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AstraZeneca Wins U.S. Approval for First-line Use of Lung Cancer Drug AstraZeneca Wins U.S. Approval for First-line Use of Lung Cancer Drug
U.S. regulators have expanded use of AstraZeneca's lung cancer drug Tagrisso to include initial treatment of patients with a specific genetic mutation, the company said on Wednesday.FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - April 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Alert Source Type: news

Are cures bad for the drug business?
A glimpse at the cold calculations required to make profitable drug investments in new genetic technologies such as gene therapy. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - April 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Curetis launches diagnostic cartridge for urinary tract infection
Curetis said today that it won CE-IVD marking for its Unyvero cartridge designed to diagnose severe urinary tract infections. The cartridge covers 103 diagnostic targets and can detect 88 pathogens, according to Curetis, including a multi-drug-resistant pathogenic fungus that is of particular concern to hospitalized patients with compromised immune systems. Unyvero UTI can also detect 15 genetic markers of antibiotic resistances. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Curetis launches diagnostic cartridge for urinary tract infection appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - April 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Diagnostics Pharmaceuticals Regulatory/Compliance curetis Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight National DNA Day is coming up next week on Wednesday, April 25. National DNA Day is celebrating the 15th anniversary of the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2018! Students, teachers and the public can learn more about how advances in genetics and genomics have changed people’s lives and what the future holds. If your library is participating in, or hosting an event for National DNA Day, Tell us about it! NNLM MAR is always interested in learning about health outreach activities that are happening in Pennsylva...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - April 20, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Is it time to worry about human cloning again?
People are copying pets to preserve a physical – and spiritual – connection to dead children.MIT Technology Review reports.When Barbra Streisand revealed to Variety magazine that she ’d had her dogcloned for $50,000, many people learned for the first time that copying pets and other animals is a real business.That ’s right: you can pay to clone a dog, a horse or a top beef bull and get a living copy back in a matter of months.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Antonio Regalado, for MIT Technology Review Tags: Pets Cloning Children Science Biology Genetics Life and style Source Type: news

Pet cloning is already here – is human cloning next?
People are copying pets to preserve a physical – and spiritual – connection to dead childrenWhen Barbra Streisand revealed to Variety magazine that she ’d had her dogcloned for $50,000, many people learned for the first time that copying pets and other animals is a real business.That ’s right: you can pay to clone a dog, a horse or a top beef bull and get a living copy back in a matter of months.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Antonio Regalado, for MIT Technology Review Tags: Pets Cloning Children Science Biology Genetics Life and style Source Type: news

Their DNA helps them dive deep on one breath
The free-diving Bajau people of Southeast Asia, or "sea nomads," can hold their breath for minutes at a time -- thanks to genetics and their unusually large spleens, a study suggests. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - April 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How a good diet can cure your acne: Doctor reveals which foods to avoid
From hormones to genetics to your skincare regime, adult acne can be triggered by many factors. New research shows this can include what you eat. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The good, the bad and their fortuitous differences
(Rothamsted Research) Genetic differences between two very similar fungi, one that led to Quorn ™ , the proprietary meat substitute, and another that ranks among the world's most damaging crop pathogens, have exposed the significant features that dictate the pair's very different lifestyles, features that promise targets for controlling disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genomics study in Africa: Demographic history and deleterious mutations
(Institut Pasteur) Scientists from the Institut Pasteur set out to understand how the demographic changes associated with the Neolithic transition also influenced the efficacy of natural selection. By comparing the genome diversity of more than 300 individuals from groups of forest hunter-gatherers (pygmies) and farmers (Bantu-speaking peoples), from western and eastern Central Africa, they discovered that the reason pygmies did not suffer from excessive deleterious mutations was because of their genetic diversity and their admixture with the Bantu peoples. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rochester scientists discover gene controlling genetic recombination rates
(University of Rochester) Genetic recombination is vital to natural selection, yet some species display far more crossover than others. Scientists in Rochester have discovered a gene in fruit flies that is responsible for the evolution of these recombination rates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Reddit AMA: Personal Genetics and You
On Monday, April 23, Reddit and National DNA Day will hold an "Ask Me Anything" (AMA) session with representatives from personal genetics companies addressingPersonal Genetics and You. Fifteen years after the completion of the Human Genome Project, we can take a detailed look at our genome as easily as ordering a kit online, spitting into a tube or swabbing the inside of your cheek and sending it to a lab. At-home genetic testing is growing and can offer different aspects about what makes you, you! Find out what you can learn from testing your genome at home. The talk starts at 1:00 p.m. (Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights)
Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights - April 20, 2018 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: news

Seattle Genetics searches for its 10th building to keep up with growth
The Seattle-area ’s largest biotech already has a footprint of about 500,000 square feet, which includes seven office buildings in Bothell, a manufacturing facility in North Creek and a Seattle office. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 19, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Casey Coombs Source Type: news

Seattle Genetics searches for its 10th building to keep up with growth
The Seattle-area ’s largest biotech already has a footprint of about 500,000 square feet, which includes seven office buildings in Bothell, a manufacturing facility in North Creek and a Seattle office. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 19, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Casey Coombs Source Type: news

Their DNA helps them dive deep on one breath, study says
The free-diving Bajau people of Southeast Asia, or "sea nomads," can hold their breath for minutes at a time -- thanks to genetics and their unusually large spleens, a study suggests. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - April 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Matter: Bodies Remodeled for a Life at Sea
The Bajau, who spend most of their time on the ocean, are among the best divers in the world. Evolution is remaking them, a new study finds. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARL ZIMMER Tags: Genetics and Heredity Evolution (Biology) Diving and Divers Spleen Archaeology and Anthropology Cell (Journal) University of California, Berkeley University of Copenhagen Nielsen, Rasmus Far East, South and Southeast Asia and Pacific Are Source Type: news

Serotonergic gene polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR, 5HTR1A, 5HTR2A), and population differences in aggression: traditional (Hadza and Datoga) and industrial (Russians) populations compared - Butovskaya ML, Butovskaya PR, Vasilyev VA, Sukhodolskaya JM, Fekhredtinova DI, Karelin DV, Fedenok JN, Mabulla AZP, Ryskov AP, Lazebny OE.
BACKGROUND: Current knowledge on genetic basis of aggressive behavior is still contradictory. This may be due to the fact that the majority of studies targeting associations between candidate genes and aggression are conducted on industrial societies and m... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Violence and Weapons Issues Source Type: news

Frenchman Is First in World to Get 2 Full Face Transplants
J é r ô me Hamon, a bookseller who has a genetic disease, underwent a second transplant after his body rejected the first because he had taken an antibiotic for a cold. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: TANGUY GARREL-JAFFRELOT Tags: Face Transplants Paris (France) Jerome Hamon Laurent Lantieri Source Type: news

Meningiomas: Overview and New Directions in Therapy Meningiomas: Overview and New Directions in Therapy
This comprehensive review summarizes the epidemiology, pathogenesis, genetics, classification, and diagnosis of meningiomas. What are current and promising therapeutic options?Seminars in Neurology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Journal Article Source Type: news

Remote-control shoots laser at nano-gold to turn on cancer-killing immune cells
(Georgia Institute of Technology) Cancer immune cell therapy has made headlines with astounding successes like saving former US President Jimmy Carter from brain cancer. But immunotherapy has also had many tragic flops. Georgia Tech researchers working to optimize the innovative treatment have implanted a genetic switch that activates T-cells when they are inside of tumors. Remote-control light waves resembling those used in a TV remote combine with gold nanorods to flip the switch. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mount Sinai partners with Chan Zuckerberg Initiative to bring big data solution to biology
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) Uri Laserson, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Genetics and Genomics Sciences at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and collaborators have been awarded one of 85 grants announced today from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative DAF (CZI). The grants totaling $15 million are dedicated to research projects aimed at building tools and technologies to support the goals of Human Cell Atlas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

EPFL scientists become part of international effort to create Human Cell Atlas
(Ecole Polytechnique F é d é rale de Lausanne) In its first investment in EPFL, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) and DAF, an advised fund of Silicon Valley Community Foundation, have awarded a research grant to the lab of Professor Bart Deplancke supporting the development of a web-based platform to analyze the transcriptome of single cells. With the grant, the genetics platform becomes part of the network of open computational tools for the Chan Zuckerberg's project Human Cell Atlas (HCA). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

3-D human 'mini-brains' shed new light on genetic underpinnings of major mental illness
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital are leveraging gene-editing tools and mini-organs grown in the lab to study the effects of DISC1 mutations in cerebral organoids -- 'mini brains' -- cultured from human stem cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

HIV-1 Viruses transmitted at birth are resistant to antibodies in mother's blood
(PLOS) Of the genetically diverse population of HIV-1 viruses present in an infected pregnant woman, the few she might transmit to her child during delivery are resistant to attack by antibodies in her blood, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens by Amit Kumar of Duke University Medical Centre, North Carolina, and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 19, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers use CRISPR to edit DNA outside of the cell for the first time
(Burness) Scientists at Christiana Care Health System's Gene Editing Institute have developed a potentially breakthrough CRISPR gene-editing tool. It could allow researchers to take fragments of DNA extracted from human cells, put them into a test tube, and quickly and precisely engineer multiple changes to the genetic code, according to a new study published today in the CRISPR Journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Innovations for investigating the plant tree of life
(Botanical Society of America) Advances in genome sequencing are providing vast amounts of genetic information that researchers are using to explore the plant family tree. This special issue showcases cutting-edge techniques that are providing solutions to challenges in the study of evolution of species (or phylogenetics); issue highlights include an overview of current options for phylogenomic studies, a new natural language processing pipeline, metagenomics pipeline comparisons, and reviews of sequence capture methods and custom pipelines for marker selection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Far-red fluorescent silk can kill harmful bacteria as biomedical and environmental remedy
(Purdue University) A silk hybrid material attacks bacteria when illuminated by a green light, thanks to a far-red fluorescent protein researchers transferred to its genetic makeup. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

ERC Advanced Grant for Professor Manolis Pasparakis
(University of Cologne) The European Research Council (ERC) has awarded the ERC Advanced Grant to the genetics researcher Manolis Pasparakis. The award is endowed with€2.5 million for five years and is considered the most important European research grant. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

AstraZeneca wins U.S. approval for 1st-line use of lung cancer drug
(Reuters) - U.S. regulators have expanded use of AstraZeneca's lung cancer drug Tagrisso to include initial treatment of patients with a specific genetic mutation, the company said on Wednesday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

The cellular composition of H3K27M gliomas
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zahn, L. M. Tags: Genetics, Medicine, Diseases twis Source Type: news

Trigenic interactions in yeast link bioprocesses
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zahn, L. M. Tags: Genetics twis Source Type: news

Inherited variation contributes to autism
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zahn, L. M. Tags: Genetics twis Source Type: news

If two deletions don't stop growth, try three
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Walhout, A. J. M. Tags: Genetics perspective Source Type: news

Omen in the blood
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hall, S. S. Tags: Genetics, Medicine, Diseases Feature Source Type: news

Ancient DNA untangles South Asian roots
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Wade, L. Tags: Anthropology, Asia/Pacific News, Evolution, Genetics In Depth Source Type: news

Paternally inherited cis-regulatory structural variants are associated with autism
The genetic basis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is known to consist of contributions from de novo mutations in variant-intolerant genes. We hypothesize that rare inherited structural variants in cis-regulatory elements (CRE-SVs) of these genes also contribute to ASD. We investigated this by assessing the evidence for natural selection and transmission distortion of CRE-SVs in whole genomes of 9274 subjects from 2600 families affected by ASD. In a discovery cohort of 829 families, structural variants were depleted within promoters and untranslated regions, and paternally inherited CRE-SVs were preferentially transmitted...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Brandler, W. M., Antaki, D., Gujral, M., Kleiber, M. L., Whitney, J., Maile, M. S., Hong, O., Chapman, T. R., Tan, S., Tandon, P., Pang, T., Tang, S. C., Vaux, K. K., Yang, Y., Harrington, E., Juul, S., Turner, D. J., Thiruvahindrapuram, B., Kaur, G., Wan Tags: Genetics reports Source Type: news

Developmental and oncogenic programs in H3K27M gliomas dissected by single-cell RNA-seq
Gliomas with histone H3 lysine27-to-methionine mutations (H3K27M-glioma) arise primarily in the midline of the central nervous system of young children, suggesting a cooperation between genetics and cellular context in tumorigenesis. Although the genetics of H3K27M-glioma are well characterized, their cellular architecture remains uncharted. We performed single-cell RNA sequencing in 3321 cells from six primary H3K27M-glioma and matched models. We found that H3K27M-glioma primarily contain cells that resemble oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC-like), whereas more differentiated malignant cells are a minority. OPC-like ce...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Filbin, M. G., Tirosh, I., Hovestadt, V., Shaw, M. L., Escalante, L. E., Mathewson, N. D., Neftel, C., Frank, N., Pelton, K., Hebert, C. M., Haberler, C., Yizhak, K., Gojo, J., Egervari, K., Mount, C., van Galen, P., Bonal, D. M., Nguyen, Q.-D., Beck, A., Tags: Genetics, Medicine, Diseases reports Source Type: news

Systematic analysis of complex genetic interactions
To systematically explore complex genetic interactions, we constructed ~200,000 yeast triple mutants and scored negative trigenic interactions. We selected double-mutant query genes across a broad spectrum of biological processes, spanning a range of quantitative features of the global digenic interaction network and tested for a genetic interaction with a third mutation. Trigenic interactions often occurred among functionally related genes, and essential genes were hubs on the trigenic network. Despite their functional enrichment, trigenic interactions tended to link genes in distant bioprocesses and displayed a weaker ma...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kuzmin, E., VanderSluis, B., Wang, W., Tan, G., Deshpande, R., Chen, Y., Usaj, M., Balint, A., Mattiazzi Usaj, M., van Leeuwen, J., Koch, E. N., Pons, C., Dagilis, A. J., Pryszlak, M., Wang, J. Z. Y., Hanchard, J., Riggi, M., Xu, K., Heydari, H., San Luis Tags: Genetics, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Reddit AMA: Dr. Francis Collins and the future of precision medicine
Former NHGRI Director Dr. Francis Collins, now director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), earned a reputation as a gene hunter at the University of Michigan and led the successful completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003. Now, Dr. Collins manages the NIH's efforts in building innovative enterprises like the precision medicine initiativeAll of Us. This AMA will focus on Dr. Collins' experiences during the Human Genome Project and his vision for the future of precision medicine. (Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights)
Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights - April 19, 2018 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: news

Gene Therapy May Be Cure for Rare Blood Disorder
There are an estimated 288,000 cases of beta-thalassemia across the world, making it one of the most common genetic diseases, according to an editorial accompanying the study. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - April 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Behind enemy lines
Chemotherapy is modern medicine ’s first line of defense against cancer: chemotherapy drugs kill dividing cells by damaging DNA, preventing tumor cells from multiplying and tumors themselves from growing. To pick which chemotherapy regimens to use, oncologists rely on broad guidelines, based on the average success rates of chemo therapies. But these guidelines don’t take into account the genetic diversity of tumors, which can make some tumors drug resistant. (Source: UCSF School of Pharmacy News)
Source: UCSF School of Pharmacy News - April 18, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Levi Gadye Source Type: news

Dyslexia gene variants tied to consonant use across populations
A correlation between consonant use and the gene DCDC2 suggests a genetic role in language differences between worldwide populations, according to researchers. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 18, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Sex specific gene increases diabetes risk in women
Research inNature Genetics reports that a natural variation of the gene KLF14 significantly increases type-2 diabetes risk in women, and dictates how some women store fat.Science Daily (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - April 18, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Researchers at Several Top Universities Unveil CRISPR-Based Diagnostics That Show Great Promise for Clinical Laboratories
Three innovative technologies utilizing CRISPR-Cas13, Cas12a, and Cas9 demonstrate how CRISPR might be used for more than gene editing, while highlighting potential to develop new diagnostics for both the medical laboratory and point-of-care (POC) testing markets CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) is in the news again! The remarkable genetic-editing technology is at the […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - April 18, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Management & Operations anatomic pathology biosensor Source Type: news

Phys Ed: To Slash Your Risk of Heart Disease, Keep Moving
Aerobic fitness can halve the likelihood of developing heart disease, no matter how worrisome your genetic profile. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GRETCHEN REYNOLDS Tags: Exercise Genetics and Heredity Heart DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid) Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Female pattern baldness: Treatment and genetics
While most women lose between 50 and 100 strands of hair per day, this hair is usually quickly replaced by new growth. When bald patches or thinning occurs, however, it may be a sign of female pattern baldness. In this article, learn more about the common causes and treatment of hair loss in women. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dermatology Source Type: news

Annual National DNA Day lecture to honor Congresswoman Louise M. Slaughter
For NHGRI's National DNA Day on April 25, Olivier Noel, Ph.D., founder and CEO of DNAsimple, will present "Bench to Bedside to Business: A Talk on Startups in Science" for the newly named Louise M. Slaughter National DNA Day lecture, which honors the late Congresswoman. The media and the public are invited to attend at the Lister Hill Center Auditorium on the NIH campus. (Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights)
Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights - April 18, 2018 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What are the signs of heart attack in a woman?
Symptoms of a heart attack can often vary between males and females. Being able to spot the early signs means that prompt treatment can be sought. There are also risk factors, such as lifestyle choices, that can be avoided, although some, such as age, genetics, or medical history, may not be avoidable. Learn more here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Higher rates of type one diabetes found in 'food swamps'
Findings from a New York University study challenge the traditional belief that type one is caused by genetics and indicate that an unhealthy diet may contribute to all kinds of health conditions. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news