Scientists discover genetic and immunologic underpinnings of some cases of severe COVID-19
NIH investigator co-led international research effort. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - September 24, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: news

New analytical model detects mutations in breast cancer
(Lund University) Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a computational model which is effective in detecting and identifying genetic mutations in breast tumours. The study, the largest of its kind in the world, includes results from over 3 200 patients with breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 24, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Overview of WormBase, Sept 2020
If you’d like to get an overview of WormBase datatypes, tools, the Author first pass form and learn about Micropublication Biology, please take a look at the slides from a talk given by Chris Grove, a WormBase curator. This was presented at the Boston area worm meeting on Sept 23rd, 2020. (Source: WormBase)
Source: WormBase - September 24, 2020 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Ranjana Kishore Tags: meetings news tutorials Uncategorized wormbase Source Type: news

Guts and brains: How microbes in a mother ’s intestines affect fetal neurodevelopment
During pregnancy in mice, the billions of bacteria and other microbes that live in a mother ’s intestines regulate key metabolites, small molecules that are important for healthy fetal brain development,UCLA biologists report Sept. 23 in the journal Nature.While the maternal gut microbiota has been associated with abnormalities in the brain function and behavior of offspring — often in response to factors like infection, a high-fat diet or stress during pregnancy — scientists had not known until now whether it influenced brain development during critical prenatal periods and in the absence of such environ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 23, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Genetically Predicted BMI Increases Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2020 -- Genetically predicted body mass index (BMI) significantly increases the risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to a study published online Sept. 22 in Arthritis& Rheumatology. Bowen Tang, from the Karolinska... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - September 23, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Massive genetic study shows coronavirus mutating and potentially evolving amid rapid U.S. spread
The largest U.S. genetic study of the virus, conducted in Houston, shows one viral strain outdistancing all of its competitors, and many potentially important mutations. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - September 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Chris Mooney Source Type: news

J & J ’s COVID-19 Vaccine Will Enter Phase 3 Testing, the Fourth To Reach That Stage
Johnson & Johnson announced today (Sept. 23) that it is launching a large-scale Phase 3 test of its COVID-19 vaccine candidate, which was developed based on science supported by the National Institutes of Health. The vaccine, being tested through the company’s Janssen Pharmaceuticals arm, will be the fourth to enter late stage studies, following candidates from Moderna, Pfizer-BioNTech and AstraZeneca. Unlike those vaccine candidates, which all require two shots, J&J’s vaccine involves a single injection. That means it could require half the number of doses to immunize the same number of people. J&J...
Source: TIME: Health - September 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Gene Therapy Clinical Trial for Mesothelioma Moving Forward
This study will compare the effectiveness of the drug against a control group receiving only the gemcitabine and celecoxib. Patients have a one-in-two chance of being randomly assigned to either the adenovirus treatment or the control group. Adenovirus-delivered interferon Alpha-2b is designed as a second- or third-line treatment for patients who have failed in earlier regimens. Patients who previously had aggressive mesothelioma surgery but whose tumors have since progressed would be eligible to enroll. Success at the phase III level would mark the culmination of 20 years of researching and fine tuning gene therapy for us...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 23, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Fran Mannino Source Type: news

New and Emerging Targeted Therapies for Vascular Malformations New and Emerging Targeted Therapies for Vascular Malformations
New insights into the genetic origins and molecular mechanisms of vascular malformations have led to the emergence of targeted molecular therapies, including sirolimus, a direct mTOR inhibitor.American Journal of Clinical Dermatology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - September 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dermatology Journal Article Source Type: news

Genetic analysis links obesity to higher rheumatoid arthritis risk
(Wiley) An analysis of genetic data collected from more than 850,000 individuals of European ancestry has found a link between obesity-related genes and rheumatoid arthritis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Multidisciplinary approaches to solving cold cases
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Forensic DNA analysis enables new and increasingly sophisticated Technology for solving cold cases. Through advances in DNA sequencing and bioinformatics, this relatively new and urgent field is enabling a broad range of cold cases, including homicides and other violent crimes, to be solved. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Arca Biopharma files application for Covid-19 drug treatment
Westminster-based biotech company Arca Biopharma has submitted an Investigational New Drug application for Covid-19. The application was filed under the Coronavirus Treatment Acceleration Program. The application will evaluate the use of one of Arca Biopharma's drugs, AB201, as a treatment for patients hospitalized with Covid-19. The 13-employee Arca Biopharma typically focuses on genetically targeted therapie s for cardiovascular diseases. AB201 is believed to be effective with RNA viruses, which… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 22, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jensen Werley Source Type: news

What Your Blood Tells You About Cancer
Blood tests can tell us a lot about what’s going on in our bodies—from whether we’re eating too much sugar to whether we’re harboring any infectious diseases. Scientists lately have been working on ways to use similar diagnostic tools for cancer, which have the potential to dramatically increase the amount of information doctors use to figure out the best treatments for their patients. Called liquid biopsies, these tests are designed to pick up genetic material shed by cancer tumors into the blood, which lets doctors avoid the invasive procedures needed to extract samples directly from tumors. That ...
Source: TIME: Health - September 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

New drug candidate found for hand, foot and mouth disease
(Duke University) Duke researchers have identified a potential drug candidate against enterovirus 71, a common cause of hand, foot and mouth disease in infants and young children. The compound of interest is a small molecule that binds to RNA, the virus's genetic material, and changes its 3-D shape in a way that stops the virus from multiplying without harming its human host. It's an antiviral strategy that could be used on other hard-to-treat diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

ADHD study reveals unique genetic differences in African American patients
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) Researchers have shown there may be key genetic differences in the causes of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) between African Americans and people of European ancestry, which may play an important part in how patients of different ethnic backgrounds respond to treatments for this condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New book on addiction from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
(Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press) 'Addiction, 2e' provides a comprehensive update on our understanding of the biological basis of and treatment strategies for addiction to psychoactive drugs, with an emphasis on opioids. Contributors examine the molecular targets of alcohol, cannabinoids, nicotine, stimulants, and opioids, the resulting changes to the neurocircuitry, and various genetic, environmental, developmental, and behavioral factors that influence the progression from abuse to addiction and susceptibility to relapse. Advances in animal models of addictive behavior and single-cell strategies to dissect neural cir...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genetics or social environment: Who wins in the influence of behaviors?
(Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia) The study published in eLife analyzed behaviors associated with oxytocin, one of the known " happy hormones " , and showed that these can be reverted in the individual, with or without oxytocin, depending on the social group it interacts with. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Daily alcohol intake triggers aberrant synaptic pruning leading to synapse loss and anxiety-like behavior
Alcohol abuse adversely affects the lives of millions of people worldwide. Deficits in synaptic transmission and in microglial function are commonly found in human alcohol abusers and in animal models of alcohol intoxication. Here, we found that a protocol simulating chronic binge drinking in male mice resulted in aberrant synaptic pruning and substantial loss of excitatory synapses in the prefrontal cortex, which resulted in increased anxiety-like behavior. Mechanistically, alcohol intake increased the engulfment capacity of microglia in a manner dependent on the kinase Src, the subsequent activation of the transcription ...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - September 22, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Socodato, R., Henriques, J. F., Portugal, C. C., Almeida, T. O., Tedim-Moreira, J., Alves, R. L., Canedo, T., Silva, C., Magalhaes, A., Summavielle, T., Relvas, J. B. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Illumina agrees $8bn deal for cancer screening group Grail
Genetic sequencing company set to take full ownership of start-up (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - September 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

The association between body dysmorphic symptoms and suicidality among adolescents and young adults: a genetically informative study - Krebs G, Fern ández de la Cruz L, Rijsdijk FV, Rautio D, Enander J, Ruck C, Lichtenstein P, Lundström S, Larsson H, Eley TC, Mataix-Cols D.
BACKGROUND: Previous research indicates that body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is associated with risk of suicidality. However, studies have relied on small and/or specialist samples and largely focussed on adults, despite these difficulties commonly emerging... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

CNIO identifies genetic factors associated to hand-foot syndrome in chemotherapy with capecitabine
(Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncol ó gicas (CNIO)) * The researchers studied more than 600,000 genetic variants in the genome of 166 patients treated with the chemotherapy drug capecitabine* Before undergoing treatment, the patients carrying the risk alleles for the hand-foot syndrome had low levels of two proteins that are key to the effective functioning of the skin barrier* The finding may help classify patients according to their genetic risk for developing this side effect of some cancer treatments (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 21, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Epigenetics linked to genetic differences between domesticated and wild chickens
(Link ö ping University) Some of the genetic differences that have arisen between domesticated chickens and their wild ancestors, the red junglefowl, are linked to epigenetic changes, according to a new study published in Nature Ecology& Evolution. Scientists at Link ö ping University, Sweden, have discovered a small number of " hotspots " in the DNA that control epigenetic changes at hundreds of other locations throughout the genome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What Are Systemic Disease Causes of Oral Ulcers?
Discussion Oral ulcers are common problems seen by dentists but pediatricians also see them. Usually families have are concerned because they are painful and acute. Ulcers are sometime noticed by the physician and not the family as in the case of herpangina or hand-foot and mouth disease. Chronic or recurrent ulcerations present less commonly and therefore it may be more difficult to determine their etiology. Many of the systemic disease causes of oral ulcers are overall infrequent and/or not common in the pediatric age range. Ulcers can be classified in several ways but acute ulcers are usually painful and last less tha...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - September 21, 2020 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Your cells look young for their age, compared to a chimp's
(Duke University) Many humans live to see their 80s, some even reach 100. But chimpanzees rarely make it past 50, despite sharing 99% of our genetic code. While modern medicine has added years to human lifespans, a study points to a more ancient explanation why humans are the long-lived primate. Part of the secret to human longevity may lie in chemical changes to our DNA that slowed the rate of aging after human ancestors diverged from chimps. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

‘This Does Not Look Good for Children’: Fires Pose Risk to Young Lungs
The wildfires blazing in the West could hinder developing lungs, worsen asthma and even lead to the condition in those who don ’t have it but are genetically disposed to it. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matt Richtel Tags: Children and Childhood Research Asthma Lungs Wildfires Air Pollution Pacific Northwestern States (US) California your-feed-healthcare Source Type: news

Human genetics: A look in the mirror
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) Genome Biology and Evolution's latest virtual issue highlights recent research published in the journal within the field of human genetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 18, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Gene therapy corrects the cardiac effects of Friedreich's ataxia
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Gene therapy was successfully used to overcome the cardiac effects of Freidreich's ataxia (FA) in a mouse model of the disease (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

INRS researcher receives $670,000 grant to continue research on Batten's disease
(Institut national de la recherche scientifique - INRS) Institut de la recherche scientifique (INRS) announces that St é phane Lefran ç ois, a professor at its Centre Armand-Frappier Sant é Biotechnologie (AFSB), has received a grant of more than $670,000 from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) for his work on Batten's disease. He will be using the funds to continue his research into this rare genetic and degenerative disease, which mainly affects children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Seven footprints may be the earliest evidence of humans on the Arabian Peninsula
Experts say discovery of 120,000-year-old prints could shed new light on spread ofHomo sapiens out of AfricaA set of seven footprints made at a lake about 120,000 years ago have been hailed as the earliest evidence of modern humans on the Arabian Peninsula – a discovery experts say could shed light on the spread of our species out of Africa.The path by whichHomosapiensspread around the world was full of twists and turns. Genetic studies suggested it was not until 60,000 years ago that a migration of modern humans out of Africa led to a successful spread across Europe.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Evolution Fossils Science Palaeontology World news Source Type: news

Seattle Genetics plans manufacturing expansion with cash from Merck deal
The biotech firm already has a 51,000-square-foot manufacturing site in Bothell. Its next one could be two or three times the size. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 17, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Megan Campbell Source Type: news

Genetic Abnormalities Common in Autism-Spectrum Disorder Genetic Abnormalities Common in Autism-Spectrum Disorder
About one in eight children diagnosed with autism-spectrum disorder (ASD) have pathogenic findings after genetic testing, according to a new study.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - September 17, 2020 Category: Pathology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

NIH funds research into differences in glioblastoma between males and females
(Cleveland Clinic) A team led by researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute has secured $10.4 million over five years from the National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute to explore at the molecular level the differences in glioblastoma between males and females. The researchers will delve into the genetics, epigenetics and cell biology of glioblastoma - the most common and deadliest brain tumor in adults - to better understand the physiologic processes which may lead to more personalized therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 17, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Algorithms uncover cancers' hidden genetic losses and gains
(Princeton University, Engineering School) Limitations in DNA sequencing technology make it difficult to detect some major mutations often linked to cancer, such as the loss or duplication of parts of chromosomes. Now, methods developed by Princeton computer scientists will allow researchers to more accurately identify these mutations in cancerous tissue, yielding a clearer picture of the evolution and spread of tumors than was previously possible. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists to explore new frontiers in Parkinson's disease research with $7.2M grant
(University of California - San Diego) Aligning Science Across Parkinson's initiative has announced a three-year, $7.2 million grant to scientists at UC San Diego and Germany to support research on the biology of a gene linked to Parkinson's disease. The new funding expands efforts at UC San Diego using leading-edge cryo-EM technology to produce previously unseen views of LRKK2, the protein linked to genetically inherited Parkinson's disease. The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research is the implementation partner for ASAP. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Yousefi to develop artificial intelligence to improve glaucoma research, diagnosis
(University of Tennessee Health Science Center) Siamak Yousefi, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Ophthalmology and the Department of Genetics, Genomics, and Informatics at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has received two grants worth more than $600,000 combined to further develop artificial intelligence (AI) to help diagnose and monitor glaucoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genetic adaptation to climate change is swift in crop pests
(University of Colorado Denver) By comparing genetic variants differing in the two fly populations, researchers found that polygenic traits led to the quickness of adaptation; many genes, each with very small effects, worked together to determine the rate of development. The research illustrates that crop pests and insect disease vectors with similar biology may rapidly respond to changing climates by a similar genetic mechanism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 17, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Looking at neurodevelopment through a big data lens
The formation of the human brain, which contains nearly 100 billion neurons making an average of 1000 connections each, represents an astonishing feat of self-organization. Despite impressive progress, our understanding of how neurons form the nervous system and enable function is very fragmentary, especially for the human brain. New technologies that produce large volumes of high-resolution measurements—big data—are now being brought to bear on this problem. Single-cell molecular profiling methods allow the exploration of neural diversity with increasing spatial and temporal resolution. Advances in human genet...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Briscoe, J., Marin, O. Tags: Molecular Biology, Neuroscience, Online Only review Source Type: news

Species-specific pace of development is associated with differences in protein stability
Although many molecular mechanisms controlling developmental processes are evolutionarily conserved, the speed at which the embryo develops can vary substantially between species. For example, the same genetic program, comprising sequential changes in transcriptional states, governs the differentiation of motor neurons in mouse and human, but the tempo at which it operates differs between species. Using in vitro directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells to motor neurons, we show that the program runs more than twice as fast in mouse as in human. This is not due to differences in signaling, nor the genomic sequence o...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Rayon, T., Stamataki, D., Perez-Carrasco, R., Garcia-Perez, L., Barrington, C., Melchionda, M., Exelby, K., Lazaro, J., Tybulewicz, V. L. J., Fisher, E. M. C., Briscoe, J. Tags: Development, Engineering, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Ancient DNA tracks Vikings across Europe
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Curry, A. Tags: Anthropology, Genetics In Depth Source Type: news

The Vikings Were More Complicated Than You Might Think
One of the biggest surveys ever of ancient DNA offers new evidence of who the Vikings were and where they went raiding and trading. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: James Gorman Tags: Vikings Genetics and Heredity Research Race and Ethnicity Archaeology and Anthropology Nature (Journal) Willerslev, Eske your-feed-science Uppsala University University of Copenhagen Harvard University Reich, David E (1974- ) Denma Source Type: news

Staff scientist 1, web analyst
CLOSING DATE: 10/15/2020; POSITION INFORMATION: The National Library of Medicine ’s (NLM), National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) is recruiting for a Staff Scientist 1 in the Information Engineering Branch (IEB) to analyze current user behavior and market conditions of online scientific resources such as PubMed (bibliographic database for biomedical literature), GenBank (genetic sequence database), and Gene (databases and tools for the study of genes). (Source: NLM General Announcements)
Source: NLM General Announcements - September 16, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

New Research Links Another Gene to Alzheimer's Risk
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16, 2020 -- A genetic variant in some people may be associated with mental decline that can't be explained by deposits of two proteins linked with Alzheimer's disease, researchers say. They said their findings could lead to new... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 16, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Transplanted Stem Cells Produce Sperm in Sterilized Livestock
The technique is designed for breeding genetically superior farm animals, but may have additional conservation and medical applications. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 16, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Dark hair was common among Vikings, genetic study confirms
Research reveals Vikings were genetically diverse group and not purely Scandinavian They may have had a reputation for trade, braids and fearsome raids, but the Vikings were far from a single group of flaxen-haired, sea-faring Scandinavians.A genetic study of Viking-age human remains has not only confirmed that Vikings from different parts of Scandinavia set sail for different parts of the world, but has revealed that dark hair was more common among Vikings than Danes today.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Genetics History Science Research UK news Source Type: news

From complexity to clarity in cell and gene therapy
One of the most exciting frontiers in medicine, cell and gene therapies are already offering breakthrough treatments and potential cures in severe genetic diseases and cancer. The innovations continue to advance rapidly, with press releases announcing major breakthroughs on a seemingly monthly basis.  It ’s undoubtedly a good news story but these advances bring with them the challenge of explaining all the exciting, but complex possibilities to patients and caregivers.  The groups that have historically been expected to help keep doctors up to speed cannot be expected to do so in this dynamic environm...
Source: EyeForPharma - September 16, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Andrew Stone Source Type: news

Chinese virologist claims the coronavirus was cooked up in a military medical facility
Li-Meng Yan, who claims to be a former researcher from Hong Kong, says the virus was built by manipulating the genetic material of two bat coronaviruses. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Where trouble starts
(University of Delaware) In the earliest hours of your embryonic status, cells were developing and multiplying, critical processes were starting up, networks were connecting and genetic codes -- for better or worse -- were directing the whole project.That early development is the focus of University of Delaware biologist Shuo Wei's research. Wei looks specifically at how problems in cellular signal relays affect these processes and cause birth defects and now his research has won more than $1.8 million in support from the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 16, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Blonde Scandinavians or well-travelled Southern Europeans? Research busts myths of Vikings
(University of Copenhagen The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences) Our notion of the Scandinavian Viking very likely stems from films rather than history. In reality, their genome contains lots of genes from Southern and Eastern Europe, which also implies that they had dark rather than blonde hair. And within the Scandinavian borders, the Vikings did not really mix genetically; instead, they travelled abroad on plundering raids. This is revealed by new research from the University of Copenhagen. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How Dantu Blood Group protects against malaria - and how all humans could benefit
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) The secret of how the Dantu genetic blood variant helps to protect against malaria has been revealed for the first time by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the University of Cambridge and the KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme, Kenya. The team found that red blood cells in people with the rare Dantu blood variant have a higher surface tension that prevents them from being invaded by the world's deadliest malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 16, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news