NIA Butler-Williams Scholars Program 2019
Discussion sessions will focus on methodological approaches and interventions. The program also will include consultation on the development of research interests and advice on preparing and submitting research grant applications to NIA.Air date: 8/2/2019 10:15:00 AM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - July 3, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Neuroscience Seminar: Time to Wake Up: Regulation of Neural Stem Cell Quiescence and Reactivation
NIH Neuroscience Series Seminar Stem cell populations in tissues as varied as blood, gut and brain spend much of their time in a mitotically dormant, quiescent, state. A key point of regulation is the decision between quiescence and proliferation. The ability to reactivate neural stem cells in situ raises the prospect of potential future therapies for brain repair after damage or neurodegenerative disease. Understanding the molecular basis for stem cell reactivation is an essential first step in this quest. In Drosophila, quiescent neural stem cells are easily identifiable and amenable to genetic manipulation, making them ...
Source: Videocast - All Events - June 7, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

NIH Director's Seminar: Of humans and mice: Fundamental mechanisms of tissue-specific antifungal immunity
NIH Director's Seminar Series Over the past few decades, fungal infections have emerged as major causes of morbidity and mortality in immunosuppressed patients despite the administration of antifungal therapy. This talk will highlight recent advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of protective host immunity against mucosal and invasive fungal infections. These insights have been gained via enrollment at the NIH Clinical Center of large cohorts of patients with inherited and acquired susceptibility to fungal disease and via corroborating immunological research in clinically relevant mouse models o...
Source: Videocast - All Events - June 5, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Why don't we get more cancer: The importance of ECM Chromatin interactions in tissue-specificity and breast cancer
CCR Grand Rounds Mina J. Bissel, Ph.D., is a Distinguished Scientist, the highest rank bestowed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and serves as Senior Advisor to the Laboratory Director on Biology. She is also Faculty of four Graduate Groups in UC Berkeley: Comparative Biochemistry, Endocrinology, Molecular Toxicology, and Bioengineering (UCSF/UCB joint program). Having challenged several established paradigms, Bissell is a pioneer in breast cancer research and her body of work has provided much impetus for the current recognition of the significant role that extracellular matrix (ECM) signaling and microenvi...
Source: Videocast - All Events - June 3, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Of humans and mice: Fundamental mechanisms of tissue-specific antifungal immunity
NIH Director's Seminar Series Over the past few decades, fungal infections have emerged as major causes of morbidity and mortality in immunosuppressed patients despite the administration of antifungal therapy. This talk will highlight recent advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of protective host immunity against mucosal and invasive fungal infections. These insights have been gained via enrollment at the NIH Clinical Center of large cohorts of patients with inherited and acquired susceptibility to fungal disease and via corroborating immunological research in clinically relevant mouse models o...
Source: Videocast - All Events - June 3, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Watch Your Step, There Is New Chemistry Everywhere
NCCIH Integrative Medicine Research Lecture Series The National Center for Complementary and Integrative health (NCCIH) presents the Integrative Medicine Research Lecture Series. The series provides overviews of the current state of research and practice involving complementary health approaches and explores perspectives on the emerging discipline of integrative medicine. Dr. Sean Brady is Tri-Institutional Professor and Evnin Professor Head, Laboratory of Genetically Encoded Small Molecules at the Rockefeller University. Dr. Brady has developed culture-independent methods to circumvent this discovery bottleneck. He will d...
Source: Videocast - All Events - May 23, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

A new resource for breeding better tomatoes or should that be, " re-sauce? "
Researchers from Boyce Thompson Institute -- partnered with the European Research Area Network for Coordinating Action in Plant Sciences (ERA-CAPS) Program -- have created a pan-genome that captures all of the genetic information of 725 closely related wild and cultivated tomatoes. This resource of ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - May 23, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

Human Hereditary Deafness is Complex Yet Easy to Grasp
Beyond the Lab, Understanding Communication Disorders: Speaker Series Learn how deafness can be inherited (passed down through generations). Genetic research can improve our understanding of which gene variants are associated with human hereditary deafness. By identifying these gene variants, scientists may be able to diagnose certain forms of hereditary hearing loss earlier and more accurately. The program is part of the Beyond the Lab speaker series offered by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). Designed for administrative and support staff as well as scientists, the speaker seri...
Source: Videocast - All Events - May 20, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

The role of mass spectrometry to implement protein biomarkers in clinical studies for precision medicine
Proteomics Interest Group Understanding cancer biology at a molecular level has dramatically changed therapeutic strategies in oncology and improved patient care. As drugs become more targeted with clearer mode of actions, it is important to implement robust biomarkers into drug development process to precisely identify the right patients for clinical trials, to deliver safer and more effective drugs, and to reduce overall developmental costs. While genetic biomarkers are widely used, implementing protein biomarkers remains challenging in part due to the lack of robust technologies fit for clinical laboratories. Recently, ...
Source: Videocast - All Events - April 26, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Opiates on the brain
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Dr. Kieffer is a basic scientist and neurobiologist. She isolated the first gene encoding an opioid receptor, a landmark in neuroscience research to understanding molecular bases of opioid transmission and opioid-mediated mechanisms underlying pain control, mood disorders and addiction. Her team elucidated the role of each opioid receptor in both known and unknown areas of opioid physiology and behaviors using gene knockout in mice. She showed that mu receptors mediate both analgesic and addictive actions of morphine, and are responsible for drug and social reward. Her team...
Source: Videocast - All Events - April 24, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Genes, lifestyle, and risk for heart attack
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Dr. Kathiresan leverages human genetics to understand the root causes of heart attack and to improve preventive cardiac care. Among his scientific contributions, Dr. Kathiresan has helped highlight new biological mechanisms underlying heart attack, discovered mutations that protect against heart attack risk, and developed a genetic test for personalized heart attack prevention.For more information go tohttps://oir.nih.gov/wals/2018-2019Air date: 5/22/2019 3:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - April 24, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Special Tuesday Lecture, NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series
Julie Theriot is the Benjamin D. Hall Endowed Chair in Basic Life Sciences and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator in the Department of Biology at the University of Washington. Her lab explores the mechanics and dynamics of how cells organize themselves to create their own structures and shapes. She studies an unusually wide variety of cell types and model systems in order to gain a broad conceptual understanding of the organizational rules that give rise to cell structure and coordinated movement. This work has important implications for understanding host-pathogen interactions, the function of immune cells, a...
Source: Videocast - All Events - April 24, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

The secret lives of cells
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series From the 17th through the 19th century, beautifully artistic micrographs of living specimens were inextricably linked to biological discovery. However, for much of the 20th century, optical microscopy took a back seat to the powerful new fields of genetics and biochemistry. Starting in the 1980s, the tables started to turn again, thanks to the widespread availability of computers, lasers, sensitive detectors, and fluorescence labeling techniques. The result has been a Cambrian explosion of new technologies with the ability to understand the findings of genetics and biochemi...
Source: Videocast - All Events - April 23, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

CC Grand Rounds: Genetic Syndromes in Diverse Populations
For more information go tohttp://www.cc.nih.gov/about/news/grcurrent.htmlAir date: 4/24/2019 12:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - March 20, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

NIGMS Director's Early-Career Investigator Lecture: Sex-Biased Genome Evolution
NIGMS Director's Early-Career Investigator Lecture 2019 If you ’ re merely counting chromosomes, men and women aren ’ t that different. We all have DNA packaged into 23 pairs of chromosomes. Just one of these pairs — the sex chromosomes known as X and Y — is inherited differently in males and females. In general, women have two X chromosomes (XX), and men have one X and one Y chromosome (XY). Today, the human X chromosome is much larger than the human Y chromosome. But that wasn ’ t always the case. Evidence indicates that, in mammals prior to about 200 million years ago, X and Y were the same...
Source: Videocast - All Events - March 4, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Expanding the functional and actionable genome: Insights from the study of fusion-driven tumors
CCR Grand Rounds Dr. Caplen co-discovered RNA interference (RNAi) in mammalian cells and has pioneered approaches for exploiting this gene regulatory mechanism to investigate cancer biology and treatment. Dr. Caplen applies the perturbations induced by RNA- or DNA-based technologies to interrogate specific aspects of the genetic, transcriptional, and cell-signaling alterations observed in cancer cells. These functional genetic approaches will be used to enhance our understanding of the mechanistic basis of cancer and to discover new cancer treatment strategies. Current studies are focused on the functional genetic analysis...
Source: Videocast - All Events - March 4, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

NCCIH Lecture: Watch Your Step, There Is New Chemistry Everywhere
NCCIH Integrative Medicine Research Lecture The characterization of biologically active small molecules (natural products) produced by easily cultured bacteria has been a rewarding avenue for identifying novel therapeutics. The characterization of biologically active small molecules (natural products) produced by easily cultured bacteria has been a rewarding avenue for identifying novel therapeutics, as well as gaining insights into how bacteria interact with the world around them. Large-scale sequencing of bacterial genomic and metagenomic DNA indicates that the traditional pure culture – based approach to studying ...
Source: Videocast - All Events - February 21, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Autoantigens and autoimmunity: a bedside to bench and back again story
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Noncoding RNAs play critical roles in the metabolism of all cells. The Wolin laboratory studies how noncoding RNAs function, how cells recognize and degrade defective noncoding RNAs, and how failure to degrade these RNAs affects cell function and contributes to human disease. Their studies revealed new mechanisms by which defective RNAs are targeted for degradation and new classes of noncoding RNAs. Most recently, their work has contributed to a novel theory for how the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus may be triggered in genetically susceptible individuals.A...
Source: Videocast - All Events - February 4, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Pediatric immune diseases, all genetics?
NIH Director ’ s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Dr. Fischer is interested in understanding how genetic errors cause vulnerability to microorganisms, autoimmunity, inflammation and allergy, with the dual goal to decipher in vivo immunity in humans and to correct its defects.Air date: 2/20/2019 3:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - February 4, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

CC Grand Rounds: 1) Severe Combined Immune Deficiency in the Newborn Screening Era: Genetic Landscape and Current Challenges and 2) Update on Clinical Outcome of Gene Therapy for X-linked Severe Combined Immune Deficiency
For more information go tohttp://www.cc.nih.gov/about/news/grcurrent.htmlAir date: 2/27/2019 12:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - February 4, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Interventional Pharmacoeconomics: A New Discipline for a Cost-Constrained Environment
Dr. Ratain ’ s research focuses on the development of new oncology drugs, and developing diagnostic tests in order to create individualized anticancer therapies based on each person ’ s genetic makeup. He is an international leader in phase I clinical trials, pharmacogenetics and clinical trial methodology. He has more than 260 original publications, leads the University of Chicago ’ s phase I oncology trials program, serves as director of the Center for Personalized Therapeutics and is Chief Hospital Pharmacologist for the University of Chicago Medical Center. Dr. Ratain is also co-chair of the Pharmacog...
Source: Videocast - All Events - January 7, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

The social life of DNA
NIH Director ’ s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Dr. Nelson is president of the Social Science Research Council and professor of sociology at Columbia University. An award-winning scholar of science, medicine, and social inequality, her recent books include The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation after the Genome, Genetics and the Unsettled Past: The Collision of DNA, Race, and History, and Body and Soul: The Black Panther Party and the Fight Against Medical Discrimination. Dr. Nelson has contributed to national policy discussions on inequality, and about the social implications of new techno...
Source: Videocast - All Events - January 7, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Corals on the Great Barrier Reef
. A recent study suggests that corals in the Great Barrier Reef have enough genetic variation to adapt to and survive rising ocean temperatures for at least another century. More about this image Using genetic samples and computer simulations, ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - December 11, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: video

Why sharing genetic information is vital for the future
Chief Development Officer at Finland ’s UNA Plan Pirkko Kortekangas says that data privacy is a priority, but sharing information is key when searching for medical solutions. (Source: Healthcare ITNews Videos)
Source: Healthcare ITNews Videos - December 6, 2018 Category: Information Technology Tags: Electronic Health Records (EHR, EMR) Government & amp; Policy Privacy amp; Security Source Type: video

Grantees Meeting: RFA AG-16-020 Impact of Aging on Currently Employed Animal Models (UH2-UH3 Demonstration Projects)
The Division of Aging Biology (DAB) is planning to hold a grantees meeting to report on their progress and engage in a panel discussion to gauge the state of the science and exchange viewpoints on the impact of aging in studies of diseases and conditions in laboratory animals (mice of different strains and genetic modifications). Grantees are in the UH3 phase of the awards. They will discuss the aging components of their studies as derived from human conditions, review preliminary findings in their respective animal models and participate in a panel discussion on outcomes and ways to optimize exposure and impact of their f...
Source: Videocast - All Events - November 29, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Endoplasmic reticulum and immunometabolic homeostasis
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series – Special Tuesday Lecture The major interest of Dr. Hotamisligil's laboratory is to study the regulatory pathways, which control glucose and lipid metabolism. His lab's biochemical and genetic studies focus on signal transduction using cultured mammalian cells as well as transgenic animals to identify specific abnormalities in these pathways, which are involved in human metabolic and inflammatory diseases including obesity, diabetes, fatty liver disease, atherosclerosis, and asthma.For more information go tohttps://oir.nih.gov/walsAir date: 11/13/2018 3:00:00 PM (Sour...
Source: Videocast - All Events - November 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

CC Grand Rounds: Clinicopathologic Grand Rounds: When “ Lethal ” Genetic Diseases of Infancy Are Diagnosed in Adulthood
CC Grand Rounds: Clinicopathologic Grand Rounds: When “ Lethal ” Genetic Diseases of Infancy Are Diagnosed in AdulthoodFor more information go tohttp://www.cc.nih.gov/news/about/grcurrent.htmlAir date: 11/28/2018 12:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - November 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Secondary Genomics Findings Service
Discussion: Improving Support for Clinical Research at the NIH 24 April 2017: The NIH Office of Research Support and Compliance (ORSC) – an Update 15 May 2017: News from the OHSRP: Informed Consent and Requests for Determination 16 October 2017: Investigational Treatments and Emerging Medicines: A Regulatory Perspective 20 November 2017: An Update on IRB Reorganization: A Panel Discussion 18 December 2017: Technology Transfer Agreements for Sharing Human Materials and Data: Policies and Procedures 19 March 2018: Common Rule Issues with Tissues 16 April 2018: The NIH IRB Consolidation and iRIS Transition 21 Ma...
Source: Videocast - All Events - November 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Maurice B. Burg Lecture: Insights into Human Hypertension and Renal Physiology from Human Genetics and Genomics
Maurice B. Burg Lecture 2018: Insights into Human Hypertension and Renal Physiology from Human Genetics and Genomics by Dr. Richard P. Lifton MD, PhD of Rockefeller UniversityAir date: 10/29/2018 3:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 26, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Surveillance of Core Cellular Pathways in C. elegans for Pathogen Assaults
CCR Eminent Lectures The Ruvkun lab uses C. elegans molecular genetics and genomics to study miRNA and RNAi pathways. Using genetic and RNA interference approaches, we have identified many genes that positively or negatively regulate RNAi and microRNA pathways. These genes reveal the trajectory of siRNAs and miRNAs as they target mRNAs, as well as components that may be developed as drug targets to enhance RNAi in mammals. Over the past decade, we discovered that like mammals, C. elegans uses an insulin signaling pathway to control its metabolism and longevity. This analysis has revealed striking congruence of molecular me...
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 18, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

How mothers give the best and enough mitochondria
NIH Directors Seminar Series Dr. Xu ’ s Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Systems Biology Center, NHLBI is interested in the basic mechanism guiding the transmission of our second genome- mitochondrial DNA. Mutations in mitochondrial genome have emerged as important factors compromising human health. Although mitochondrial genome is prone to accumulating mutations due to the high spontaneous mutation frequency and a lack of repair mechanisms, the crippling mitochondrial mutation is exceedingly rare in populations. It is puzzling how mothers are able to restrict the transmission of damaging mutations to the next gener...
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 10, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Of mice and men: what we can learn about human cancer by studying mouse models
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series The research in Cory Abate-Shen ’ s laboratory is focused on understanding basic mechanisms of transcriptional regulation and differentiation, and how these become dysregulated in cancer. The laboratory takes a multi-disciplinary approach to investigate genitourinary malignancies, which includes using mechanism-based studies, analyses of genetically-engineered mouse models (GEMMs), and state-of-the-art systems biology approaches.For more information go tohttps://oir.nih.gov/walsAir date: 12/19/2018 3:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Standing on the shoulders of mice: adventures in human immunology
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series While inbred mice have been a very powerful model for analyzing the immune system, recent advances, both technological and conceptual, have begun to make direct studies of the human immune system possible. This is vitally important from a translational perspective, as mouse models of disease have not been as productive as hoped for in producing “ actionable intelligence ” with which to diagnose and treat patients. Another benefit is that human work is almost unexplored territory for immunologists in our present time, where asking basic questions often results in...
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series – Special Tuesday Lecture
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series The major interest of Dr. Hotamisligil's laboratory is to study the regulatory pathways, which control glucose and lipid metabolism. His lab's biochemical and genetic studies focus on signal transduction using cultured mammalian cells as well as transgenic animals to identify specific abnormalities in these pathways, which are involved in human metabolic and inflammatory diseases including obesity, diabetes, fatty liver disease, atherosclerosis, and asthma.For more information go tohttps://oir.nih.gov/walsAir date: 11/13/2018 3:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

What Makes America Great
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Dr. Gahl studies the natural history, diagnosis, and treatment of rare genetic disorders such as cystinosis, Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome, sialic acid storage diseases, GNE myopathy, and disorders of platelets and pigmentation. He also investigates undiagnosed disorders under the aegis of the NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program and Network, and pursues new disease discovery.For more information go tohttps://oir.nih.gov/walsAir date: 11/7/2018 3:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

NIH Director's Seminar Series
NIH Directors Seminar Series Dr. Xu ’ s Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Systems Biology Center, NHLBI is interested in the basic mechanism guiding the transmission of our second genome- mitochondrial DNA. Mutations in mitochondrial genome have emerged as important factors compromising human health. Although mitochondrial genome is prone to accumulating mutations due to the high spontaneous mutation frequency and a lack of repair mechanisms, the crippling mitochondrial mutation is exceedingly rare in populations. It is puzzling how mothers are able to restrict the transmission of damaging mutations to the next gener...
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Understanding the source of regenerative ability in animals
NIH Director ’ s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series DeWitt Stetten Jr. Lecture Established by NIGMS in 1982 and presented annually in honor of Dr. Stetten, the third NIGMS director, this annual lecture is part of the Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series. Salamanders and starfish might be “ simpler ” than humans, but they far surpass us in one major way — the ability to regenerate tissues and regrow lost limbs. Dr. S á nchez Alvarado studies regeneration using the flatworm planaria Schmidtea mediterranea. Remarkably, when halved or quartered (even by high school students) this organism can clone...
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 4, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Living in the Cold -- Adaptations in Hibernation
NIH Neuroscience Series Seminar Dr. Li ’ s lab studies the structure and function of retinal synapses and circuits. Although they know the basic structure and major cell types of the retina, it remains much of a " black box " in terms of the connections and functions of these neurons. Their long-term research goal is to understand how the neuronal circuits are wired in this " black box " under normal conditions and how the circuits are altered during pathological processes. Both pieces of information will be crucial for the design of biological and/or prosthetic interventions aiming to restore vis...
Source: Videocast - All Events - September 14, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Staghorn coral
(A. millepora). A recent study suggests that corals in the Great Barrier Reef have enough genetic variation to adapt to and survive rising ocean temperatures for at least another century. More about this image Using genetic samples and computer simulations, ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - September 13, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: video

Boosting bacteria's productivity
Chemical engineers have designed a genetic switch that allows them to dramatically boost bacteria’s production of useful chemicals. More about this image Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) chemical engineers have designed a novel genetic switch that allows them to ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - September 13, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: video

NIH Research Festival - Plenary Session II
During this session, we will hear about recent research advances in the areas of immunodeficiency, rare diseases, genetic disorders, and membrane proteins.For more information go tohttps://researchfestival.nih.gov/2018/plenary-sessionsAir date: 9/13/2018 10:00:00 AM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - September 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Base editing: chemistry on a target nucleotide in the genome of living cells
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Marshall W. Nirenberg Lecture Dr. Liu ’ s research integrates chemistry and evolution to illuminate biology and enable next-generation therapeutics. His major research interests include the engineering, evolution, and in vivo delivery of genome editing proteins such as base editors to study and treat genetic diseases; the evolution of proteins with novel therapeutic potential using phage-assisted continuous evolution (PACE); and the discovery of bioactive synthetic small molecules and synthetic polymers using DNA-templated organic synthesis and DNA-encoded libraries.F...
Source: Videocast - All Events - August 28, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

WALS Lecture - Base editing: chemistry on a target nucleotide in the genome of living cells
Dr. Liu ’ s research integrates chemistry and evolution to illuminate biology and enable next-generation therapeutics. His major research interests include the engineering, evolution, and in vivo delivery of genome editing proteins such as base editors to study and treat genetic diseases; the evolution of proteins with novel therapeutic potential using phage-assisted continuous evolution (PACE); and the discovery of bioactive synthetic small molecules and synthetic polymers using DNA-templated organic synthesis and DNA-encoded libraries.For more information go tohttps://oir.nih.gov/wals/2018-2019/base-editing-chemist...
Source: Videocast - All Events - August 27, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Genomics & Health Disparities Lecture: Towards Understanding the Role of Population Diversity in Cancer Genome Science
Genomics and Health Disparities Lecture Series John Carpten, PhD is Professor and Chair for the Department of Translational Genomics. His training and professional experiences include postdoctoral training at the National Human Genome Research Institute/NIH, and serving as Deputy Director of Research at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen). Dr. Carpten ’ cancer research program spans multiple disciplines including germline genetics for disease risk and predisposition, somatic cancer genomics, health disparities research, cell biology, functional genomics, and precision medicine. The primary focus of h...
Source: Videocast - All Events - August 15, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

A newly engineered bacteria could help deliver nitrogen gas to plants, reducing the need for costly,
To enable plants to take advantage of Earth's nitrogen-rich atmosphere -- and reduce the need for fertilizer -- scientists have genetically engineered bacteria that can make use of nitrogen gas, a process called nitrogen fixation. If scientists can apply this engineering method -- in which ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - August 4, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: video

A feat of reverse engineering!
NSF funded researchers @tuftsu have developed a genetically modified yeast that can more efficiently consume a sugar called xylose. Changing the menu for yeast from glucose to xylose can lead to many advances including biofuel production. For more information: (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - June 14, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: video

NCI Support for Cancer Immunology
Immunonology IG Seminar Norman E. “ Ned ” Sharpless, M.D., was officially sworn in as the 15th director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) on October 17, 2017. Prior to his appointment, Dr. Sharpless served as the director of the University of North Carolina (UNC) Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, a position he held since January 2014. Dr. Sharpless was a Morehead Scholar at UNC – Chapel Hill and received his undergraduate degree in mathematics. He went on to pursue his medical degree from the UNC School of Medicine, graduating with honors and distinction in 1993. He then completed his internal ...
Source: Videocast - All Events - June 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Exploring adult brain plasticity following adverse developmental conditions
NIH Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Adverse conditions during development, including stress in early life or the presence of a neurodevelopmental disorder, can set the stage for enduring behavioral impairments that last a lifetime. While it would be ideal to prevent or reverse such occurrences during the developmental period, in the absence of these options, approaches designed to modify residual plasticity in the adult brain may help to optimize function and mitigate problematic behaviors. Using rodent models of early life stress-induced anxiety and hyperactivity, as well as those of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), Dr....
Source: Videocast - All Events - June 11, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

B cells in Autoimmune diseases: Focus on Sj ö gren's Syndrome
NIDCR Clinical Research Fellowship Grand Rounds B cells play a complex role in the development of systemic autoimmune diseases, especially in primary Sj ö gren's syndrome, a progressive condition that damages saliva and tear glands and leads to dry mouth, dry eyes, and other symptoms. Dr. Jacques-Olivier Pers will outline growing evidence that regulatory B lymphocytes (Breg) may blunt the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune disease, and thus may be potential targets for treatment. Studies of distinct B cell subsets that play differing roles in autoimmune diseases are providing new insights into Breg development and im...
Source: Videocast - All Events - April 11, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

CC Grand Rounds: New Findings in Genetic Bone Diseases 1) X-linked Form of Osteogenesis Imperfecta Caused by Defective Intramembrane Proteolysis and 2) Cracking the " Tough Nut " : Somatic Mutations in the Candle Wax Bone Disease Melorheostosis
CC Grand Rounds:New Findings in Genetic Bone Diseases " 1) X-linked Form of Osteogenesis Imperfecta Caused by Defective Intramembrane Proteolysis and 2) Cracking the " Tough Nut " : Somatic Mutations in the Candle Wax Bone Disease MelorheostosisFor more information go tohttp://www.cc.nih.gov/about/news/grcurrent.htmlAir date: 4/25/2018 12:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - March 26, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video