ in time to help (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - August 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is IBM Really Making Progress with Watson in Healthcare?
Recent media reports have cast doubt on the benefits of IBM's Watson computing system in healthcare, but the company isn't taking the criticism lying down. "I feel it is imperative to set the record straight," John Kelly III, senior vice president of cognitive solutions and IBM research, wrote in a blog post for IBM. IBM has placed a big bet on healthcare, Kelly said.  "We know that AI can make a big difference in solving medical challenges and supporting the work of the healthcare industry," he said, adding that the company also sees an enormous business opportunity in this area as the adop...
Source: MDDI - August 14, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

Gene Test Predicts Risk of 5 Common Diseases
TUESDAY, Aug. 14, 2018 -- A new type of genetic analysis could identify millions of Americans at high risk for five serious and common diseases, researchers report. The diseases include coronary artery disease, the heart rhythm disorder atrial... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 14, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Matter: The ‘ Zombie Gene ’ That May Protect Elephants From Cancer
With such enormous bodies, elephants should be particularly prone to tumors. But an ancient gene in their DNA, somehow resurrected, seems to shield the animals. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARL ZIMMER Tags: Genetics and Heredity Elephants Proteins DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid) Mitochondria Cancer Mammals Cell Reports (Journal) University of Chicago Lynch, Vincent J Schiffman, Joshua D Source Type: news

Fishing quotas upended by nuclear DNA analysis
(University of Johannesburg) Fishing quotas have been decided using an inadequate method for decades, according to a Scientific Reports study. The same method has also been used to decide about culling, hunting quotas, or translocating threatened species. Analysing the nuclear genome of sardines shows previously unrecognised genetic differences between populations, which are not identified by the go-to-method for Isolation-By-Distance, mitochondrial DNA analysis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Inching closer to a soft spot in isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Researchers comparing clonal strains of the mycobacteria that cause TB, before and after they developed resistance to a first-line drug, found that a single genetic change may not always have identical effects on bacterial fitness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 14, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Medically underserved women in the Southeast rarely receive BRCA tests
(Vanderbilt University Medical Center) Medically underserved women in the Southeast diagnosed with breast cancer or ovarian cancer missed out on genetic testing that could have helped them and their relatives make important decisions about their health, according to new research from Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Research identifies potential guidance for gastric cancer treatment
(National Foundation for Cancer Research) Researchers from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital (TMUCIH) have discovered that gastric cancer tissue samples bearing mutation of a specific gene, MUC16, too are associated with higher tumor mutation loads. Also known as tumor mutation burdens, measurement of high genetic mutation rates among cancerous versus healthy tissue has increasingly been shown to correlate with effective response rates to immunotherapy. The knowledge could bode positively for patients with the biomarker present. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

National team of researchers identify new genes that may contribute to Alzheimer's disease
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers have discovered new genes that will further current understanding of the genetic risk factors that predispose people to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mitotic phosphorylation regulates Hsp72 spindle localization by uncoupling ATP binding from substrate release
Hsp72 is a member of the 70-kDa heat shock family of molecular chaperones (Hsp70s) that comprise a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) and a substrate-binding domain (SBD) connected by a linker that couples the exchange of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) with the release of the protein substrate. Mitotic phosphorylation of Hsp72 by the kinase NEK6 at Thr66 located in the NBD promotes the localization of Hsp72 to the mitotic spindle and is required for efficient spindle assembly and chromosome congression and segregation. We determined the crystal structure of the Hsp72 NBD containing a genetically ...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - August 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mukherjee, M., Sabir, S., ORegan, L., Sampson, J., Richards, M. W., Huguenin-Dezot, N., Ault, J. R., Chin, J. W., Zhuravleva, A., Fry, A. M., Bayliss, R. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Functional coupling of GABAA/B receptors and the channel TRPV4 mediates rapid progesterone signaling in the oviduct
We report a rapid response to P4 and agonists of -aminobutyric acid receptors A and B (GABAA/B) in the mouse oviduct that was characterized by oscillatory Ca2+ signals and increased ciliary beat frequency (CBF). Pharmacological manipulation, genetic ablation, and siRNA-mediated knockdown in oviductal cells, as well as overexpression experiments in HEK 293T cells, confirmed the participation of the cationic channel TRPV4, different subunits of GABAA (α1 to α3, β2, and β3), and GABAB1 in P4-induced responses. TRPV4-mediated Ca2+ entry in close proximity to the inositol trisphosphate receptor was require...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - August 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jung, C., Fernandez-Duenas, V., Plata, C., Garcia-Elias, A., Ciruela, F., Fernandez-Fernandez, J. M., Valverde, M. A. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

NICE welcomes further discussions about spinal muscular atrophy drug
NICE hopes for further talks over nusinersen for treating a rare genetic disorder; spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - August 14, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Gene-Editing Startups Ignite the Next'Frankenfood' Fight Gene-Editing Startups Ignite the Next'Frankenfood' Fight
In a suburban Minneapolis laboratory, a tiny company that has never turned a profit is poised to beat the world's biggest agriculture firms to market with the next potential breakthrough in genetic engineering - a crop with"edited" DNA.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - August 13, 2018 Category: Pathology Tags: Pathology & Lab Medicine News Source Type: news

Multi-gene test may find risk for heart disease and more
New way to track millions of genetic variations promises better forecasting of people's risk for heart attacks, four other disorders (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - August 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news