Backpacks And Bird Brains: The Week ’s Best Psychology Links
Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web Many birds have impressive cognitive abilities such as good memory, tool-making talents, and problem-solving skills — yet they don’t have the part of the brain called the neocortex which is key to those abilities in mammals. But now researchers have discovered that a region of the pigeon brain called the pallium seems to be organised in a similar way to mammals’ neocortex, reports Virginia Morell at Science, suggesting it is responsible for bird cognition. Most of us would go out of our way to avoid hurting othe...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - September 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Weekly links Source Type: blogs

Update: A life of cognitive and physical exercise helps you stay sharp in your 70s and beyond
Welcome to a new edition of SharpBrains’ e‑newsletter, featuring 13 fascinating brain research findings, useful resources–and a brain teaser to test your attention skills. #1. Good news of the month: Elders today are in significantly better shape–physically and cognitively–than three decades ago #2. A distinction WITH a difference: Actual, sustained practice–not mere knowledge–is needed to harness neuroplasticity and improve cognition over time #3. “Be mindful that with the rapid changes we are experiencing, our brains are going through accelerated learning. Our brains get tired ...
Source: SharpBrains - September 25, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Technology adhd anticholinergic drugs Behavioral Health Boehringer Ingelheim brain teaser for adults brain training brain-teaser brains Click Therapeutics cog Source Type: blogs

A Discussion of Targeting the Mechanisms of Cardiovascular Aging
This very readable open access paper discusses some of the mechanisms involved in cardiovascular aging. As for many such publications, and to my eyes at least, it leans too much towards the details of the aged metabolism rather than towards the underlying causes that make the cells of an aged cardiovascular system behave differently. Near all medicine for age-related disease has so far focused on trying to change the way in which cells behave in response to the causes of aging, without addressing those causes, and, as a result, beneficial outcomes have been marginal at best. It is somewhere between very hard and impossible...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 25, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Why a Root Cause Analysis is often useless in patients with IVF failure
Many patientswho fail an IVF cycle, want the doctor to tell them exactly why the cycle failed. They want the doctor to get at the root cause , and this is completely logical. After all, once the root cause has been identified, the doctor will be able to fix the problem, and the next IVF cycle will succeed.Sadly, life doesn't work this way, because biological systems are complex, and it's not possible to get a simple answer to what seems to be a very simple question. This is because there are multiple interlocking parts , and it's not possible to tease them out individually to find out why a particular cycle failed.The real...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - September 25, 2020 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

Medin Amyloid Aggregation with Age Causes Cerebral Vascular Dysfunction
There are twenty or so different proteins in the body that can become altered in ways that cause them to aggregate into solid deposits known as amyloids, spreading and encouraging other molecules of the same protein to do likewise. Amyloids are a phenomenon of old individuals and old tissues, for reasons that are much debated and no doubt quite complex. Some of these amyloids are well studied and well known to be harmful, such as the amyloid-β involved in Alzheimer's disease. Others are known but less well studied, and whether or not they are harmful is a question mark. The progression of knowledge over the pas...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 23, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Study: Elders today are in significantly better shape –physically and cognitively–than three decades ago
Conclusions: The results of this study provide strong evidence that cognitive performance is better in more recent cohorts of older people compared to their counterparts measured 28 years earlier. (Editor’s Note: The cognitive performance measures used underlie traits such as memory, attention, processing speed and problem solving.) The Study in Context: Brain scans show lower accumulation of tau and amyloid pathology among cognitive “super-agers” Reminder: A brain-friendly lifestyle is the best approach to delay cognitive decline and dementia Cognitive training, diet, exercise, and vascular management ...
Source: SharpBrains - September 23, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness cognitive decline cognitive performance tests cognitive-abilities cognitive-performance Cognitive-tests elders lower cognitive abilities older Source Type: blogs

Orbit Subretinal Delivery System for Gene Therapy: Interview with Mike Keane, CTO of Gyroscope Therapeutics
Gyroscope Therapeutics, a retinal gene therapy company, has developed the Orbit subretinal delivery system (SDS). The technology is designed to deliver therapies to the retina without the need for invasive procedures, such as vitrectomies, which involve removing the gel-like substance within the eye, or retinotomies, which involve making a hole in the retina. The company hopes that by combining medical devices that allow minimally invasive delivery with innovative gene therapies they can develop transformative therapeutic strategies. Gyroscope Therapeutics recently announced that the FDA has granted 510(k) clearance...
Source: Medgadget - September 22, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Genetics Medicine Source Type: blogs

Dealing With Anxiety in the Time of COVID-19
Now that we’re in the middle of a pandemic, more people than ever are experiencing anxiety, especially those who struggled with mental health issues before COVID-19. And to make things even worse, many of our coping mechanisms, like going to the gym or hanging out with friends, have been taken away. In today’s show, our host, Gabe Howard, talks with Dr. Jasleen Chhatwal, who helps explain why so many people are having anxiety symptoms and what we can do about it. We want to hear from you — Please fill out our listener survey by clicking the graphic below! SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW   Guest informati...
Source: World of Psychology - September 21, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: Anxiety and Panic Disorders Mental Health and Wellness The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

Genetic testing: Could there be unintended consequences? [PODCAST]
“Both clinical and direct-to-consumer genetic testing have become significantly less costly and more common, providing people with access to a wealth of information about everything from their ethnicity and family lineage to their risk for certain diseases and how they will respond to medications such as blood thinners and antidepressants. But before you decide to […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 21, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/the-podcast-by-kevinmd" rel="tag" > The Podcast by KevinMD < /a > < /span > Tags: Podcast Genetics Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 21st 2020
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 20, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

International commission: go slow with heritable human genome editing
The international commission on heritable human genome editing (HHGE), formed by the US National Academies of Medicine and Science and the Royal Society of Great Britain, has issued it report.  The 224-page report is freely available for reading here, and a summary news report can be accessed here. The upshot:  not too fast.  The commission’s … Continue reading "International commission: go slow with heritable human genome editing" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Genetics Health Care Stem Cells abortion bioethics biotechnology enhancement human dignity reproduction syndicated Source Type: blogs

Recent Studies on the Changing Gut Microbiome in Aging
Today's research materials are a selection of recent studies on the gut microbiome and its relationship to the aging process. The scientific community has in recent years uncovered a great deal of new information regarding the way in which the gut microbiome both influences health and exhibits detrimental changes with age. Some of the microbes of the digestive tract are responsible for the generation of beneficial metabolites such as butyrate, indoles, and propionate. Unfortunately these populations decline in number with advancing age, and this negatively impacts tissue function throughout the body. Additionally, harmful ...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 17, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Time for flu shots — getting one is more important than ever!
Wondering when to get your flu shot? The best time is before influenza (flu) starts circulating widely. For most people, September or October is ideal for protection through the whole flu season, as the immune response from the vaccine wanes over time. And while changes and restrictions due to COVID-19 may make getting a flu vaccine less convenient for some this year, the pandemic makes it more important than ever. Why do I need to get a flu vaccine yearly? Influenza A and Influenza B cause most cases of flu in humans. Both have many strains that constantly change, accumulating genetic mutations that disguise them from the...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Elise Merchant, MD Tags: Cold and Flu Coronavirus and COVID-19 Vaccines Source Type: blogs

Metformin Found to Reduce Liver Inflammation
Metformin produces a modest and unreliable extension of life in animal models, and human data shows a small increase in life span in diabetic patients. This is thought to work as a calorie restriction mimetic drug, triggering one slice of the beneficial response to a reduced nutrient intake. Researchers here dig further in the biochemistry of the drug, and find that it reduces liver inflammation in addition to other, known effects. This is interesting, and suggestive that any benefits it produces are going to be much smaller in healthier older adults with lower levels of chronic inflammation. It doesn't change the fact tha...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 17, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The Most Reliable COVID-19 Online Resources: Your Ultimate Guide
In the era of fake news, mask naysayers and, dare we say, covidiots, relevant news often gets lost under the rubble of conspiracy theories and what not. 2020 already feels like a lucid fever dream as it is and we would be better off being well-informed by trustworthy sources of information. However, even leading authorities are lagging behind in this respect. The WHO only recently stopped releasing its daily PDF COVID reports in favour of an online dashboard. On the other hand, Johns Hopkins put one together in 3 days in January. It took the WHO 8 months since the first outbreak to have its own. The health authority als...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 17, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Digital Health Research Healthcare Policy Security & Privacy testing online resources digital technology applications covid covid19 Good Judgement Project WHO sewage data vaccine who dashboard worldometer Johns Hopkins JHU Source Type: blogs

Inside Schizophrenia: Love, Dating, and Marriage with Schizophrenia
Can people with schizophrenia fall in love? Can they date or even get married? In today’s episode, host Rachel Star Withers (a woman who lives with schizophrenia) and co-host Gabe Howard review their own past romantic experiences. They also interview Andrew and Stephanie Downing, authors of Marriage and Schizophrenia: Eyes on the Prize. Listen to learn about their incredible journey of overcoming schizophrenia and building a healthy, rewarding, and happy marriage. Computer Generated Transcript of “Love, Dating, Marriage with Schizophrenia” Episode Editor’s Note: Please be mindful that this trans...
Source: World of Psychology - September 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: Inside Schizophrenia Marriage and Divorce Motivation and Inspiration Podcast Relationships Sexuality Source Type: blogs

Preimplantation Genetic Screening / Diagnosis | PGD | PGD (in Hindi)
(Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog)
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - September 15, 2020 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

Streptomyces – the smell of life
The Mall in Central Park, New York City in late autumn on a rainy day   Did you know that humans can detect the smell of wet soil 200,000 times better than sharks sense blood? [1] It appears our olfactory abilities are not that bad after all, at least when it comes to finding potential sources of food. Petrichor, the term to describe the scent was coined in 1964, by scientists I. Bear and R.G. Thomas, meaning “petros” – stone and “ichor” – the blood of the gods [2] in Greek. Divine or not, Streptomyces is a genus of over 800 bacterial species and subspecies responsible for the eart...
Source: GIDEON blog - September 15, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology Microbiology News Source Type: blogs

Clearance of Senescent Cells Reverses the Peripheral Neuropathy Caused by Chemotherapy
A primary goal of chemotherapy is to force cancerous cells into programmed cell death or cellular senescence. Cellular senescence is a state of growth arrest that should normally be triggered by exactly the sort of damage and dysfunction exhibited by cancer cells, but cancer is characterized by a mutation-induced ability to bypass those restrictions. Chemotherapy remains the primary approach to cancer therapy, but chemotherapeutic agents are still at best only marginally discriminating. Treating cancer with chemotherapy has always been a fine balance between harming the cancer and harming the patient. Even in the best of o...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 14, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Evidence for Familial Longevity to be Largely Cultural Rather than Genetic
It is certainly possible that a small number of people have mutations or genetic variants that confer notable longevity. The small lineage exhibiting a PAI-1 loss of function mutation springs to mind as an example of this sort of thing. But for the overwhelming majority of long-lived lineages, the evidence on genetic contributions to longevity tends to support the hypothesis that familial longevity arises much more from lifestyle and environment than from inherited genetics. The data from very large genetic databases points to genetic variants contributing little to variation in human life span. The data on exercise, diet,...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 14, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 14th 2020
This study is the first to provide a direct link between this inflammation and plaque development - by way of IFITM3. Scientists know that the production of IFITM3 starts in response to activation of the immune system by invading viruses and bacteria. These observations, combined with the new findings that IFITM3 directly contributes to plaque formation, suggest that viral and bacterial infections could increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease development. Indeed, researchers found that the level of IFITM3 in human brain samples correlated with levels of certain viral infections as well as with gamma-secretase activ...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 13, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Anticholinergic drugs found to significantly increase risk of cognitive decline, especially among those with Alzheimer ’s Disease biomarkers or genetic predisposition
Conclusions: aCH increased risk of incident MCI and cognitive decline, and effects were significantly enhanced among individuals with genetic risk factors and CSF-based AD pathophysiological markers. Findings underscore the adverse impact of aCH medications on cognition and the need for deprescribing trials, particularly among individuals with elevated risk for AD. The Study in Context: First, do no harm? Common anticholinergic meds seen to increase dementia risk Study: 46.7 million Americans have Alzheimer’s Disease brain pathology today, so it’s urgent to prevent or at least delay progression to clinical di...
Source: SharpBrains - September 11, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Alzheimer’s Disease anticholinergic anticholinergic medications biomarkers cognition cognitive decline cognitively dementia lower cognitive abilities lower cognitive ability MCI mild-cog Source Type: blogs

Targeting Cellular Senescence to Heal Non-Healing Wounds
An accumulation of senescent cells takes place throughout the body with age. Cells become senescent constantly, the vast majority as a consequence of hitting the Hayflick limit on replication of somatic cells. In youth, these cells are efficiently removed, either via programmed cell death, or destroyed by the immune system. In later life, removal processes slow down, while the damaged state of tissue provokes ever more cells into becoming senescent. In older people, this imbalance leads to a state in which a few percent of all cells in tissues are senescent at any given time. This is, unfortunately, more than enough to pro...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 10, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Long Lived Humans Do Not Exhibit Fewer Harmful Gene Variants
Why are long lived humans long lived? Why does this trait often run in families? One of the few firm advances in answering these questions is to rule out the hypothesis that long-lived lineages bear fewer detrimental gene variants. Several studies and study populations have indicated that there are just as many harmful variants present in the genomes of exceptionally long-lived people as are present in the rest of us. Beyond that, it remains to be seen as to just how much of exceptional longevity is in fact genetic. Broader genetic studies have in recent years continued to revise downward the contribution of genetics to va...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 9, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

HDAC9 Inhibition Slows the Progression of Osteoporosis in Old Mice
In this study, we report that HDAC9 plays an important role in maintaining the balance between osteogenesis and adipogenesis of BMMSCs during aged-related bone mass loss. Furthermore, we found that the downregulation of HDAC9 could partially reverse the differentiation of aging BMMSCs and bone loss in mice by regulating autophagy. These results suggest that aged-related bone mass loss may be partially controlled by the HDAC9-meditated autophagy of BMMSCs. Link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13287-020-01785-6 (Source: Fight Aging!)
Source: Fight Aging! - September 7, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Sewage Data As A Surprising Predictor For COVID-19 Cases
You might not think much of them, but bodily fluids offer a treasure trove of information for medical diagnoses. Indeed, scientists are now looking past the drain and directly into sewage to gather data about COVID-19.  You might not have heard about it, but it turns out it is possible to detect and measure the amount of virus DNA in sewage samples which can predict case number by about 7-10 days in advance. Several countries are already employing this method to predict infection cases; and it is yet another example of an unusual association between a data source and outcomes. Combining the information gathered fro...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 7, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Healthcare Design Security & Privacy prediction rna epidemiology gastrointestinal covid sewage data covid-19 cdc wastewater Yale Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 7th 2020
In conclusion, using a large cohort with rich health and DNA methylation data, we provide the first comparison of six major epigenetic measures of biological ageing with respect to their associations with leading causes of mortality and disease burden. DNAm GrimAge outperformed the other measures in its associations with disease data and associated clinical traits. This may suggest that predicting mortality, rather than age or homeostatic characteristics, may be more informative for common disease prediction. Thus, proteomic-based methods (as utilised by DNAm GrimAge) using large, physiologically diverse protein sets for p...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Charlie Gard ’ s Parents: Our New Baby Ollie Has ‘ Lit up Our Lives ’
In August, Chris and Connie Yates welcomed  baby Ollie, born a day after Charlie's birthday. Charlie Gard, who suffered from a rare genetic condition, died in 2017, after an extensive court battled that followed by media around the world. The... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Is Age-Related Polyploidy a Beneficial Adaptation to a Damaged Environment?
Cells with abnormal chromosome counts, a state known as aneuploidy, are considered to be a problem. The evidence suggests that such cells accumulate with age, a form of damage and dysfunction that is associated with cellular senescence, and is expected to contribute to age-related degeneration and disease. Here, researchers argue that having duplicate chromosomes, polypoidy, might actually be protective, a beneficial adaptation that emerges in the damaged environment of aged tissues. This may be the case, and it may also be true that it is both protective and harmful. The weight of evidence to date continues to point to an...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 2, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

An Update on Lygenesis: Functional Liver Organoids in the Lymph Nodes of Pigs
Lygenesis is the company founded to conduct the clinical development of research into the use of lymph nodes to support the growth and function of organoids. Lymph nodes are found in the lymphatic system, places where immune cells can coordinate with one another in order to produce an immune response. Mammals have more lymph nodes than they need, and so it is possible to insert small pieces of organ tissue into a few lymph nodes, transforming them into miniature organs, without harming the immune system. This can in principle work well for factory organs like the liver and thymus, which carry out functions that do not have...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 1, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

The RNAAgeCalc Transcriptional Aging Clock
Omics data provides a wealth of metrics that correlate with age, quite well in some cases. Weighted combinations of CpG site methylation status, protein levels, and RNA transcript levels have all been found to measure age, and new and improved versions of these aging clocks are introduced on a regular basis. For people with a greater burden of damage and age-related disease, measured age tends to be greater than chronological age. So there is some hope that these approaches are actually measuring biological age, and can thus be used to speed up the development of rejuvenation therapies. Unfortunately it is unclear as to ho...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 31, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Comparing the Genetics of Large and Small Long-Lived Rodents
Research into the comparative biology of aging seeks to identify important mechanisms determining life span and the progression of aging by comparing different near neighbor species with very different life spans. In this case, researchers are comparing the genetics of naked mole-rats, as a small long-lived rodent, with beavers, as a large long-lived rodent, in order to shed more light on mammalian aging. Discerning the genetic factors that affect the aging process, in particular how they control lifespan, is one of the important yet unanswered questions in biology and evolution. Rodent species differ more than 10...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 31, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

How to Grieve the Death of Someone You Don ’ t Know
Grief is healthy. The death of a loved one is an inevitable, certain, unavoidable, and inexorable part of life. Surviving family and friends experience an emotional cascade of grief, regardless of how their loved one passed. Bereavement has no formula, no time limit, or right or wrong. Grieving is an important part of the process of healing. Each of us grieves in our own time and way. Neither wisdom nor understanding makes it easier, because those are rational thoughts. Grief is not rational or linear. In grief, the rationale is useless. Emotions are dictated by the limbic system in your brain, which is the seat of your e...
Source: World of Psychology - August 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Grief and Loss Publishers YourTango grieving Mourning Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 31st 2020
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 30, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The impact of COVID-19 on human kindness
Human kindness is a trait that, though inherent within our genetic make-up, can also be a learned behavior. The absence of human kindness is blatantly visible to others when a lack of compassion and/or empathy permeates within an interaction with another human being. As our daily life responsibilities continue at a steady state: mundane things […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 29, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/cristina-carballo-perelman" rel="tag" > Cristina Carballo-Perelman, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Physician COVID-19 coronavirus Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

FOXO3a Suppresses Genomic Instability
FOXO3a is one of the very few genes for which an association with longevity has been identified in multiple human studies - though one should bear in mind that even though it shows up fairly reliably, the effect size is small. Still, near all such associations between human genetic variants and longevity cannot be replicated. Given this, there is an interest in understanding exactly how FOXO3a acts to influence life span. Here, researchers provide evidence that is suggestive of an effect on the burden of mutations in nuclear DNA, particularly double strand breaks. This is interesting in the context of recent work that link...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 28, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Aging as a Target is a New Therapeutic Frontier
My attention was recently drawn to an open access commentary on the present early stage of the scientific initiative to treat aging as a medical condition. It was published earlier this year, and slipped past my notice amidst all of the other interesting papers emerging at the time. It is illustrative of a number of similar commentaries, in scientific journals, at conferences, and so forth, and is reflective of the present tenor of discussion among researchers. The scientific community is largely optimistic about the potential to intervene in the aging process, even if opinions vary widely as to how hard it will be, from a...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 27, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Increased Levels of Methylmalonic Acid May Raise the Risk of Metastasis in Older People
The article here discusses the interesting possibility that comparatively simple differences in circulating factors may be at the root of the higher risk of cancer metastasis in older people. Metastasis is the process by which cancer cells migrate from the primary tumor to form new tumors elsewhere. It is what makes cancers in much of the body hard to treat and ultimately fatal rather than merely harmful, problematic, but manageable. Thus targets that might potentially interfere in metastasis are of interest. As we get older, the risk that we will develop cancer increases, because we accumulate genetic mutations a...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 27, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Unnecessary and Redundant? Evaluating Canada ’s Genetic Non-Discrimination Act, 2017
Kathleen Hammond (McGill University), Unnecessary and Redundant? Evaluating Canada ’s Genetic Non-Discrimination Act, 2017, 98 Canadian Bar Rev. 3 (2020, Forthcoming): In 2017, Canada’s Genetic Non-Discrimination Act (GNDA) came into force. The GNDA’s enactment was prompted by concerns about genetic discrimination... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - August 27, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

A Gene Therapy Approach to Clearing Persistent Herpesviruses
Approaches that might effectively clear herpesviruses from the body are of considerable interest, as there is good evidence for the burden of persistent infection to have a meaningful impact on the pace of aging, largely via detrimental effects on the operation of the immune system over the course of years and decades. This is particularly true for cytomegalovirus, which may be a major cause of immunosenescence in near all people, but one might also look at the (presently disputed) evidence for HSV-1 to be a primary contributing cause of Alzheimer's disease. Infectious disease researchers have used a gene editing ...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 26, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Destroying Existing Microglia is Necessary for Replacement Strategies to Work
Today's open access research is a demonstration in mice of approaches to replace near all microglia in the central nervous system. Microglia are innate immune cells of the brain, involved not just in destroying pathogens and errant cells, but also in ensuring the correct function of neural connections. With the progression of aging, their behavior shifts to become more harmful and inflammatory, and their numbers include ever more senescent cells. Senescent cells generate tissue dysfunction and chronic inflammation via the senescence-associated secretory phenotype, but beyond that microglia tend to adopt a more aggressive a...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 24, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Accordion sign – Cardiology MCQ – Answer
Accordion sign – Cardiology MCQ – Answer Accordion sign on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is seen in – Correct answer: 3. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy A focal crinkling of the right ventricular outflow tract and subtricuspid regions on MRI in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVD/C) has been called “accordion sign” [1]. It was observed in 60% of the mutation carriers and none of those without the mutation (p
Source: Cardiophile MD - August 24, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

The Prospects for LANDO Upregulation as a Treatment for Alzheimer's Disease
Of late, researchers have identified a process known as LC3-associated endocytosis (LANDO) by which cells can ingest and then break down the amyloid-β deposits associated with Alzheimer's disease. This raises the idea that perhaps some form of upregulation of LANDO would at least slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease, though the balance of evidence to date is beginning to suggest that amyloid-β is the wrong target, at least in later stages of the condition. Researchers here show that, in animal models, LANDO can reduce the inflammation of brain tissue associated with neurodegenerative conditions, a finding ...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 24, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The Language Race
My last post reviewed Donald M. Morrison ’s bookThe Coevolution of Language, Teaching, and Civil Discourse among Humans. This entry is a brief meditation inspired by my reading.The fossil skulls of our Homo ancestors show an amazingly rapid growth of theHomobrain.Homo habilis(2.8 million years ago) had a brain only slightly larger than that of a chimpanzee. By 200 thousand years ago, the brain had tripled in size. 2.6 million years is long by most standards but is very fast for an organ to triple in size, and is especially impressive when you realize that sustaining neurons requires much greater support in calories t...
Source: Babel's Dawn - August 24, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Blair Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 24th 2020
We report that electrical stimulation (ES) stimulation of post-stroke aged rats led to an improved functional recovery of spatial long-term memory (T-maze), but not on the rotating pole or the inclined plane, both tests requiring complex sensorimotor skills. Surprisingly, ES had a detrimental effect on the asymmetric sensorimotor deficit. Histologically, there was a robust increase in the number of doublecortin-positive cells in the dentate gyrus and SVZ of the infarcted hemisphere and the presence of a considerable number of neurons expressing tubulin beta III in the infarcted area. Among the genes that were unique...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 23, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Genetic DCM – Cardiology MCQ – Answer
Genetic DCM – Cardiology MCQ – Answer Association of genetic DCM (Dilated cardiomyopathy) – Correct answer: 4. All of the above. Truncation mutations in titin gene (TTN) was found in 13% of non familial DCM cases in one study [1]. LMNA and SCN5A mutations have been associated with DCM with cardiac conduction abnormalities [2]. Back to question References Angharad M Roberts, James S Ware, Daniel S Herman, Sebastian Schafer, John Baksi, Alexander G Bick, Rachel J Buchan, Roddy Walsh, Shibu John, Samuel Wilkinson, Francesco Mazzarotto, Leanne E Felkin, Sungsam Gong, Jacqueline A L MacArthur, Fiona Cunningha...
Source: Cardiophile MD - August 23, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

Aging Research Should be Far More of a Priority than is Presently the Case
For our species, aging is by far the greatest single cause of suffering and death. It is presently inevitable, affects everyone, and produces a drawn out decline of pain and disability, leading to a horrible death through progressive organ failure of one sort or another. The integrity of the mind is consumed along with the vitality of the body. Aging is the cause of death of 90% or more of the people who live in wealthier regions of the world, and the majority of those even in the poorest regions. More than 100,000 lives every day are lost to aging, and hundreds of millions more are suffering on their way to that fate. ...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 21, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Activism, Advocacy and Education Source Type: blogs

Adenosine Signaling via the A1 Receptor Reverses Age-Related Decline in Neutrophil Function
The objective of this study was to explore the age-driven changes in the EAD pathway and its impact on PMN function. PMNs from old mice failed to efficiently kill pneumococci ex vivo; however, supplementation with adenosine rescued this defect. To identify which adenosine receptors is involved, we used specific agonists and inhibitors. We found that A1 receptor signaling was crucial for PMN function as inhibition or genetic ablation of A1 impaired the ability of PMNs from young mice to kill pneumococci. Importantly, activation of A1 receptors rescued the age-associated defect in PMN function. In exploring mechanisms...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 21, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Genetic DCM – Cardiology MCQ
Genetic DCM – Cardiology MCQ Association of genetic DCM (Dilated cardiomyopathy): Lamin A/C gene (LMNA) Titin gene (TTN) Atrioventricular (AV block) All of the above Click here for the correct answer The post Genetic DCM – Cardiology MCQ appeared first on All About Cardiovascular System and Disorders. (Source: Cardiophile MD)
Source: Cardiophile MD - August 21, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

Centenarians are Comparatively Resistant to Age-Related Disease
Centenarians, people who survive to 100 years of age or more, are comparatively resistant to age-related disease. They are not in good shape in comparison to a much younger person, of course. They are much reduced in vigor and capacity, and aging has gnawed away at their bodies and minds. But nonetheless, the very modest goals of much of the aging research community - to slow aging and extend healthy life span by just a few years - leads to the view that centenarian biochemistry is an interesting place to look for the basis for treatments. If the goal is only a couple more years of life, then why not investigate how it is ...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 20, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs