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Alnylam's genetic disease drug clears key study, shares soar
(Reuters) - Alnylam Pharmaceuticals Inc said its drug to treat patients suffering from a rare genetic disease met the main goal in a late-stage study, moving the company closer to filing a marketing application for the drug in late 2017. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

National Cancer Institute designates UCLA brain cancer program a site of research excellence
The brain cancer program at UCLA ’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and the UCLA Brain Tumor Center has been designated a Specialized Program of Research Excellence, or SPORE, by the National Cancer Institute, making it one of only five brain cancer programs nationwide to receive this national recognition and substantial rese arch funding.The designation comes with an $11.4 million, five-year grant that recognizes UCLA ’s brain cancer program as one of the best in the country. The program supports research into the prevention, detection and treatment of one of the most lethal and deadly cancers, which often...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 20, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Genetic risk profile predicts survival for people with severe lung disease
An international Yale-led research team has shown that a risk profile based on 52 genes accurately predicts survival for patients with a severe lung disease. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - September 19, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

White Man Arrested in ‘Cold, Calculated’ Killings of 2 Black Men
(BATON ROUGE, La.) — A 23-year-old white man was arrested Tuesday and accused of cold-bloodedly killing two black men and shooting up a black family’s home in a string of attacks last week that police say may have been racially motivated. A law enforcement official said authorities found a handwritten copy of an Adolf Hitler speech at Kenneth James Gleason’s home, and investigators said surveillance footage and DNA on a shell casing link him to the crimes. Authorities said he would be charged with first-degree murder in the shooting deaths of a homeless man and a dishwasher who was walking to work. In eac...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michael Kunzelman / AP Tags: Uncategorized APW Louisiana onetime Race Source Type: news

New Study Links Playing Youth Football to Later Brain Damage
If children play tackle football before they are 12 and continue to play through high school, they may be putting their brains at risk. That’s the key takeaway from a new study published Tuesday in the journal Nature’s Translational Psychiatry. Researchers from Boston University’s Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Center studied 214 former football players, including 43 who only played at the high school level, 103 who played in college, and 68 who played professionally. The scientists found that playing tackle football before the age of 12 increased the odds of problems with behavioral regulation, apathy ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sean Gregory Tags: Uncategorized Boston University Brain Damage CTE Football head trauma NFL Youth Football youth sports Source Type: news

Scientist Joann Sweasy awarded Postdoctoral Mentoring Prize
Sweasy, the Ensign Professor of Therapeutic Radiology and professor of genetics, is honored for her strong advocacy for those working in her lab. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - September 19, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Clinical Trials Involve Gene Therapy
Treatment options for malignant mesothelioma may soon include customized gene therapy, according to thoracic surgeon and scientist Dr. Prasad Adusumilli at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. Gene therapy involves a laboratory reprogramming of a patient’s own T cells, which are a type of white blood cell, to recognize and destroy the cancer. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved the first gene therapy specifically for pediatric leukemia, signaling the start of a new approach to cancer treatment in this country. The newly approved treatment is also known as chimeric antigen rece...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 19, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Tags: CAR T cell therapy checkpoint blockade chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy Dr. Andy Haas Dr. Prasad Adusumilli Dr. Scott Gottlieb FDA Commissioner gene therapy cancer gene therapy for mesothelioma immunotherapy clinical trial mali Source Type: news

New toolkit helps nurses use genomics in patient care
Bethesda, Md., Tues., September 19, 2017 - Nurses and other health professionals looking to integrate genomics into patient care now have access to an online toolkit with more than 100 resources, part of a new website launched by the National Human Genome Research Institute. Developed with input from clinical educators and administrators, The Method for Introducing a New Competency in Genomics (MINC) website provides resources for nursing leaders at all levels of genomics competency, ranging from basic knowledge about genomics to its practical impact on healthcare systems and policies. (Source: NHGRI Press Releases)
Source: NHGRI Press Releases - September 19, 2017 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: news

Convicted Charleston Church Killer Wants to Fire His ‘Biological Enemy’ Jewish and Indian Lawyers
(COLUMBIA, S.C.) — A white supremacist who was sentenced to death in the 2015 massacre of nine black worshippers has told a federal appeals court he wants to fire his appellate attorneys because one of them is Jewish and the other is Indian-American. In a handwritten request filed Monday with the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia, Dylann Roof wrote that his attorneys’ backgrounds are “a barrier to effective communication.” Given their ethnicities, Roof wrote, “it is therefore quite literally impossible that they and I could have the same interests relating to my case.&rdq...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Meg Kinnard / AP Tags: Uncategorized APW Crime onetime Source Type: news

Educational attainment and personality are genetically intertwined - M õttus R, Realo A, Vainik U, Allik J, Esko T.
Heritable variance in psychological traits may reflect genetic and biological processes that are not necessarily specific to these particular traits but pertain to a broader range of phenotypes. We tested the possibility that the personality domains of the... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Future of legalized cannabis focus of expert panel discussion in cannabis journal
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) In the roundtable entitled " Expert Panel on Understanding Cannabis: Medicine, Society, Government, " the panelists shared their views on topics ranging from what actions U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions might take, the business of growing and selling cannabis, risk of addiction, and whether patients should use cannabis to alleviate cancer pain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists identify key regulator of male fertility
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) When it comes to male reproductive fertility, timing is everything. Now scientists are finding new details on how disruption of this timing may contribute to male infertility or congenital illness. Researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center report in Genes& Development identifying the key molecular and genetic switch that activates production of healthy male sperm -- but only when the time is right. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is there a link between breast milk nutrients, circadian rhythms, and infant health?
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) The fat content and levels of several key nutrients and hormones in breast milk vary with the mother's circadian rhythm, which may have implications for the timing of breastfeeding and feeding of expressed milk, especially for high-risk infants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A study switches from genetic to metabolic analysis to reconstitute evolutionary process
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) A new method for analyzing a living being chemical compositions is tested in Andean plants and attest the genesis of species by means of geographic isolation. Scientific article published August 2017 by Brazilian researchers is based on the analysis of chemical compounds which express specific biogeographic trends at the evolutionary process, validating a Smithsonian hypothesis on the evolution of the genus Espeletia in the process. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genetic risk profile predicts survival for people with severe lung disease
(Yale University) An international Yale-led research team has shown that a risk profile based on 52 genes accurately predicts survival for patients with a severe lung disease. If confirmed in further studies, the finding could transform the way patients are treated for the condition, which is on the rise in older adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dar Williams: How to Make Your Town Somewhere Everyone Wants to Live
It doesn’t start with love. If you want to live in a great town, but you’re not quite there yet, you don’t just start to build that town with love, peace, civility, or morality. You start with a hill. You say to yourself, That hill, off the side of the high school, would be perfect for sledding. I know someone who could mow it with his riding mower. You call that guy and ask. He says, “Sure.” On an early Saturday morning in late September when the streets are empty, he drives over on the main roads and mows the hill. You hand him a coffee and tell him your idea. He says, pointing, “Afte...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dar Williams Tags: Uncategorized Books Community Source Type: news

What to know about the new BRCA genetic mutation test
An affordable new BRCA gene test has hit the market, but who should take it? (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Yale experts explain what parents should know about pediatric obesity
There are multiple factors that contribute to childhood obesity, including a clear genetic component, say two Yale experts. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - September 18, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Alzheimer's disease: New genetic culprit found
A new study challenges the traditional understanding of Alzheimer's disease, as scientists point to a new gene that may be responsible for the illness. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alzheimer's / Dementia Source Type: news

Wildlife Experts Spotted a Rare All-White Giraffe and Her Cub in the Wild
Conservationists in Kenya have recorded a rare phenomenon in the animal kingdom: A pair of all-white giraffes. The animals were spotted by the Hirola Conservation Program working on a tip from a local resident. “We spent almost 20 minutes with the beautiful animals and had the pleasure of getting close-up photos and video of the duo,” Hirola Conservation Program founder Abdullahi H. Ali told the New York Times. “To our surprise, one normal color reticulated giraffe also was among the mother and calf. You can actually compare the difference.” ‘Snow white’ #giraffes caught on video for ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rachel Lewis Tags: Uncategorized Conservation Kenya onetime tanzania Source Type: news

What to know about the new affordable BRCA genetic mutation test
An affordable new BRCA gene test has hit the market, but who should take it? (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

WATCH: What to know about the new affordable BRCA gene test
Here is what women should know about the newly-launched, user-friendly, at-home, BRCA genetic mutation test. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

Cells programmed like computers to fight disease
Cells can be programmed like a computer to fight cancer, influenza, and other serious conditions - thanks to a breakthrough in synthetic biology by the University of Warwick. Led by Professor Alfonso Jaramillo in the School of Life Sciences, new research has discovered that a common molecule - ribonucleic acid (RNA), which is produced abundantly by humans, plants and animals - can be genetically engineered to allow scientists to program the actions of a cell. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - September 18, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

A new approach to high insulin levels
(Universit é de Gen è ve) Diabetes is characterised by a deficiency of insulin. The opposite is the case in congenital hyperinsulinism: patients produce the hormone in excessive quantities. This leads to chronic hypoglycaemia. The disorder can lead to serious brain damage and even death in the worst cases. A team at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation has succeeded in describing the effects of a frequent genetic mutation in cases of congenital hyperinsulinism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study shows promise of gene therapy to treat alcoholism
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Researchers used gene transfer to block the expression of one of the two main enzymes that break down alcohol in the liver, leading to the accumulation in liver cells of acetaldehyde, a metabolic byproduct of ethanol. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dogs' social skills linked to oxytocin sensitivity
(Link ö ping University) The tendency of dogs to seek contact with their owners is associated with genetic variations in sensitivity for the hormone oxytocin, according to a new study from Link ö ping University, Sweden. The results have been published in the scientific journal Hormones and Behavior and contribute to our knowledge of how dogs have changed during their development from wolf to household pet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Biologists identify gene involved in kidney-related birth defects
(University of Iowa) A team led by University of Iowa researchers has identified a gene linked to rare kidney-related birth defects. When working properly, a gene called GREB1L activates a cascade of signals that ultimately tells other genes what they need to do to create a kidney. Results published in the journal Genetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Microscopic technique for detecting microbial life in enceladus water plumes
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study has demonstrated the potential to use digital holographic microscopy (DHM) to detect microorganisms and evidence of life in water collected from the plume rising from the surface of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How Common Are Twins?
Discussion Twinning is the conception and development of more than one zygote during one pregnancy. Monozygotic (MZ) twins arise from one zygote that then splits to form two embryos so that the twins are necessarily of the same gender (male-male or female-female). Dizygotic (DZ) twinning arises from the development of two independent zygotes and therefore the genders may be the same or different (male-male, female-female or male-female). Increased risks of spontaneous DZ twinning includes increased maternal age, parity and gravity, family history including familial clustering, maternal obesity and overweight and smoking. ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - September 18, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Found: Genetic markers against deadly cassava viruses
Scientists identify genetic markers for aiding the creation of cassava varieties resistant to two deadly viruses. (Source: SciDev.Net)
Source: SciDev.Net - September 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Onset gluten intolerance in children could be delayed with probiotics, study finds
(Natural News) Certain probiotic strains may mitigate the onset of gluten intolerance in children, a new study revealed. To carry out the study, a team of researchers at the Lund University in Sweden examined 78 children who exhibited a genetic predisposition to celiac disease. Forty children were given a combination of the probiotic strains Lactobacillus plantarum... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Self-Stigma and Mental Health
I’ve been asked twice to talk about my personal experience dealing with depression, anxiety and the use of genetic testing for mental health treatment. I became aware of this new test during a medication management appointment. My practitioner, a psychiatric advanced practice nurse, is an expert with psychopharmacology, and very knowledgeable about the latest treatments for depression. After trial and error with many medications, we discussed pinpointing the best antidepressant for me, through genetic testing. My interviews were featured on “Innovations”, a TV series on the Discovery Channel (watch here),...
Source: Psych Central - September 16, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Vince G. Sparks Tags: Anxiety Depression Genetics Medications Motivation and Inspiration Personal Stories Self-Esteem Treatment Inheritance Mental Health self-compassion Stereotype Stigma Stigmatization Source Type: news

A case-control association study of 12 candidate genes and attempted suicide in French adolescents - Mirkovic B, Cohen D, Laurent C, Lasfar M, Marguet C, Gerardin P.
Background Suicide is the second leading cause of death for 10-19-year-olds. Evidence has shown that attempted suicide is a complex interplay of genes and environmental factors. In the adult population, possible associations between genetic polymorphisms a... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Genomewide association studies of suicide attempts in US soldiers - Stein MB, Ware EB, Mitchell C, Chen CY, Borja S, Cai T, Dempsey CL, Fullerton CS, Gelernter J, Heeringa SG, Jain S, Kessler RC, Naifeh JA, Nock MK, Ripke S, Sun X, Beckham JC, Kimbrel NA, Ursano RJ, Smoller JW.
Suicide is a global public health problem with particular resonance for the US military. Genetic risk factors for suicidality are of interest as indicators of susceptibility and potential targets for intervention. We utilized population-based nonclinical c... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Myriad Genetics Announces Positive Data Supporting New riskScore(TM) Test at the 36th Annual Conference of the National Society of Genetic Counselors
Validation of Residual Risk Score to Predict Breast Cancer Risk in Women without Hereditary Cancer Mutations Is Highly Statistically Significant SALT LAKE CITY, Sept. 15, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Myriad Genetics, Inc. (NASDAQ:MY... Diagnostics, Personalized Medicine, Oncology Myriad Genetics, riskScore, breast cancer (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - September 15, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Fewer calories may increase lifespan, but how?
New research uncovers an epigenetic mechanism that might explain why restricted calorie intake has been associated with increased longevity. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics Source Type: news

The Unique Features of Complex PTSD
“If we could somehow end child abuse and neglect, the eight hundred pages of DSM (and the need for the easier explanations such as DSM-IV Made Easy: The Clinician’s Guide to Diagnosis) would be shrunk to a pamphlet in two generations.” – John Briere The term Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD) was first used in 1992. It originates in the observation that many of the symptoms exhibited by sufferers of PTSD are also found in those who experienced prolonged periods of abuse or neglect as children, including flashbacks, nightmares, insomnia and feelings of fear, often unrelated to any presen...
Source: Psych Central - September 15, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Fabiana Franco, Ph.D. Tags: PTSD Trauma Treatment C-PTSD Child Abuse childhood neglect complex posttraumatic stress disorder complex trauma Traumatic Experience Source Type: news

University of Minnesota researchers replicate FSH muscular dystrophy in mice
(University of Minnesota) A new study published in the journal Nature Communications describes a breakthrough in research related to facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). The debilitating genetic disease -- which has no approved treatment -- affects an estimated 38,000 Americans and causes muscle degeneration. Scientists inserted into mice a gene called DUX4, which is believed to cause FSHD in humans. When they activated the gene in mice skeletal muscle cells, the animals developed a muscular dystrophy with key features of FSHD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Kit will identify genetic variations without need for lab analysis
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Tests will identify genetic alterations that can be used to measure meat quality, characteristics of seedlings and plants, or pesticide resistance of disease-transmitting mosquitoes. In developing a simple and portable kit, Brazilian startup Scheme Lab is making companies from multiple market areas less reliable on clinical laboratories and their rather expensive brand of expertise. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 15, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UCLA to offer free mental health screening, treatment to all incoming students
Speaking before dozens of influential business and civic leaders about mental health in the workplace, UCLA Chancellor Gene Block announced today the university will for the first time offer free mental health screening and, if appropriate, treatment, to all incoming freshmen and transfer students.“It affects about 350 million people worldwide, and yet, in my view, depression remains somewhat overlooked and understudied. That depression has not been identified as our number one health issue astounds me,” said Block during his keynote speech at the inauguralOne Mind Initiative at Work summit.The One Mind Initiat...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 14, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Selena Gomez Had a Kidney Transplant for Lupus. What Is That?
This article originally appeared on Health.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan / Health Tags: Uncategorized celebrities kidney transplant lupus lupus symptoms public health Selena Gomez Selena gomez disease Selena gomez Kidney Transplant Selena Gomez lupus what disease does selena gomez have What is lupus Why did selena gomez Source Type: news

S.F. genetic company will retest 50,000 saliva samples after error creates false negatives for cancer gene
A San Francisco-based genetic diagnostics company will retest 50,000 saliva samples after a genetic counselor noticed that it had created a false negative for a genetic marker that can be linked to hereditary colon cancer, the company said this week. Invitae Corp. (NYSE: NVTA) said after being notified of the error, it will now retest thousands of samples, and has thus far found two patients who had the wrong results. A spokesperson told the Business Times that the company doesn't expect more than… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 14, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Riley McDermid Source Type: news

Cargo-Sorting DNA Robots
Autonomous molecules that collect, carry, and sort different genetic packages usher in a new era for nucleic-acid robotics. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Daily News,News & Opinion Source Type: news

Zimbabwe: Govt Drafts GMO Labelling Regulations
[The Herald] Government has drafted Genetically Modified food and feeds labelling regulations that would allow consumers to make informed choices on products offered either for free or cash, a senior official has said. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 14, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Genetic information and confidentiality
In the latest in our series on the GMC's new confidentiality guidance, MDU medico-legal adviser Dr Kathryn Leask explores confidentiality and genetics. (Source: GP Online Education)
Source: GP Online Education - September 14, 2017 Category: Primary Care Tags: 3.3 Ethics and Values Based Medicine Source Type: news

A case of a four-year-old child adopted at eight months with unusual mood patterns and significant polypharmacy - Romanowicz M, McKean AJ, Vande Voort J.
BACKGROUND: Long-term effects of neglect in early life are still widely unknown. Diversity of outcomes can be explained by differences in genetic risk, epigenetics, prenatal factors, exposure to stress and/or substances, and parent-child interactions. Very... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Tiny fighters in sediments determine success of invasive marine plants
(University of New South Wales) Armies of microbes that are invisible to the naked eye battle it out to determine whether exotic marine plants successfully invade new territory and replace native species, UNSW Sydney-led research shows. The genetic study, which compared microbial communities in sediments associated with an invasive alga and a native seagrass, is the first to test the idea that marine microbes play a critical role in the establishment of invasive marine species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Chad Carr's tumor offers genetic clues for DIPG research
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) A year and half after losing his battle against brain cancer, Chad Carr's legacy lives through research that will help other children facing the same cruel disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 14, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Rare genetic cause of peritoneal mesothelioma points to targeted therapy
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) BWH investigators have uncovered a new genetic cause of mesothelioma: a genetic rearrangement in the ALK gene, observed in three patients with peritoneal mesothelioma. Unlike previously known causes, this new discovery points to a potential therapeutic approach for those few patients whose tumors harbor the mutation. The team's findings are published in JAMA Oncology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 14, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Treating a little-known virus, CMV, to combat hearing loss in children
(University of Utah Health) A National Institutes of Health-supported nationwide clinical trial will test a novel approach to combat hearing loss in children infected by a relatively unknown virus, cytomegalovirus (CMV). The University of Utah Health-led study will determine whether antiviral therapy can halt progressive hearing loss in children with a confirmed CMV infection. CMV is the leading non-genetic cause of hearing loss, contributing from 6 to 30 percent of childhood cases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 14, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news