Zooming in on breast cancer reveals how mutations shape the tumour landscape
(Cancer Research UK) Scientists have created one of the most detailed maps of breast cancer ever achieved, revealing how genetic changes shape the physical tumour landscape, according to research funded by Cancer Research UK and published in Nature Cancer today (Monday). An international team of scientists has developed intricate maps of breast tumour samples, with a resolution smaller than a single cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 17, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Your DNA is a valuable asset, so why give it to ancestry websites for free? | Laura Spinney
DNA testing companies are starting to profit from selling our data on to big pharma. Perhaps they should be paying usThe announcement by 23andMe, a company that sells home DNA testing kits, that it hassold the rights to a promising new anti-inflammatory drug to a Spanish pharmaceutical company is cause for celebration. The collected health data of 23andMe ’s millions of customers have potentially produced a medical advance – the first of its kind. But a few weeks later the same company announced that it was laying off workers amid a shrinking market that its CEO put down to the public ’s concerns about pr...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Laura Spinney Tags: Genetics Biology Science Privacy Data protection Technology World news Source Type: news

The influence of risk factors on the onset and outcome of psychosis: what we learned from the GAP study - Murray RM, Mondelli V, Stilo SA, Trotta A, Sideli L, Ajnakina O, Ferraro L, Vassos E, Iyegbe C, Schoeler T, Bhattacharyya S, Marques TR, Dazzan P, Lopez-Morinigo J, Colizzi M, O'Connor J, Falcone MA, Quattrone D, Rodriguez V, Tripoli G, La Barbera D, La Cascia C, Alameda L, Trotta G, Morgan C, Gaughran F, David A, Di Forti M.
The GAP multidisciplinary study carried out in South London, recruited 410 first episode of psychosis patients and 370 controls; the aim was to elucidate the multiple genetic and environmental factors influencing the onset and outcome of psychosis. The stu... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Risk Factor Prevalence, Injury Occurrence Source Type: news

' Ghost' Ancestors: African DNA Study Detects Mysterious Human Species'Ghost' Ancestors: African DNA Study Detects Mysterious Human Species
Scientists examining the genomes of West Africans have detected signs that a mysterious extinct human species interbred with our own species tens of thousands of years ago in Africa, the latest evidence of humankind's complicated genetic ancestry.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Genetic researchers work to overcome suspicion among indigenous groups
The effort to rebuild trust, change attitudes will hopefully improve medical care, one scientist says. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - February 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sindya N. Bhanoo Source Type: news

Killer coronavirus was NOT genetically engineered: Scientist debunks conspiracy claims
Dr Trevor Bedford, from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington, said nothing about the virus appeared to suggest it had been made by people in a lab. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Slide show: How genetic disorders are inherited
(Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed)
Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed - February 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

California man freed after 15 years in prison thanks to genealogy website data
Authorities used DNA links developed through publicly available genealogical websites to free man wrongfully convicted of killing housemateCalifornia authorities used the same DNA techniques that led to the capture of the suspected Golden State Killer to free a man who spent about 15 years in prison after being wrongfully convicted in the slaying of his housemate.Ricky Davis was ordered released from custody during an emotional court hearing in Placerville, near Sacramento, on Thursday, after authorities used extended DNA links developed through publicly available genealogical websites to build a family tree that led to th...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 14, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Guardian staff and agency Tags: California US crime US news Genetics Biology Source Type: news

Data from Basket Studies Help Anatomic Pathologists Better Understand Effectiveness of Oncology Drugs
Pathologists can be paid for their role in identifying and recruiting patients for basket studies and reporting results of medical laboratory tests Anatomic pathologists who biopsy, report, and diagnosis cancer will benefit from a better understanding of basket studies and their application in developing cancer treatment therapies. Such studies can lead to more documentation of […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - February 14, 2020 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Uncategorized anatomic pathology basket studies biomarker BRAF gene cancer clinical laboratory Dark Daily dark intelligence group Dark Report FDA food and drug administration genetic medicine genetic mutation larotrectinib ma Source Type: news

New CRISPR-based tool can probe and control several genetic circuits at once
(Stanford School of Engineering) Stanford researchers have devised a biological tool that can not only detect faulty genetic circuits but also " debug " them - like running a patch cord around a computer hardware glitch. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 14, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

FDA Grants Priority Review to Tucatinib for HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Treatment
The FDA granted a priority review to a new drug application submitted by Seattle Genetics, Inc. for tucatinib to treat patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - February 14, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Matthew Fowler Source Type: news

Key modifier identified in large genetic deletion related to neurodevelopmental disorders
(Penn State) Neurodevelopmental disorders, including schizophrenia and autism, likely result from complex interactions that modify the effects of individual genes, according to new research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Therapeutic Genome Editing Shows Promise, but Numerous Challenges Remain Therapeutic Genome Editing Shows Promise, but Numerous Challenges Remain
Current technology has allowed for the identification of genetic mutations associated with various diseases, but there is a growing separation between diagnostics and treatments, according to a new report.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines)
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - February 13, 2020 Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care News Source Type: news

How can nutrients help with dermatitis?
(Natural News) A person’s nutritional status affects his body’s immune function. Scientific evidence of this has sparked interest in the possible role dietary factors play in the pathogenesis of skin conditions like atopic dermatitis (AD). While food allergies and elimination diets have been studied in relation to atopy — a genetic tendency to develop allergic diseases —... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Genetic profile may predict chance of type 2 diabetes among women with gestational diabetes
Researchers followed women before, during and after pregnancy and captured data on their health later in life. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 13, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Much shorter radiation treatment found to be safe, effective for people with soft tissue sarcoma
In this study at UCLA, a national leader in the care of patients with sarcoma, researchers used a condensed five-day radiation regimen that considerably cuts down the length of treatment and the time to surgery.“Shortening the radiation therapy from five weeks to five days has been a very meaningful change for patients,” said lead author Dr. Anusha Kalbasi, assistant professor of radiation oncology in the division of molecular and cellular oncology. “Five weeks of daily treatments is a burdensome com mitment for patients. The daily back-and-forth can be expensive and time consuming, and it can really inte...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 13, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Genetic Testing for Alzheimer Disease: Challenges and Ethics Genetic Testing for Alzheimer Disease: Challenges and Ethics
Advances in genomics have increased interest in predictive genetic testing for Alzheimers, but concerns remain regarding the accuracy of such tests, their regulation, and potential ethical issues.Current Opinion in Psychiatry (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychiatry Journal Article Source Type: news

U.S. diners, watch out: First GMO animal approved for human consumption soon to hit restaurants
(Natural News) Resistance to the prevalence of genetically modified foods has risen like a wave in the United States in recent years. Back in 2015, an Associated Press survey found that a whopping two thirds of Americans supported the labeling of genetically modified foods. Frankly, many people are wary of eating what are commonly known... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mathematical model reveals behavior of cellular enzymes
(Princeton University) Mathematical modeling helps researchers to understand how enzymes in the body work to ensure normal functioning. The models also can show how genetic mutations alter the enzymes' behavior in ways that cause disease, including cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 13, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Research pinpoints rogue cells at root of autoimmune disease
(Garvan Institute of Medical Research) Breakthrough cellular genomics technology has allowed Garvan and UNSW Sydney researchers to reveal genetic mutations causing rogue behaviour in the cells that cause autoimmune disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 13, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers validate link between genetic variant and poor outcomes in advanced prostate cancer
(Cleveland Clinic) In a new Cleveland Clinic-led study published in JAMA Oncology, researchers show that a testosterone-related genetic variant -- HSD3B1(1245C) -- is associated with more aggressive disease and shorter survival in men with metastatic prostate cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 13, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Autophagy genes act as tumor suppressors in ovarian cancer
(Medical University of South Carolina) Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina and University of California at San Diego report in PLOS Genetics that the loss of BECN1 promoted early ovarian cancer formation and genomic instability. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 13, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

UIC researchers find unique organ-specific signature profiles for blood vessel cells
(University of Illinois at Chicago) Researchers have discovered that endothelial cells have unique genetic signatures based on their location in the body. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Michelle Craske to share how research can inform anxiety and depression treatment
For more than three decades, Michelle Craske  has been trying to understand what makes some people prone to anxiety and depression. She’s studied what biomarkers, behaviors and thinking patterns contribute to these conditions, and how to use that knowledge to develop better treatments. At the128th Faculty Research Lecture, Craske, distinguished professor of psychology in the UCLA College, will describe some of her findings and talk about how virtual reality has begun playing a role in changing patients ’ mindsets for the better. The talk will be held at 3 p.m. on Wednesdsay, Feb. 19. “Anxie...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 12, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

High polygenic burden is associated with blood DNA methylation changes in individuals with suicidal behavior - Cabrera-Mendoza B, Martinez-Maga ña JJ, Genis-Mendoza AD, Sarmiento E, Ruíz-Ramos D, Tovilla-Zárate CA, González-Castro TB, Juárez-Rojop IE, García-de la Cruz DD, López-Armenta M, Real F, Garcia-Dolores F, Flores G, Vázquez-Roque RA, Lanzagorta N, Escamilla M, Saucedo-Uribe E, Rodríguez-Mayoral O, Jiménez-Genchi J, Castañ eda-González C, Roche-Bergua A, Nicolini H.
Suicidal behavior is result of the interaction of several contributors, including genetic and environmental factors. The integration of approaches considering the polygenic component of suicidal behavior, such as polygenic risk scores (PRS) and DNA methyla... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Philip Leder, Who Deciphered Amino Acid Sequences, Dies
The Harvard Medical School researcher’s work on the genetic basis of protein coding and production led him to make groundbreaking discoveries in immunology, molecular biology, and cancer... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 12, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

31st Fungal Genetics Conference
Date: Wednesday, February 12, 2020Year: 2021Location: Pacific Grove, CaliforniaContent-type: current_conferences (Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates)
Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates - February 12, 2020 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: helenfindon Source Type: news

ALS Association, Project ALS to fund drug trial for ALS patients with rare gene mutations
(Columbia University Irving Medical Center) The ALS Association and Project ALS will fund a clinical research study at Columbia University Irving Medical Center to test an experimental drug for ALS patients with rare genetic mutations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gene therapy prevents disorders with alcohol exposure in ALDH2 deficiency
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study has shown that gene therapy to treat one of the most common hereditary disorders, aldehyde dehydrogenase type 2 (ALDH2) deficiency, may prevent increased risk for esophageal cancer and osteoporosis associated with chronic alcohol exposure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Preclinical study links human gene variant to THC reward in adolescent females
(Weill Cornell Medicine) A common variation in a human gene that affects the brain's reward processing circuit increases vulnerability to the rewarding effects of the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis in adolescent females, but not males, according to preclinical research by Weill Cornell Medicine investigators. As adolescence represents a highly sensitive period of brain development with the highest risk for initiating cannabis use, these findings in mice have important implications for understanding the influence of genetics on cannabis dependence in humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Thyroid cancer, genetic variations, cell phones linked in YSPH study
(Yale School of Public Health) Radiation from cell phones is associated with higher rates of thyroid cancer among people with genetic variations in specific genes, a new study led by the Yale School of Public Health finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 12, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Huge bacteria-eating viruses close gap between life and non-life
(University of California - Berkeley) Bacterial viruses, called bacteriophages, are simple genetic machines, relying on their bacterial hosts to replicate and spread. But UC Berkeley scientists have found hundreds of huge phages that carry a slew of bacterial proteins that the phages evidently use to more efficiently manipulate their microbial hosts. These proteins include those involved with ribosomal production of proteins and the CRISPR bacterial immune system, as if the phages are a hybrid between living microbes and viral machines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 12, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Drug makers tap genetic test to save kids with seizures
As more drug companies subsidize the cost of the genetic test, more patients can be tested and, potentially, matched to the companies' drugs. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 11, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ron Leuty Source Type: news

Drug makers tap genetic test to save kids with seizures
As more drug companies subsidize the cost of the genetic test, more patients can be tested and, potentially, matched to the companies' drugs. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 11, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Ron Leuty Source Type: news

New Chapter in WormBook, GENETICS
Check out the new chapter in WormBook, GENETICS: ‘Caenorhabditis elegans Gastrulation: A Model for Understanding How Cells Polarize, Change Shape, and Journey Toward the Center of an Embryo‘ by Bob Goldstein and Jeremy Nance. (Source: WormBase)
Source: WormBase - February 11, 2020 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Ranjana Kishore Tags: brief communication community news paper of interest wormbook Source Type: news

Technology takes a step forwards in genetic research
New research brings combined computational and laboratory genome engineering a step closer following the design of smaller and smaller genomes, to advance genetic manipulation, using supercomputers by researchers at the University of Bristol. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - February 11, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International, Research; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, Institutes, Institutes, Bristol BioDesign Institute; Press Release Source Type: news

An Alzheimer ’s Treatment Fails: ‘We Don’t Have Anything Now’
With high hopes, drugs to fight brain plaques were tested in people genetically destined to develop dementia. The drugs failed. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gina Kolata Tags: Alzheimer ' s Disease Elderly Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Brain Clinical Trials Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) Eli Lilly and Company National Institute on Aging Roche Holding AG Washington University Source Type: news

Coronavirus Researchers Are Using High-Tech Methods to Predict Where the Virus Might Go Next
As the deadly 2019-nCov coronavirus spreads, raising fears of a worldwide pandemic, researchers and startups are using artificial intelligence and other technologies to predict where the virus might appear next — and even potentially sound the alarm before other new, potentially threatening viruses become public health crises. “What we’re doing currently with Coronavirus is really trying to get an understanding of what’s happening on the ground through as many sources as we can get our hands on,” says John Brownstein, chief innovation officer at Boston Children’s Hospital and a professor...
Source: TIME: Health - February 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV coronavirus MSFTAI2019 onetime Source Type: news

Alzheimer ’s treatment led by Wash U researcher fails
A study of whether drugs could slow or stop cognitive decline in patients with a genetic mutation guaranteeing they'd develop dementia has failed. Dr. Randall Bateman, a neurologist at Washington University, told the New York Times he was “shocked” when he first saw the data: “It was really crushing,” he said. Still, the Times reports that the scientists believe the drugs may have been given at too low a dose or could be given to yo unger patients. Participating in the trial at Washington… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 11, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jacob Kirn Source Type: news

Genetic Basis for Testosterone Levels Differs According to Sex
TUESDAY, Feb. 11, 2020 -- The genetic determinants of testosterone levels differ between the sexes, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in Nature Medicine. Katherine S. Ruth, Ph.D., from the University of Exeter Medical School in the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 11, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

South Africa: Dentists in South Africa Aren't Being Taught Genetics. Why They Should
[The Conversation Africa] Genetic and genomic research has improved our understanding of the genetic origin of growth, development and disease and affects all areas of healthcare. There is also mounting evidence that many complex conditions are the result of interactions between genes. These include diabetes and hypertension. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 11, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Can T'ai Chi alleviate chronic low back pain in older adults?
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of using T'ai Chi to improve chronic low back pain in adults over 65 years of age compared to health education and usual care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Genetic rewiring' drives cancer's drug resistance
(Institute of Cancer Research) Tiny RNA molecule rewires signalling network in bile duct cancer. Drugs to block RNA could overcome cancer's drug resistance. Findings announced to coincide with Bile Duct Cancer Awareness Day. Results could be applicable in other cancer types and have wider benefit. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 11, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Local genetic adaption helps sorghum crop hide from witchweed
(Penn State) Sorgum crops in areas where the parasite witchweed is common have locally adapted to have mutations in a particular gene, which helps the plant resist the parasite. A new study led by researchers at Penn State reveals the effects of this mutation, as well as other genes that might confer parasite resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 11, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

An Alzheimer ’s Drug Trial Fails: ‘We Don’t Have Anything Now’
With high hopes, drugs to fight brain plaques were tested in people genetically destined to develop dementia. The drugs failed. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gina Kolata Tags: Alzheimer ' s Disease Elderly Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Brain Clinical Trials Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) Eli Lilly and Company National Institute on Aging Roche Holding AG Washington University Source Type: news

Phone apps unreliable for detecting all cases of skin cancer
Current regulatory process for awarding CE mark for algorithm-based apps does not adequately protect public Related items fromOnMedica NHS must improve access to screening to save lives Metastatic breast cancer goes undiagnosed for too long GPs urge caution over DTC genetic testing UK cancer survival improved, but lags behind similar nations Is crowdfunding for cancer patients paying for ‘quackery’? (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - February 11, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Genes linked to schizophrenia identified in ancestral African population
Researchers found damaging genetic variants linked to schizophrenia in the Xhosa population of South Africa. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - February 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Disappointing results from two experimental Alzheimer drugs
Two drugs failed to prevent or slow mental decline in a study of people with a genetic predisposition to develop Alzheimer's disease at a relatively young age. (Source: L.A. Times - Health)
Source: L.A. Times - Health - February 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news

Disappointing results from two experimental Alzheimer drugs
Two drugs failed to prevent or slow mental decline in a study of people with a genetic predisposition to develop Alzheimer's disease at a relatively young age. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news

Why are fermented foods so great for your gut health?
(Natural News) Fermented foods like yogurt and kimchi are popular health foods. While many studies have found that they offer plenty of health benefits, the science behind how they do so is not well-understood. But a recent study published in PLOS Genetics revealed that a cell receptor called HCA3 is key to understanding how fermented foods benefit human health.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news