New insights into endometriosis, predicting RNA folding, and the surprising career of the spirometer
News Intern Rachel Fritts talks with host Sarah Crespi about a new way to think about endometriosis —a painful condition found in one in 10 women in which tissue that normally lines the uterus grows on the outside of the uterus and can bind to other organs. Next, Raphael Townshend, founder and CEO of Atomic AI, talks about predicting RNA folding using deep learning—a machine learning approach that relies on very few examples and limited data. Finally, in this month's edition of our limited series on race and science, guest host and journalist Angela Saini is joined by author Lundy Braun, professor of patholog...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - August 24, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 796: The vary hungry spike with Paul and Theodora
Paul and Theodora return to TWiV to explain their research on determining the number of neutralizing epitopes on the SARS-CoV-2 spike that are recognized by antibodies, and engineering of a polymutant spike with twenty amino acid changes that demonstrates the high genetic barrier to escape from convalescent serum. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Rich Condit, and Brianne Barker Guests: Paul Bieniasz and Theodora Hatiziiouannou Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode High genetic barrier for SARS-CoV-2 antibod...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - August 22, 2021 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

Debating metabolically healthy obesity, delaying type 1 diabetes, and visiting bone rooms
First this week, Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the paradox of healthy obesity. They chat about the latest research into the relationships between markers of metabolic health —such as glucose or cholesterol levels in the blood—and obesity. They aren’t as tied as you might think. Next, Colin Dayan, professor of clinical diabetes and metabolism at Cardiff University and senior clinical researcher at the Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics at the University of Oxford, joins Sarah to discuss his contribution to a special issue on type 1 diabetes. In his review, Colin an...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - July 29, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Debating healthy obesity, delaying type 1 diabetes, and visiting bone rooms
First this week, Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the paradox of metabolically healthy obesity. They chat about the latest research into the relationships between markers of metabolic health —such as glucose or cholesterol levels in the blood—and obesity. They aren’t as tied as you might think. Next, Colin Dayan, professor of clinical diabetes and metabolism at Cardiff University and senior clinical researcher at the Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics at the University of Oxford, joins Sarah to discuss his contribution to a special issue on type 1 diabetes. In his r...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - July 26, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 784: Virtually live from ASV
Moriah and Joseph join the nearly complete TWiV team to discuss their work on genetic variation and adaptability in herpes simplex virus, and how rotavirus infection disrupts intracellular calcium homeostasis. Live streamed during the 2021 annual meeting of the American Society for Virology. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Rich Condit, Alan Dove, and Brianne Barker Guests: Joseph Hyzer and Moriah Szpara Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Diversity of HSV2 in neonates (mSphere) Genome of HSV1 from multip...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - July 25, 2021 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

Cicada citizen science, and expanding the genetic code
First this week, freelance journalist  Ian Graber-Stiehl discusses what might be the oldest community science project—observing the emergence of periodical cicadas. He also notes the shifts in how amateur scientists have gone from contributing observations to helping scientists make predictions about the insects’ schedules. Next, Jason Chin, program leader at the Medical Research Council’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology, discusses how reducing redundancy in the genetic code opens up space for encoding unusual amino acids. His group shows that eliminating certain codes from the genome makes bac...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - May 28, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 756: Precluding problematic polio prophylaxis
TWiV returns to the 2012 brouhaha over transmission experiments with avian H5N1 influenza virus, re-examines the claim of SARS-CoV-2 RNA integration into human DNA, and reviews the engineering and testing of a genetically stable version of the attenuated type 2 Sabin poliovirus vaccine. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Amy Rosenfeld Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode ASV vaccine town halls 3:16 First smallpox vaccine day Revised masking and distancing (CDC) Science vs Spin (Sa...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - May 16, 2021 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

JAMA Cardiology : Association of Rare Genetic Variants and Early-Onset Atrial Fibrillation in Ethnic Minority Individuals
Interview with Dawood Darbar, MD, author of Association of Rare Genetic Variants and Early-Onset Atrial Fibrillation in Ethnic Minority Individuals, and Sadiya Sana Khan, MD, and Elizabeth M. McNally, MD, authors of Genetic Studies of Atrial Fibrillation in Diverse Cohorts and Identification of Diverse Phenotypes Associated With Single Genes (Source: JAMA Specialty Journals Author Interviews)
Source: JAMA Specialty Journals Author Interviews - May 5, 2021 Category: General Medicine Authors: The JAMA Network Source Type: podcasts

Coronavirus Variants With John P. Moore
Genetic variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus are emerging but so far do not seem to have caused breakthrough infections in people with previous infection or in those who have been vaccinated. John P. Moore, PhD, of Weill Medical College of Cornell University in New York, joins JAMA's Q&A series for an update on the latest variants and what you need to know. Recorded March 4, 2021. Related Article: Approaches for Optimal Use of Different COVID-19 Vaccines (Source: JAMA Author Interviews)
Source: JAMA Author Interviews - March 8, 2021 Category: General Medicine Authors: JAMA Network Source Type: podcasts

Coronavirus Vaccine Update From the CDC With Nancy E. Messonnier, MD
Nancy E. Messonnier, MD is director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and leads the CDC’s efforts on COVID-19 vaccination. She joins JAMA's Q&A series to discuss the agency's response to emerging coronavirus variants, the FDA advisory hearings on the new Johnson & Johnson vaccine, and other agency activities and priorities related to COVID-19 control. Recorded February 26, 2021. Related Content: Genetic Variants of SARS-CoV-2—What Do They Mean? Coronavirus Vaccine Update From the CDC With Nancy E. Messonnier, ...
Source: JAMA Author Interviews - March 2, 2021 Category: General Medicine Authors: JAMA Network Source Type: podcasts

Coronavirus Variants - What They Mean
2021 has brought news of emerging SARS-CoV-2 genetic variants that increase transmissibility. Will they diminish vaccine efficacy and lead us to lose pandemic control? University of Michigan's Adam Lauring, MD, PhD, a molecular virologist who uses evolutionary theory to study viral transmission and pathogenesis, joins JAMA's Q&A series to explain the variants and what they mean for public health. Recorded February 4, 2021. Related Article(s): Genetic Variants of SARS-CoV-2—What Do They Mean? (Source: JAMA Author Interviews)
Source: JAMA Author Interviews - February 8, 2021 Category: General Medicine Authors: JAMA Network Source Type: podcasts

Coronavirus Update With Anthony Fauci – February 3, 2021
NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, MD, returns to JAMA's Q&A series to discuss Shifts in the US pandemic response under the Biden administration Emerging genetic variants and implications for vaccine efficacy Prospects for new vaccine approvals and more. Related Article: Preventing the Spread of SARS-CoV-2 With Masks and Other “Low-tech” Interventions (Source: JAMA Author Interviews)
Source: JAMA Author Interviews - February 5, 2021 Category: General Medicine Authors: JAMA Network Source Type: podcasts

Hiring discrimination laid bare by mountain of data
Analysis of hundreds of thousands of job searches shows that recruiters will discriminate based on ethnicity and gender, and the neural circuitry behind a brief period of forgetting.In this episode:00:47 Hiring discriminationA huge dataset has shown that widespread discrimination occurs in job hiring, based on ethnicity and gender. This backs up decades of research, showing that people from minority backgrounds tend to get contacted far less by employers.Research Article: Hangartner et al.09:31 CoronapodToday Joe Biden becomes the next president of the United States. We find out what this new political chapter could mean f...
Source: Nature Podcast - January 20, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 702: Year of the Pandemic
For this first episode of 2021, the complete TWiV team reviews compelling virology stories of 2020, and thanks the multitude of guests who have helped us to navigate the pandemic, and our many listeners who turn to us for scientific facts. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, Kathy Spindler, and Brianne Barker Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Poems are at Twiverse This little virus went to market (TWiV 581) Host genetics initiative TWiV 628  Inborn errors of immunity & seri...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - January 3, 2021 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 678: Fishing for viruses with Nels Elde
Nels joins TWiV to reveal the discovery of a picornavirus of zebrafish by measuring immune responses in the host, genome sequence analysis of the White House COVID-19 outbreak, and a six-fold higher SARS-CoV-2 exposure rate than reported cases in German children. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler Guest: Nels Elde Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Zebrafish virus discovery by visualization (Curr Biol) Viral genome sequencing of White House COVID-19 outbreak (medRxiv) Genetic signature of virus...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - November 5, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 676: Tragic gene flow from Neanderthals
In this episode we explain how regions of the human genome associated with severe COVID-19 are identified, the finding that one of these regions was inherited from Neanderthals, and prolonged SARS-CoV-2 reproduction in an immunocompromised patient. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Rich Condit, Kathy Spindler and Brianne Barker Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, emailBecome a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Genome wide association study of severe COVID-19 (NEJM) Major genetic risk factor for severe COVID-19 inherited from Neanderthals (Nature) COVID-19 host genetics init...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - October 29, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 674: In the company of coronaviruses with Lisa Gralinski
Lisa joins TWiV to discuss her research on the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and SARS-CoV-2, including work on vaccines and an antiviral, then we review the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein as a potential analgesic, and listener questions. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Rich Condit, Kathy Spindler and Brianne Barker Guest: Lisa Gralinski Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode SARS-like bat CoV with potential for human emergence (Nat Med) SARS-CoV susceptibility loci in CC mice (PLoS Genetics) Combination attenuation for SARS-Co...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - October 22, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

Coughing kids with Tim Spector and Ed Snelson
Persistent coughing in children is always a challenge, both for parents trying to describe and measure the cough, and for doctors making a diagnosis. In the current climate, this is all the more difficult, seeing as a continual cough is one of the major symptoms of COVID-19. UK Government guidance advises that anyone with a persistent cough should get a coronavirus test. But with the reopening of schools and the beginning of the cold& flu season both coinciding with a national shortage of tests available, should we all err on the side of caution and try to get a test at the first sign of a cough or sniffle, or can the ...
Source: The BMJ Podcast - October 8, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Coughing kids with Tim Spector and Edward Snelson
Persistent coughing in children is always a challenge, both for parents trying to describe and measure the cough, and for doctors making a diagnosis. In the current climate, this is all the more difficult, seeing as a continual cough is one of the major symptoms of COVID-19. UK Government guidance advises that anyone with a persistent cough should get a coronavirus test. But with the reopening of schools and the beginning of the cold& flu season both coinciding with a national shortage of tests available, should we all err on the side of caution and try to get a test at the first sign of a cough or sniffle, or can the ...
Source: The BMJ Podcast - October 8, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Alien hunters get a funding boost, and checking on the link between chromosome ‘caps’ and aging
First up this week, Senior Correspondent Daniel Clery talks with host Sarah Crespi about how Breakthrough Listen —a privately funded initiative that aims to spend $100 million over 10 years to find extraterrestrial intelligent life—has changed the hunt for alien intelligence.  And as part of a special issue on the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project, Brandon Pierce, a professor in the Departments of Public Health Sciences and Human Genetics at the University of Chicago, joins Sarah to discuss his group’s work on variation in the protective caps at the end of our chromosomes. The gradual s...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - September 9, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

A new way to cool computer chips - from within
Keeping electronics from overheating, and how to include minority populations in genetic analyses.In this episode:00:46 Cool computersKeeping components cool is a major hurdle when it comes to increasing electronic power. This week, we find out about a new way to integrate tiny microfluidic channels directly into circuits, to help keep them cool. Research Article: van Erp et al.06:57 CoronapodBy comparing coronavirus genomes taken from people around the world, researchers are getting an idea of how SARS-CoV-2 is changing as it spreads. We discuss a particular genetic mutation that rapidly became dominant early in the pande...
Source: Nature Podcast - September 9, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

A new way to cool computer chips — from within
Keeping electronics from overheating, and how to include minority populations in genetic analyses.In this episode:00:46 Cool computersKeeping components cool is a major hurdle when it comes to increasing electronic power. This week, we find out about a new way to integrate tiny microfluidic channels directly into circuits, to help keep them cool. Research Article: van Erp et al.06:57 CoronapodBy comparing coronavirus genomes taken from people around the world, researchers are getting an idea of how SARS-CoV-2 is changing as it spreads. We discuss a particular genetic mutation that rapidly became dominant early in the pande...
Source: Nature Podcast - September 9, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Effect of Vitamin C in Sepsis, Effect of Collaborative Care on CVD Risk Factors, Genetic Variants Accounting for Severe COVID-19, and more
Editor's Summary by Howard Bauchner, MD, Editor in Chief of JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association, for the August 18, 2020 issue (Source: JAMA: This Week's Audio Commentary)
Source: JAMA: This Week's Audio Commentary - August 18, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: JAMA Network Source Type: podcasts

Why skin grows bigger as you stretch it
Skin's unusual response to stretching is finally explained, and the latest in a huge effort to map DNA.In this episode:01:06 Stretching skinFor decades it’s been known that stretching skin causes more skin to grow, but the reasons why have been a mystery. Now, researchers have uncovered a mechanism to explain the phenomenon. Research Article: Aragona et al.; News and Views: Stretch exercises for stem cells expand the skin07:49 CoronapodWe discuss how the coronavirus pandemic has affected scientific meetings and how the learned societies that organise them are adapting. How scientific conferences will survive the...
Source: Nature Podcast - July 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 639: Virology Nobel Prizes with Erling Norrby part 2
Vincent and Erling resume their discussion of virology Nobel Prizes, focusing on awards for research on tumor viruses, bacteriophages, virus structure, reverse transcriptase, hepatitis B virus, HIV-1, human papillomaviruses and much more. Host: Vincent Racaniello Guest: Erling Norrby Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Nobel Prizes and Life Sciences by Erling Norrby Nobel Prizes and Nature’s Surprises by Erling Norrby Nobel Prizes and Notable Discoveries by Erling Norrby Nobel Prizes: Cancer, Visio...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - July 14, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 628: Physical distance for COVID-19
Vincent and Rich discuss the SARS-CoV-2 D614G amino acid change in the spike glyprotein, duration of infectious virus shedding from patients, virus transmission among hamsters infected in the laboratory, and tackle listener email. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello and Rich Condit Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Austin TX key indicators for staging D614 amino acid change (Scripps) Virus shedding in hospitalized patients (medRxiv) Hamster SARS-CoV-2 model (Nature) COVID-19 host genetic initiative Image credit Letters read on...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - June 18, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

Lab-made skin grows its own hair
This week, a new method to grow hairy skin in a dish, and new research takes aim at the RNA world hypothesis.In this episode:00:45 Hairy SkinResearchers may have developed a way to make skin that can grow hair in the lab, paving the way for treatment of a variety of skin disorders, and perhaps even baldness. Research Article: Lee et al.; News and Views: Regenerative medicine could pave the way to treating baldness08:56 Research HighlightsHow mercury moved during the ‘Great Dying’, and the link between mobile phones and gender equality. Research Highlight: Giant eruptions belched to...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 3, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

The Need to Improve the Clinical Utility of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Tests: Either Too Narrow or Too Broad
Interview with Madison Kilbride, PhD, author of The Need to Improve the Clinical Utility of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Tests: Either Too Narrow or Too Broad (Source: JAMA Author Interviews)
Source: JAMA Author Interviews - April 21, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: JAMA Network Source Type: podcasts

Does coronavirus spread through the air, and the biology of anorexia
On this week ’s show, Staff Writer Robert Service talks with host Sarah Crespi about a new National Academy of Sciences report that suggests the novel coronavirus can go airborne, the evidence for this idea, and what this means for the mask-wearing debate. See all of our News coverage of the pandemic here. See all of our Research and Editorials here. Also this week, Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel joins Sarah to talk about a burgeoning understanding of the biological roots of anorexia nervosa—an eating disorder that affects about 1% of people in the United States. From genetic links to brain scan s, scien...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - April 6, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

"Cognitive Gadgets" with Cecilia Heyes (BS 168
Cecelia Heyes (click to play, right click to download audio) BS 168 is an interview with psychologist Cecilia Heyes from Oxford University in the UK. We talk about her fascinating book "Cognitive Gadgets: The Cultural Evolution of Thinking." Our focus is on exploring the evidence that several cognitive skills that appear to be unique to humans are learned from other people rather than being inherited genetically as is often assumed. Her proposal that language is a cognitive gadget NOT a cognitive instinct is controversial and has very important implications.Cognitive Gadget...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - February 28, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books Brain Evolution Cognitive Science Interviews Language learning Podcast Show Notes Psychology Source Type: podcasts

A cryo –electron microscope accessible to the masses, and tracing the genetics of schizophrenia
Structural biologists rejoiced when cryo –electron microscopy, a technique to generate highly detailed models of biomolecules, emerged. But years after its release, researchers still face long queues to access these machines. Science’s European News Editor Eric Hand walks host Meagan Cantwell through the journey of a group of researche rs to create a cheaper, more accessible alternative. Also this week, host Joel Goldberg speaks with psychiatrist and researcher Goodman Sibeko, who worked with the Xhosa people of South Africa to help illuminate genetic details of schizophrenia. Though scientists have exami...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - January 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Podcast Extra: Epigenetics
As part of Nature's 150th anniversary celebrations, Nick Howe dives into the topic of epigenetics.Since its origin in 1942, the term 'epigenetics' has been repeatedly defined and redefined. There's always been hype around the field, but what actually is epigenetics and how much does it influence our genes?In this Podcast Extra, Nick Howe speaks to Edith Heard, Director General of the EMBL, and Giacomo Cavalli, from the Institute of Human Genetics, to guide us through these questions and find out about the history and future of epigenetics. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - December 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Hunting for new epilepsy drugs, and capturing lightning from space
About one-third of people with epilepsy are treatment resistant. Up until now, epilepsy treatments have focused on taming seizures rather than the source of the disease and for good reason —so many roads lead to epilepsy: traumatic brain injury, extreme fever and infection, and genetic disorders, to name a few. Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel talks with host Sarah Crespi about researchers that are turning back the pages on epilepsy, trying to get to the beginning of the story w here new treatments might work. And Sarah also talks with Torsten Neurbert at the Technical University of Denmark’s National Spac...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - December 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Hunting for new epilepsy drugs, and capturing lightning from space
About one-third of people with epilepsy are treatment resistant. Up until now, epilepsy treatments have focused on taming seizures rather than the source of the disease and for good reason —so many roads lead to epilepsy: traumatic brain injury, extreme fever and infection, and genetic disorders, to name a few. Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel talks with host Sarah Crespi about researchers that are turning back the pages on epilepsy, trying to get to the beginning of the story w here new treatments might work. And Sarah also talks with Torsten Neurbert at the Technical University of Denmark’s National Spac...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - December 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Hunting for new epilepsy drugs, and capturing lightning from space
About one-third of people with epilepsy are treatment resistant. Up until now, epilepsy treatments have focused on taming seizures rather than the source of the disease and for good reason —so many roads lead to epilepsy: traumatic brain injury, extreme fever and infection, and genetic disorders, to name a few. Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel talks with host Sarah Crespi about researchers that are turning back the pages on epilepsy, trying to get to the beginning of the story w here new treatments might work. And Sarah also talks with Torsten Neurbert at the Technical University of Denmark’s National Space...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - December 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

05 December 2019: Genomic sequencing and the source of solar winds
We recently launched our 2019 listener survey. We want to hear your views on the show to help us make it even better. You can find the survey here. Thanks!In this episode: 00:45 The GenomeAsia 100k projectResearchers have released the first data from an ambitious project to sequence the genomes of 100,000 people from populations across Asia. Research Article: GenomeAsia100K Consortium 08:56 Research HighlightsBare riverbanks make meanders move, and human activity affects picky penguins. Research Highlight: The meandering rivers that speed across barren landscapes; Research Highlight: Climate change splits two pen...
Source: Nature Podcast - December 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

24 October 2019: Quantum supremacy and ancient mammals
This week, a milestone in quantum computing, and rethinking early mammals.In this episode:00:43 A quantum computing milestoneA quantum computer is reported to have achieved ‘quantum supremacy’ – performing an operation that’s essentially impossible for classical computers. Research Article: Arute et al.; News and Views: Quantum computing takes flight; Editorial: A precarious milestone for quantum computing; News: Hello quantum world! Google publishes landmark quantum supremacy claim08:24 Research HighlightsThe world’s speediest ants, and the world’...
Source: Nature Podcast - October 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 570: Aarhus viral
At Aarhus University in Denmark, Vincent speaks with Trine Mogensen, Søren Paludan, Ole Søgaard, and Madalina Carter-Timofte about their careers and their work on sensing herpesviral DNA, immunodeficiencies that predispose to severe viral infections, and the path to a cure for HIV/AIDS. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello Guests: Trine Mogensen, Søren Paludan, Ole Søgaard, and Madalina Carter-Timofte Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Aarhus University Findaphd.com Sensing incoming HSV-1 (J Int Cyto ...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - October 20, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

Ancestry DNA tests can over or under estimate genetic disease risk
Direct-to-consumer genetic tests are sold online and in shops as a way to “find out what your DNA says". They insights into ancestry or disease risks; others claim to provide information on personality, athletic ability, and child talent. However, interpretation of genetic data is complex and context dependent, and DTC genetic tests may produce... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - October 17, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Privacy concerns slow Facebook studies, and how human fertility depends on chromosome counts
On this week ’s show, Senior News Correspondent Jeffrey Mervis talks with host Sarah Crespi about a stalled Facebook plan to release user data to social scientists who want to study the site’s role in elections. Sarah also talks with Jennifer Gruhn, a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Copenh agen Center for Chromosome Stability, about counting chromosomes in human egg cells. It turns out that cell division errors that cause too many or too few chromosomes to remain in the egg may shape human fertility over our reproductive lives. Finally, in this month’s book segment, Kiki Sanford ta lks...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - September 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Privacy concerns slow Facebook studies, and how human fertility depends on chromosome counts
On this week ’s show, Senior News Correspondent Jeffrey Mervis talks with host Sarah Crespi about a stalled Facebook plan to release user data to social scientists who want to study the site’s role in elections. Sarah also talks with Jennifer Gruhn, a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Copenh agen Center for Chromosome Stability, about counting chromosomes in human egg cells. It turns out that cell division errors that cause too many or too few chromosomes to remain in the egg may shape human fertility over our reproductive lives. Finally, in this month’s book segment, Kiki Sanford ta lks...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - September 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Privacy concerns slow Facebook studies, and how human fertility depends on chromosome counts
On this week ’s show, Senior News Correspondent Jeffrey Mervis talks with host Sarah Crespi about a stalled Facebook plan to release user data to social scientists who want to study the site’s role in elections. Sarah also talks with Jennifer Gruhn, a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Copenha gen Center for Chromosome Stability, about counting chromosomes in human egg cells. It turns out that cell division errors that cause too many or too few chromosomes to remain in the egg may shape human fertility over our reproductive lives. Finally, in this month’s book segment, Kiki Sanford talk s w...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - September 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 564: Virology Nobel Prizes with Erling Norrby
From the 16th Smögen Summer Symposium on Virology, Vincent speaks with Erling Norrby about how he has used archival material to provide insight into early Nobel Prizes for research on viruses. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello Guest: Erling Norrby Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Swedish Society for Virology Nobel Prizes and Life Sciences by Erling Norrby Nobel Prizes and Nature's Surprises by Erling Norrby Nobel Prizes and Notable Discoveries by Erling Norrby Nobel Prizes: Cancer, Vision and the Genetic...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - September 8, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

Ep370: Interviewed on Louie Free Show
Just wanted to share my interview from the Louie B Free Radio Show on June 6, 2019. I share a little bit about growing up in the Youngstown, Ohio area. We also talk about medical topics like medicine & social media, the perceived fear of vaccines, the 2019 Measles epidemic in the USA, the inappropriate use of antibiotics for viral infections, the concerning cost of pharmaceuticals and prescription drugs, hospice and end of life care, the dangers of genetic testing, and more! (Source: Doctor Anonymous Live)
Source: Doctor Anonymous Live - September 4, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: DrMikeSevilla Tags: Health Source Type: podcasts

29 August 2019: Carbon-based computing, and depleting ancient-human genomes
This week, a computer chip based on carbon nanotubes, and the potential pitfalls of sequencing ancient-human remains.In this episode: 00:45 A nanotube microprocessorScientists are looking beyond silicon, by constructing a computer chip using carbon nanotubes.Research article: Shulaker et al. News and Views: Nanotube computer scaled up 08:38 Research HighlightsWeighing neutrinos, and discovering a hidden Zika epidemic.Research Highlight: Lightest neutrino is at least 6 million times lighter than an electron; Research Highlight: Cuba’s untold Zika outbreak uncovered 10:29 Using ancient-human remains...
Source: Nature Podcast - August 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

"Avocado Analysis" -- The Discovery Files
Scientists have sequenced the avocado genome, shedding light on the ancient origins of this buttery fruit and laying the groundwork for future improvements to farming. The study reveals for the first time that the popular Hass avocado inherited about 61% of its DNA from Mexican varieties and about 39% from Guatemalan ones. The research also provides vital reference material for learning about the function of individual avocado genes, and for using genetic engineering to boost productivity of avocado trees, improve disease resistance and create fruit with new tastes and textures. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - August 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-Related Cancer
Interview with Carol M Mangione, MD MSPH, USPSTF member and coauthor of Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-Related Cancer: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement (Source: JAMA Author Interviews)
Source: JAMA Author Interviews - August 20, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: JAMA Network Source Type: podcasts

Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-Related Cancer
Interview with Carol M Mangione, MD MSPH, USPSTF member and coauthor of Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-Related Cancer: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement Audio at 5:55 was changed to reflect a revised risk increase statement.   (Source: JAMA Author Interviews)
Source: JAMA Author Interviews - August 20, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: JAMA Network Source Type: podcasts

Kevin Mitchell, author "Innate" (BS 159)
Kevin Mitchel (click to play interview) Every parent knows that each child is born with an unique personality. In his new book Innate: How the Wiring of Our Brains Shapes Who We Are. Dr. Kevin Mitchell writes “We are different from each other in large part because of the way our brains get wired before we are born.” (page 7) A key idea is that much of much of our behavior is innate but this is only partly due to genetics. Events during brain development are equally important.Listen to BS 159 now to learn more about what science is revealing about this fascinating topic. (PS: we also tal...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - July 26, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books Development Interviews Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Psychology Source Type: podcasts