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Examination of cross-sectional associations of neighborhood deprivation and alcohol outlet density with hazardous drinking using a twin design - Rhew IC, Kosterman R, Duncan GE, Mair C.
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine whether neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation and alcohol outlet density are associated with hazardous drinking using a co-twin design to control for confounding because of genetic and shared environment... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Treating depression requires a multifaceted approach
Depression affects one in four women and one in six men. It is the cause of more than $200 billion in lost productivity, work absenteeism, and disability and health care costs annually, and is believed to contribute to roughly a million suicides worldwide each year.These were among the statistics experts shared at aZ ócalo/UCLA discussion on depression and the efforts UCLA is undertaking to better diagnose and treat it. The event, which was held Dec. 11, drew a packed house to the National Center for the Preservation of Democracy in downtown Los Angeles.The evening featured panelists Gene Block, UCLA chancellor; &nb...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Do you hate cilantro? The answer may be in your DNA
The new video from ACS Reactions explores the so-called ‘cilantroversy’ that causes people to be so divided on the common herb. Scientists say it may be because of a genetic variation. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘ Phenomenal ’ trial results may lead to a treatment for Huntington ’ s disease, experts say
The discovery of a drug that may treat the fatal disease known as Huntington's is being hailed as “historic” by Louise Vetter, president and CEO of the Huntington's Disease Society of America, and “phenomenal” and “fantastically promising” by Huntington's researchers, including the woman who discovered the genetic mutation that causes the disease. “I'm ecstatic,” said Nancy Wexler, […]Related:Trump reportedly drinks 12 cans of Diet Coke each day. Is that healthy?New CDC head faces questions about financial conflicts of interestSurge in gun sales after Sandy H...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Research reveals how diabetes in pregnancy affects baby ’s heart
Researchers at the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have discovered how high glucose levels — whether caused by diabetes or other factors — keep heart cells from maturing normally. Their findings help explain why babies born to women with diabetes are more likely to develop congenital heart disease.The study, which was led by Atsushi “Austin” Nakano, a UCLA associate professor of molecular, cell, and developmental biology and member of the Broad Stem Cell Research Center, was published today in the journal eLife.When developing heart cell...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 12, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Amgen Announces 15 Percent Increase In 2018 First Quarter Dividend
THOUSAND OAKS, Calif., Dec. 12, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN) today announced that its Board of Directors declared a $1.32 per share dividend for the first quarter of 2018. The dividend will be paid on March 8, 2018, to all stockholders of record as of the close of business on Feb. 15, 2018. This represents a 15 percent increase from that paid in each of the previous four quarters. About Amgen Amgen is committed to unlocking the potential of biology for patients suffering from serious illnesses by discovering, developing, manufacturing and delivering innovative human therapeutics. This approach begi...
Source: Amgen News Release - December 12, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Makayla ’s story: Living with Leri-Weill Dyschondrosteosis
Our daughter Makayla was born perfectly healthy on April 5th, 2014, passing all of the usual newborn screenings without issue. From day one, her personality shone through. She was strong-willed and had a smile that would light up her eyes before her mouth even showed a hint of joy. But over the next 3 months, Makayla wasn’t eating well and wasn’t gaining enough weight.  Our pediatrician referred us to Dr. Elizabeth Hait, a gastroenterologist at Boston Children’s Hospital. Dr. Hait would change Makayla’s formula multiple times and put her on medication for her acid reflux. Her pediatrician also ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - December 12, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Kerri Theriault Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Division of Endocrinology Dr. James Kasser Dr. Travis Matheney hip dysplasia Orthopedic Center Otolaryngology Department Source Type: news

WATCH: Family fights to find a cure after 2 children are diagnosed with fatal genetic disease
A New York couple is calling on the pubic's help to raise awareness and funding for Canavan disease. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

Lack Of Genetic Diversity May Have Doomed Tasmanian Tiger, Scientists Say
Although humans are blamed for the extinction of the dog-like Australian marsupial some 80 years ago, researchers say its problems may have started more than 70,000 years ago.(Image credit: Windmill Books/UIG via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Scott Neuman Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What you should know about white hair
A look at white hair, a common change that many people experience as they age. Included is detail on genetic factors and stress-related causes. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dermatology Source Type: news

New research finds that MS, the most common inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, may be triggered by an imbalance in gut flora
(Natural News) Intestinal flora may be the key to understanding how multiple sclerosis develops. Previous assumptions held that MS was a mostly genetic problem, prompting physicians to closely examine DNA. New research, however, has shown that autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, are brought about by a combination of environmental and genetic factors, the catalyst... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Genetics preserves traces of ancient resistance to Inca rule
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) The Chachapoyas region was conquered by the Inca Empire in the late 15th century. Inca oral histories, written down after the Spanish conquest, claim that the native population was forcibly resettled out of Chachapoyas and dispersed across the Inca Empire. However, a new study in Scientific Reports uses genetic evidence to reveal that despite Inca conquest, the population of Chachapoyas has remained genetically distinct, and not assimilated with that of the Inca heartland. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Privacy policies affect quantity of genetic testing
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Different types of privacy laws in US states produce markedly different effects on the willingness of patients to have genetic testing done, according to a new study co-authored by an MIT professor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What role can schools play in preventing and responding to teen dating violence?
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A nationwide study of school principals has shown that while the majority had assisted a victim of teen dating violence (TDV) recently, most of them had never received formal training in this area and their school did not have a specific protocol for dealing with TDV. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Oligonucleotide drug producers coauthor report on drug impurities
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new addition to a series of articles that focus on important topics related to the development of oligonucleotide therapeutics presents an in-depth look at the identification, characterization, and reporting of product-related impurities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 12, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

$5 million grant from NIH will enable UCLA to develop new models for autism
Many genes that increase the risk of autism spectrum disorders have been identified, but their mechanisms remain largely unknown. Now a team of UCLA researchers has received a five-year grant of more than $5 million from the National Institutes of Health to support its work to identify those mechanisms.Led by Dr. Daniel Geschwind at UCLA, researchers will work with counterparts at Stanford University to assess the specific impact of genetic mutations on alterations in molecular, cellular and neural circuitry. Geschwind is the Gordon and Virginia MacDonald Distinguished Chair in Human Genetics and a professor of neurology a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 12, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Promising responses seen with Agios leukemia drug in study
(Reuters) - Nearly a third of patients with an advanced form of a fast-progressing leukemia who carry a specific genetic mutation experienced a complete or near complete response to an experimental Agios Pharmaceuticals drug, according to data from an early stage trial released on Monday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Blood flow –sensing protein protects against atherosclerosis in mice
FINDINGSUCLA scientists have found that a protein known as NOTCH1 helps ward off inflammation in the walls of blood vessels, preventing atherosclerosis — the narrowing and hardening of arteries that can cause heart attacks and strokes.The new finding, from research conducted on mice, also explains why areas of smooth, fast blood flow are less prone to inflammation: levels of NOTCH1 are higher in these vessels.BACKGROUNDNOTCH1 was already known to be a key player in the development of blood vessels in embryos, but researchers weren ’t sure whether it was also critical to adults’ health. In a 2015 study, Lu...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 11, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Excitement as trial shows Huntington's drug could slow progress of disease
Hailed as ‘enormously significant’, results in groundbreaking trial are first time a drug has been shown to suppress effects of Huntington’s genetic mutationA landmark trial for Huntington ’s disease has announced positive results, suggesting that an experimental drug could become the first to slow the progression of the devastating genetic illness.The results have been hailed as “enormously significant” because it is the first time any drug has been shown to suppress the effects of the Huntington’s mutation that causes irreversible damage to the brain. Current treatments only help...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 11, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Huntington's disease Medical research Science Neuroscience Alzheimer's Parkinson's disease Health Society Genetics Source Type: news

Thylacine DNA reveals weakness – and kinship with the kangaroo
Researchers sequence the Tasmanian tiger ’s genome, showing it to be a closer relative of the kangaroo than the dingoThe first full genetic blueprint of the long-extinct thylacine has revealed the animal suffered from genetic weakness well before it was isolated on Tasmania 10,000 to 13,000 years ago.An international team of researchers led by associate professor Andrew Pask from the University of Melbourne used DNA from the 106-year-old preserved remains of a juvenile thylacine or Tasmanian tiger to sequence the animal ’s genome, making it one of the most complete genetic blueprints for an extinct species.Cont...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 11, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Michael McGowan Tags: Extinct wildlife Tasmania Science Australia news World news Source Type: news

'Ground-breaking' new drug gives hope in Huntington's disease
LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists have for the first time fixed a protein defect that causes Huntington's disease by injecting a drug from Ionis Pharmaceuticals into the spine, offering new hope for patients with the devastating genetic disease. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

'Ground-breaking' new drug gives hope on Huntingdon's disease
LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists have for the first time fixed a protein defect that causes Huntingdon's disease by injecting a drug from Ionis Pharmaceuticals into the spine, offering new hope for patients with the devastating genetic disease. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

'You know that you ’re gradually lessening': life with Huntington's
Huntington ’s patient Peter Allen and his siblings – who also carry the gene – watched their mother and grandmother slowly die from the disease. Buta new trial has given the family a glimmer of hopeHuntington ’s has blighted Peter Allen’s family for generations. He watched his mother, Stephanie, slowly die from the disease and before that his grandmother, Olive, fell victim to the same illness. At 51 years old, Peter is the first of his generation to show signs of the illness, but his sister, Sandy, and brother, Frank, know they are also carrying the gene.The onset of Huntington ’s is in...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 11, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Tags: Huntington's disease Science Medical research Genetics Health Society Neuroscience Source Type: news

Polygenic risk for alcohol consumption and its association with alcohol-related phenotypes: do stress and life satisfaction moderate these relationships? - Mies GW, Verweij KJH, Treur JL, Ligthart L, Fedko IO, Hottenga JJ, Willemsen G, Bartels M, Boomsma DI, Vink JM.
BACKGROUND: Genetic and environmental factors contribute about equally to alcohol-related phenotypes in adulthood. In the present study, we examined whether more stress at home or low satisfaction with life might be associated with heavier drinking or more... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Large genetic study links tendency to undervalue future rewards with ADHD, obesity
(University of California - San Diego) Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have found a genetic signature for delay discounting -- the tendency to undervalue future rewards -- that overlaps with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), smoking and weight. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study identifies genetic basis for western corn rootworm resistance in maize
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) Farmers are stuck. Western corn rootworm can destroy cornfields -- and profits -- but populations of the 'billion-dollar bug' have stopped responding to insecticides and the genetically modified corn hybrids designed to resist insect attacks. But there may be hope. In a new study, University of Illinois researchers uncover the genetic basis of resistance to western corn rootworm, paving the way for development of non-GM corn hybrids that can withstand the worm. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 11, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Great Basin seed study experiment targets rangeland restoration
(University of Nevada, Reno) Restoration of rangelands in the Great Basin is taking a new direction as scientists seek to find the ideal seed stock to use for its many different ecosystems. A new $500,000 USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture funded project at the University of Nevada, Reno will use genetic studies and new seed stock and seeding strategies to find the most compatible seed and seed combinations for the Great Basin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 11, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Having a high IQ is a curse ... just look at Donald Trump
Research suggests that people with high IQ scores are more likely to have mood disorders, and a higher risk factor of ‘psychological overexcitabilities’ – perhaps that explains the behaviour of the man in the White HouseMy IQ is extremely, almost embarrassingly, high. I ’ve never actually taken an IQ test, mind you, but my educated guess is that, if I did, my score would be whatever is the highest possible. No doubt your IQ is lower than mine, but please don’t feel stupid or insecure because of this, it’s not your fault. You’re probably just born that way. And you know what? Thank ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 10, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Arwa Mahdawi Tags: Psychology Science Consciousness US news Donald Trump Artificial intelligence (AI) Computing Race issues World news Technology Social exclusion Society Economic policy Politics Source Type: news

Having a high IQ is a curse ... just look at Donald Trump | Arwa Mahdawi
Research suggests that people with high IQ scores are more likely to have mood disorders, and a higher risk factor of ‘psychological overexcitabilities’ – perhaps that explains the behaviour of the man in the White HouseMy IQ is extremely, almost embarrassingly, high. I ’ve never actually taken an IQ test, mind you, but my educated guess is that, if I did, my score would be whatever is the highest possible. No doubt your IQ is lower than mine, but please don’t feel stupid or insecure because of this, it’s not your fault. You’re probably just born that way. And you know what? Thank ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 10, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Arwa Mahdawi Tags: Psychology Science Consciousness US news Donald Trump Artificial intelligence (AI) Computing Race issues World news Technology Social exclusion Society Economic policy Politics Source Type: news

Tracking how multiple myeloma evolves by sequencing DNA in the blood
(Dana-Farber Cancer Institute) Although people with multiple myeloma usually respond well to treatment, the blood cancer generally keeps coming back. Following genetic changes in how the disease evolves over time will help to understand the disease and, eventually, deliver more effective treatments. Researchers now have successfully demonstrated techniques to track these alterations over time by analyzing cell-free DNA (cfDNA) found in blood, according to Jens Lohr, M.D., Ph.D., a hematologist and oncologist at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 10, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Landmark CAR-T cancer study published in the New England Journal of Medicine
(Loyola University Health System) Loyola University Medical Center is the only Chicago center that participated in the pivotal clinical trial of a groundbreaking cancer treatment that genetically engineers a patient's immune system to attack cancer cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 10, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

SABCS: Biannual breast MRI best for young women at high risk
For young women with a high genetic risk of breast cancer, twice-yearly MRI...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: At-risk women not receiving breast MRI scans Breast MRI neural network predicts treatment response Deep learning with breast MRI helps with lesion detection Breast MRI neural networks predict recurrence scores ACR releases breast cancer screening criteria (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - December 9, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: All you need to know about dwarfism
A look at dwarfism, a condition that causes a person to be very short. Included is detail on the diagnosis of dwarfism and management for the condition. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics Source Type: news

International team identifies genetic model for predicting primary myelofibrosis outcomes
(Mayo Clinic) A group of investigators from Mayo Clinic and multiple academic research centers in Italy have identified a genetic model for predicting outcomes in patients with primary myelofibrosis who are 70 years or younger and candidates for stem cell transplant to treat their disease. The group's findings were presented today at the 59th American Society of Hematology annual meeting in Atlanta by lead authors Alessandro Vannucchi, M.D., from the University of Florence and Ayalew Tefferi, M.D., a hematologist at Mayo Clinic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Likelihood of caesarean birth found to be inherited: Causes of obstructed labor often get passed on, circumventing natural selection
(Natural News) Women who were born via caesarean section are more likely to also give birth via caesarean section, concluded an international team of scientists including Michaela Pavlicev of the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (Human Genetics) and evolutionary biologists at the University of Vienna in a study that was published in PNAS. According to... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Google is Helping Make Sense of Your Genome
It’s been over a decade since the Human Genome Project, and in the years since, scientists have become quite efficient at sequencing DNA. Entire genomes can now be sequenced at incredible speeds, but sorting through nucleotides and creating hypotheses about their role remains guesswork. This week, Google released a new tool that aims to use artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques to begin to bridge that gap — helping scientists build a more accurate picture of the human genome from sequencing data. The new tool, known as DeepVariant, was designed to help turn high-throughput sequencing readouts ...
Source: MDDI - December 8, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kristopher Sturgis Tags: R & D Software Source Type: news

Debate on Glyphosate Use Comes to a Head in Argentina
Academics discuss the impacts on health and the environment of the use of glyphosate in Argentine agriculture, during a Dec. 6 conference at the University of Buenos Aires. Concern about this topic is now on the country’s public agenda. Credit: Daniel Gutman / IPSBy Daniel GutmanBUENOS AIRES, Dec 8 2017 (IPS)In and around the city of Rosario, where most of Argentina’s soybean processing plants are concentrated, a local law banned the use of glyphosate, the most widely-used herbicide in Argentina. But two weeks later, producers managed to exert enough pressure to obtain a promise that the ban would be overturned...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Daniel Gutman Tags: Active Citizens Civil Society Development & Aid Economy & Trade Editors' Choice Environment Food & Agriculture Headlines Health Latin America & the Caribbean Population Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories Source Type: news

CRISPR breakthrough may enable treatment for genetic diseases
Scientists can now edit genes without creating gaps in the genetic code -- paving the way for the use of CRISPR/Cas9 in clinical trials. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - December 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sleep paralysis linked to stress and PTSD
Researchers from Goldsmiths University of London also identified substance use, genetics, physical illness, personality, sleep disorders and psychiatric illnesses as factors. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study finds genetic mutation causes 'vicious cycle' in most common form of ALS
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) University of Michigan-led research brings scientists one step closer to understanding the development of neurodegenerative disorders such as ALS. A study published today in Nature Communications details what the researchers describe as a vicious cycle of toxic protein production set in motion by cell stress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Family members without inherited mutation have increased risk of melanoma
(Karolinska Institutet) In families who carry certain inherited mutations that increase the risk for melanoma, members who do not carry the mutation also have an increased risk of melanoma, a study from Karolinska Institutet published in Genetics in Medicine reports. The phenomenon, which is called phenocopy, could result from other shared risk-enhancing genes or environmental factors within the families. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 8, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New study shows HIV-infected women not using statins as recommended
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study has shown that HIV-infected women do not use statins as recommended by the most recent guidelines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

For women with genetic risk, bi-annual MRI beats mammograms
(University of Chicago Medical Center) Intensive surveillance including a dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) exam every six months was far more effective in detecting breast cancer in younger women with a high-risk genetic profile than an annual mammogram. DCE-MRI every six months performed well for early detection of invasive breast cancer in high-risk women. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 8, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Heterogeneity in the development of proactive and reactive aggression in childhood: common and specific genetic - environmental factors - Paquin S, Lacourse E, Brendgen M, Vitaro F, Dionne G, Tremblay RE, Boivin M.
BACKGROUND: Few studies are grounded in a developmental framework to study proactive and reactive aggression. Furthermore, although distinctive correlates, predictors and outcomes have been highlighted, proactive and reactive aggression are substantially c... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Linking Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat loci to human male impulsive aggression - Yang C, Ba H, Cao Y, Dong G, Zhang S, Gao Z, Zhao H, Zhou X.
INTRODUCTION: Men are more susceptible to impulsive behavior than women. Epidemiological studies revealed that the impulsive aggressive behavior is affected by genetic factors, and the male-specific Y chromosome plays an important role in this behavior. In... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

HealthWatch: Moderate Exercise Can Make Fat Cells Healthier
BOSTON (CBS) – Imagine being able to eat all the fatty foods you want without gaining weight. Researchers say that could one day be possible. There is a pathway of proteins in the body that can inhibit the formation of fat cells, and researchers genetically modified mice to activate these proteins in response to fatty foods. The scientists found that after eating a high-fat diet for 8 weeks, the genetically altered mice gained no more weight than regular mice who were eating a standard diet. Not only that, the altered mice were leaner, had lower blood glucose and were more sensitive to insulin. These were experiments...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Food Source Type: news

Adapted Crispr gene editing tool could treat incurable diseases, say scientists
New form of genetic engineering designed to boost gene activity could one day be used to overcome diseases such as diabetes and muscular dystrophyIncurable diseases such as diabetes and muscular dystrophy could be treated in future using a new form of genetic engineering designed to boost gene activity, according to scientists.The technique is an adapted version of the powerful gene editing tool called Crispr. While the original version of Crispr snips DNA in precise locations to delete faulty genes or over-write flaws in the genetic code, the modified form “turns up the volume” on selected genes.Continue readi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Genetics Science Medical research Diabetes Biology Source Type: news

Maybe the healthiest wine in the world
When I was in South Africa last year, I met a revolutionary winemaker… His wine was completely organic. It had no toxins, and it contained powerful antioxidant properties. It was infused with a local herb called rooibos, also known as “red bush.” You may have seen rooibos tea on supermarket shelves. I immediately knew this wine should be made widely available in America — and I’m still hopeful a distributor will bring it here. I enjoy a nice glass of red wine from time to time, but the trouble with most of the wines sold in America is that they’re loaded with dangerous chemicals. Winema...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - December 7, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Cathy Card Tags: Health additives natural organic Sulfites wine Source Type: news

Study claims homosexual men have common genetic markers
Researchers at NorthShore University, based in  Evanston, Illinois, made the findings after conducting a genome-wide association study of around 2,300 men (stock image). (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Genes Start Mutating Soon After Life Begins, Study Finds
THURSDAY, Dec. 7, 2017 -- Hundreds of minor genetic mutations start to form in the cells of an embryo soon after conception, researchers have discovered. The Yale University and Mayo Clinic scientists said that many of these mutations occur as sex... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 7, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news