NASA twins study reveals space flight can cause genetic changes
From his eyes to his immune system, astronaut Scott Kelly's body sometimes reacted strangely to nearly a year in orbit, at least compared to his Earth-bound identical twin, but newly published research shows nothing that would cancel even longer space treks, such as to Mars. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - April 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Technology & Science Source Type: news

We Finally Learned What a Year in Space Did to Astronaut Scott Kelly ’s Body
Traveling in space looks like all kinds of fun, and in a lot of respects, it is—provided you can overlook a few downsides. There’s the loss of muscle mass, for one thing. Then there’s the decalcification of bones and the stress on the heart and the damage to the eyes and the changes in the immune system and the disruption of the genome and an actual shortening of your overall life expectancy. It was, in part, to study all of those biological problems that astronaut Scott Kelly spent 340 days in space from 2015 to 2016 (chronicled in TIME’s Emmy-nominated series A Year in Space). Now, just over three...
Source: TIME: Health - April 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Year in Space Source Type: news

We Finally Learned What a Year in Space Did to Astronaut Scott Kelly ’s Body
Traveling in space looks like all kinds of fun, and in a lot of respects, it is—provided you can overlook a few downsides. There’s the loss of muscle mass, for one thing. Then there’s the decalcification of bones and the stress on the heart and the damage to the eyes and the changes in the immune system and the disruption of the genome and an actual shortening of your overall life expectancy. It was, in part, to study all of those biological problems that astronaut Scott Kelly spent 340 days in space from 2015 to 2016 (chronicled in TIME’s Emmy-nominated series A Year in Space). Now, just over three...
Source: TIME: Science - April 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Year in Space Source Type: news

CAR T-Cell Therapy for Mesothelioma Proving Effective in Clinical Trial
Dr. Prasad Adusumilli at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center believes novel CAR T-cell therapy will be part of future, standard-of-care treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma. The therapy involves the laboratory reprograming of a patient’s T cells — a type of white blood cell — to attack the cancer by targeting mesothelin, a surface protein. CAR T-cell therapy is a form of immunotherapy that could extend mesothelioma survival significantly. “That’s my goal. That’s what we’ve been working toward for many years,” Adusumilli told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com....
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - April 11, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Baby with DNA from three people born in Greece
Experimental IVF, which involves extra egg from female donor, criticised by UK expertsA baby with DNA from three people has been born in Greece following a controversial fertility treatment.The baby boy, weighing 2.9kg (6lb), was born on Tuesday and both he and his mother, who is 32, are said to be in good health.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Genetics Greece Science Fertility problems Biology World news Source Type: news

Rare gut condition a model for study of genetic diseases
(NYU Langone Health / NYU School of Medicine) A study published online in the April 11, 2019 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine found that Hirschsprung disease is more predictable from an individual's genetic makeup than previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Shutting down deadly pediatric brain cancer at its earliest moments
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) Cell-by-cell genetic analyses of developing brain tissues in neonatal mice and laboratory models of brain cancer allowed scientists to discover a molecular driver of the highly aggressive, deadly, and treatment-resistant brain cancer, glioblastoma. Published in Cell Stem Cell, the findings present an opportunity to find out if new therapeutic approaches can stop glioblastoma at its earliest stages of initial formation or recurrence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 11, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Strategic Planning Workshop: Genomics in Medicine & Health
NHGRI is planning a workshop focused on Genomics in Medicine and Health for September 2019. Submityour feedback on how to advance genomics in medicine and health byMay 10, 2019. We will be selecting 12 of the most innovative and compelling ideas and offering travel to the workshop to participate in-person and share more about your idea. We want comments from all perspectives involved in genomic medicine and health including clinicians, patients and researchers. (Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights)
Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights - April 11, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: news

The NASA Twins Study: A multidimensional analysis of a year-long human spaceflight
To understand the health impact of long-duration spaceflight, one identical twin astronaut was monitored before, during, and after a 1-year mission onboard the International Space Station; his twin served as a genetically matched ground control. Longitudinal assessments identified spaceflight-specific changes, including decreased body mass, telomere elongation, genome instability, carotid artery distension and increased intima-media thickness, altered ocular structure, transcriptional and metabolic changes, DNA methylation changes in immune and oxidative stress–related pathways, gastrointestinal microbiota alteration...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Garrett-Bakelman, F. E., Darshi, M., Green, S. J., Gur, R. C., Lin, L., Macias, B. R., McKenna, M. J., Meydan, C., Mishra, T., Nasrini, J., Piening, B. D., Rizzardi, L. F., Sharma, K., Siamwala, J. H., Taylor, L., Vitaterna, M. H., Afkarian, M., Afshinnek Tags: Molecular Biology, Online Only, Physiology r-articles Source Type: news

New CRISPR tool shreds long DNA strands
In an advance of capability for the CRISPR DNA editing tool, researchers report they have designed a new tool -- Cas3 -- that can shred, or delete, longs strands of genetic code with accuracy. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - April 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Monkeys Genetically Edited to Mimic Human Brain Development
Rhesus monkeys engineered to express a human gene reportedly show delayed brain development and better short-term memory. Fellow scientists are raising ethical red flags. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 10, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Can genetic variants predict depression risk in young people?
A new way of determining the genetic risk of depression may help predict which children and adolescents are most likely to face mental health problems. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Depression Source Type: news

Scientists identify a key gene in the transmission of deadly African sleeping sickness
Life scientists from UCLA and the University of Bern have identified a key gene in the transmission of African sleeping sickness — a severe disease transmitted by the bite of infected tsetse flies, which are common in sub-Saharan Africa.The disease is fatal if untreated, as the parasite responsible moves from the bloodstream to the central nervous system. Tens of millions of people in 36 African countries are at risk. There is no vaccine, and conventional drug treatments, which include an arsenic derivative, are antiquated, not very effective and have severe side effects.The research,  published in the journal N...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 10, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

A new role for genetics in cancer therapy-induced cardiomyopathy
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) A team of investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School finds that genetics may be at play and elucidates rare genetic variants which may influence risk for developing cancer therapy-induced cardiomyopathy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CSI meets conservation
(Stanford University) The challenges of collecting DNA samples directly from endangered species makes understanding and protecting them harder. A new approach promises cheap, rapid analysis of genetic clues in degraded and left-behind material, such as hair and commercial food products. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 10, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Adenosine kinase deficiency makes liver more susceptible to carcinogen
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study has shown that reduced adenosine kinase expression in the liver can make it more susceptible to carcinogenic damage and the development of liver cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 10, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Is maternal vaccination safe during breastfeeding?
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) In light of the continuing anti-vaccination movement, a provocative new article provides a comprehensive overview of the potential risks of vaccinating breastfeeding women. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 10, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Research reveals how the most common ALS mutation dooms cells
(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have cracked the mystery surrounding the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease. The research suggests possible new approaches to diagnosis and treatment of the lethal disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Novel strategy hits 'reset button' for disease-causing genetic duplications
(University of Massachusetts Medical School) Scientists at UMass Medical School have developed a strategy for editing and repairing a particular type of genetic mutation associated with microduplications using CRISPR/Cas9 and a seldom-used DNA repair pathway. Described in Nature, this approach to programmable gene editing overcomes prior inefficiencies in gene correction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ASHG launches Human Genetics Scholars Initiative
(American Society of Human Genetics) ASHG is pleased to announce the creation of the Human Genetics Scholars Initiative to increase and support workforce diversity in the human genetics and genomics research community. Over the course of the planned five-year program, the Human Genetics Scholars Initiative will provide a two-year, intensive mentoring and skill-building experience for up to 40 promising US trainees and early career scientists from underrepresented backgrounds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Loss of a DNA repair system creates a unique vulnerability in many cancer types
(Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard) Cancer cells adapt to potentially fatal mutations and other molecular malfunctions by adjusting one or more other genes' activity, in the process becoming dependent on those genes for their survival and growth. The resulting genetic dependencies may provide targets for developing new precision-guided drugs or other cancer treatment strategies.Reporting in Nature, researchers describe one such vulnerability shared by a large subset of colon, gastric, endometrial, and ovarian cancer cell lines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 10, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Human Genetics Scholars Initiative will increase diversity in the genomics workforce
NHGRI has partnered with the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) to create the Human Genetics Scholars Initiative, a multi-year program that will increase and support workforce diversity in the human genetics and genomics research community. The initiative will support up to 40 U.S. trainees and early career scientists from underrepresented backgrounds with mentoring programs, skill building, travel and professional support during a two-year, intensive program. (Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights)
Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights - April 10, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: news

Genetic Testing Underused in Breast, Ovarian Cancer
TUESDAY, April 9, 2019 -- Only one-quarter of those with breast cancer and one-third with ovarian cancer undergo genetic testing, according to a study published online April 9 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Allison W. Kurian, M.D., from... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 9, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Health Tip: Understanding Cystic Fibrosis
-- Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic condition that causes a bodily protein to malfunction. The faulty protein affects cells, tissues and glands. People with CF make thick mucus that can block, damage and infect organs. Symptoms vary, depending on... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 9, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

UConn and Foundation for Prader Willi Research create stem cell biobank
(University of Connecticut) A new collaboration between UConn Health and the Foundation for Prader-Willi Research will create a centralized, high quality biobank of stem cells to help researchers better understand Prader-Willi syndrome, a rare genetic disease that may hold insights into obesity, developmental delays, autism spectrum disorders, and many other conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genetic breakthrough on tropical grass could help develop climate-friendly cattle farms
(International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT)) Researchers at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) have shown that Brachiaria grass species can reduce greenhouse gas emissions from cattle and increase productivity -- and breeding improved varieties can potentially augment the environmental and economic benefits. A breakthrough on Brachiaria's complex genome may make breeding much more efficient, and potentially increase the speed with which new grasses begin benefiting cattle farmers and the environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Next-generation gene drive arrives
(University of California - San Diego) Scientists developed a new version of a gene drive that allows the spread of specific, favorable genetic variants, also known as 'alleles,' throughout a population. The new 'allelic drive' is equipped with a guide RNA that directs CRISPR to cut undesired variants of a gene and replace it with a preferred version. Using a word processing analogy, CRISPR-based gene drives allow scientists to edit sentences of genetic information, while the new allelic drive offers letter-by-letter editing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 9, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ovarian cancer patients undertested for mutations that could guide clinical care
(Stanford Medicine) Fewer than a quarter of breast cancer patients and a third of ovarian cancer patients diagnosed between 2013 and 2014 in two states underwent genetic testing for cancer-associated mutations, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and several other organizations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 9, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Genetic code of WWI soldier's cholera mapped
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) The oldest publicly available strain of the cholera-causing bacterial species, Vibrio cholerae, has had its genetic code read for the first time. The bacterium was isolated from a British soldier during World War One (WWI) and stored for over 100 years before being revived and sequenced. The results show that this strain is a unique, non-toxigenic strain of V. cholerae that's distantly related to the strains of bacteria causing cholera pandemics today and in the past. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 9, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Teen and her dog star in production of "The Wizard of Oz"
Erin Bischoff has a genetic disorder known as brittle bond disease. She has had 10 surgeries and now uses a wheelchair. But that hasn't stopped her from making it to the lead role in her high school play. Elaine Quijano has her story. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - April 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sydney Brenner passes away
Sydney Brenner, the Nobel prize-winning molecular biologist who pioneered the use of C. elegans as a model organism has passed away. https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01128-3 (Source: WormBase)
Source: WormBase - April 8, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Ranjana Kishore Tags: brief communication community news Source Type: news

Family-based analyses reveal novel genetic overlap between interleukin-8 and risk for suicide attempt - M Knowles EE, Curran JE, G öring HHH, Mathias SR, Mollon J, Rodrigue A, Olvera RL, Leandro A, Duggirala R, Almasy L, Blangero J, Glahn DC.
Suicide is major public health concern. It is imperative to find robust biomarkers so that at-risk individuals can be identified in a timely and reliable manner. Previous work suggests mechanistic links between increased inflammation and risk for suicide, ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

New tool helps find genetic culprits in cancer ’s spread
Using CRISPR gene editing technology, Yale researchers have devised a way to identify the complex processes that result in deadly metastasis. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 8, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Gene Therapy Trial for Mesothelioma Opens Internationally
A long-awaited phase III clinical trial of a novel gene therapy could change malignant pleural mesothelioma treatment in the future. The trial, which will include almost 50 locations around the world, opens this month for mesothelioma patients whose standard treatment has stopped working. The gene therapy drug, called TR002, is also a form of immunotherapy. It will be used in combination with gemcitabine chemotherapy in a second-line setting. “We can’t predict what the outcome will be, but we’re very excited about the potential of this treatment, and the fact there may be another drug in the armamentarium...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - April 8, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

No U.S. Labs Follow All Guidelines for'Cell-Free' Prenatal Testing No U.S. Labs Follow All Guidelines for'Cell-Free' Prenatal Testing
Not even one of the commercial labs offering"cell-free" noninvasive prenatal screening for chromosomal disorders is fully following the recommendations published by the American College of Medical Genetics, according to a new report.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - April 8, 2019 Category: Pathology Tags: Pathology & Lab Medicine News Source Type: news

Genetic Research Results May Warrant Updates to Participants
MONDAY, April 8, 2019 -- In certain cases, research participants should be recontacted to be provided with updates on reinterpretation of variants, according to a position statement published in the April 4 issue of the American Journal of Human... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 8, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Sanofi and Alnylam conclude research and option phase of 2014 rare disease alliance
Sanofi and Alnylam have agreed to conclude the research and option phase of the companies' 2014 RNAi therapeutics alliance in rare genetic diseases. The material collaboration terms for patisiran, vutrisiran (ALN-TTRsc02) and fitusiran, as previously announced, will continue unchanged. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - April 8, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Sanofi Business and Industry Source Type: news

Psychiatry: Multigene test predicts depression risk
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) An international team led by Munich-based researchers has found a genetic score that reliably predicts the risk, severity and age of onset of depression in young people. The study also confirms a history of childhood abuse as a risk factor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Exploiting metabolic differences to optimize SSRI dosing in adolescents
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) In a simulated study, exposure to and maximum blood concentrations of two selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) -- commonly used to treat anxiety and depression in adolescents -- differed depending on whether the teens modeled were poor, normal, rapid, or ultra-rapid metabolizers of the SSRIs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Resistosome illuminates plant disease resistance mechanisms
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) In a recent study, a team led by scientists at Tsinghua University (TU) and the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology (IGDB) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) solved the first structures of a full-length plant NLR protein and uncovered previously unknown mechanisms of this important class of immune receptors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

ACP issues guidance statement for breast cancer screening
(American College of Physicians) In a new evidence-based guidance statement published in Annals of Internal Medicine, the American College of Physicians (ACP) says that average-risk women between the ages of 50 and 74 should undergo breast cancer screening with mammography every other year. ACP's guidance statement does not apply to patients with prior abnormal screening results or to higher risk populations, such as women with a personal history of breast cancer or a genetic mutation known to increase risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 8, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

What Are Treatment Options for Pediatric Onycomycosis?
Discussion Onycomycosis is a fungal infection of the nails. It has a world-wide prevalence of 0.3% with some geographical variations such as in the U.S. it is 0.44%. It is an uncommon problem especially in children. It is very uncommon in those under 6 years and only very sporadic case reports in those under 2 years. The lower incidence is felt to be due to children’s faster nail growth, smaller surface to infect, reduced exposure to fungi, lower prevalence of tinea pedis and especially less cumulative trauma. Onycomycosis is more common in families (unsure if this is due to genetic factors or family members having m...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - April 8, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Adoption and Sperm and Egg Donations Are No Longer Anonymous
Widespread direct-to-consumer genetic testing and family databases mean that anonymous adoption, and sperm and egg donations no longer exist. Parents should share accurate biological information with their children before they someday learn this information from an online DNA matching site. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - April 7, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ellen Matloff, Contributor Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Looking for beauty in your DNA
Newly published research explores the genetic variations that are associated with facial attractiveness and finds that they vary by sex. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics Source Type: news

Patients resistant to breast cancer therapy show epigenetic differences
(Experimental Biology) According to a new study, breast cancer patients who don't respond to targeted therapy have different patterns of epigenetic modifications than patients who do respond. Epigenetic modifications change gene expression without altering the DNA's genetic code. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 6, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

FDA Warns Lab Against Marketing Tests Linking Genes, Drug Reaction FDA Warns Lab Against Marketing Tests Linking Genes, Drug Reaction
Inova Genomics is cited for illegally marketing MediMap genetic tests that claim to predict a patient's response to antidepressants and other medications.News Alerts (Source: Medscape Psychiatry Headlines)
Source: Medscape Psychiatry Headlines - April 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care News Alert Source Type: news

Even 1 Alcoholic Drink A Day Can Raise Stroke Risk, Study Says
This study uses a novel genetic approach to try to determine the effect of alcohol consumption on risk of cardiovascular disease,” said Tim Chico, professor of cardiovascular medicine at the University of Sheffield. “Although it has previously been suggested moderate alcohol intake may reduce risk of stroke or heart disease, this new study adds to recent evidence that finds no protective effect even at low levels of intake,” he added. “Sadly the hope that alcohol somehow protects against cardiovascular disease is probably unfounded.” David Spiegelhalter, a professor for the public understandin...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Alcohol CNN Source Type: news

Inova ’s genomics lab ‘illegally marketing’ genetic tests, FDA says
The agency said claims on the Inova Iab's webpage violate the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 5, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

Inova ’s genomics lab ‘illegally marketing’ genetic tests, FDA says
The agency said claims on the Inova Iab's webpage violate the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 5, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

Even one alcoholic drink a day can raise risk of stroke, study says
Drinking one or two glass a day may increase the chances of having a stroke, according to a new genetic study published Thursday. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - April 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news