Secondary Genomics Findings Service
Discussion: Improving Support for Clinical Research at the NIH 24 April 2017: The NIH Office of Research Support and Compliance (ORSC) – an Update 15 May 2017: News from the OHSRP: Informed Consent and Requests for Determination 16 October 2017: Investigational Treatments and Emerging Medicines: A Regulatory Perspective 20 November 2017: An Update on IRB Reorganization: A Panel Discussion 18 December 2017: Technology Transfer Agreements for Sharing Human Materials and Data: Policies and Procedures 19 March 2018: Common Rule Issues with Tissues 16 April 2018: The NIH IRB Consolidation and iRIS Transition 21 Ma...
Source: Videocast - All Events - November 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Maurice B. Burg Lecture: Insights into Human Hypertension and Renal Physiology from Human Genetics and Genomics
Maurice B. Burg Lecture 2018: Insights into Human Hypertension and Renal Physiology from Human Genetics and Genomics by Dr. Richard P. Lifton MD, PhD of Rockefeller UniversityAir date: 10/29/2018 3:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 26, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Surveillance of Core Cellular Pathways in C. elegans for Pathogen Assaults
CCR Eminent Lectures The Ruvkun lab uses C. elegans molecular genetics and genomics to study miRNA and RNAi pathways. Using genetic and RNA interference approaches, we have identified many genes that positively or negatively regulate RNAi and microRNA pathways. These genes reveal the trajectory of siRNAs and miRNAs as they target mRNAs, as well as components that may be developed as drug targets to enhance RNAi in mammals. Over the past decade, we discovered that like mammals, C. elegans uses an insulin signaling pathway to control its metabolism and longevity. This analysis has revealed striking congruence of molecular me...
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 18, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

How mothers give the best and enough mitochondria
NIH Directors Seminar Series Dr. Xu ’ s Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Systems Biology Center, NHLBI is interested in the basic mechanism guiding the transmission of our second genome- mitochondrial DNA. Mutations in mitochondrial genome have emerged as important factors compromising human health. Although mitochondrial genome is prone to accumulating mutations due to the high spontaneous mutation frequency and a lack of repair mechanisms, the crippling mitochondrial mutation is exceedingly rare in populations. It is puzzling how mothers are able to restrict the transmission of damaging mutations to the next gener...
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 10, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Of mice and men: what we can learn about human cancer by studying mouse models
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series The research in Cory Abate-Shen ’ s laboratory is focused on understanding basic mechanisms of transcriptional regulation and differentiation, and how these become dysregulated in cancer. The laboratory takes a multi-disciplinary approach to investigate genitourinary malignancies, which includes using mechanism-based studies, analyses of genetically-engineered mouse models (GEMMs), and state-of-the-art systems biology approaches.For more information go tohttps://oir.nih.gov/walsAir date: 12/19/2018 3:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Standing on the shoulders of mice: adventures in human immunology
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series While inbred mice have been a very powerful model for analyzing the immune system, recent advances, both technological and conceptual, have begun to make direct studies of the human immune system possible. This is vitally important from a translational perspective, as mouse models of disease have not been as productive as hoped for in producing “ actionable intelligence ” with which to diagnose and treat patients. Another benefit is that human work is almost unexplored territory for immunologists in our present time, where asking basic questions often results in...
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series – Special Tuesday Lecture
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series The major interest of Dr. Hotamisligil's laboratory is to study the regulatory pathways, which control glucose and lipid metabolism. His lab's biochemical and genetic studies focus on signal transduction using cultured mammalian cells as well as transgenic animals to identify specific abnormalities in these pathways, which are involved in human metabolic and inflammatory diseases including obesity, diabetes, fatty liver disease, atherosclerosis, and asthma.For more information go tohttps://oir.nih.gov/walsAir date: 11/13/2018 3:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

What Makes America Great
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Dr. Gahl studies the natural history, diagnosis, and treatment of rare genetic disorders such as cystinosis, Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome, sialic acid storage diseases, GNE myopathy, and disorders of platelets and pigmentation. He also investigates undiagnosed disorders under the aegis of the NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program and Network, and pursues new disease discovery.For more information go tohttps://oir.nih.gov/walsAir date: 11/7/2018 3:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

NIH Director's Seminar Series
NIH Directors Seminar Series Dr. Xu ’ s Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Systems Biology Center, NHLBI is interested in the basic mechanism guiding the transmission of our second genome- mitochondrial DNA. Mutations in mitochondrial genome have emerged as important factors compromising human health. Although mitochondrial genome is prone to accumulating mutations due to the high spontaneous mutation frequency and a lack of repair mechanisms, the crippling mitochondrial mutation is exceedingly rare in populations. It is puzzling how mothers are able to restrict the transmission of damaging mutations to the next gener...
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Understanding the source of regenerative ability in animals
NIH Director ’ s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series DeWitt Stetten Jr. Lecture Established by NIGMS in 1982 and presented annually in honor of Dr. Stetten, the third NIGMS director, this annual lecture is part of the Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series. Salamanders and starfish might be “ simpler ” than humans, but they far surpass us in one major way — the ability to regenerate tissues and regrow lost limbs. Dr. S á nchez Alvarado studies regeneration using the flatworm planaria Schmidtea mediterranea. Remarkably, when halved or quartered (even by high school students) this organism can clone...
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 4, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Living in the Cold -- Adaptations in Hibernation
NIH Neuroscience Series Seminar Dr. Li ’ s lab studies the structure and function of retinal synapses and circuits. Although they know the basic structure and major cell types of the retina, it remains much of a " black box " in terms of the connections and functions of these neurons. Their long-term research goal is to understand how the neuronal circuits are wired in this " black box " under normal conditions and how the circuits are altered during pathological processes. Both pieces of information will be crucial for the design of biological and/or prosthetic interventions aiming to restore vis...
Source: Videocast - All Events - September 14, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Staghorn coral
(A. millepora). A recent study suggests that corals in the Great Barrier Reef have enough genetic variation to adapt to and survive rising ocean temperatures for at least another century. More about this image Using genetic samples and computer simulations, ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - September 13, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: video

Boosting bacteria's productivity
Chemical engineers have designed a genetic switch that allows them to dramatically boost bacteria’s production of useful chemicals. More about this image Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) chemical engineers have designed a novel genetic switch that allows them to ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - September 13, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: video

NIH Research Festival - Plenary Session II
During this session, we will hear about recent research advances in the areas of immunodeficiency, rare diseases, genetic disorders, and membrane proteins.For more information go tohttps://researchfestival.nih.gov/2018/plenary-sessionsAir date: 9/13/2018 10:00:00 AM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - September 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Base editing: chemistry on a target nucleotide in the genome of living cells
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Marshall W. Nirenberg Lecture Dr. Liu ’ s research integrates chemistry and evolution to illuminate biology and enable next-generation therapeutics. His major research interests include the engineering, evolution, and in vivo delivery of genome editing proteins such as base editors to study and treat genetic diseases; the evolution of proteins with novel therapeutic potential using phage-assisted continuous evolution (PACE); and the discovery of bioactive synthetic small molecules and synthetic polymers using DNA-templated organic synthesis and DNA-encoded libraries.F...
Source: Videocast - All Events - August 28, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

WALS Lecture - Base editing: chemistry on a target nucleotide in the genome of living cells
Dr. Liu ’ s research integrates chemistry and evolution to illuminate biology and enable next-generation therapeutics. His major research interests include the engineering, evolution, and in vivo delivery of genome editing proteins such as base editors to study and treat genetic diseases; the evolution of proteins with novel therapeutic potential using phage-assisted continuous evolution (PACE); and the discovery of bioactive synthetic small molecules and synthetic polymers using DNA-templated organic synthesis and DNA-encoded libraries.For more information go tohttps://oir.nih.gov/wals/2018-2019/base-editing-chemist...
Source: Videocast - All Events - August 27, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Genomics & Health Disparities Lecture: Towards Understanding the Role of Population Diversity in Cancer Genome Science
Genomics and Health Disparities Lecture Series John Carpten, PhD is Professor and Chair for the Department of Translational Genomics. His training and professional experiences include postdoctoral training at the National Human Genome Research Institute/NIH, and serving as Deputy Director of Research at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen). Dr. Carpten ’ cancer research program spans multiple disciplines including germline genetics for disease risk and predisposition, somatic cancer genomics, health disparities research, cell biology, functional genomics, and precision medicine. The primary focus of h...
Source: Videocast - All Events - August 15, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

A newly engineered bacteria could help deliver nitrogen gas to plants, reducing the need for costly,
To enable plants to take advantage of Earth's nitrogen-rich atmosphere -- and reduce the need for fertilizer -- scientists have genetically engineered bacteria that can make use of nitrogen gas, a process called nitrogen fixation. If scientists can apply this engineering method -- in which ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - August 4, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: video

A feat of reverse engineering!
NSF funded researchers @tuftsu have developed a genetically modified yeast that can more efficiently consume a sugar called xylose. Changing the menu for yeast from glucose to xylose can lead to many advances including biofuel production. For more information: (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - June 14, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: video

NCI Support for Cancer Immunology
Immunonology IG Seminar Norman E. “ Ned ” Sharpless, M.D., was officially sworn in as the 15th director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) on October 17, 2017. Prior to his appointment, Dr. Sharpless served as the director of the University of North Carolina (UNC) Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, a position he held since January 2014. Dr. Sharpless was a Morehead Scholar at UNC – Chapel Hill and received his undergraduate degree in mathematics. He went on to pursue his medical degree from the UNC School of Medicine, graduating with honors and distinction in 1993. He then completed his internal ...
Source: Videocast - All Events - June 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Exploring adult brain plasticity following adverse developmental conditions
NIH Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Adverse conditions during development, including stress in early life or the presence of a neurodevelopmental disorder, can set the stage for enduring behavioral impairments that last a lifetime. While it would be ideal to prevent or reverse such occurrences during the developmental period, in the absence of these options, approaches designed to modify residual plasticity in the adult brain may help to optimize function and mitigate problematic behaviors. Using rodent models of early life stress-induced anxiety and hyperactivity, as well as those of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), Dr....
Source: Videocast - All Events - June 11, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

B cells in Autoimmune diseases: Focus on Sj ö gren's Syndrome
NIDCR Clinical Research Fellowship Grand Rounds B cells play a complex role in the development of systemic autoimmune diseases, especially in primary Sj ö gren's syndrome, a progressive condition that damages saliva and tear glands and leads to dry mouth, dry eyes, and other symptoms. Dr. Jacques-Olivier Pers will outline growing evidence that regulatory B lymphocytes (Breg) may blunt the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune disease, and thus may be potential targets for treatment. Studies of distinct B cell subsets that play differing roles in autoimmune diseases are providing new insights into Breg development and im...
Source: Videocast - All Events - April 11, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

CC Grand Rounds: New Findings in Genetic Bone Diseases 1) X-linked Form of Osteogenesis Imperfecta Caused by Defective Intramembrane Proteolysis and 2) Cracking the " Tough Nut " : Somatic Mutations in the Candle Wax Bone Disease Melorheostosis
CC Grand Rounds:New Findings in Genetic Bone Diseases " 1) X-linked Form of Osteogenesis Imperfecta Caused by Defective Intramembrane Proteolysis and 2) Cracking the " Tough Nut " : Somatic Mutations in the Candle Wax Bone Disease MelorheostosisFor more information go tohttp://www.cc.nih.gov/about/news/grcurrent.htmlAir date: 4/25/2018 12:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - March 26, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Rapid, genetically tailored N-of-1 neurotherapeutics: a case study in Batten disease
NIH Neuroscience Series Seminar Dr. Yu ’ s laboratory leads genome-wide searches for rare single-gene causes of autism to reveal ASD ’ s underlying genomic architecture, to understand its neurobiological causes, and to illuminate possible treatments. For instance, they are studying whole exome sequencing data from a large cohort of patients recruited via the Autism Sequencing Consortium, and have uncovered a striking enrichment of gene knockouts, especially in girls, and several dozen novel candidate genes, including several of special neurobiological interest responsible for glutamatergic and serotonergic sign...
Source: Videocast - All Events - March 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

PD-1 Cancer Immunotherapy
NCI Center for Cancer Research Eminent Lecture Series Gordon J. Freeman, PhD works in the Department of Medical Oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and is Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Freeman earned his BA in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and PhD in Microbiology and Molecular Genetics from Harvard University. His research has identified the major pathways that control the immune response by inhibiting T cell activation (PD-1/PD-L1 and B7-2/CTLA-4) or stimulating T cell activation (B7-2/CD28). In 2000, Dr. Freeman discovered PD-L1 and PD-L2, and showed they were ligands for PD-1, thus def...
Source: Videocast - All Events - March 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

From Germline Genetics to Function: Making Sense of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Pancreatic Cancer Risk
NIH Directors Seminar Series Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States and the seventh world-wide. This seminar will discuss results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), conducted within the NCI-led Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium. This collaborative effort has identified over 20 common pancreatic cancer risk loci. Genomic and functional characterization of a subset of these loci will be presented. These examples highlight different molecular mechanisms underlying cancer risk and genes found to be important for a wide range of processes incl...
Source: Videocast - All Events - March 1, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Under Your Skin: Molecules and Cells for Touch and Pain
The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) presents the integrative Medicine Research Lecture Series. The series provides overviews of the current state of research and practice involving complementary health approaches and explores perspectives on the emerging discipline of integrative medicine. Dr. Alexander Chesler, Ph.D., Principal Investigator, Section on Sensory Cells and Circuits Intramural Lab, NCCIH, is our guest speaker for this lecture. The somatosensory system enables us to detect touch, temperature and painful stimuli. By studying patients with a rare, inherited disease, Alexander Che...
Source: Videocast - All Events - February 26, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Biowulf Seminar Series: How to build a dog in 2,392,715,236 simple steps
Biowulf Seminar Series The Biowulf seminar series continues with talks by Biowulf users. The first such seminar features Heidi Parker, the Senior Staff Scientist for the Dog Genome Project at NHGRI The NHGRI Dog Genome Project at NIH and focuses on the genetics of health and body structure in the domestic dog. We are particularly interested in the variation represented in individual dog breeds, which allows us to focus on locating genes involved in both canine cancer and the morphologic traits. Our research yields not only an understanding of how genes interact to create the modern dog breeds we see today and how we can ke...
Source: Videocast - All Events - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Sensing from within: how the immune system discriminates friend from foe
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series The Fitzgerald lab is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling the inflammatory response. We are interested in determining how the immune system discriminates between pathogens, resident microflora and host molecules to both protect the host from infection and avoid damaging inflammatory diseases. We employ multifaceted approaches including immunology, biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics to understand these mechanisms.For more information go tohttps://oir.nih.gov/wals/2017-2018/Air date: 4/25/2018 3:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - February 14, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Preclinical cancer-target validation: How not to be wrong
Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Published and unpublished studies by investigators in the pharmaceutical industry indicate that a disturbingly high number of academic laboratories' reports nominating potential new cancer-drug targets are either non-reproducible or, if reproducible, are not sufficiently robust to form the basis for drug-discovery efforts. The reasons are likely multifactorial, including the ubiquitous use of " down " assays in cancer biology (e.g. decreased cell proliferation, decreased tumor growth, etc.) that incorporate chemical and genetic perturbants that are prone to cause off-target effe...
Source: Videocast - All Events - January 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Who knew mosquitoes could go on diets? This species is foregoing human blood for floral nectar
Most mosquitoes in a species called Wyeomyia smithii refuse blood meals in favor of sweet floral nectar. New research is helping to explain the evolutionary genetics of the switch from blood sucker to flower fanatic.This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - January 12, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: video

Single cell analysis of the effector T cell transcriptome
Immunonology IG Seminar Dr. Thomas Ciucci is a post-doctoral fellow in Dr. R é my Bosselut ’ s group within the Laboratory of Immune Cell Biology (LICB). He received a Ph.D. in Genetics and Immunology from the University of Nice, France in 2012. His doctoral research work investigated the relationship between inflammatory immune cells, the tumor environment and bone tissue. Dr. Ciucci joined Dr. Bosselut ’ s group in 2013 to pursue his interests in the regulation of T cell responses. His research has focused on two aspects of T cell differentiation during the immune response. The first, identified a prev...
Source: Videocast - All Events - January 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Genetic Compensation and Transcriptional Adaptation
NCI's Center for Cancer Research (CCR) Grand Rounds is a weekly lecture series addressing current research in clinical and molecular oncology. Speakers are leading national and international researchers and clinicians.Air date: 1/19/2018 12:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - January 3, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Secrets of butterfly wings revealed!
How do genes shape and color a butterfly’s wings? George Washington University evolutionary geneticist Arnaud Martin is using CRISPR Cas9, a gene editing technique, to determine how changes in the 'painting gene' WntA result in different wing shapes and patterns in butterflies. This research ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - December 21, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: video

Using Biophysical Protein Models to Map Genetic Variation to Phenotypes (Image 1)
A research project by the University of Idaho looks at how changes in amino acids lead to changes in the characteristics of living organisms. The project focuses on protein biophysical models and uses a diverse set of experimental systems, molecular and mathematical modeling. In this figure, the ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - December 13, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: video

Using Biophysical Protein Models to Map Genetic Variation to Phenotypes (Image 2)
The central scientific hypothesis of the research project "Using biophysical protein models to map genetic variation to phenotypes" by the University of Idaho is that biophysical models of proteins provide an efficient framework for predicting how amino acid changes (left side) -- alone, in ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - December 13, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: video

Simulation shows HIV capsid interacting with its environment
The genetic material of the HIV virus is encased in multiple structures that hide it from the host immune system. The capsid, in blue, protects the virus after it enters a cell and shuttles it to the nucleus, where it completes the process of infection. More about this image A ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - December 7, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: video

Scientists fight cancer’s resistance by re-programming chromatin
Scientists have developed an effective new strategy for treating cancer, which has wiped out the disease to near completion in cellular cultures in the laboratory. The treatment works by controlling chromatin, a group of macromolecules -- including DNA, RNA and proteins -- that houses genetic ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - November 29, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: video

Unraveling the complexities of tryptase form and function in humans
Immunonology IG Seminar Dr. Jonathan Lyons received his undergraduate education from Pomona College, and a Doctorate of Medicine from the University of Southern California in 2007. Dr. Lyons completed residency training in Internal Medicine at the University of California, San Diego, in 2010, remaining an additional year as a Chief Medical Resident. He concluded his formal medical training as a clinical fellow in Allergy and Immunology at NIAID in 2014. Following completion of fellowship, Jonathan was selected for the NIAID Transition Program in Clinical Research, and he is currently an Assistant Clinical Investigator in t...
Source: Videocast - All Events - November 14, 2017 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Towards the assembly of a synthetic bacterial cell
NIH Director's Seminar Series Bacterial spores, amongst the hardiest organisms on earth, are dormant cell types produced by certain species to protect the cell ’ s genetic material from harsh environmental conditions. Spores of Bacillus subtilis are encased in a thick protein shell, the “ coat ” , which participates in conferring the amazing resistance properties of spores. Using a combination of classical genetics and biochemistry, buttressed by cytological, biophysical, and computational techniques, we are studying spore coat assembly to understand how cells build and localize large static biological st...
Source: Videocast - All Events - November 9, 2017 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Loss of Type I Interferon Negative Regulation – Lessons from Human Genetics
Immunonology IG Seminar Dr. Dusan Bogunovic is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Microbiology, Department of Pediatrics at Mindich Child Health and Development Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. He obtained his PhD in Immunology at NYU Medical School where he studied innate immune signaling in dendritic cells as a function of their ability to mount an adaptive immune response against melanoma. That work has inspired two clinical trials. He did his postdoctoral fellowship at The Rockefeller University with Jean-Laurent Casanova where he studied how host genetics contribute to inf...
Source: Videocast - All Events - November 2, 2017 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Stem Cell Aging
GeroScience Interest Group The Trans-NIH GeroScience Interest Group (GSIG), cordially invites you to its fall seminar, featuring Dr. Sean Morrison. Dr. Morrison is the Director of the Children ’ s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern and is the Mary McDermott Cook Chair in Pediatric Genetics as well as an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. The Morrison laboratory studies the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate the function of stem cells and cancer cells in the nervous and hematopoietic systems. The laboratory is particularly interested in the mechanisms that regulate stem...
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 26, 2017 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Translational fidelity and neurodegeneration
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series The goal of the Ackerman laboratory is to define the molecular pathways necessary to maintain homeostasis in both developing and aging mammalian neurons. To do this they utilize forward genetics to identify mutations that are associated with loss of neurons in the aging mouse brain. To further dissect pathways underlying homeostatic disruption and disease, they also use forward genetics to identify genetic variants that enhance or suppress neural phenotypes. Their approach allows the identification, without a priori assumptions, of molecules critical for neuron homeostasis ...
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 26, 2017 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

From human genetics to therapeutic hypothesis for nervous system disorders: pain and Alzheimer ’ s disease
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Dr. Sheng is Vice-President, Neuroscience, and responsible for directing neuroscience research and drug discovery efforts at Genentech. An expert on synapse biology, Dr. Sheng is now focused on the genetic underpinnings and pathogenic mechanisms of neurodegenerative disease, including Alzheimer ’ s, Parkinson ’ s, fronto-temporal dementia. In this translational context, recent research activities of the Sheng lab have centered on the molecular and cellular mechanisms of synapse loss, regulation of mitophagy, microglial involvement in neurodegeneration, and funct...
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 26, 2017 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Principles of Epigenetics and Chromatin in Development and Human Disease
NCI ’ s Center for Cancer Research (CCR) Grand Rounds Dr. Ali Shilatifard, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics of the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, is a world renown biochemist and molecular biologist. He is a respected expert in the field of transcription and epigenetics, specifically as it relates to cancer biology. He has an immense interest in understanding the intricate molecular mechanisms of the regulation of gene expression, the mechanisms that activate or suppress a particular gene ’ s traits. As a Jane Coffin Childs postdoctoral fellow...
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 23, 2017 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

How Telomeres Solve the End-Protection Problem
NCI Center for Cancer Research Eminent Lecture Series Dr. de Lange's lab studies telomeres, protective elements at the ends of chromosomes critical for the stability and maintenance of the genetic information. Deficiency in telomere function can cause genomic alterations found in cancer, and the gradual loss of telomeres contributes to aging of human cells. Dr. de Lange seeks to understand how telomere protection is established and what happens when telomere function is lost during the early stages of tumor formation. Dr. de Lange ’ s group is working to determine the mechanism by which each shelterin protein inhibi...
Source: Videocast - All Events - September 11, 2017 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

CC Grand Rounds: Contemporary Clinical Medicine: Great Teachers: Discovering New Genetic Syndromes at the NIH Clinical Research Center: Carney-Stratakis Syndrome, 3PAS, iMAD, X-LAG and Others
For more information go tohttp://www.cc.nih.gov/about/news/grcurrent.htmlAir date: 9/20/2017 12:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - August 28, 2017 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Optogenetics -- revolutionary new research technique (Image 2)
Optogenetics is a revolutionary new research technique that enables scientists to use light to precisely control the activity of neurons in the brain. In optogenetics, light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, known as microbial opsins, are genetically targeted to specific cells, so that upon light ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - July 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: video

Research in the Luo Lab, Stanford University (Image 1)
Cerebellar Purkinje cells (four large cell bodies, with elaborate dendrites above them) and granule cells (below the Purkinje cells) that are labeled by a genetic mosaic method called MADM, a method used to reveal the relationships between lineage, birth timing and wiring properties in flies. ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - June 21, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: video

Hematopoietic Stem Cells Aging – Mechanisms, Consequences and Interventions
The Trans-NIH GeroScience Interest Group (GSIG), cordially invites you to its summer seminar, featuring Dr. Emmanuelle Passegu é . Dr. Passegue is a Professor in the Department of Genetics and Development at the Columbia University Medical Center and Director of the Columbia Stem Cell Initiative (CSCI) in New York. She is widely recognized for her expertise on hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) biology. Her research over the past 10-years has focused on understanding the cellular and molecular processes controlling HSC activity during homeostasis, and addressing how these regulations are changed in myeloid malignancies a...
Source: Videocast - All Events - June 20, 2017 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video