Roche SMA drug shines in study as costly new therapies advance
ZURICH (Reuters) - A drug being co-developed by Roche to treat spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) helped improve development scores in babies with the genetic disease, a study released on Monday showed, as the race heats up for therapies destined to be among the drug industry's most expensive. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Scientists edit heart muscle gene in stem cells, may be able to predict risk
For the first time, scientists use the gene-editing tool CRISPR to determine if a heart condition-related genetic variant in a patient poses real risk or not to that patient's health. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists edit heart muscle gene in stem cells
For the first time, scientists use the gene-editing tool CRISPR to determine if a heart condition-related genetic variant in a patient poses real risk or not to that patient's health. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mushroom poisoning mimicking painless progressive jaundice: a case report with review of the literature - Perisetti A, Raghavapuram S, Sheikh AB, Yendala R, Rahman R, Shanshal M, Thein KZ, Farooq A.
Mushroom poisoning is common in the  United States. The severity of mushroom poisoning may vary, depending on the geographic location, the amount of toxin delivered, and the genetic characteristics of the mushroom. Though they could have varied presentatio... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Prostate cancer: Scientists find 63 'new genetic markers'
Research locates new genetic markers that may show an elevated risk of developing prostate cancer. This will help to identify men who need early screening. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Prostate / Prostate Cancer Source Type: news

Genomics offers new treatment options for infants with range of soft tissue tumors
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) The genetic causes of a group of related infant cancers have been discovered by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the University of Wuerzburg and their collaborators. Whole genome sequencing of tumours revealed mutations which are targetable by existing drugs used to treat lung cancer and melanoma. The results have implications for clinical practice and the diagnosis of rare cancers in infants, and could lead to new, targeted treatment options for these children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

High risk of food shortages without pesticides, says chemical giant
Head of Syngenta, world ’s biggest pesticide maker, says rejecting farming tech could have serious consequences within 20 yearsThe world is likely to face food shortages within 20 years if pesticides and genetically modified crops are shunned, according to the head of the world ’s biggest pesticide manufacturer.J Erik Fyrwald, CEO of Syngenta, also said the technologies to produce more food from less land are vital in halting climate change, but that better targeting will mean farmers around the world will use less pesticide in future.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington in Basel Tags: Pesticides Farming Food GM Environment Science China World news Source Type: news

Genomic testing for the causes of stillbirth should be considered for routine use
(European Society of Human Genetics) The use of whole genome and whole exome sequencing can uncover the cause of unexplained stillbirth and neonatal deaths. In addition to providing an explanation to bereaved parents, it can help the understand whether a recurrence in future pregnancies is likely. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New technique provides accurate dating of ancient skeletons
(European Society of Human Genetics) A new way of dating skeletons by using mutations in DNA associated with geography will avoid the difficulties and inaccuracies sometimes associated with existing dating methods. The technique will enable a better understanding of historical developments from the beginning of the Neolithic period, through the Bronze and Iron Ages. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What we eat directly translates to how vulnerable we are to disease: Here's why 1 in every 100 people now suffer from celiac disease
(Natural News) There was a time when celiac disease (CD) was known as a rare condition that almost exclusively afflicted individuals of European descent. Today, one out of 100 persons around the world is thought to have the disease. To understand how a supposedly uncommon genetic disorder now afflicts such a considerable percentage of humanity,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Doctors Have Cost Concerns About Genetic Tests for Disease Risk Doctors Have Cost Concerns About Genetic Tests for Disease Risk
While many primary care providers believe genetic tests to assess risk for common chronic diseases might prove useful in treating patients, a recent study also suggests they're worried that steep out-of-pocket costs may limit who can be tested.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Are Genetic Testing Sites the New Social Networks?
Like Facebook, but for fifth cousins, adoptive mothers and sperm-donor dads. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: ALYSON KRUEGER Tags: Genetics and Heredity Ancestry.com 23andMe Adoptions Social Media Families and Family Life Source Type: news

Fourth EAN Meeting Tackles Theme of Neurogenetics Fourth EAN Meeting Tackles Theme of Neurogenetics
New insights into genetic influences on brain disorders are emerging every day, says the president of the European Academy of Neurology.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Rapid Genetic Test May Prevent Abx-Linked Hearing Loss in Babies
(MedPage Today) -- For newborns with sepsis,identifies those at risk from aminoglycosides (Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease)
Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease - June 15, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

PainTracker: An Online Survey to Underline the Needs of Chronic Pain Patients.  
How do you treat a patient with complex chronic pain in a way that accounts for factors like genetics or their medical histories? For some patients, it is hard to find a treatment that aligns with their individual needs and conditions with the very few options available. The article, “To treat pain, you need to treat the patient” describes how researchers at the University of Washington  Center for Pain Relief created an online form called PainTracker to help determine the effectiveness of the patient’s treatments and improve their quality of life. If you would like to learn more about the PainTracke...
Source: MCR News - June 15, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: liaison Tags: #CC/Academic List #Health Interest List #Health Sciences List #Public/K-12 List PainTracker Source Type: news

Harvard, MIT launch effort to make the FDA more efficient
When the U.S. Food and Drug Administration began monitoring drug safety in 1937, the industry looked markedly different than it does today. Genetic therapies and enzyme treatments had not been invented, much less analyzed for their safety. A new partnership between Harvard Medical School and MIT seeks to modernize how the federal government permits, analyzes and evaluates whether drugs are safe and effective. “It’s making the system work better," said Brian Alexander, associate professor of… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 15, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

Serial dieter drops a stone in 12 weeks after having her DNA tested
Rachel Roberts, 47, from Brighton had her DNA tested to find the perfect diet for her genes. 'Nutrigenomics' pinpoints the lifestyle changes needed to lose weight for your genetic makeup. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Association of autistic traits with depression from childhood to age 18 years - Rai D, Culpin I, Heuvelman H, Magnusson CMK, Carpenter P, Jones HJ, Emond AM, Zammit S, Golding J, Pearson RM.
IMPORTANCE: Population-based studies following trajectories of depression in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) from childhood into early adulthood are rare. The role of genetic confounding and of potential environmental intermediaries, such as bullying, in a... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Did dinosaurs get dandruff?
Palaeontologists studying the evolution of dinosaurs ’ skin and feathers think they didAs a regular reader of this blog, you are well aware that dinosaurs had feathers (unless you are a certain film franchise). Dinosaurs were covered in patches of fuzz, proto-floof, shook their tail feathers, and in some cases displayed full-fledged plumage. Over the last decade, exceptionally preserved fossils and intense genetic study have taught us a lot about feather evolution. But what do we know about the evolution of the skin of dinosaurs and early birds?Vertebrateskin consists of several layers of cells making up the epidermi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hanneke Meijer Tags: Dinosaurs Fossils Science Evolution Zoology Palaeontology Source Type: news

No horsing around: Penn Vet researchers get $300K to study new way to combat gene doping
The Pennsylvania Horse Breeders Association has donated $300,000 to the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine to fund research to detect gene doping in race horses. The research will be conducted at Penn Vet's New Bolton Center’s Equine Pharmacology Laboratory in Kennett Square, Pa. Gene doping has been a lingering problem in the horse racing industry. The practice involves transferring or modifying genes, or genetically modified cells, of healthy human at hletes — as well… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - June 15, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

Sex-change mice research could help humans, say scientists
Removal of enhancer 13 DNA strands caused males to grow ovaries and female genitalia, helping research on human sexual development disordersScientists have turned male mice into females by snipping out strands of their DNA in work that could shed light on sexual development disorders which arise in humans.The male mice grew ovaries and female genitalia instead of the more conventional male anatomy after researchers removed small chunks of DNA from the animals ’ genetic code.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Genetics Science Biology Gender Medical research Source Type: news

WGS helps diagnosis and reduces healthcare costs for neonates in intensive care
(European Society of Human Genetics) Two studies looking at the effect of carrying out rapid genome sequencing on children born seriously ill, but where diagnosis is difficult, show that it can provide speedy answers and lead to appropriate treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genetic engineering researcher: Politicians are deaf to people's ethical concerns
(University of Copenhagen) New study from the University of Copenhagen reports that political discussions about genetically modified foods have ignored concerns among Danes that GM foods are 'unnatural'. This is very regrettable, according to Jesper Lassen, a researcher who has investigated public attitudes about genetic modification for the past 25 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Individual access to genomic disease risk factors has a beneficial impact on lifestyles
(European Society of Human Genetics) A large study from Finland shows that giving personal genomic information to individuals can have a long-term beneficial effect on their lifestyles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NICE rejects adjuvant use of breast cancer drug
Draft guidance dubs Perjeta ‘not cost effective’ Related items fromOnMedica NICE fast-tracks approval of new skin cancer treatment New breast cancer drug ‘unaffordable’ for NHS One in 10 children in phase I cancer trials respond to drugs Cancer strategies failed to improve one-year survival Genetic risk model could guide prostate cancer screening (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - June 15, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Doctors have cost concerns about genetic tests for disease risk
(Reuters Health) - While many primary care providers believe genetic tests to assess risk for common chronic diseases might prove useful in treating patients, a recent study also suggests they're worried that steep out-of-pocket costs may limit who can be tested. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Paws and play: gene treatment helps rats with spinal cord injury regain their nerve
Hopes for injured humans and larger animals as groundbreaking gene therapy helps mend damaged nerves on the spine of rodents by dissolving scar tissueRats with spinal cord injuries have regained the use of their paws after being given a groundbreaking gene therapy that helps to mend damaged nerves in the spine.The new therapy works by dissolving the dense scar tissue that forms a thick barrier between severed nerves when the spinal column is broken.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Neuroscience Genetics Biology Medical research Source Type: news

Researchers develop bacteria that may treat constipation
Genetically engineered bacteria may prove to be an effective treatment for constipation after it helped treat the condition in mice, according to a new study. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - June 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Trilobites: Using Harpoon-Like Appendages, Bacteria ‘ Fish ’ for New DNA
Seeing how microbes snatch new genetic material from their environment could help in the fight against antibiotic resistance. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: STEPH YIN Tags: Bacteria Genetics and Heredity Antibiotics Microbiology Research Dalia, Ankur Ellison, Courtney Brun, Yves Nature Microbiology Source Type: news

Results of Novel Mesothelioma Drug Presented at ASCO Meeting
A multicenter phase II clinical trial involving the latest orally administered protein inhibitor drug has shown considerable promise in helping control malignant mesothelioma. The effectiveness of tazemetostat was presented last week at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting in Chicago. The trial study, which will conclude late 2018, involves 74 previously treated patients with recurring mesothelioma. “We’ve seen benefit for some patients with this treatment and patients who have benefited over a long period of time,” medical oncologist Dr. Marianna Koczywas, City of Hope Cancer T...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - June 14, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Physical activity overcomes genetic propensity to obesity
According to a study, published inMenopause, physically active women in their 70s can maintain a healthy weight, despite genetic predisposition to obesity.Medscape (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - June 14, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Scientists WARN: Genetic editing of humans with "CRISPR" technology may lead to generation of cancer sufferers
(Natural News) CRISPR-Cas9 is a budding technology, with proponents singing its praises for the last few years. But it turns out this “promising” advancement comes with some unintended side effects – like the potential to cause cancer in a whole generation of humans (if not more). It appears the more we learn about CRISPR, the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rapid genetic testing can prevent hearing loss in newborns treated for sepsis
(European Society of Human Genetics) More than a million neonatal deaths worldwide each year are estimated to be due to sepsis. Many patients receive antibiotic therapy during their hospital stay, but babies with a specific genetic change can suffer irreversible hearing loss as a result. Now, a rapid test for distinguishing those infants who will have this adverse reaction to gentamicin has been developed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 14, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Gene testing could identify men with prostate cancer who may benefit from immunotherapy
(Institute of Cancer Research) Scientists have identified a pattern of genetic changes that could pick out men with advanced prostate cancer who are likely to benefit from immunotherapy.Developing a genetic test to pick out these men could speed up the path of immunotherapy into use for prostate cancer patients.The research found that men whose tumors had a distinct pattern of genetic changes could be much more likely to benefit from immunotherapy than otherwise. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Repair and regeneration of peripheral nerves possible with dual polymer hydrogel adhesive
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Researchers have demonstrated that a novel biocompatible adhesive made of two naturally derived polymers is 15 times stronger than adhesive materials currently used for nerve reconstruction and can support the survival, extension, and proliferation of cells essential for nerve regeneration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Synthetic biologists get $1.7 million to engineer world's strongest biomaterial
(Colorado State University) Synthetic biologists at Colorado State University are attempting to manufacture sporopollenin in the lab using plants, and to control its properties using gene parts designed for specific functions, known as genetic circuits. Their goal is to produce coatings that could one day protect ships, bridges and other infrastructure that crack as they age. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

161 genetic factors for myopia identified
(Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz) The international Consortium for Refractive Error and Myopia (CREAM) recently published the worldwide largest genetic study of myopia, which identified 161 genetic factors for short-sightedness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Novel in vitro approaches for toxicity testing of inhaled substances
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Integrated approaches that avoid the use of animals to assess the toxicity of inhaled materials may include a computational model to screen for chemical reactivity, a human tissue-based assay to predict the absorption of a chemical into the respiratory tract, and other types of advanced systems based on in vitro and in vivo respiratory biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A maestro that conducts the invasiveness of glioblastoma tumors
(Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia) Glioblastoma is the most severe form of brain cancer in adults. The aggressiveness of this cancer is largely due to its ability to invade surrounding brain tissue, making the tumor difficult to remove by surgery. Now, a research team led by Diogo Castro, from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia (IGC, Portugal), discovered a genetic program that controls the invasiveness of this form of cancer. This research, published now in The EMBO Journal, may open avenues for developing new therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

IQ Scores Are Falling Due to Environmental Factors, Study Finds
IQ scores are on a decline, reversing a trend that saw scores rising at a steady rate during the 20th century, according to a new study. Researchers from the Ragnar Frisch Centre for Economic Research in Norway studied the IQ scores of about 730,000 Norwegian men born between 1962 and 1991. They found that scores grew by nearly three percentage points every decade for people born between 1962 and 1975. But among those born after 1975, scores fell. The cause of the IQ decline is due to environmental factors, and not genetics, said Ole Rogeburg, a senior research fellow at Ragnar Frisch Centre and co-author of the study on I...
Source: TIME: Science - June 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Talking to Cancer Patients About Genetic Testing
(MedPage Today) -- Managing expectations, next steps when the results come back (Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology)
Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology - June 13, 2018 Category: Hematology Source Type: news

Tips on Advising, Treating Cancer Patients After Genetic Testing
(MedPage Today) -- Managing expectations, next steps when the results come back (Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology)
Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology - June 13, 2018 Category: Hematology Source Type: news

Eisai to open Alzheimer's research center in Alewife next year
The 50,000-square-foot Center for Genetics Guided Dementia Discovery will be located inside the new Alewife Research Center on CambridgePark Drive. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 13, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Don Seiffert Source Type: news

Eisai to open Alzheimer's research center in Alewife next year
The 50,000-square-foot Center for Genetics Guided Dementia Discovery will be located inside the new Alewife Research Center on CambridgePark Drive. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - June 13, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Don Seiffert Source Type: news

Treating intestine with ‘good’ cholesterol compound inhibits lung tumor growth in mice
FINDINGSA compound that mimics the main protein in high-density lipoprotein (HDL, or “good”) cholesterol significantly reduced the number of tumors in the lungs of mice, reports a team of UCLA researchers. The findings help explain the connection between HDL cholesterol and reduced cancer risk, and suggest that a similar compound may be an effective therapy in humans.BACKGROUNDPrevious research, both in lab animals and humans, had suggested that higher HDL cholesterol levels were linked to reduced cancer risk. The team ’s earlier work had found that small peptide “mimetics,” or mimics, of...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 13, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Active Women in Their 70s Beat Genetic Propensity to Obesity Active Women in Their 70s Beat Genetic Propensity to Obesity
' Our findings point to the importance of promoting and maintaining healthy behaviors particularly in older adults to maximize quality of life,'say the researchers.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care News Source Type: news

Probiotics Prevent Cholera in Animal Models
Two different types of bacteria-one genetically engineered and one from cheese-defend animal intestines from Vibrio cholerae infection. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - June 13, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Daily News,News & Opinion Source Type: news

BridgeBio Pharma Launches CoA Therapeutics to Target Coenzyme-A for Rare Genetic Disorders
PALO ALTO, Calif., June 13, 2018 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- BridgeBio Pharma today announced the launch of CoA Therapeutics, a biopharmaceutical company developing novel small-molecules designed to increase Coenzyme-A (CoA) levels in gen... Biopharmaceuticals BridgeBio Pharma, CoA Therapeutics, Coenzyme-A, PKAN (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - June 13, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Healing from GMOs and Roundup: How to protect yourself and your family
(Natural News) In 2005, the rate of patients with chronic diseases almost doubled from seven percent to 13 percent – this started to happen nine years earlier when genetically modified organisms (GMO) were introduced. While the U.S. government approves of genetically modified food, even they can’t hide that fact that it has a lot of adverse effects... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Polygenic Scores Show Potential to Predict Humans ’ Susceptibility to a Range of Chronic Diseases; New Clinical Laboratory Genetic Tests Could Result from Latest Research
Access to vast banks of genomic data is powering a new wave of assessments and predictions that could offer a glimpse at how genetic variation might impact everything from Alzheimer’s Disease risk to IQ scores Anatomic pathology groups and clinical laboratories have become accustomed to performing genetic tests for diagnosing specific chronic diseases in humans. […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - June 13, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Alzheimer’s disease Amit Khera MD anatomic patholo Source Type: news