They said I'd go blind. Now gene therapy has changed that
Matthew Bishop was told there was no treatment that could save his vision. But now scientific breakthroughs in gene therapy have given him, and others, hopeIn his office in Oxford ’s John Radcliffe hospital, Prof Robert MacLaren sits upright, his back as straight as a soldier’s, and tells me about the lowest point in his 20-yearcareer. It was the rejection, many years ago, of his grant application for a project investigating how gene therapy might treat conditions causing blindness. “It was completely panned by the reviewers,” he says. “We were told ‘There’s no way it’s ever ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Moya Sarner Tags: Genetics Parents and parenting Biology Science Family Life and style Source Type: news

Schizophrenia: Genetic Mutation Alters Teen Brain, Raises Risk Schizophrenia: Genetic Mutation Alters Teen Brain, Raises Risk
Schizophrenia may be caused by a genetic mutation in the SLC39A8 gene that leads to a structural abnormality in the brain during adolescence, suggesting a new target for therapy.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news

Are You a Risk-Taker? It Might Lie in Your Genes
More than 100 genetic variants are linked with risk-taking, according to a groundbreaking new study. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - January 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Does Marijuana Use Cause Schizophrenia?
As the drug becomes more popular, concerns have been raised that its use can lead to psychotic disorders. Here ’ s what scientists know for sure, and what they don ’ t. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: BENEDICT CAREY Tags: Marijuana Drug Abuse and Traffic Schizophrenia Mental Health and Disorders Genetics and Heredity Research Brain Smoking and Tobacco Source Type: news

Are You a Risk-Taker? It Might Lie in Your Genes
FRIDAY, Jan. 18, 2019 -- Do you shy away from risky business or cast caution aside and go for it? Either way, your answer could come from your DNA. Scientists have identified more than 100 genetic variants linked with risk-taking, according to a... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 18, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Genetic risk score may improve on identification of diabetes in babies
Research, published inDiabetes Care, suggests that a new genetic risk score may be more effective at diagnosing diabetes in newborns than current methods.Science Daily (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - January 18, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Evolutionary perspectives on genetic and environmental risk factors for psychiatric disorders - Keller MC.
Evolutionary medicine uses evolutionary theory to help elucidate why humans are vulnerable to disease and disorders. I discuss two different types of evolutionary explanations that have been used to help understand human psychiatric disorders. First, a con... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Genome-wide association analyses of risk tolerance and risky behaviors in over 1 million individuals identify hundreds of loci and shared genetic influences - Karlsson Linn ér R, Biroli P, Kong E, Meddens SFW, Wedow R, Fontana MA, Lebreton M, Tino SP, Abdellaoui A, Hammerschlag AR, Nivard MG, Okbay A, Rietveld CA, Timshel PN, Trzaskowski M, Vlaming R, Zünd CL, Bao Y, Buzdugan L, Caplin AH, Chen CY, Eibich P, Fontanillas P, Gonzalez JR, Joshi PK, Karhunen V, Kleinman A, Levin RZ, Lill CM, Meddens GA, Muntané G, Sanchez-Roige S, Rooij FJV, Taskesen E, Wu Y, Zhang F, Auton A, Boardman JD, Clark DW, Conlin A, Dolan CC, Fischbacher U, Groenen PJF, Harris KM, Hasler G, Hofman A, Ikram MA, Jain S, Karlsson R, Kessler RC, Kooyman M, Mackillop J, Männikkö M, Morcillo -Suarez C, McQueen MB, Schmidt KM, Smart MC, Sutter M, Thurik AR, Uitterlinden AG, White J, Wit H, Yang J, Bertram L, Boomsma DI, Esko T, Fehr E, Hinds DA, Johannesson M, Kumari M, Laibson D, Magnusson PKE, Meyer MN, Navarro A, Palmer AA, Pers TH, Posthuma D, Schunk D, Stein MB, Svento R, Tiemeier H , Timmers PRHJ, Turley P, Ursano RJ, Wagner GG, Wilson JF, Gratten J, Lee JJ, Cesarini D, Benjamin DJ, Koellinger PD, Beauchamp JP.
Humans vary substantially in their willingness to take risks. In a combined sample of over 1 million individuals, we conducted genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of general risk tolerance, adventurousness, and risky behaviors in the driving, drinking, ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

New technologies enable better-than-ever details on genetically modified plants
(Salk Institute) Salk researchers have mapped the genomes and epigenomes of genetically modified plant lines with the highest resolution ever to reveal exactly what happens at a molecular level when a piece of foreign DNA is inserted. Their findings, published in the journal PLOS Genetics on January 15, 2019, elucidate the routine methods used to modify plants, and offer new ways to more effectively minimize potential off-target effects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Green turtle: The success of the reintroduction program in Cayman Islands
(University of Barcelona) The reintroduction program for the green turtle in the Cayman Islands has been crucial in order to recover this species, which are threatened by the effects of human overexploitation, according to the first genetic study of the green turtle's reintroduction program in this area of the Atlantic ocean. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Discovery of enhanced bone growth could lead to new treatments for osteoporosis
UCLA and UC San Francisco life scientists have discovered a dramatic pattern of bone growth in female mice — research that could potentially lead to stronger bone density in women and new treatments for osteoporosis in older women.The researchers found that blocking a particular set of signals from a small number of neurons in the brain causes female, but not male, mice to build super-strong bones and maintain them into old age. These neurons may play an important role in controlling women ’s bone density, the researchers said. Thestudy was published Jan. 11 in the journal  Nature Communications.“We ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 18, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Better treatment for your patients – NEW program on lipid disorders
Better treatment for your patients – NEW program on lipid disorders p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:10...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - January 17, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

N.J. approves Legacy Treatment Services' affiliation with Woods Services
New Jersey officials have approved a deal that will allow Legacy Treatment Services to formerly affiliate with Woods Services in Bucks County. The affiliation deal is part of Langhorne-based Woods Services’ strategy to expand its comprehensive and coordinated approach to care for people with complex medical and behavioral health care needs caused by a wide range of intellectual and developmental disabilities, genetic disorders, child w elfare issues, and brain trauma.    Legacy Treatment of… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 17, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: John George Source Type: news

N.J. approves Legacy Treatment Services' affiliation with Woods Services
New Jersey officials have approved a deal that will allow Legacy Treatment Services to formerly affiliate with Woods Services in Bucks County. The affiliation deal is part of Langhorne-based Woods Services’ strategy to expand its comprehensive and coordinated approach to care for people with complex medical and behavioral health care needs caused by a wide range of intellectual and developmental disabilities, genetic disorders, child w elfare issues, and brain trauma.    Legacy Treatment of… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - January 17, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

6 High-Protein Foods That Are Healthier Than Beef
Americans are obsessed with protein. It’s touted as the cornerstone of any healthy diet, since it helps people feel full and builds muscle. But most Americans eat too much protein every day, according to federal estimates—and they’re going especially overboard with animal proteins, namely red meat. It’s becoming clear how big a problem excessive red-meat consumption can be for health. Research has found associations between diets heavy in red and processed meats and many chronic diseases, including Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Red meat comes with high amounts of saturated fat, and proc...
Source: TIME: Health - January 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Does Cannabis Use Cause Schizophrenia?
As the drug becomes more popular, concerns have been raised that its use can lead to psychotic disorders. Here ’ s what scientists know for sure, and what they don ’ t. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: BENEDICT CAREY Tags: Marijuana Drug Abuse and Traffic Schizophrenia Mental Health and Disorders Genetics and Heredity Research Brain Smoking and Tobacco Source Type: news

UCLA scientists create a renewable source of cancer-fighting T cells
A study by UCLA researchers is the first to demonstrate a technique for coaxing pluripotent stem cells — which can give rise to every cell type in the body and which can be grown indefinitely in the lab — into becoming mature T cells capable of killing tumor cells.The technique uses structures called artificial thymic organoids, which work by mimicking the environment of the thymus, the organ in which T cells develop from blood stem cells.T cells are cells of the immune system that fight infections, but also have the potential to eliminate cancer cells. The ability to create them from self-renewing pluripotent ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 17, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

'Stealth condition' found to multiply risk of cancer and chronic conditions, study reveals
A "stealth condition" which is one of the western world's most common genetic disorders is causing far higher levels of cancer and chronic health conditions than previously thought, a UK study has revealed. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - January 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nature Or Nurture? Genetics Matters More For Understanding Disease
Nature or nurture? Now experts make clear that genes count more than environment, an extensive new study shows and challenges fundamental understanding that genetics and environment equally contribute to illness which has been taught in medical schools for decades. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - January 17, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Greg Licholai, Contributor Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Researchers Seek More Effectiveness from Immunotherapy
The objective-response rate was 9 percent, which included one patient with a complete response and disappearance of all tumor burden, and four patients with a partial response. Of the 48 patients whose data were assessed for change in tumor size, 24 experienced a reduction of some level. Most encouraging were the patients with a higher-level of PD-L1. They had a median overall survival of 20.2 months and a 12-month overall survival of 72.5 percent. PD-L1 presence alone, though, is not considered the only factor in how well the drug would work. Other factors such as genetic mutations of the tumor and mesothelioma cell type ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 17, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Data Pirates: Patients And Scientist Battle To Liberate Genetic Testing Results
A small band of patients and a scientist tried to free their existing genetic testing data for cancer research. It was harder than they expected. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - January 17, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ellie Kincaid, Forbes Staff Source Type: news

Breast Cancer Patients Do Not Overreact to Genetic Testing
THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 -- Among breast cancer patients, more extensive genetic testing is not associated with increased cancer worry, according to a study recently published in JCO Precision Oncology. Steven J. Katz, M.D., M.P.H., from the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 17, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Haemochromatosis 'bigger threat than we thought'
Genetic disorder Haemochromatosis can cause liver failure, diabetes and severe arthritis if untreated. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - January 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can a critic-turned-believer sway others? The case of genetically modified foods
(Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania) When an advocate for one side of an issue announces that he or she now believes the opposite, can that message affect others' views? Research from the Annenberg Public Policy Center shows that such a conversion message can influence public attitudes. Using video of environmentalist Mark Lynas speaking about his change from an opponent of genetically modified crops to an advocate, researchers found that message had a greater impact than his direct advocacy message. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

DNA analyses show a dynamic coevolutionary relationship between birds and their feather mites
(Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)) A genetic study uncovers that birds maintain a dynamic coevolutionary relationship with their feather mites. The study has involved the participation of the Estaci ó n Biol ó gica de Do ñ ana from the CSIC, and its results have just been published in the journal Molecular Ecology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Haemochromatosis: 'Most common' genetic disorder test call
Jenny Lees, whose son had haemochromatosis and died, wants to see routine testing for the disorder. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - January 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The first 'living medicine': Revolutionary GM microbes can 'mop up' toxins in the human body
The genetically modified bacteria created by  Synlogic, a firm co-founded by MIT, could be used to treat liver and bowel diseases by mopping up toxins inside the gut. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CRISPR-mediated activation of a promoter or enhancer rescues obesity caused by haploinsufficiency
A wide range of human diseases result from haploinsufficiency, where the function of one of the two gene copies is lost. Here, we targeted the remaining functional copy of a haploinsufficient gene using CRISPR-mediated activation (CRISPRa) in Sim1 and Mc4r heterozygous mouse models to rescue their obesity phenotype. Transgenic-based CRISPRa targeting of the Sim1 promoter or its distant hypothalamic enhancer up-regulated its expression from the endogenous functional allele in a tissue-specific manner, rescuing the obesity phenotype in Sim1 heterozygous mice. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of CRISPRa, we injected CRIS...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Matharu, N., Rattanasopha, S., Tamura, S., Maliskova, L., Wang, Y., Bernard, A., Hardin, A., Eckalbar, W. L., Vaisse, C., Ahituv, N. Tags: Genetics, Medicine, Diseases, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

CRISPRa corrects haploinsufficient obesity
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Purnell, B. A. Tags: Genetics, Medicine, Diseases twis Source Type: news

Commonest genetic mutation causes much morbidity
HFE p.C282Y homozygosity to blame for more haemochromatosis and other illness than was realised Related items fromOnMedica Type 2 diabetes in 10 times more young people than realised Scotland reveals plans to cut impact of type 2 diabetes Scotland reveals target of halving child obesity by 2030 Diabetes will soon cost NHS £16.9bn UK falls behind other nations in preventing avoidable death (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - January 17, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Restoring the genetic diversity of key food crops
The EU-funded project G2P-SOL is gathering, improving and disseminating genetic and phenotypic information on key food crops like potato and tomato. This information can be used in farming to improve the productivity of such crops and provide healthier food. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - January 17, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Father-of-two reveals how starting puberty as a toddler resulted in a childhood of shame and anger
Patrick Burleigh, 34, from Santa Monica, California, was diagnosed at age two with testotoxicosis, a rare, hereditary disease caused by a genetic mutation that puts the body through puberty at a young age. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hundreds of thousands could be suffering with 'stealth disease' caused by common genetic disorder
Ruth Jones, (pictured) a mother-of-two from Stamford, Lincolnshire, was diagnosed after suffering aches and pains. Haemochromatosis was previously thought to be a minor condition. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘Living medicine’ helps make toxic ammonia breakthrough
Using genetically modified bugs to prolong life was ‘fanciful’ until recently, says scientistA “living medicine” made from genetically modified bugs has prolonged the lives of animals with severe metabolic disease in a landmark test of the treatment.Researchers created the medicine by making a common strain of bacteria mop up excess ammonia in the body. High levels can be fatal for people with liver damage and rare genetic disorders.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Genetics Science Health Biology Source Type: news

Schizophrenia may be linked to a genetic mutation in childhood
Schizophrenia may come from a structural abnormality caused by a genetic mutation in the brain during childhood, a study says. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - January 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gene-Linked Iron Disorder More Common Than Thought: Study
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 -- The most common genetic disorder among northern Europeans -- called hemochromatosis -- occurs more often than previously thought, according to a new study. The researchers also found that people with the condition often... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 16, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

ACP Ethics Guidance Now Addresses Health Technology ACP Ethics Guidance Now Addresses Health Technology
New sections include use of EHRs, electronic communication, telemedicine, and genetic tests. Two ethics experts say the guidelines are valuable but gaps remain.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Internal Medicine News Source Type: news

The science is pouring in: You're probably eating Roundup herbicide in "excessive" levels
(Natural News) How much Roundup have you consumed this week? This question might sound like a joke, but the amount of the toxic weed killer that people consume unwittingly is certainly no laughing matter. Most people have no idea just how widely used this chemical is. Now that Monsanto has genetically engineered crops to stand... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Image of the Day: Sentinel Cells
Researchers hacked the genetic machinery of E. coli to make them glow and identify proteins linked to cancer. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - January 16, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Image of the Day Source Type: news

Sea slug study illuminates how mitochondria move
(Scripps Research Institute) Defects in the transport of cells' energy organelles are a suspected cause of diseases including Alzheimer's, ALS, Huntington's and Parkinson's. A new study reveals the genetics behind mitochondrial shifts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Approaches to Seasonal Influenza and Genetic Sequence Data Under the PIP (Pandemic Influenza Preparedness) Framework: Revised Analysis
Source: World Health Organization (WHO). Published: 12/14/2018. This 38-page document is the revised analysis by a group of eight independent experts who examined the Pandemic Influenza Preparedness (PIP) Framework with a view to proposing revisions reflecting developments, as appropriate to the World Health Assembly. It updates the September 2018 Draft Analysis. It notes that there are key issues that must urgently be addressed for the PIP Framework to remain relevant, including the issue of how genetic sequence data should be handled under the PIP Framework, and whether the Framework should expand to include seasonal in...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Schizophrenia linked to genetic structural abnormality in adolescent brain
(University of Warwick) Schizophrenia could be caused by a genetic mutation that causes a structural abnormality in the brain during adolescence. Therefore testing for the gene SLC39A8, and brain scans for schizophrenia could predict whether or not someone will develop it -- researchers at the University of Warwick have found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Combatting brain infections in special issue of Viral Immunology
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A special issue of Viral Immunology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, contains a rich collection of the latest research and reviews focusing on Viral Neuroimmunology and the intricacies of viral brain infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UCLA researcher uses big data to help optimize cancer treatment
UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center Treating cancer is incredibly complex and there is no one-size-fits-all solution. But, there is something that can help physicians create treatments customized for individuals: big data.There ’s an abundance of information being gathered in the health care sector including genome sequencing, tissue imaging, electronic health records and personal health trackers.As director of cancer data science for the  UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Paul Boutros and the other researchers in his laboratory are using big data to help optimize treatment for people, fur...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 16, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study Explores Influence of Genetics, Environment in Disease
Genetic component for 40 percent of phenotypes studied; 25 percent have environmental risk factors (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - January 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Cardiology, Dermatology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Infections, AIDS, Internal Medicine, Allergy, Nephrology, Neurology, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, ENT, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacy, Psychiatry, Pulmonology Source Type: news

Doctors say girl, four, with rare form of albinism will eventually need life-saving lung transplant
Zerina Nelson, four, of Mesa, Arizona, was diagnosed with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, a genetic condition characterized by albinism and vision considered legally blind (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Tool Calculates Breast Cancer Risk With Greater Precision
(CNN) — UK scientists have developed an online calculator that could enable doctors to more accurately predict a patient’s chance of developing breast cancer. If rolled out, the new tool could change the way in which the condition is treated. Among other things, details of family history, genetics, weight, alcohol consumption, age at menopause and use of hormone replacement therapy will all be considered by doctors when assessing a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer — the most common form of cancer in the UK. Each of these factors has “a small impact on the likelihood of developing the d...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Breast Cancer CNN Local TV Source Type: news

Opposed to G.M.O.s? How Much Do You Know About Them?
People who are the most extremely opposed to genetically modified organisms tend to know the least about them, a new study found. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Genetic Engineering Genetics and Heredity Cloning Genetically Modified Food (GMOs) Source Type: news

Olympus inks precision cancer imaging and treatment dev deal with USC
Olympus (TYO:7733) said late last week that it inked a co-development partnership with the University of Southern California looking to advance multiscale research into cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment through the use of precision medicine. The deal is a first for the university and the company, Olympus said, adding that it hopes that the personalized treatments that emerge from the partnership will advance cancer research and “potentially improve the precision of patient diagnosis and treatment.” “Olympus is honored to provide the optical tools used to capture the breadth of what’s h...
Source: Mass Device - January 15, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Imaging Oncology Research & Development Olympus Source Type: news

More Cancer Mutations, Better Immunotherapy Outcomes
Immune checkpoint inhibitors are generally most effective against tumors with more genetic mutations, according to a new study, although the relationship isn't true for all cancers. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - January 15, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news