Developing Low-Cost Lab Techniques: Q & A With Abraham Badu-Tawiah
Credit: Ohio State University. “I never thought I could make an impact on chemistry and students’ lives. But now, I’m the head of a lab with several Ph.D. and undergraduate students and a postdoctoral researcher; and we’re developing simple, low-cost lab techniques that can be adopted by labs across the world,” says Abraham Badu-Tawiah, Ph.D., the Robert K. Fox Professor of Chemistry at Ohio State University in Columbus. We talked with Dr. Badu-Tawiah about his career progression, research, and advice for students hoping to launch a career in science. Q: How did you get started on the path to a career in sci...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - February 21, 2024 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Being a Scientist Chemistry, Biochemistry and Pharmacology Tools and Techniques Profiles Source Type: blogs

Cool Images: Radiant in Red
Happy Valentine’s Day! In place of red roses, we hope you’ll accept a bouquet of beautiful scientific images featuring rich, red hues. Be sure to click all the way through to see the festive protein flowing through your blood! For more scientific photos, illustrations, and videos in all the colors of the rainbow, visit our image and video gallery. .featured { opacity: 1 !important; transform: scale(1) !important; z-index: 1 !important; } .featured a:hover::after { content: "Click to view on NIGMS image gallery"; /*Image hover tool tip*/ background-color: #fff;...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - February 14, 2024 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Cells Molecular Structures Cellular Imaging Cool Images Proteins Source Type: blogs

What Does an Immunologist Do?
This post is part of a miniseries on the immune system. Be sure to check out the other posts in this series that you may have missed. Immunology is the study of the immune system, including all the cells, tissues, and organs that work together to protect you from germs. A person who studies immunology is called an immunologist, and there are three types: Researchers, who study the immune system in the laboratory to understand how it works or how it can go awry and find new treatments for immune system-related diseases Doctors, who diagnose and care for patients with diseases related to the immune system, such as ...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - February 12, 2024 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Being a Scientist Cells Injury and Illness Immunology Miniseries Infectious Diseases Medicines Microbes Research Roundup Source Type: blogs

Broadening Opportunities for Students in STEM at Brown University and Beyond
Credit: Courtesy of Brown University. Andrew G. Campbell, Ph.D., a professor of medical science at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, and previous dean of the graduate school, is passionate about researching understudied diseases and helping students reach their full potential. Dr. Campbell’s lab has studied the single-cell organism Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei), a parasite transmitted through the bite of the tsetse fly, which is only found in specific regions of Africa. In humans, T. brucei causes African Trypanosomiasis, also known as sleeping sickness. Symptoms of this illness include headache, weakne...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - February 8, 2024 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Being a Scientist STEM Education Profiles Training Source Type: blogs

Increasing Opportunities in STEM at Brown University and Beyond
Credit: Courtesy of Brown University. Andrew G. Campbell, Ph.D., a professor of medical science at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, and previous dean of the graduate school, is passionate about researching understudied diseases and helping students reach their full potential. Dr. Campbell’s lab has studied the single-cell organism Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei), a parasite transmitted through the bite of the tsetse fly, which is only found in specific regions of Africa. In humans, T. brucei causes African Trypanosomiasis, also known as sleeping sickness. Symptoms of this illness include headache, weakne...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - February 7, 2024 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Being a Scientist STEM Education Profiles Training Source Type: blogs

Putting West Virginia Students on the Path to Scientific Careers
Credit: NIGMS. Two NIGMS-funded programs are teaming up to shape the future of science and technology in West Virginia (WV). One engages high school students in science, technology, engineering, math, and medicine (STEM+M); introduces them to research; and provides direct access to college through tuition waivers. In the other program, undergraduate students are paired with a researcher at their institution for a paid internship—an important step toward a career in science. The Health Sciences & Technology Academy “We liken our students to rosebuds. As they grow, you see them blossom into self-confident lea...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - January 31, 2024 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Being a Scientist STEM Education SEPA Training Source Type: blogs

What Do Fats Do in the Body?
It’s common knowledge that too much cholesterol and other fats can lead to disease and that a healthy diet involves watching how much fatty food we eat. However, our bodies need a certain amount of fat to function—and we can’t make it from scratch. Hepatocytes, like the one shown here, are the most abundant type of cell in the human liver. One important role they play is producing bile, a liquid that aids in digesting fats. Credit: Donna Beer Stolz, University of Pittsburgh. Triglycerides, cholesterol, and other essential fatty acids—the fats our bodies can’t make on their own—store energy, ins...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - January 24, 2024 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Cells Chemistry, Biochemistry and Pharmacology Common questions Source Type: blogs

Research Organism Superheroes: Fruit Flies
Credit: iStock. Those pesky little bugs flying around the overripe bananas in your kitchen may hold the key to understanding something new about how our bodies work. That’s right, the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) is a widely used research organism in genetics because of its superpower of reproducing quickly with similar genes to people. Researchers have been studying fruit flies for over a century for many reasons. First, they’re easy to please—just keep them at room temperature and feed them corn meal, sugar, and yeast (or those bananas on your counter!). Second, they reproduce more quickly and have shor...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - January 17, 2024 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: STEM Education Tools and Techniques Cool Creatures Research Organisms Source Type: blogs

RISE-ing Stars From Northern Arizona University
Chantel Tsosie at her college graduation, wearing her Tribe’s formal, traditional rug dress that her grandmother made. Credit: Courtesy of Chantel Tsosie. “Science is for everyone. It’s in everything. It exists in cultures everywhere,” says Chantel Tsosie, a master’s student in the NIGMS-supported Research Initiative for Scientific Enhancement (RISE) program at Northern Arizona University (NAU) in Flagstaff. The program aims to prepare a diverse group of students for research careers through culturally relevant support, hands-on research experiences, and a tailored curriculum. Chantel started her bachelor’...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - January 10, 2024 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Being a Scientist Profiles Training Source Type: blogs

How Can the Immune System Go Awry?
This post is part of a miniseries on the immune system. Be sure to check out the other posts in this series that you may have missed. The immune system is designed to closely monitor the body for signs of intruders that may cause infection. But what happens if it malfunctions? Overactive and underactive immune systems can both have negative effects on your health. Autoimmune Disorders To effectively monitor the body for pathogens, the adaptive immune system has to learn what a pathogen “looks like” on a molecular level. During their development, white blood cells go through training to learn how to differe...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - January 8, 2024 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Cells Injury and Illness Diseases Immunology Miniseries Infectious Diseases Microbes Sepsis Source Type: blogs

Inspiring the Next Generation of Scientists Through CityLab
Credit: CityLab. “Many of the students we work with don’t have access to a laboratory through their local schools. For them, CityLab is their first exposure to a laboratory environment—these are hugely important moments for these kids,” says Carl Franzblau, Ph.D., the founder of CityLab at Boston University (BU). CityLab was established more than 30 years ago as a science education outreach program for precollege students and teachers through a partnership between the Chobanian & Avedisian School of Medicine and the Wheelock College of Education & Human Development at BU. “Since our first Science Edu...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - January 3, 2024 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Being a Scientist Chemistry, Biochemistry and Pharmacology STEM Education SEPA Training Source Type: blogs

Ring In the New Year With Basic Research
Empowering basic biomedical research, which focuses on understanding how living systems work, is one of NIGMS’ main goals. This type of research not only helps us learn how our bodies and those of other organisms function but also lays the foundation for advances in disease diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. We’re excited to see what the upcoming year has in store for the field! In preparation, we’re highlighting what NIGMS-supported scientists had to say in 2023 about the many merits of basic research. Also check out the links to the Biomedical Beat posts that feature them if you haven’t already. ...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - December 27, 2023 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Being a Scientist Scientific Process Source Type: blogs

Seeking Success in Science Through NIH-Funded Training
Credit: Courtesy of Hasset Nurelegne. “What’s great about a career in research is that there are so many paths you can take. I get so excited for the future when I think about all the open doors ahead of me,” says Hasset Nurelegne, a senior at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. Hasset is majoring in neuroscience and behavioral biology (NBB) as well as English. Since her first year on campus, Hasset has been an active participant in an NIGMS-funded program at Emory that aims to develop a diverse pool of scientists, the Initiative for Maximizing Student Development (IMSD) (which is now just for graduate student...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - December 20, 2023 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Being a Scientist Profiles Training Source Type: blogs

Science Snippet: Zooming In on Nanoparticles
Nanoparticles come in many different shapes and configurations. Credit: Adapted from Stevens, et. al., under Creative Commons License 4.0. Nanoparticles may sound like gadgets from a science fiction movie, but they exist in real life. They’re particles of any material that are less than 100 nanometers (one-billionth of a meter) in all dimensions. Nanoparticles appear in nature, and humans have, mostly unknowingly, used them since ancient times. For example, hair dyeing in ancient Egypt involved lead sulfite nanoparticles, and artisans in the Middle Ages added gold and silver nanoparticles to stained-glass windows. Over...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - December 13, 2023 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Chemistry, Biochemistry and Pharmacology Tools and Techniques Cool Tools/Techniques Cool Videos Medicines Science Snippet Source Type: blogs

What Is the Immune System?
A computer-generated image of the rotavirus, a virus that commonly causes illness in children through inflammation of the stomach and intestines. Credit: Bridget Carragher, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California. What do antibodies, mucus, and stomach acid have in common? They’re all parts of the immune system! The immune system is a trained army of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to block, detect, and eliminate harmful insults to your body. It can protect you from invaders like bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. Innate and Adaptive The immune system is often thought of as two...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - December 11, 2023 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Cells Common questions Immunology Miniseries Infectious Diseases Microbes Source Type: blogs