Leakage of Mitochondrial DNA into the Cytosol Implicated in Parkinson's Disease
This study showed that the leakage of this mitochondrial nucleic material may occur as a result of mitochondrial dysfunction, which may involve genetic mutations in genes encoding mitochondrial proteins or incomplete degradation of mitochondrial dsDNA in the lysosome - which is a 'degradation factory' of the cell. Upon the leakage into the cytoplasm, this undegraded dsDNA is detected by a 'foreign' DNA sensor of the cytoplasm (IFI16) which then triggers the upregulation of mRNAs encoding for inflammatory proteins." Using a PD zebrafish model (gba mutant), the researchers demonstrated that a combination of PD-li...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 18, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

First, do no harm? Six reasons to approach anti-amyloid drug Aduhelm cautiously, if at all
6 ways the FDA’s approval of Aduhelm does more harm than good (STAT News): Like many people, I was shocked when the Food and Drug Administration ignored the advice of its neurological drugs advisory panel and broadly approved Biogen’s new drug, Aduhelm, even for populations never included in the clinical trials to assess the drug. I am not a casual bystander to this controversial decision. I am a physician who has been treating people with Alzheimer’s since 1982; an early researcher into the biology of amyloid, the brain protein that Aduhelm targets; someone with a strong personal family history of dement...
Source: SharpBrains - June 16, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Aduhelm amyloid anti-amyloid dementia FDA Food and Drug Administration neurological drugs Source Type: blogs

IT Exec to EHR vendors: We need these 7 features to put genetic data to work at the point of care
Penn Medicine ’s Brian Wells puts out a call to technology companies to incorporate new functionalities that could vastly improve how physicians personalize care and eradicate killer diseases.  (Source: Healthcare IT News Blog)
Source: Healthcare IT News Blog - June 15, 2021 Category: Information Technology Tags: Core Technologies, EHR, Precision medicine, Care Source Type: blogs

Million European Genome Alliance – bringing genetic medicine into the heart of European healthcare
Dr Layla McCay, director of international relations at the NHS Confederation, writes about a new initiative to sequence a million genomes by 2022 in Europe. (Source: Healthcare IT News Blog)
Source: Healthcare IT News Blog - June 15, 2021 Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs

Growing backlash against the FDA approval of unproven Alzheimer ’s treatment Aduhelm, by Biogen
ICER Issues Statement on the FDA’s Approval of Aducanumab for Alzheimer’s Disease (Institute for Clinical and Economic Review): The Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER) believes that the FDA, in approving aducanumab (Aduhelm™, Biogen) for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, has failed in its responsibility to protect patients and families from unproven treatments with known harms. Our review of the evidence was concordant with that of many independent experts: current evidence is insufficient to demonstrate that aducanumab benefits patients. The avenue forward has seemed clear: anothe...
Source: SharpBrains - June 14, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health aducanumab Aduhelm Alzheimer’s Disease Alzheimer’s disease treatment amyloid amyloid plaques amyloid-related imaging abnormalities ARIA Biogen brain swelling clinical benefit FDA ICER Janet Woodcock N Source Type: blogs

Reports of the Death of Diamyd's T1D Intervention Have Been Greatly Exaggerated
Remember Diamyd Medical?  I wrote about the company and even interviewed one of the company execs (Peter Zerhouni, who was then Director of Business Development) back in 2010 (see that post athttps://blog.sstrumello.com/2010/05/interview-with-diamyd-medical-ab.html). A year later, I wrote another post about it not being dead yet (seehttps://blog.sstrumello.com/2011/06/teplizumab-and-dpt-1-not-dead-yet.html), but it later appeared to actually be dead, and I basically lost interest.As it turns out, the Swedish biotech firm known as Diamyd Medical isn't dead after all! Diamyd Medical was founded by the Swedish entreprene...
Source: Scott's Web Log - June 14, 2021 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 14th 2021
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out mo...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 13, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Progress on Understanding Why Human Growth Hormone Receptor Variants are Associated with Greater Longevity
A few years back, researchers noted that a common growth hormone receptor gene variant was associated with greater life expectancy in humans. There was some theorizing as to possible mechanisms at the time, following the usual paths for anything that touches on growth hormone or its receptor. In short-lived mammals such as mice, loss of function in growth hormone or its receptor produces small body size and increased healthy longevity. The present record for mouse longevity is held by a growth hormone receptor knockout lineage. In humans, members of the small Laron syndrome population exhibit an analogous disruption of gro...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 11, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Culture Now Drives Human Evolution More Than Genetics (M)
Cultural changes can sweep across countries and continents through modern communication networks, regardless of genetics. (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - June 11, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Psychology subscribers-only Source Type: blogs

DARPA-funded nonsurgical neurotechnologies push the frontier of brain-machine interfaces
This article will first overview the DARPA program and the basics of these three programs. Then, a look at the common electronics technologies that are being used in biotechnology at Rice University. Keep reading excellent article HERE, over at All About Circuits. About DARPA’s N3 program: Six paths to the nonsurgical future of brain-machine interfaces (DARPA): Back in 2019, DARPA awarded funding to six organizations to support the Next-Generation Nonsurgical Neurotechnology (N3) program, first announced in March 2018. Battelle Memorial Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, Johns Hopkins University Applied Phys...
Source: SharpBrains - June 9, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Peak Performance Technology & Innovation BCI brain brain-to-brain communication cognitive-skills DARPA human-machine interfacing neural-activity neuroplasticity Next-Generation Nonsurgical Neurotechnology noninvasive neurotechnologie Source Type: blogs

Distinctive Macrophage Signaling is Vital to Axolotl Limb and Organ Regeneration
Research into the comparative biology of regeneration suggests that mammals are in principle capable of proficient, full regeneration of complex tissues, but some critical difference in cell signaling and behavior leads instead to the formation of scar tissue in adults. In recent years, scientists have focused on the role of macrophages in coordinating the process of regeneration. In proficient regenerators like salamanders and zebrafish, the presence of macrophages is essential to the regenerative process. Absent macrophages, scar tissue forms in the same way as it does in mammals. Researchers now aim to understand exactl...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 9, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 7th 2021
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 6, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Non-Invasive Deep Brain Stimulation Using Ultrasound and Genetic Modification
Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have developed a technique they call sonothermogenetics, which combines ultrasound and genetic modification to achieve non-invasive neural control in deep brain regions. The technique involves using viral vectors to introduce genetic material encoding for ion channels to specific neurons in the brain. An external ultrasound probe can then provide gentle heating, which activates the ion channels, effectively allowing researchers to turn specific neurons on or off. The new approach may eventually lead to effective non-invasive treatments for neurological conditions such as Pa...
Source: Medgadget - June 4, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Genetics Neurology Neurosurgery Source Type: blogs

U.S. Science Embrace of Wuhan “Gain-Of-Function” Viral Research Proved A Slippery Slope
By MIKE MAGEE The truth hurts. Eighteen months into a disaster that has claimed 3.5 million lives around the globe, the truth is seeping out. Human error likely caused the Covid pandemic, and America’s Medical-Industrial Complex was right in the middle of it. Signs of a “great awakening” have emerged from various corners in the month of May. On May 14, UNC’s top virologist, Ralph Baric, who worked closely with Wuhan chief virologist and batwoman extraordinare, Shi Zhengli, signed on with 17 other scientists to a Science editorial that demanded a reexamination of Covid&rsqu...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy Mike Magee Wuhan Source Type: blogs

Magic Tricks And Media Literacy: The Week ’s Best Psychology Links
Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web Sleep researchers often takes a “brain-centric” approach to their work, measuring sleep stages using EEG, for instance, or examining how sleep affects learning and memory. Yet rudimentary creatures also sleep — including the hydra, an aquatic organism which has a basic nervous system but no brain at all.  The findings suggest that our primitive ancestors slept before they even evolved brains, writes Veronique Greenwood at Wired.  In his recent testimony to a House of Commons committee, Dominic Cummings bl...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - June 4, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Weekly links Source Type: blogs

Human exceptionalism
It seems to be something of  a fad to claim that humans aren't actually exceptional. Other animals can think and learn and plan and communicate with each other, there's nothing special about us, at least no more than the extent to which every species is unique, yadda yadda. I think this is an utterly vapid argument. Sure, every species is unique, but our impact on the planet is vastly greater than that of any other organism. Yes of course, photosynthetic organisms created and sustain our oxygen-rich atmosphere, but that's been the case for more than 2 billion years. That's the stable background of life on earth. We've...
Source: Stayin' Alive - June 3, 2021 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

The Links Between Aging and Immune Function Go Far Beyond Defense Against Pathogens
The immune system is deeply integrated into tissue function throughout the body. This goes far beyond merely identifying and chasing down invaders such as fungi, bacteria, and viruses. Immune cells of various types also help to coordinate tissue maintenance, regeneration from injury, and the destruction of damaged, cancerous, and senescent cells. In the brain, immune cells are involved in the maintenance and alteration of synaptic connections between neurons. Immune cells mediate inflammatory signaling, and that signaling is in turn highly influential on the behavior of other cells, altering tissue function, particularly w...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 2, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Preparing For The Next Generation of Ethical Challenges Concerning Heritable Human Genome Editing
by Robert Klitzman, MD This editorial can be found in the latest issue of American Journal of Bioethics. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15265161.2021.1913894 On September 5, 2020, the International Commission on the Clinical Use of Human Germline Genome Editing, established by the U.S. National Academy of Medicine (NAM), the National Academy of Science, and the British Royal Society, with members from 10 countries, issued its Report, recommending caution in future uses of heritable human genome editing (HHGE) (National Academy of Medicine, the National Academies of Sciences and the Royal Society&nb...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 2, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Robert Klitzman Tags: Editorial-AJOB Ethics Featured Posts Genetics Source Type: blogs

Webinar for Postdoctoral Research Associate Training (PRAT) Program Applicants
We’re hosting a webinar for students and fellows interested in the Postdoctoral Research Associate Training (PRAT) program for the October 4, 2021, receipt date: Tuesday, June 22, 2:00-3:00 p.m. ET PRAT is a competitive 3-year fellowship program that prepares trainees for leadership positions in biomedical careers. Training includes a mentored laboratory research experience and intensive career and leadership development activities. PRAT fellows conduct research in laboratories in the NIH Intramural Research Program (IRP) in basic biomedical research areas within the NIGMS mission....
Source: NIGMS Feedback Loop Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - June 1, 2021 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Funding Opportunities Meetings/Events Training/Fellowships/Career Development PRAT Preparing an Application Webinars Source Type: blogs

Make Some Microbe Friends
By KIM BELLARD It’s the coolest story I’ve seen in the past few days: The New York Times reported how an Italian  museum cleaned its priceless Michelangelo sculptures with an army of bacteria.  As Jason Horowitz wrote, “restorers and scientists quietly unleashed microbes with good taste and an enormous appetite on the marbles, intentionally turning the chapel into a bacterial smorgasbord.” And you just want to kill them all with your hand sanitizers and anti-bacterial soaps.  The Medici Chapel in Florence had the good fortune to be blessed with an abundance of works by Michel...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 1, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Policy Public Health bacteria Kim Bellard microbes Microbiome Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 31st 2021
In conclusion, iMSC-sEVs could rejuvenate the senescence of NPCs and attenuate the development of IVDD. Cell Signaling via Exosomes in the Development of Vascular Calcification https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2021/05/cell-signaling-via-exosomes-in-the-development-of-vascular-calcification/ Vascular calcification is a feature of aging, a process in which cells in the blood vessel wall take on inappropriate identities and activities that are more appropriate to bone tissue. Evidence of recent years implicates chronic inflammation and the presence of senescent cells in this process. Senescent cells caus...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 30, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Targeting Senescent Cells to Reverse the Aging of the Kidneys
Senescent cells accumulate with age and cause a wide range of pathologies. They contribute in some way to near all of the common, ultimately fatal age-related conditions. Senescent cells secrete a mix of signals that produces chronic inflammation, disrupts tissue maintenance to encourage fibrosis, and changes the behavior of other cells for the worse in numerous ways. It is the signaling that allows the comparatively small fraction of senescent cells in any given aged tissue to cause such widespread harm. Destroying senescent cells in a targeted fashion via the use of senolytic therapies has shown great promise in a...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 28, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Vascular Degeneration in the Brain as the Common Link Between Lifestyle and Dementia
Researchers here propose that the unifying underlying mechanism for lifestyle influences on dementia risk is chronic inflammation. That inflammation causes vascular degeneration and a consequent decline in the blood supply to the brain, which in turn contributes - to some degree - to all of the observed issues in the aging brain. When present to a large degree, these vascular issues are categorized as vascular dementia, a widely studied condition. But it is entirely plausible that subclinical vascular degeneration is an important mediating factor linking lifestyle and dementia. A competing hypothesis involves the role of p...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 28, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

A Blood Protein Signature that Correlates with Alzheimer's Risk
Signatures built from the vast array of proteins found in the blood stream, including those encapsulated in extracellular vesicles, should in principle correlate with many health conditions. This includes those conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease, characterized by a long, slow preclinical stage in which damage and metabolic disarray builds up over time. Modern machine learning techniques allow the cost-effective construction of such signatures, given a large enough database work with, and as illustrated here. Efforts to gauge people's Alzheimer's risk before dementia arises have focused mainly on the two most ...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 25, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Matt Meselson Needs a Biographer!
Yesterday was Matt Meselson's 91st birthday.   I have only met him a few times and he wouldn't know me from Adam, but he is a particularly interesting individual I've had the good fortune to converse with.   I'm putting out a plea now for a skilled biographer to write his life, because it certainly has been an interesting and impactful one, with scientific work stretching from the early beginnings of molecular genetics to a preprint just recently posted onBioRxiv.Read more » (Source: Omics! Omics!)
Source: Omics! Omics! - May 25, 2021 Category: Bioinformatics Authors: Keith Robison Source Type: blogs

If Lawmakers Really Want to “Follow the Science” They Will Repeal Codified Opioid Guidelines
This study documents a relationship between opioid prescribing and opioid overdose in a large, national, prospective cohort of individuals receiving opioid therapy for a variety of medical conditions. The risk of opioid overdose should continue to be evaluated relative to the need to reduce pain and suffering and be considered along with other risk factors.University of Alabama Professor of Medicine Stefan Kerteszpointed out thatfollow up research led by Bohnert found the median overdose dosage was 60 MMEs and 86 percent occurred under 90 MMEs. Yet he cautioned policymakers:Reliance on a simple binary dose metric is an ext...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 24, 2021 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 24th 2021
In conclusion, we showed that addition of resistance exercise training, but not dietary EAAs, to the myostatin inhibition further increased muscle mass through the attenuation of muscle protein breakdown with proportionate improvements in muscle strength. Interestingly, addition of dietary EAAs to the myostatin inhibition with or without resistance exercise training improved muscle quality. Thus, dissection of the underlying mechanisms behind the combined positive effect of dietary EAAs and resistance exercise training on muscle mass and quality can shed light on the discovery of effective therapeutics against muscle wasti...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 23, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Mechanisms by Which Stem Cell Therapy Might Treat Skin Aging
There is some interest in the research community in targeting first generation stem cell therapies to the skin in order to reverse skin aging. These stem cell therapies use cells obtained from fat tissue or other well established sources, and in near all cases the transplanted cells near all die quite quickly following their introduction into the patient. Methods of cell production and sources of cells vary widely, and so do the observed benefits. Increased regeneration is widely claimed, but only intermittently proven. Benefits realized by patients largely derive from reductions in systemic inflammation and other effects ...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 21, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Correlations Between Mechanisms of Aging and Diseases of Aging
Researchers here mine a very large data set to establish whether age-related diseases linked to a specific underlying single causative mechanism of aging will show up together in patients more often than not. One would expect that they will. To pick one example, multiple age-related diseases appear likely to be primarily caused by the increased presence of senescent cells in old tissues. A patient's senescent cell burden will thus largely determine the risk of suffering from all of those conditions. Patients exhibiting one condition, most likely because they have more senescent cells than their healthier peers, should be m...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 21, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Lab move to ETH Zurich, the job search and fixed term PI positions
ETH Zurich (credit) Next January, after 9 years at the EMBL, I will be joining ETH Zurich as a tenured faculty of the Department of Biology with my research group hosted at the Institute for Molecular and Systems Biology (IMSB). I am really excited about this move and I think the IMSB is a perfect fit for the type of research that we do. We primarily use computational approaches to study the relation between genotype and phenotype with a specific focus on post-translational regulatory systems (more on theEBI website or myGScholar page). IMSB has a long tradition of method development in large scale measurements o...
Source: Evolution of Cellular Networks - May 21, 2021 Category: Cytology Tags: academia group Source Type: blogs

Arguing for Raised O-GlcNAcylation to be Closer to the Cause of Heart Failure than Thought
Researchers here use animal models to argue that raised levels of O-GlcNAcylation observed in heart failure patients are more important than thought as a contributing cause to the progression of this condition, rather than being further downstream as an end consequence. One must always be careful, however, in analysis of work where researchers break some important mechanism, causing problems, and then fix it. It is always possible to produce harm by causing unnatural disarray to a specific mechanism in animal metabolism. Removing that unnatural disarray will always help. That doesn't mean that the model necessarily has rel...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 20, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Gene-Silencing Nanoparticles to Treat COVID-19
Researchers at City of Hope, a research center based in California, and Griffith University in Australia have collaborated to create a new experimental anti-viral therapy that can treat COVID-19. The therapeutic consists of small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules encapsulated within lipid nanoparticles. When delivered into the bloodstream, the nanoparticles travel to the lungs. There, the siRNA is released into infected cells and proceeds to bind to and disrupt the genome of the SARS‑CoV‑2 virus. The COVID-19 pandemic has evolved over the past year, and with the ongoing vaccination campaigns, many people now have a ...
Source: Medgadget - May 19, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Genetics Materials Medicine Nanomedicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

Trojan Horse Virus Makes Tumors Destroy Themselves
Researchers at the University of Zurich have developed a virus-based therapy that causes a tumor to destroy itself. They modified an adenovirus, which is a common virus that typically infects the respiratory tract and which is already widely used in medicine, to deliver genetic material that codes for an anti-cancer protein. In a sneaky move, the researchers designed the therapy so that the virus would infect tumor cells, forcing them to destroy themselves. Cancer therapies are constantly evolving. Immunotherapies, which include antibodies that stimulate the immune system to destroy cancer cells, are the latest class of...
Source: Medgadget - May 19, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Genetics Materials Medicine Oncology Source Type: blogs

Quiz: Are You a Genetics Genius?
Genes are segments of DNA. They contain instructions for building one or more molecules that help the body work. Researchers in the field of genetics study genes and heredity—how certain traits are passed from parents to their offspring through DNA. NIGMS supports many scientists who investigate the genetics of people and research organisms to better understand human health and disease. Take our quiz below to test how much you know about genetics. Then check out our new fact sheet on genetics to learn more. For more quizzes and other fun learning tools, visit our activities and multimedia webpage. ...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - May 19, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Genes Tools and Techniques DNA Genomics Quiz Source Type: blogs

Normal Toddler Behavior vs ADHD
An official diagnosis of ADHD can be hard to pinpoint as its symptoms can often be indicative of other conditions, but it is especially hard to diagnose in children under the age of four, as most children naturally experience about a year of extreme energy that generally encompasses their third birthday. This realization may be, in turn, both comforting and exhausting as parents learn that their toddler is likely just exhibiting the rampant energy normal for their age group. What is ADHD? Children with an official diagnosis of ADHD consistently present symptoms of inattentiveness, over-activity, impulsivity, or some combin...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - May 18, 2021 Category: Child Development Authors: Alan Greene MD Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog ADHD Toddler ADHD Source Type: blogs

Considering the Comparative Biology of Long-Lived Mammals
This popular science article covers some of the high points of the past few decades of research into the comparative biology of aging. Why are some mammals exceptionally long-lived for their size? What are the mechanisms of interest, and can any of those mechanisms inform the development of therapies to extend healthy human life spans? Answers remain to be determined in a concrete fashion for these and other, related questions. Metabolism and its relationship to aging is a very complex area of study, a great deal of the space remains poorly mapped, and as of yet it is hard to say as to whether any of the work in progress i...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 17, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

What happens to pain over 21 years?
No! I was not born then… I’m much older than that. No, in this longitudinal cohort study, participants recruited from the general public in Sweden were surveyed five times: at inception in 1995, again in 1998, 2003, 2007 and 2016. The article I’m reporting on included all respondents who had completed information on at least 3 of the 5 time points, a total of 1858 people! That’s a decent-sized study. Longitudinal studies are really hard to do but offer us so much information about what happens over time to a group of people and it’s something we need to do more often. The problems with lon...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - May 16, 2021 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Chronic pain Pain conditions Research longitudinal prospective study trajectory Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 17th 2021
This study is consistent with previous evidence showing that inflammaging, or age-related inflammation, is naturally heightened in the nervous system. Moreover, the authors disproved their hypothesis that anti-inflammatory microglia-specific genes are responsible for the elevated inflammatory response in aged brains since the expression of anti-inflammatory mediators was elevated in middle-aged brains following infection. Thus, the cause for the increase in pro-inflammatory genes remains to be elucidated. Mixed Results in Animal Studies of Gene Therapy Targeting Axonal Regrowth https://www.fightaging.org/archiv...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 16, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

In Search of Treatments for Alzheimer's Disease in the Lymphatic System of the Brain
That the brain has a lymphatic system that drains into the body is a comparatively recently discovery, a development of the last decade of research. It isn't the only way in which fluids drain from the brain - see, for example, the work on the cribriform plate path for drainage of cerebrospinal fluid - but there are a limited number of such pathways outside the vascular system. The vascular system itself is separated from the brain by the blood-brain barrier that surrounds every blood vessel that passes through the central nervous system. This barrier controls the entry and exit of molecules and cells, limiting the degree ...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 14, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

A genetically stable attenuated poliovirus vaccine
Eradication of poliomyelitis appears to be on track: types 2 and 3 polioviruses have been declared eradicated, and in the past 12 months there have been just 338 cases of type 1 polio in Afghanistan and Pakistan. But there have also been 491 cases of polio caused by the type 2 Sabin vaccine. The development […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - May 14, 2021 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information attenuated vaccine genetic stability neurovirulence OPV poliovirus recombination reversion Sabin viral viruses Source Type: blogs

Targeting Microglia in the Aging Brain
The progressive age-related dysfunction of microglia in the aging brain is implicated in the progression of neurodegenerative disease, as well as the increased inflammation and forms of pathology found in the brain tissue of older individuals. In mice, clearance of microglia can be efficiently achieved and leads to a rapid repopulation of the brain with new microglia, as well as improvements in measures of brain function. Similarly, targeted destruction of senescent microglia and other supporting cells in the brain via the use of senolytic drugs that can pass the blood-brain barrier has been shown to reduce chronic inflamm...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 13, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Whole Genome Sequencing of Supercentenarians in Search of Genetic Contributions to Longevity
In this study, we generated and analyzed the first whole genome sequencing data with high coverage (90X) in a cohort of 81 semi-supercentenarians and supercentenarians [105+/110+] (mean age: 106.6 ± 1.6) recruited across the entire Italian peninsula together with a control cohort of 36 healthy geographically matched individuals (Northern, Central, and Southern Italy) (mean age 68.0 ± 5.9). Data recently published with a second independent cohort of 333 centenarians (100+ years) and 358 geographically matched controls (Northern, Central, and Southern Italy) were used to replicate our results. We identif...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 12, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Science Snippet: Learn About the Cytoskeleton
A cow cell showing actin filaments (red) and microtubules (green). Credit: Tina Carvalho, University of Hawaii at Manoa. The cytoskeleton is a collection of fibers that gives shape and support to cells, like the skeleton does for our bodies. It also allows movement within the cell and, in some cases, by the entire cell. Three different types of fibers make up the cytoskeleton: actin filaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Powering Muscles Actin filaments contract or lengthen to give cells the flexibility to move and change shape. Along with the protein myosin, they’re responsible for m...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - May 12, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Cells Source Type: blogs

Members of Long-Lived Families Exhibit Slower Cognitive Aging
Greater longevity tends to be accompanied by better late life health and a slower progression of measurable aspects of aging. Researchers are very interested in uncovering the genetic contribution to variations in the pace of aging in our species, but the harder they look, the more it appears that genetic differences provide only a small contribution at best. Variance in pace of aging must then largely result from better lifestyle choices and lesser exposure to damaging circumstances such as persistent infections. Even in the case of long-lived families, there is the argument that a slower pace of aging is far more a matte...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 12, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Reviewing Recent Work on the Mechanisms of Cellular Senescence
Impressive results have been produced in mice via clearance of senescent cells: rejuvenation, extension of life, and reversal of numerous different age-related conditions. This has provoked an increasing number of research groups to focus on the mechanisms of cellular senescence, in search of novel ways to identify and destroy these cells, or to suppress the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) that they produce. The secreted signal molecules of the SASP alter surrounding cell behavior and rouse the immune system to chronic inflammation. This is the means by which the comparatively small number of lingering sen...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 11, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Arming T Cells with IL-24 Improves the Ability to Destroy Cancerous Cells
Altering T cells of the adaptive immune system to enable recognition of cancerous cells is a mainstream area of research these days. The approach of adding chimeric antigen receptors to T cells, tailored to a cancer, is well established for blood cancers, but still challenging for solid tumors, characterized a wide variety of cancerous cells and signatures. Researchers here show that genetic modification of T cells to produce IL-24 allows these immune cells to effectively destroy cancerous cells that lack recognizable surface features, so long as they are close to cancerous cells that can be recognized. Further, the proces...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 10, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 10th 2021
This study suggests that some of those changes contribute to age-related hypertension, providing yet another reason to put resources into the near term development of therapies that can reverse the aging of the gut microbiome, such as flagellin vaccination or fecal microbiota transplantation. "Previous studies from our lab have shown that the composition of the gut microbiota in animal models of hypertension, such as the SHRSP (spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone) rat model, is different from that in animals with normal blood pressure. Further, transplanting dysbiotic gut microbiota from a hypertensive an...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 9, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Tips for Managing Obsessive Stressing About Potential Disease
Many people are genetically predisposed to developing certain diseases, among them diabetes, cancer, heart disease and Alzheimer’s. It’s natural to worry if you’ve watched family members endure the illnesses. However, the cortisol released in your body by chronic stress, which can be caused by worry, could increase your susceptibility. The fix? Be proactive. Limiting stress may not completely protect you from the disease that you dread, but it can help your overall health and, for some diseases, this could help you avoid a trigger. Where do you start? Continue reading on HealthCentral to pick up some tips...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 8, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Foreword to Wheat Belly Revised & Expanded Edition
  An excerpt from the Wheat Belly Revised & Expanded Edition: Have you ever come home from the grocery store with a fresh container of milk, opened it and immediately realized that it was bad—sour-smelling, curdled, unfit to drink?  Feed it to the cat? Probably not. Lighten your coffee? I don’t think so. Pour it down the sink—yeah, that’s the ticket. Or maybe go back to the store with some of the curdled remains and ask for your money back.  That is what your reaction to conventional dietary advice should be. You should wrinkle your nose at the bad smell that emanates from advice ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - May 7, 2021 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Open grain-free wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Is IBD an underrecognized health problem in minority groups?
As many people know, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex condition affecting the intestine, which is the part of the digestive tract that helps digest food and remove water, salt, and waste. But you might not know this: in recent years in the US, IBD is being diagnosed more often among people who are Black, Hispanic/Latinx, East and Southeast Asian, or from other minority groups than it was in past decades. Is this a true rise in cases? Is IBD underrecognized in minority populations? While we don’t have all the answers yet, exploring health disparities in IBD and explaining its symptoms may encourage more p...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Adjoa Anyane-Yeboa, MD, MPH Tags: Digestive Disorders Health Health care disparities Inflammation Source Type: blogs