Exclusive: Inside the Facilities Making the World ’s Most Prevalent COVID-19 Vaccine
If you’ve been vaccinated for COVID-19, chances are pretty high that you’re benefiting from a product made by BioNTech. The German biotech company, co-founded by a husband-and-wife team of scientists, developed the vaccine that became not only the first to earn authorization in the U.S. for COVID-19 in December but also the first ever based on a new technology involving the genetic material mRNA. In interviews in December and March, co-founders Ugur Sahin and Ozlem Tureci spoke about their whirlwind year and their partnership with U.S. pharmaceutical company Pfizer to test and manufacture the vaccine. Over thre...
Source: TIME: Health - April 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park and Aryn Baker/Marburg, Germany Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Exclusive feature longform Magazine photography Source Type: news

Scientists identify protein that could serve as a therapeutic target in lung cancer
(Virginia Commonwealth University) A new study led by scientists at VCU Massey Cancer Center suggests that gain-of-function mutations turn p53 into an oncogene, causing cells to replicate uncontrollably and contribute to cancer development. Recently published in Nature Communications, the researchers determined that mutant p53 genes are empowered by a specific protein, PLK3, to copy their genetic code and promote tumor cell proliferation through a process called transactivation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 19, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stone Age black bears didn't just defecate in the woods - they did it in a cave too
(St John's College, University of Cambridge) Scientists have sequenced ancient DNA from soil for the first time and the advance will transform what is known about everything from evolution to climate change. The findings have been described as the 'moon landings' of genomics because researchers will no longer have to rely on finding and testing fossils to determine genetic ancestry, links and discoveries - and it is thanks to Stone Age black bears who defecated in a remote cave in Mexico 16,000 years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 19, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Attacking aortic aneurysms before they grow
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) New basic science research shows what happens to the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms when you inhibit JMJD3 through both genetics and pharmacology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 19, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Coffee: Researchers determine three levels of caffeine sensitivity - which one are you?
COFFEE sensitivity depends on how quickly a person's liver can metabolise caffeine, and whether their genetic disposition influences them to react more easily via their central nervous system. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sperm from malnourished males transmits information that negatively affects the genetic expression of their offspring
(Natural News) DNA has long been considered the roadmap to our destiny, the final determinant in our disease risk and longevity. We are told repeatedly that our health is inherited, that our life is already determined by our father and mother’s DNA. While the DNA provides a template, it is not the final arbiter over... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Extraction of decision rules using genetic algorithms and simulated annealing for prediction of severity of traffic accidents by motorcyclists - Ospina-Mateus H, Quintana Jim énez LA, López-Valdés FJ, Berrio Garcia S, Barrero LH, Sana SS.
The objective of this study is to analysis of accident of motorcyclists on Bogot á roads in Colombia. For detection of conditions related to crashes and their severity, the proposed model develops the strategies to enhance road safety. In this context, dat... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 17, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

What are the new Covid variants and what do they mean for the pandemic?
From Doug to Nelly and Eeek, we look at how mutations are affecting the battle against the virusCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageFrom the moment public health officials started to track new variants of coronavirus, it became clear that the same mutations were cropping up time and again and making the virus more troublesome. What are these mutations, what do they do, and what do they mean for the pandemic?Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 16, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Coronavirus Health Genetics Infectious diseases World news Science Source Type: news

Will You Need a Booster Shot of the COVID-19 Vaccine?
When the first COVID-19 vaccines from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna were authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in December 2020, most people breathed a sigh of relief since both shots were shown to be between 94% and 95% effective in protecting from COVID-19 symptoms. But public health experts warned that nobody really knew how long the protection would last, since the longest clinical trials in people only went to a few months. Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and the chief medical advisor to President Joe Biden, suggested that additional booster ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 16, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Female protective effect: Yale researchers find clues to sex differences in autism
(Yale University) In a new Yale-led study, researchers find that autism may develop in different regions of the brain in girls than boys and that girls with autism have a larger number of genetic mutations than boys, suggesting that they require a larger " genetic hit " to develop the disorder.The findings appear in the April 16 edition of the journal Brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 16, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

GMO mosquitos being released in Florida Keys despite concerns by scientists and residents
(Natural News) Coronavirus isn’t the only danger Floridians will have to contend with this spring as biotech firm Oxitec has announced that it will be releasing genetically modified mosquitoes in the Florida Keys. These mosquitoes have been genetically altered in a way that causes them to pass “self-limiting” genes to offspring. When the modified male... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Report Creating the First Embryo With Human and Non-Human Primate Cells
In a ground-breaking experiment, researchers have successfully created the first human-monkey chimera. The work, published in the journal Cell, describes the the first embryo containing both human and monkey cells that was cultured for 20 days. Led by Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, the study represents the culmination of decades of work in understanding early embryo development in non-human species, which Belmonte hopes will now apply to humans. But it is bound to raise serious ethical questions about the implications of combining human cells with those from a different species (even if it is a closely related one), and the...
Source: TIME: Health - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Healthy Lifestyle May Offset Genetic Risk in Prostate Cancer Healthy Lifestyle May Offset Genetic Risk in Prostate Cancer
Adhering to a healthy lifestyle may offset the heightened risk of lethal prostate cancer in patients with adverse genetic risk factors, according to results of a large US study presented at AACR 2021.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Hair loss: A doctor approves six strategies to help prevent further thinning and baldness
HAIR loss affects around 10 million men in the UK. Although the classic M-shaped receding hairline is a genetic condition, there are things you can do to help prevent further thinning of the hair. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Genetic ancestry versus race can provide specific, targeted insights to predict and treat many diseases
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) The complex patterns of genetic ancestry uncovered from genomic data in health care systems can provide valuable insights into both genetic and environmental factors underlying many common and rare diseases--insights that are far more targeted and specific than those derived from traditional ethnic or racial labels like Hispanic or Black, according to a team of Mount Sinai researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Japanese-European research team discovers novel genetic mitochondrial disorder
(Fujita Health University) The list of known genetic mitochondrial disorders is ever-growing, and ongoing research continues to identify new disorders in this category. In an article recently published in Brain, a Japanese-European team of scientists, including researchers from Fujita Health University, describe mutations in the LIG3 gene, which plays a crucial role in mitochondrial DNA replication. These mutations cause a previously unknown syndrome characterized by gut dysmotility, leukoencephalopathy, and neuromuscular abnormalities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mining wild animal microbiomes
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Zahn, L. M. Tags: Genetics, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Diversity and functional landscapes in the microbiota of animals in the wild
Animals in the wild are able to subsist on pathogen-infected and poisonous food and show immunity to various diseases. These may be due to their microbiota, yet we have a poor understanding of animal microbial diversity and function. We used metagenomics to analyze the gut microbiota of more than 180 species in the wild, covering diverse classes, feeding behaviors, geographies, and traits. Using de novo metagenome assembly, we constructed and functionally annotated a database of more than 5000 genomes, comprising 1209 bacterial species of which 75% are unknown. The microbial composition, diversity, and functional content e...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Levin, D., Raab, N., Pinto, Y., Rothschild, D., Zanir, G., Godneva, A., Mellul, N., Futorian, D., Gal, D., Leviatan, S., Zeevi, D., Bachelet, I., Segal, E. Tags: Genetics, Microbiology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

NAS Considers Expulsion of Two Scientists for Sexual Harassment
The National Academy of Sciences is reviewing complaints about astronomer Geoffrey Marcy and geneticist Francisco Ayala, who left their academic positions following investigations at their... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 14, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Know the Enemy: Why Genetic Sequencing Is Key to Tracking COVID Know the Enemy: Why Genetic Sequencing Is Key to Tracking COVID
The US effort to analyze viral genomes, slow to start, is now picking up speed.Knowable Magazine (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - April 14, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Set of genetic markers in lung cancer identified
(Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center) Investigators at Wake Forest School of Medicine, part of Wake Forest Baptist Health, have identified a set of new genetic markers that could potentially lead to new personalized treatments for lung cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 14, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

ACMG Foundation/David L. Rimoin Inspiring Excellence Award honors Catherine A. Ziats, MD
(American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics) The ACMG Foundation for Genetic and Genomic Medicine is proud to present the ACMG Foundation/David L. Rimoin Inspiring Excellence Award honors Catherine A. Ziats, MD for her platform presentation, " Alterations in respiratory epithelial gene SPDEF segregate with severe disease in a family with variable response to COVID-19 infection. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 14, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

FDA and CDC Recommend Pausing COVID-19 Vaccination With J & J-Janssen Shot While They Investigate Blood Clot Risks
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are recommending that vaccinations with the Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine be temporarily halted while the agencies review reports of blood clots among vaccinated people. On April 13, the two government agencies issued a joint statement announcing a recommended pause as federal regulators review six cases of blood clots reported six to 13 days after the people received the single-dose vaccine. “Until that [review] process is complete, we are recommending a pause in the use of this vaccine out of an abundance of cautio...
Source: TIME: Health - April 13, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

COVID-19 in our dust may help predict outbreaks, study finds
(Ohio State University) A study done in rooms where COVID-19 patients were isolated shows that the virus's RNA - part of the genetic material inside a virus - can persist up to a month in dust. The study did not evaluate whether dust can transmit the virus to humans. It could, however, offer another option for monitoring COVID-19 outbreaks in specific buildings, including nursing homes, offices or schools. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 13, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Simple genetic modification aims to stop mosquitoes spreading malaria
(eLife) Altering a mosquito's gut genes to make them spread antimalarial genes to the next generation of their species shows promise as an approach to curb malaria, suggests a preliminary study published today in eLife. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 13, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Genetic predisposition to schizophrenia may increase risk of psychosis from cannabis use
(Centre for Addiction and Mental Health) New research shows that while cannabis users had higher rates of psychotic experiences than non-users across the board, the difference was especially pronounced among those with high genetic predisposition to schizophrenia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Amoeba biology reveals potential treatment target for lung disease
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) In a series of experiments that began with amoebas -- single-celled organisms that extend podlike appendages to move around -- Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they have identified a genetic pathway that could be activated to help sweep out mucus from the lungs of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease a widespread lung ailment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Two New Studies Show That the U.K. COVID-19 Virus Variant Is Not Linked to Severe Disease —But Questions Remain
In two studies published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases and in The Lancet Public Health, respectively, scientists provide comforting news about a new strain of the COVID-19 virus that emerged from the U.K. last December. It has since become the dominant virus in the region, accounting for nearly all of the new COVID-19 cases there—and has recently been implicated in spikes in parts of the U.S., as well as other parts of the world. The researchers report that the so-called B.1.1.7 variant of the virus is not linked to more severe disease or death, and that the virus isn’t causing different (or higher numbers ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

AACR: Healthy Lifestyle May Counter High Genetic Risk for Lethal Prostate Cancer
But adherence to healthy lifestyle not associated with decreased risk for overall prostate cancer (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - April 12, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Internal Medicine, Oncology, Pathology, Urology, Conference News, Source Type: news

Why We Should Be Spending More on Space Travel
Let’s stipulate one thing: there’s absolutely no reason for us to go to space. It does nothing to feed us, to clothe us, to protect us, to heal us. It’s dangerous and hideously expensive too, a budget-busting luxury that policy makers and administrators have spent decades trying to defend—always unsuccessfully because the fact is, there’s no practical defense for it. So stand down the rockets, take down the space centers, pocket the money and let’s move on. Still want the adventure of going to space? That’s what they make movies for. Now that we’ve established that, let&rsquo...
Source: TIME: Science - April 12, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

AACR: Healthy Lifestyle May Counter High Genetic Risk for Lethal Prostate Cancer
MONDAY, April 12, 2021 -- Genetic factors are associated with an increased risk for overall and lethal prostate cancer, and adherence to a healthy lifestyle can reduce the risk for lethal disease among men in the highest genetic risk quartile,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 12, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Deadly Brain Tumor: Survival Extended by Oncolytic Virus Product Deadly Brain Tumor: Survival Extended by Oncolytic Virus Product
Improved survival was seen in a small trial in which a genetically engineered version of herpes simplex virus was infused directly into high-grade gliomas.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - April 12, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Healthy Living Helps Ward Off Deadly Prostate Cancers in Men at High Risk
MONDAY, April 12, 2021 -- A nutritious diet, regular exercise and other components of a healthy lifestyle may reduce the odds of lethal prostate cancer in men with a high genetic risk for it, researchers report. " The excess genetic risk of lethal... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 12, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Sanofi acquires Cambridge mRNA startup for $470M
Sanofi is looking to get into the mRNA game. The French pharmaceutical giant, the parent of Cambridge-based Sanofi Genzyme, has acquired Tidal Therapeutics, a startup developing nanoparticles that deliver genetic instructions to reprogram immune cells with messenger RNA, or mRNA. Even though Tidal is still in the preclinical stage and does n ot yet have a website, Sanofi paid $160 million up front for the startup, with up to $310 million more in milestone payments. Founded in 2019, Tidal is a resident… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 12, 2021 Category: American Health Authors: Rowan Walrath Source Type: news

Spit samples uncover genetic risk factors for paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder
(University of Calgary) University of Calgary and The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) researchers have discovered genetic risk factors for OCD that could help pave the way for earlier diagnosis and improved treatment for children and youth. Saliva samples from 5,000 kids were scanned and compared to responses using the Toronto Obsessive-Compulsive Scale. The team identified that those with a genetic variant in the gene PTPRD had a greater risk for obsessive-compulsive traits. Findings published in Translational Psychiatry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers engineer probiotic yeast to produce beta-carotene
(North Carolina State University) Researchers have genetically engineered a probiotic yeast to produce beta-carotene in the guts of laboratory mice. The advance demonstrates the utility of work the researchers have done to detail how a suite of genetic engineering tools can be used to modify the yeast. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 12, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A novel, quick, and easy system for genetic analysis of SARS-CoV-2
(Osaka University) Osaka/Hokkaido University researchers established a novel PCR-based, bacterium-free reverse genetics system for SARS-CoV-2 using the CPER method, which is simpler and faster than previous methods. Large numbers of recombinant SARS-CoV-2 can be produced in about two weeks. This method can be used to modify the viral genome, allowing detailed study of the functions of mutations and the pathogenesis of COVID-19, and could speed the development of preventative measures and therapeutic strategies for the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 12, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Kevin Love is working with a personalized medicine company to raise awareness about mental health
The company's new product analyzes 38 genetic variants and their influence on 29 mental health traits. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 9, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: John George Source Type: news

The predictive capacity of psychiatric and psychological polygenic risk scores for distinguishing cases in a child and adolescent psychiatric sample from controls - Jansen AG, Jansen PR, Savage JE, Kraft J, Skarabis N, Polderman TJC, Dieleman GC.
BACKGROUND: Psychiatric traits are heritable, highly comorbid and genetically correlated, suggesting that genetic effects that are shared across disorders are at play. The aim of the present study is to quantify the predictive capacity of common genetic va... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Re-examining the link between childhood maltreatment and substance use disorder: a prospective, genetically informative study - Capusan AJ, Gustafsson PA, Kuja-Halkola R, Igelstr öm K, Mayo L, Heilig M.
Childhood maltreatment is considered a risk factor for substance use disorders (SUD), but this is largely based on retrospective self-reports that are subject to recall bias, designs that do not control for familial confounding, or both. The specific contr... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

King of Prussia's Genomind adds NBA All-Star Kevin Love to the team
The company's new product analyzes 38 genetic variants and their influence on 29 mental health traits. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - April 9, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: John George Source Type: news

Using genetics, researchers identify potential drugs for early treatment of COVID-19
(Veterans Affairs Research Communications) This is about a new study using human genetics that suggests researchers should prioritize clinical trials of drugs that target two proteins to manage COVID-19 in its early stages. Based on their analyses, the researchers call for prioritizing clinical trials of drugs targeting the proteins IFNAR2 and ACE2. The goal is to identify existing drugs, either FDA-approved or in clinical development for other conditions, that can be repurposed for the early management of COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Balancing between build-up and break-down of bone
(Osaka University) Researchers at Osaka University have shown that SLPI, a secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, coordinates the mutually contradictory actions of parathyroid hormone (PTH) on bone. They revealed the genetic mechanisms and molecular pathways whereby SLPI promotes osteoblast activity to augment bone mass and showed how osteoblasts interact with osteoclasts to subdue bone resorption. This knowledge will inform clinical usage of anabolic PTH in osteoporosis as well as promote development of innovative drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 9, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genetic differences may explain higher chronic pain risk in women, study finds
That women appear to be at higher risk for chronic pain conditions such as fibromyalgia and certain types of arthritis may be due to genetic differences between the sexes, a study published by PLOS Genetics found. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - April 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study shows wearables could detect COVID-19 earlier
Tejaswini Mishra, PhD, Research Scientist in the Department of Genetics at Stanford University School of Medicine, joins Yahoo Finance’s... (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Exclusive: CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky Unveils Agency Initiative to Address Racism in Health
If the COVID-19 pandemic has taught us anything, it is that health is a commodity bestowed readily on some and denied to so many others. Within months of the COVID-19 virus reaching U.S. shores, it became clear that the disease hit certain groups harder, contributing to more severe illness and higher hospitalization and death rates among Black, Latinx and American Indian/Alaska Native communities, and those of lower socioeconomic status. The reason for that skewed impact doesn’t have so much to do with biology or genetics as it does a myriad of other factors, such as where people live, how clean the air they breathe ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

New Roche data at 2021 AAN highlight impact and breadth of expanding neuroscience portfolio
             Basel, 8 April 2021 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that new data for its approved and investigational medicines for the treatment of neurological disorders will be presented at the 73rd American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Annual Meeting being held virtually April 17-22, 2021. These new data include 23 abstracts highlighting the expanding Roche neuroscience portfolio across six therapeutic areas, including EVRYSDI ™ (risdiplam) for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), OCREVUS® (ocrelizumab) in relapsing and primary progre...
Source: Roche Media News - April 8, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New Roche data at 2021 AAN highlight impact and breadth of expanding neuroscience portfolio
             Basel, 8 April 2021 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that new data for its approved and investigational medicines for the treatment of neurological disorders will be presented at the 73rd American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Annual Meeting being held virtually April 17-22, 2021. These new data include 23 abstracts highlighting the expanding Roche neuroscience portfolio across six therapeutic areas, including EVRYSDI ™ (risdiplam) for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), OCREVUS® (ocrelizumab) in relapsing and primary progre...
Source: Roche Investor Update - April 8, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Scientists identify new differences between the sexes in age-related changes to brain stem cells
(International Society for Stem Cell Research) Data suggest that ageing-related changes to stem cells and blood vessels in the brain are more pronounced in male animals. Possible causes for these differences by sex, such as hormonal or genetic influences and their impact on brain function and disease related to ageing, require further investigation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

USC Stem Cell study explores 'synthetic' embryonic development with $2.5 million NIH grant
(Keck School of Medicine of USC) USC Stem Cell scientist Leonardo Morsut, Ph.D., received a $2.56 million grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to design artificial genetic programs to perturb natural signaling networks and study how this inflects embryonic development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news