Why skin grows bigger as you stretch it
Skin's unusual response to stretching is finally explained, and the latest in a huge effort to map DNA.In this episode:01:06 Stretching skinFor decades it’s been known that stretching skin causes more skin to grow, but the reasons why have been a mystery. Now, researchers have uncovered a mechanism to explain the phenomenon. Research Article: Aragona et al.; News and Views: Stretch exercises for stem cells expand the skin07:49 CoronapodWe discuss how the coronavirus pandemic has affected scientific meetings and how the learned societies that organise them are adapting. How scientific conferences will survive the...
Source: Nature Podcast - July 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 639: Virology Nobel Prizes with Erling Norrby part 2
Vincent and Erling resume their discussion of virology Nobel Prizes, focusing on awards for research on tumor viruses, bacteriophages, virus structure, reverse transcriptase, hepatitis B virus, HIV-1, human papillomaviruses and much more. Host: Vincent Racaniello Guest: Erling Norrby Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Nobel Prizes and Life Sciences by Erling Norrby Nobel Prizes and Nature’s Surprises by Erling Norrby Nobel Prizes and Notable Discoveries by Erling Norrby Nobel Prizes: Cancer, Visio...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - July 14, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 628: Physical distance for COVID-19
Vincent and Rich discuss the SARS-CoV-2 D614G amino acid change in the spike glyprotein, duration of infectious virus shedding from patients, virus transmission among hamsters infected in the laboratory, and tackle listener email. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello and Rich Condit Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Austin TX key indicators for staging D614 amino acid change (Scripps) Virus shedding in hospitalized patients (medRxiv) Hamster SARS-CoV-2 model (Nature) COVID-19 host genetic initiative Image credit Letters read on...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - June 18, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

Lab-made skin grows its own hair
This week, a new method to grow hairy skin in a dish, and new research takes aim at the RNA world hypothesis.In this episode:00:45 Hairy SkinResearchers may have developed a way to make skin that can grow hair in the lab, paving the way for treatment of a variety of skin disorders, and perhaps even baldness. Research Article: Lee et al.; News and Views: Regenerative medicine could pave the way to treating baldness08:56 Research HighlightsHow mercury moved during the ‘Great Dying’, and the link between mobile phones and gender equality. Research Highlight: Giant eruptions belched to...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 3, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

The Need to Improve the Clinical Utility of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Tests: Either Too Narrow or Too Broad
Interview with Madison Kilbride, PhD, author of The Need to Improve the Clinical Utility of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Tests: Either Too Narrow or Too Broad (Source: JAMA Author Interviews)
Source: JAMA Author Interviews - April 21, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: JAMA Network Source Type: podcasts

Does coronavirus spread through the air, and the biology of anorexia
On this week ’s show, Staff Writer Robert Service talks with host Sarah Crespi about a new National Academy of Sciences report that suggests the novel coronavirus can go airborne, the evidence for this idea, and what this means for the mask-wearing debate. See all of our News coverage of the pandemic here. See all of our Research and Editorials here. Also this week, Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel joins Sarah to talk about a burgeoning understanding of the biological roots of anorexia nervosa—an eating disorder that affects about 1% of people in the United States. From genetic links to brain scan s, scien...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - April 6, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

"Cognitive Gadgets" with Cecilia Heyes (BS 168
Cecelia Heyes (click to play, right click to download audio) BS 168 is an interview with psychologist Cecilia Heyes from Oxford University in the UK. We talk about her fascinating book "Cognitive Gadgets: The Cultural Evolution of Thinking." Our focus is on exploring the evidence that several cognitive skills that appear to be unique to humans are learned from other people rather than being inherited genetically as is often assumed. Her proposal that language is a cognitive gadget NOT a cognitive instinct is controversial and has very important implications.Cognitive Gadget...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - February 28, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books Brain Evolution Cognitive Science Interviews Language learning Podcast Show Notes Psychology Source Type: podcasts

A cryo –electron microscope accessible to the masses, and tracing the genetics of schizophrenia
Structural biologists rejoiced when cryo –electron microscopy, a technique to generate highly detailed models of biomolecules, emerged. But years after its release, researchers still face long queues to access these machines. Science’s European News Editor Eric Hand walks host Meagan Cantwell through the journey of a group of researche rs to create a cheaper, more accessible alternative. Also this week, host Joel Goldberg speaks with psychiatrist and researcher Goodman Sibeko, who worked with the Xhosa people of South Africa to help illuminate genetic details of schizophrenia. Though scientists have exami...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - January 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Podcast Extra: Epigenetics
As part of Nature's 150th anniversary celebrations, Nick Howe dives into the topic of epigenetics.Since its origin in 1942, the term 'epigenetics' has been repeatedly defined and redefined. There's always been hype around the field, but what actually is epigenetics and how much does it influence our genes?In this Podcast Extra, Nick Howe speaks to Edith Heard, Director General of the EMBL, and Giacomo Cavalli, from the Institute of Human Genetics, to guide us through these questions and find out about the history and future of epigenetics. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - December 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Hunting for new epilepsy drugs, and capturing lightning from space
About one-third of people with epilepsy are treatment resistant. Up until now, epilepsy treatments have focused on taming seizures rather than the source of the disease and for good reason —so many roads lead to epilepsy: traumatic brain injury, extreme fever and infection, and genetic disorders, to name a few. Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel talks with host Sarah Crespi about researchers that are turning back the pages on epilepsy, trying to get to the beginning of the story w here new treatments might work. And Sarah also talks with Torsten Neurbert at the Technical University of Denmark’s National Spac...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - December 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Hunting for new epilepsy drugs, and capturing lightning from space
About one-third of people with epilepsy are treatment resistant. Up until now, epilepsy treatments have focused on taming seizures rather than the source of the disease and for good reason —so many roads lead to epilepsy: traumatic brain injury, extreme fever and infection, and genetic disorders, to name a few. Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel talks with host Sarah Crespi about researchers that are turning back the pages on epilepsy, trying to get to the beginning of the story w here new treatments might work. And Sarah also talks with Torsten Neurbert at the Technical University of Denmark’s National Spac...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - December 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

05 December 2019: Genomic sequencing and the source of solar winds
We recently launched our 2019 listener survey. We want to hear your views on the show to help us make it even better. You can find the survey here. Thanks!In this episode: 00:45 The GenomeAsia 100k projectResearchers have released the first data from an ambitious project to sequence the genomes of 100,000 people from populations across Asia. Research Article: GenomeAsia100K Consortium 08:56 Research HighlightsBare riverbanks make meanders move, and human activity affects picky penguins. Research Highlight: The meandering rivers that speed across barren landscapes; Research Highlight: Climate change splits two pen...
Source: Nature Podcast - December 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

24 October 2019: Quantum supremacy and ancient mammals
This week, a milestone in quantum computing, and rethinking early mammals.In this episode:00:43 A quantum computing milestoneA quantum computer is reported to have achieved ‘quantum supremacy’ – performing an operation that’s essentially impossible for classical computers. Research Article: Arute et al.; News and Views: Quantum computing takes flight; Editorial: A precarious milestone for quantum computing; News: Hello quantum world! Google publishes landmark quantum supremacy claim08:24 Research HighlightsThe world’s speediest ants, and the world’...
Source: Nature Podcast - October 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 570: Aarhus viral
At Aarhus University in Denmark, Vincent speaks with Trine Mogensen, Søren Paludan, Ole Søgaard, and Madalina Carter-Timofte about their careers and their work on sensing herpesviral DNA, immunodeficiencies that predispose to severe viral infections, and the path to a cure for HIV/AIDS. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello Guests: Trine Mogensen, Søren Paludan, Ole Søgaard, and Madalina Carter-Timofte Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Aarhus University Findaphd.com Sensing incoming HSV-1 (J Int Cyto ...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - October 20, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

Ancestry DNA tests can over or under estimate genetic disease risk
Direct-to-consumer genetic tests are sold online and in shops as a way to “find out what your DNA says". They insights into ancestry or disease risks; others claim to provide information on personality, athletic ability, and child talent. However, interpretation of genetic data is complex and context dependent, and DTC genetic tests may produce... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - October 17, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Privacy concerns slow Facebook studies, and how human fertility depends on chromosome counts
On this week ’s show, Senior News Correspondent Jeffrey Mervis talks with host Sarah Crespi about a stalled Facebook plan to release user data to social scientists who want to study the site’s role in elections. Sarah also talks with Jennifer Gruhn, a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Copenh agen Center for Chromosome Stability, about counting chromosomes in human egg cells. It turns out that cell division errors that cause too many or too few chromosomes to remain in the egg may shape human fertility over our reproductive lives. Finally, in this month’s book segment, Kiki Sanford ta lks...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - September 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Privacy concerns slow Facebook studies, and how human fertility depends on chromosome counts
On this week ’s show, Senior News Correspondent Jeffrey Mervis talks with host Sarah Crespi about a stalled Facebook plan to release user data to social scientists who want to study the site’s role in elections. Sarah also talks with Jennifer Gruhn, a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Copenh agen Center for Chromosome Stability, about counting chromosomes in human egg cells. It turns out that cell division errors that cause too many or too few chromosomes to remain in the egg may shape human fertility over our reproductive lives. Finally, in this month’s book segment, Kiki Sanford ta lks...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - September 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 564: Virology Nobel Prizes with Erling Norrby
From the 16th Smögen Summer Symposium on Virology, Vincent speaks with Erling Norrby about how he has used archival material to provide insight into early Nobel Prizes for research on viruses. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello Guest: Erling Norrby Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Swedish Society for Virology Nobel Prizes and Life Sciences by Erling Norrby Nobel Prizes and Nature's Surprises by Erling Norrby Nobel Prizes and Notable Discoveries by Erling Norrby Nobel Prizes: Cancer, Vision and the Genetic...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - September 8, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

Ep370: Interviewed on Louie Free Show
Just wanted to share my interview from the Louie B Free Radio Show on June 6, 2019. I share a little bit about growing up in the Youngstown, Ohio area. We also talk about medical topics like medicine & social media, the perceived fear of vaccines, the 2019 Measles epidemic in the USA, the inappropriate use of antibiotics for viral infections, the concerning cost of pharmaceuticals and prescription drugs, hospice and end of life care, the dangers of genetic testing, and more! (Source: Doctor Anonymous Live)
Source: Doctor Anonymous Live - September 4, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: DrMikeSevilla Tags: Health Source Type: podcasts

29 August 2019: Carbon-based computing, and depleting ancient-human genomes
This week, a computer chip based on carbon nanotubes, and the potential pitfalls of sequencing ancient-human remains.In this episode: 00:45 A nanotube microprocessorScientists are looking beyond silicon, by constructing a computer chip using carbon nanotubes.Research article: Shulaker et al. News and Views: Nanotube computer scaled up 08:38 Research HighlightsWeighing neutrinos, and discovering a hidden Zika epidemic.Research Highlight: Lightest neutrino is at least 6 million times lighter than an electron; Research Highlight: Cuba’s untold Zika outbreak uncovered 10:29 Using ancient-human remains...
Source: Nature Podcast - August 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

"Avocado Analysis" -- The Discovery Files
Scientists have sequenced the avocado genome, shedding light on the ancient origins of this buttery fruit and laying the groundwork for future improvements to farming. The study reveals for the first time that the popular Hass avocado inherited about 61% of its DNA from Mexican varieties and about 39% from Guatemalan ones. The research also provides vital reference material for learning about the function of individual avocado genes, and for using genetic engineering to boost productivity of avocado trees, improve disease resistance and create fruit with new tastes and textures. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - August 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-Related Cancer
Interview with Carol M Mangione, MD MSPH, USPSTF member and coauthor of Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-Related Cancer: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement (Source: JAMA Author Interviews)
Source: JAMA Author Interviews - August 20, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: JAMA Network Source Type: podcasts

Kevin Mitchell, author "Innate" (BS 159)
Kevin Mitchel (click to play interview) Every parent knows that each child is born with an unique personality. In his new book Innate: How the Wiring of Our Brains Shapes Who We Are. Dr. Kevin Mitchell writes “We are different from each other in large part because of the way our brains get wired before we are born.” (page 7) A key idea is that much of much of our behavior is innate but this is only partly due to genetics. Events during brain development are equally important.Listen to BS 159 now to learn more about what science is revealing about this fascinating topic. (PS: we also tal...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - July 26, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books Development Interviews Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Psychology Source Type: podcasts

Kevin Mitchell, author "Innate" (BS 159)
Kevin Mitchel (click to play interview) Every parent knows that each child is born with an unique personality. In his new book Innate: How the Wiring of Our Brains Shapes Who We Are. Dr. Kevin Mitchell writes “We are different from each other in large part because of the way our brains get wired before we are born.” (page 7) A key idea is that much of much of our behavior is innate but this is only partly due to genetics. Events during brain development are equally important.Listen to BS 159 now to learn more about what science is revealing about this fascinating topic. (PS: we also tal...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - July 26, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books Development Interviews Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Psychology Source Type: podcasts

Ep370: Interviewed on Louie Free Show
Just wanted to share my interview from the Louie B Free Radio Show on June 6, 2019. I share a little bit about growing up in the Youngstown, Ohio area. We also talk about medical topics like medicine & social media, the perceived fear of vaccines, the 2019 Measles epidemic in the USA, the inappropriate use of antibiotics for viral infections, the concerning cost of pharmaceuticals and prescription drugs, hospice and end of life care, the dangers of genetic testing, and more! (Source: Doctor Anonymous Live)
Source: Doctor Anonymous Live - June 7, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: DrMikeSevilla Tags: Health Source Type: podcasts

Kimberly Halla, MSN, FNP-C - Realizing the Promise of PARP Inhibitors in Solid Tumor Therapy: Guiding Oncology Nurses on the Advances and Challenges
Go online to PeerView.com/KWE860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this PeerView MasterClass, an expert panel of oncology nurse professionals presents the highlights of emerging science and clinical data on PARP inhibition in multiple solid tumors, assesses the role of companion diagnostic tests that identify patients with DDR mutations, as well as engage the audience in a stimulating discussion on the value of genetic testing and significance of enrollment in ongoing PARP inhibitor clinical trials. Going beyond the standard didactic lectures, our experts...
Source: PeerView CME/CE Audio Podcast - Oncology - June 5, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: PVI, PeerView Institute for Medical Education Tags: Science, Medicine Source Type: podcasts

Molecular Tumor Boards In Clinical Practice: Increasingly Needed, GENTleMEN Study Offers Men With Prostate Cancer The Opportunity To Get Web & Phone Based Genetic Testing
Heather Cheng MD Of Seattle Cancer Care Alliance Discusses Molecular Tumor Boards In Clinical Practice: Increasingly Needed, GENTleMEN Study Offers Men With Prostate Cancer The Opportunity To Get Web ... Author: Annual-Meeting Added: 06/03/2019 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - June 4, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

How it Works - Genetic Testing in Lung Cancer Davies
GRACE - Global Resource for Advancing Cancer EducationPublished on Jun 26, 2018Kurtis Davies, PhD, with the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Department of Pharmacology, joined GR... Author: cancergrace Added: 05/28/2019 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - May 28, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

"Tomato Source" -- The Discovery Files
Researchers from Boyce Thompson Institute -- partnered with the European Research Area Network for Coordinating Action in Plant Sciences (ERA-CAPS) Program -- have created a pan-genome that captures all of the genetic information of 725 closely related wild and cultivated tomatoes. This resource of genetic information -- an expansion of the Tomato Reference Genome, which is limited to a specific tomato variety -- promises to help breeders develop more flavorful and sustainable varieties, and perhaps create more disease- and pest-resistant tomatoes. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - May 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 547: Upstate virology
Vincent travels to the University at Albany to speak with Cara, Rachel, and Alex about their careers and their work on stress granules, epitranscriptomics, and arboviruses. Host: Vincent Racaniello Guests: Cara Pager, Rachel Netzband, and Alex Ciota Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Five postdocs in North America (TWiV 194) Zika virus subverts stress granules (J Virol) DDX68 modulates miR-122 interaction with HCV RNA (Virol) (+) RNA virus epitranscriptome (Nucl Acids Res) Adaptation of Rabensburg virus to vertebrate ...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - May 12, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

Race and disease risk and Berlin ’s singing nightingales
Noncancerous tumors of the uterus —also known as fibroids—are extremely common in women. One risk factor, according to the scientific literature, is “black race.” But such simplistic categories may actually obscure the real drivers of the disparities in outcomes for women with fibroids, according to this week’s guest. Host Meagan Cantwell speaks with Jada Benn Torres, an associate professor of anthropology at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, about how using interdisciplinary approaches— incorporating both genetic and cultural perspectives—can paint a more complete picture of how...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - April 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

25 April 2019: Tiny earthquakes, the genetics of height, and how US-China politics is affecting research
This week we ’ve got an extended News Chat between presenter Benjamin Thompson andNature's European Bureau Chief Nisha Gaind. They discuss a new way to identify tiny earthquakes, new insights into the heritability of height, and how political tensions between the US and China are affecting scientists and research. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - April 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

25 April 2019: Tiny earthquakes, the genetics of height, and how US-China politics is affecting research
This week we’ve got an extended News Chat between presenter Benjamin Thompson and Nature's European Bureau Chief Nisha Gaind. They discuss a new way to identify tiny earthquakes, new insights into the heritability of height, and how political tensions between the US and China are affecting scientists and research. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - April 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

How dental plaque reveals the history of dairy farming, and how our neighbors view food waste
This week we have two interviews from the annual meeting of AAAS in Washington D.C.: one on the history of food and one about our own perceptions of food and food waste.   First up, host Sarah Crespi talks with Christina Warinner from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany, about the history of dairying. When did people first start to milk animals and where? It turns out, the spread of human genetic adaptations for drinking mil k do not closely correspond to the history of consuming milk from animals. Instead, evidence from ancient dental plaque suggests people from all over t...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - April 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

How dental plaque reveals the history of dairy farming, and how our neighbors view food waste
This week we have two interviews from the annual meeting of AAAS in Washington D.C.: one on the history of food and one about our own perceptions of food and food waste.   First up, host Sarah Crespi talks with Christina Warinner from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany, about the history of dairying. When did people first start to milk animals and where? It turns out, the spread of human genetic adaptations for drinking mil k do not closely correspond to the history of consuming milk from animals. Instead, evidence from ancient dental plaque suggests people from all over t...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - April 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Dr. Tewari Racial Disparities in Pca
Dr. Ash Tewari discusses the concept of race vs. genetics in Health Disparity research and treatment Author: vhsimons Added: 04/17/2019 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - April 17, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Alexander Perl, MD and James M. Foran, MD, FRCPC - Integrating Innovative Therapeutics With Allogeneic HCT in AML: Insights and Evidence From Induction to Maintenance
Go online to PeerView.com/PCE860 to view the entire program with slides. In this activity, based on a recent live symposium held at the 2019 TCT Meetings in Houston, Texas, experts in the management of AML illustrate the arrival of individualized care for HCT-eligible patients by profiling updated practice guidelines that support the use of novel agents across a range of clinical settings. The expert panelists also provide insights on the efficacy and safety evidence demonstrating that improved outcomes are possible when using cutting-edge targeted therapies, epigenetic modifiers, or antibodies in conjunction with transpla...
Source: PeerView CME/CE Audio Podcast - Immunology - April 9, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: PVI, PeerView Institute for Medical Education Tags: Science, Medicine Source Type: podcasts

Can Patients Benefit from Broad vs. Focal Genetic Testing_ [360p]
Drs. Ben Solomon, Leora Horn, & Jack West evaluate the merits of broad genetic testing with a "next generation sequencing" platform compared to selective, limited testing for the most proven driver mu... Author: cancergrace Added: 03/30/2019 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - March 30, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Possible potato improvements, and a pill that gives you a jab in the gut
Because of its genetic complexity, the potato didn ’t undergo a “green revolution” like other staple crops. It can take more than 15 years to breed a new kind of potato that farmers can grow, and genetic engineering just won’t work for tackling complex traits such as increased yield or heat resistance. Host Sarah Crespi talks with Staff Wri ter Erik Stokstad about how researchers are trying to simplify the potato genome to make it easier to manipulate through breeding. Researchers and companies are racing to perfect an injector pill—a pill that you swallow, which then uses a tiny needle ...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - February 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Possible potato improvements, and a pill that gives you a jab in the gut
Because of its genetic complexity, the potato didn ’t undergo a “green revolution” like other staple crops. It can take more than 15 years to breed a new kind of potato that farmers can grow, and genetic engineering just won’t work for tackling complex traits such as increased yield or heat resistance. Host Sarah Crespi talks with Staff Wri ter Erik Stokstad about how researchers are trying to simplify the potato genome to make it easier to manipulate through breeding. Researchers and companies are racing to perfect an injector pill—a pill that you swallow, which then uses a tiny needle ...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - February 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

The Role Of Genetic Testing In mCRC
Howard Hochster, MD, Associate Director for Clinical Research, Rutgers Cancer institute of New jersey, Director of Oncology Research, RWJBarnabas Health discusses, The Role Of Genetic Testing In mCRC.... Author: obr Added: 02/04/2019 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - February 4, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Genetic Testing In Newly Diagnosed mCRC
Jeffrey A. Meyerhardt, MD, Professor, Medicine, Harvard Medical School Active Medical Staff, Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute discusses, Genetic Testing In Newly Diagnosed mCRC. At The 2... Author: obr Added: 02/04/2019 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - February 4, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

JAMA Otolaryngology –Head & Neck Surgery : Association of Genetic vs Environmental Factors in Swedish Adoptees With Clinically Significant Tinnitus
Interview with Christopher R. Cederroth, PhD, author of Association of Genetic vs Environmental Factors in Swedish Adoptees With Clinically Significant Tinnitus (Source: JAMA Specialty Journals Author Interviews)
Source: JAMA Specialty Journals Author Interviews - January 17, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: podcasts

The Rationale For Genetically Profiling AML Patients
Robert Rifkin, MD, Hematologist/Oncologist, Associate Chair, US Oncology Hematology Research, Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, discusses The Rationale For Genetically Profiling AML Patients. At The 60th... Author: obr Added: 01/15/2019 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - January 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

AML Genetic Testing Prior To Start Of Therapy
Keith Pratz, MD Assistant Professor of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University Discusses AML Genetic Testing Prior To Start Of Therapy. At The 60th ASH Annual Mee... Author: obr Added: 01/11/2019 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - January 11, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

Podcast Extra: The search for a rare disease treatment
Nick Sireau ’s sons have a rare genetic disease called alkaptonuria, which can lead to body tissues becoming brittle, causing life long health issues.In this Podcast Extra, Geoff Marsh speaks to Nick and to the physician Dr Lakshminarayan Ranganath about their search for a treatment for alkaptonuria. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - January 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Podcast Extra: The search for a rare disease treatment
Nick Sireau’s sons have a rare genetic disease called alkaptonuria, which can lead to body tissues becoming brittle, causing life long health issues.In this Podcast Extra, Geoff Marsh speaks to Nick and to the physician Dr Lakshminarayan Ranganath about their search for a treatment for alkaptonuria. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - January 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

African-American Prostate Cancer
Dr. Ashutosh Tewari discusses the nature of genetic difference and aggressiveness among African-Ameican men Author: vhsimons Added: 12/20/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - December 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

ASHUTOSH TEWARI, MD (vid.1)
The concept of Precision Therapy in Prostate Cancer treatment will need to rely more heavily on genetic testing Author: vhsimons Added: 12/17/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - December 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts