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Idle Thinking on the Outcome when the Political Establishment Notices that Rejuvenation Therapies are Imminent
The political establishment is a plague upon the land; this is generally true of any era. We are fortunate to live in an age in which the level of impact is less brutal and more bureacratic than it has been, and in a region in which the level of wealth is high enough to allow most people to live comfortably despite the constant wars and vast waste of the powers that be. There is, importantly, sufficient space in our society left unpillaged and uncontrolled for technological development to take place at a fair pace. Technology determines near everything about our lives, the degree to which they are worth living, the shape o...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 14, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Politics and Legislation Source Type: blogs

Cellular Senescence as a Failed Anti-Cancer Strategy
The evolution of multi-cellular life is in essence the story of a tooth and nail struggle with cancer, one that continues even now. Complex structure, regeneration, and growth are all required in higher forms of life, but that combination means that any sort of sustained breakdown in control over cell proliferation tends to be fatal because it disrupts necessary structures. Multiple layered systems, within cells and outside them, have evolved to try to block damaged cells from uncontrolled proliferation, ranging from tumor suppressor genes to the surveillance of the immune system and its destruction of potentially cancerou...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 13, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

A Discussion of Cellular Senescence in Age-Related Macular Degeneration
Cellular senescence is one of the root causes of aging. A small fraction of the large number of cells that become senescent every day fail to self-destruct, and instead linger in tissues to secrete a mix of inflammatory and other harmful signals. This behavior is known as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype, or SASP. The sizable numbers of senescent cells in old tissues have been implicated as a contributing cause of numerous age-related conditions, from lung disease to cardiovascular issues to forms of arthritis. More causal links will be discovered: this is a newly energetic field of research. As an exam...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 13, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

An Interview with Doug Ethell of Leucadia Therapeutics
Leucadia Therapeutics is a startup company focused on Alzheimer's disease, noteworthy for being one of the few ventures to depart from the orthodoxy of immunotherapy to clear amyloid and tau protein aggregates. The Leucadia founder is working on the establishment of a faster and cheaper path to an effective therapy for Alzheimer's that nonetheless still addresses the deeper causes of the condition. Leaving the mainstream is perhaps more of a challenge in the Alzheimer's research community than elsewhere; the US National Institute on Aging has for years been primarily an Alzheimer's concern, and the biggest of Big Ph...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 12, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Death Receptors as Biomarkers for Cardiovascular Mortality
Researchers here present evidence for the appropriately named death receptors to be biomarkers for cardiovascular disease risk, an indirect measure of the damage accumulating in the vascular system over the course of aging, and its effects on cellular biochemistry. The research community is very interested in establishing reliable, easily measured biomarkers that relate to age-related disease, mortality, and known mechanisms of aging. The more that exist, the more likely it is that these biomarkers can be combined in some algorithmic way to generate a more precise overall biomarker of biological age - something that can be...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 12, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Yet More Evidence for Impaired Drainage of Cerebrospinal Fluid in Aging
Leucadia Therapeutics is one of the young companies shepherded by the Methuselah Fund, in this case working on an Alzheimer's treatment predicated on a theory of the disease that views impaired drainage of cerebrospinal fluid as an important cause. Alzheimer's disease is a condition characterized by a build up of protein aggregates, and one of the ways in which the brain normally removes these aggregates is through drainage of cerebrospinal fluid out into the body. The passages for that drainage, like most other bodily systems, fail over time. An increasing amount of supporting evidence for this to contribute to age-relate...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 12, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Asking the Right Question: Do You Want to Live Longer, if Good Health is Guaranteed?
In this study, we asked people in an open-ended way about their desire for longer life: Would you like to have more time? What age would you like to become? This was something more specific than asking about a preference for survival without reference to any length of time; about one's plans for the future; or whether people see the future as open or limited, as in studies of future time perspective. Our attempt was to discover whether there were preferred temporal spans with which older adults framed their futures and plans. The two-question series about extra years and desired age ("How old would you like to ...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 12, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Of Interest Source Type: blogs

Young Plasma Improves Liver Function in Old Rats by Boosting Autophagy
In the research here, injections of blood plasma from young rats are shown to improve autophagy and liver function in old rats. This is interesting given the so far mixed evidence for young to old plasma transfer to be beneficial. There is, however, a history of research to show that increased levels of the cellular maintenance processes of autophagy can improve liver function in old rodents. Autophagy normally declines with age, and this appears to contribute to a variety of issues, such as loss of stem cell activity. You might recall that increasing the number of receptors on lysosomes in old rats can improve liver funct...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 11, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Mutational Damage in Long-Lived Brain Cells Correlates with Age
Is random mutational damage to nuclear DNA a sizable cause of aging? The consensus in the scientific community on that question is that it is an important cause, with the theory being that this results in sufficient change in protein production and cellular behavior to produce degraded function. That consensus is challenged, however, and at present there is a distinct lack of supporting evidence for either position, even given a few intriguing studies from recent years. It is well known that mutation level correlates with age, and methods of slowing aging also slow the increase of mutational damage. So every aspect of agin...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 11, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 11th 2017
In this study, we used the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) to estimate clinically measured SBP and DBP trajectories for 20 years prior to death, for individuals dying at 60 years and older. Second, we compared the linear SBP trends for years 10 to 3 years before death in patients who died and age- and sex-matched controls who survived at least 9 years. These approaches aimed to separate age from end-of-life associations, and avoid healthy survivor biases. Twenty years before death, estimated mean SBPs increased with increasing age at death (60-69 years, 139.5 mm Hg; ≥90 years, 150.0 mm Hg). All age-at-...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 10, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Highlights from Yesterday's /r/futurology AMA with Aubrey de Grey
Aubrey de Grey of the SENS Research Foundation took a few hours from his packed schedule yesterday to answer questions from the community at /r/futurology. It is a pity that we can't get a full day of his time at some point - clearly there are way too many interested folk with questions and not enough hours to answer more than half of them. It is a sign of progress, I hope, that ever more people recognize that the SENS approach to the development of rejuvenation therapies is promising, and understand enough of the science to ask intelligent questions about the details. SENS is simple enough to explain at the high le...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 9, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Increased Autophagy Improves Stem Cell Activity and Restores Bone Loss in Mice
Researchers here provide evidence for increased autophagy, achieved via targeting mTOR to mimic some of the response to calorie restriction, to improve stem cell function in old mice. As a result some of the loss of bone mass and strength that occurs with age was reversed. Autophagy is the collection of maintenance processes responsible for clearing out broken proteins and structures in the cell, but like most of our biochemistry it declines in effectiveness with age. Increased levels of autophagy have been shown to be necessary for the gains in health and longevity provided by calorie restriction in short-lived species, a...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 8, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Covalent Bioscience is One of the Current Crop of SENS Rejuvenation Biotechnology Startup Companies
Covalent Bioscience is the company formed to carry forward work on catalytic antibodies capable of clearing aggregated proteins found in old tissues, such as transthyretin amyloid. This type of amyloid, a misfolded protein that disrupts normal tissue function when present in large enough amounts, is associated with cardiovascular mortality and osteoarthritis, and is thought to be a prevalent cause of death in supercentenarians. The advantage of catalytic antibodies over normal antibodies is that they bind to the target site on a protein, then destroy that site, then move on. One antibody can attack thousands of targets, ma...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 8, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

mTOR and the Age-Related Decline in Stem Cell Activity
As a companion piece to an earlier post on the relationship between the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) gene and cellular senescence in aging, you might take a look at the research here that investigates the relationship between mTOR and the characteristic decline in stem cell activity that occurs with advancing age. In addition to the large body of research focused on insulin and growth hormone metabolism, work on mTOR is among the most active areas of study resulting from investigations of calorie restriction. The practice of calorie restriction has been shown to slow aging in near all species and lineages studied...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 7, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

mTOR and Cellular Senescence
Now that the research community has finally woken up to the significance of cellular senescence in aging, a point long advocated for by the SENS Research Foundation and Methuselah Foundation, scientists are busily patching it in to their existing understanding and models of aging. This is just as true for studies of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) as elsewhere. This is one of the more popular areas of research to emerge from the study of calorie restriction, an intervention that slows aging in near all species tested to date. There is a sizable contingent of researchers interested in finding ways to mimic some fract...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 7, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Boosting Mitochondrial Function Reduces Plaque and Improves Cognitive Function in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease
Mitochondria, the power plants of the cell, suffer a general malaise in older individuals. Their dynamics change and their production of energy store molecules declines. This is distinct and separate from the damage to mitochondrial DNA outlined in the SENS vision for rejuvenation therapies, in that it occurs across all cells rather than in a small but significant number of cells. It is probably a secondary or later consequence of other forms of cell and tissue damage, an inappropriate reaction that makes things worse. This decline in mitochondrial function is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases; the brain requires a ...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 7, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Does Blood Pressure Decrease in Late Life, and Why Would this Happen?
In this study, we used the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) to estimate clinically measured SBP and DBP trajectories for 20 years prior to death, for individuals dying at 60 years and older. Second, we compared the linear SBP trends for years 10 to 3 years before death in patients who died and age- and sex-matched controls who survived at least 9 years. These approaches aimed to separate age from end-of-life associations, and avoid healthy survivor biases. Twenty years before death, estimated mean SBPs increased with increasing age at death (60-69 years, 139.5 mm Hg; ≥90 years, 150.0 mm Hg). All age-at-...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 7, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

ANGPTL2 Knockout Reduces Inflammation and Slows Muscle Loss in Mice
The gene ANGPTL2 is starting to look like an interesting basis for therapy, something to bump closer to the top of the lengthy list of targets to consider for first generation human gene therapies. In animal studies, lowering the level of protein produced by this gene has been shown to reduce chronic inflammation in older individuals and slow progression towards heart failure. These effects might be mediated through the presence of senescent cells in the cardiovascular system, in that it is these cells that are the primary producers of ANGPTL2. One of the most easily measured consequences of the growing numbers of senescen...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 6, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Towards a Mass Production System for Liver Organoids
Researchers can create functional organ tissue in small quantities, building few-millimeter-sized structures known as organoids. Yet because there is still no reliable approach to the creation of the capillary networks required to support thick tissue sections, this cannot yet scale up to the production of full-size replacement organs. That may not be a roadblock for organs such as the liver and kidney, which are responsible for what are essentially chemical manufacture and filtration tasks; in this case the large-scale structure of the organ isn't as important as the small-scale structure, and much of the organ might be t...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 6, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

A High Level View of Progress in SENS Rejuvenation Research in Recent Years
The Life Extension Advocacy Foundation folk have put together a compact summary of some of the progress towards SENS rejuvenation therapies that has taken place in recent years. These treatments, some existing in prototype forms, and some yet to be constructed, are based on repair of the forms of cell and tissue damage known to cause aging. It is a good article to show to a friend who has expressed interest in greater human longevity, or to mine for talking points to use when you next bring up the topic with those unfamiliar with the current state of the science. You might also compare it with my bullet point list of the h...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 6, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Adrenomedullin is Involved in Age-Related Memory Loss
Researchers have identified adrenomedullin as a contributing factor in age-related memory loss in mice, and in the open access paper here note that levels of adrenomedullin increase with age in humans as well. This research is a fair distance from a rigorous proof of the relevance of adrenomedullin to human memory loss, but it is nonetheless quite interesting. The observed correlations suggest that the important connection is between adrenomedullin and the aggregated tau protein that gives rise to tauopathies, and consequently that tau is influential in the lesser degree of mental decline with age that occurs in people wit...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 5, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Another Study to Suggest that the Harms of Excess Fat Tissue are Understated
As a companion piece to a recent sizable study on weight and risk of age-related disease, here is another set of data to suggest that the existing consensus on the harms done by excess visceral fat tissue are, if anything, an underestimate. There is a large body of research that covers the many mechanisms by which the visceral fat packed around internal organs causes damage, such as through inflammation and immune dysfunction, the presence of raised numbers of senescent cells, the metabolic disarray that leads to diabetes, and so forth. Collectively it is a lengthy cautionary tale for those living far enough along the upwa...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 5, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Undoing Aging with Cellular Repair Therapies: an /r/futurology AMA with Aubrey de Grey on December 7th
Aubrey de Grey of the SENS Research Foundation will be answering your questions in the /r/futurology subreddit later this week, on Thursday December 7th 2017 at 2PM PST / 10PM GMT. There is a stickied post up now to collect questions in advance for the Ask Me Anything (AMA) post that will go up on Thursday, largely as a service for those who might not be able to be online at the time. For this audience, de Grey needs little introduction - he has spent the last fifteen years energetically pushing the research community into paying greater attention to the most plausible, high-value lines of development likely to result in r...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 5, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Low Cost Biotechnologies can be Inconvenienced but not Halted by Regulators
The coming era of gene therapies will be considerably more distributed and bottom-up than the advent of stem cell therapies. This will be a dynamic industry in which many small groups compete to set up distribution of mail order kits and clinics to provide widespread access to therapies. Regulators will attempt to suppress all of this, and will largely fail, as money talks and many regions will choose to host the businesses that offer gene therapies. This will come to pass because gene therapy technologies are many times cheaper, more easily managed, and capable of centralization and mass production than stem cell technolo...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 4, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

George Church Discusses Gene Therapies as a Basis for Therapies to Control Aging
George Church is one of the more noteworthy business-oriented scientists whose work touches on aging and longevity science. He is involved in a number of different companies, and while his primary focus is genetics, his interests include tissue engineering, farming engineered pigs for xenotransplantation, and a range of other items. Just about everyone of note in the scientific community has a different view on aging: the theory, the plausibility of various endeavors, and how best to go about tackling it as a medical challenge. This interview illuminates a little more of Church's viewpoint, which is, as one might expect, q...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 4, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 4th 2017
In this study, we integrated atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular approaches to determine whether increased stiffness of aortic VSMCs in hypertensive rats is ROCK-dependent, and whether the anti-hypertensive effect of ROCK inhibitors contributes to the reduction of aortic stiffness via changing VSMC mechanical properties. Despite a widely held belief that aortic stiffening is associated with changes in extracellular matrix proteins and endothelial dysfunction, our recent studies demonstrated that intrinsic stiffening of aortic VSMCs, independent of VSMC proliferation and migration, is an important contributo...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 3, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Useful Tests for Self-Experimentation in Rejuvenation Therapies, those Not Requiring the Assistance of a Physician
The objective is a set of tests that anyone can run without the need to involve a physician, as that always adds significant time and expense. Since we are really only interested in the identification of large and reliable effects as the result of an intervention, we can plausibly expect a collection of cheaper and easier measures known to correlate with age to be useful in this matter. Once that hill has been climbed, then decide whether or not to go further. Don't bite off more than is easy to chew for a first outing. I picked the following: A standard blood test, with inflammatory markers. Resting heart rate and...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 2, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Of Interest Source Type: blogs

Sirtuin Research Continues Ever Onward in Search of Relevance
As a result of failed commercial efforts a decade ago, research into sirtuins - particularly SIRT1 - in the context of aging is broader than it might otherwise be, and has a great deal of inertia. A lot of funding poured into this area, and as a result efforts to map all of the biochemistry that touches upon SIRT1 continue today, long after the goal of building a therapy to slow aging based upon manipulating SIRT1 was abandoned. The early evidence for SIRT1 to be important enough in aging to be a basis for therapies was demolished, no useful treatment ever emerged, a bunch of investors nonetheless made a very large profit,...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 1, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Pol III Inhibition Modestly Extends Life in Flies and Worms
As a general rule, a 10% extension of life in short-lived species is nothing of any great significance. There are an increasing number of methods shown to do this, such as the one noted here. Researchers have more than doubled the life span in flies and worms in a few different ways over the past twenty years, however, and where the effects of any given intervention can be compared with the results in humans, it has been found that short-lived species have a much greater plasticity of life span. The large gains of calorie restriction and growth hormone receptor loss of function observed in lower species don't occur in our ...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 1, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

An Example of a Pitfall in the Correlation of Excess Fat with Age-Related Disease
Terrible, slow moving age-related diseases that kill you also tend to make you lose weight along the way. Even the lengthy period of gradually increasing disability prior to full-blown disease can achieve that result. This point is very important to bear in mind when looking at association studies that map measures of weight versus disease risk, or life expectancy, or other health metrics. Are the studies using late snapshots of weight, or lifetime maximum weight, or some other measure and time, and does that choice of data succeed in avoiding entanglement with the loss of weight that serious age-related disease tends to p...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 1, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Aubrey de Grey Summarizes Rejuvenation Research at the MIT Technology Review
In this piece at the MIT Technology Review, Aubrey de Grey of the SENS Research Foundation summarizes the strategy of rejuvenation research based on periodic repair of the cell and tissue damage that causes aging. This is a philosophy of development that has proven its utility over the past fifteen years, and especially recently with the growing data on senolytic therapies that remove senescent cells. Clearance of senescent cells was specifically called out by de Grey in his position paper in 2002, and he and his allies have advocated for it and supported it with research funding where possible since then. SENS, the Strate...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 30, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

There Will Be No Shortage of Geroprotector Drug Candidates
Portions of the research community are becoming quite proficient at churning out potential drug candidates for specific conditions based on processes that involve a lot more computation and modeling than actual laboratory work. The compound databases these days are huge, containing vast swathes of molecules that are barely explored in the context of medicine. Those researchers interested in very modestly slowing aging through calorie restriction mimetics such as metformin and rapamycin, designated by some as geroprotectors, will be faced with an embarrassment of riches. This is a strategy I think to be of little wor...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 30, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

No Great Surprises in a Recent Study of Skin Aging
A recent study of skin aging brings no great surprises. The authors are focused on epigenetic changes that alter the rate of production of various proteins, and thus also alter the behavior and function of cells and tissues. People with younger-looking skin at a given chronological age also tend to have younger-looking patterns of gene expression, the process of generating proteins from their DNA blueprints. Aging is a global phenomenon, and progression of all of its aspects tend to correlate to some degree in any given individual. Among the more easily identified differences in the epigenetics of skin aging are those rela...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 30, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Aging and the Unfolded Protein Response in the Endoplasmic Reticulum
The endoplasmic reticulum, like many structures in the cell, becomes dysfunctional in old tissues. Since it is involved in the later stages of the construction of properly formed proteins, this is one of the more problematic failures; degraded performance here has many secondary consequences. In this open access paper, researchers review what is known of how the endoplasmic reticulum fails to properly fold proteins in old tissues, and how it tries to respond to that failure with what is known as the unfolded protein response - a maintenance process that itself declines with age. These disruptions of normal function ...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 29, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Researchers Demonstrate a Larger Heart Muscle Patch, but Generating Blood Vessels Remains a Challenge
In the engineering of tissue grown from a cell sample, researchers are currently limited to building thin slices or small sections, no more than a few millimeters in thickness, the distance that nutrients can perfuse without a capillary network. There is still no reliable, cost-effective solution for generating tissues that incorporate this intricate blood vessel network, and this is a roadblock to the creation of thicker, larger tissue sections. Thus the most advanced uses of tissue engineering at the present time are those in which thin tissue sections can still get the job done. One potential application is the generati...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 29, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

This Giving Tuesday, Help to Bring an End to Age-Related Disease, Pain, and Death
It is Giving Tuesday once more, a time to look ahead and consider how we can improve the future of humanity through philanthropy: to join forces and fund the projects that will build a better tomorrow. A time to not just think about it, but to take action - to make a difference. Many of us believe that the most effective approach given the present human condition is to work towards bringing an end to aging, as the cell and tissue damage that causes aging is by far the greatest source of suffering and death in the world today. That damage can in principle be repaired, and there are now a number of non-profit organizations i...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 28, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Activism, Advocacy and Education Source Type: blogs

Expanding the " Don't Eat Me " Signal Blockade Approach to Killing Cancer Cells
Cancers evolve to abuse mechanisms that suppress or control the immune system, as any cancer that fails to do so tends to be destroyed early-on by immune cells. One of these mechanisms is the presentation of "don't eat me" signals on the cell surface that prevent macrophage cells of the innate immune system from engulfing and destroying a cancer cell. CD47 was identified some years ago as one of these signals, and bypassing it or suppressing it has the potential to be a broad basis for the treatment of many types of cancer. As a bonus, it also appears to be a potentially viable strategy for treating age-related f...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 28, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Linking RAGE, DNA Damage, Cellular Senescence, and Reversible Fibrosis
Researchers here find that loss of RAGE in mice produces accelerated fibrosis that is reversible if RAGE is restored. It is a little early in this line of research to be enthused by it; I think that all that is being shown here is that fibrosis is principle reversible, though this is interesting enough to merit comment in and of itself. It is frequently the case that a form of accelerated disease progression has little relevance to the biochemistry of the real thing. Acceleration usually takes the form of one aspect of the disease progress being exaggerated out of proportion, and that aspect may well not play a significant...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 28, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

An Update on Leukocyte Transfer Cancer Therapy Development
LIFT, or GIFT, is an approach to cancer therapy that involves transplantation of suitably aggressive leukocyte or granulocyte immune cells. While cancers have numerous ways to suppress the native immune response, they can be vulnerable to foreign immune cells from a donor. Not all donors, but perhaps a few in a hundred on average will have immune cells capable of rapidly destroying a patient's cancer. In principle this approach should be able to target many different types of cancer, which is exactly what we need to see from the research community: more of broadly applicable approaches, and less of very specific cancer the...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 27, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

To What Degree can Vascular Stiffness be Reversed by Overriding Signaling Changes?
In this study, we integrated atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular approaches to determine whether increased stiffness of aortic VSMCs in hypertensive rats is ROCK-dependent, and whether the anti-hypertensive effect of ROCK inhibitors contributes to the reduction of aortic stiffness via changing VSMC mechanical properties. Despite a widely held belief that aortic stiffening is associated with changes in extracellular matrix proteins and endothelial dysfunction, our recent studies demonstrated that intrinsic stiffening of aortic VSMCs, independent of VSMC proliferation and migration, is an important contributo...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 27, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Skin Aging Correlates with Conductive Disorders in the Heart
Researchers here provide evidence to show that measures of skin aging sensitive to the progression of fibrosis appear to correlate with the risk of suffering conductive disorders of cardiac tissue. The heart is an electrochemical machine, and electrical properties of heart tissue such as the atrioventricular node are vital to the way in which the organ functions. Fibrosis in heart tissue disrupts these electrical properties, just as it disrupts any function of tissue that depends on its fine structure. Fibrosis is the creation of scar-like deposits in place of normal tissue structure, the result of an age-related di...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 27, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 27th 2017
We examined associations between mortality and accelerometer-measured PA using age-relevant intensity cutpoints in older women of various ethnicities. The results support the hypothesis that higher levels of accelerometer-measured PA, even when below the moderate-intensity threshold recommended in current guidelines, are associated with lower all-cause and CVD mortality in women aged 63 to 99. Our findings expand on previous studies showing that higher self-reported PA reduces mortality in adults aged 60 and older, specifically in older women, and at less than recommended amounts. Moreover, our findings challenge th...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 26, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Breaking the Ceiling on the Current Maximum Human Lifespan
There has been some discussion of late in the scientific community regarding whether or not there is a maximum human life span, whether that concept is even meaningful, and the scope of improvement in human life expectancy that could be plausibly achieved in the near future. The present round of debate was kicked off by a paper published this time last year in which Jan Vijg's team made a pessimistic argument for a ceiling on human life span based on recent historical data - that the current upward gentle upward trend in human life expectancy will hit a limit. Since can take a year to assemble a paper and get it through th...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 24, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Lower Levels of PPAR- γ Slow Thymic Atrophy with Age, Improve Immune Function
Researchers here demonstrate that mice with lower levels of PPAR-γ exhibited reduced atrophy of the thymus with age, and as a consequence also exhibit improved measures of immune function. The thymus is where T cells mature in the final stages of their creation before being released to duties in the body. Unfortunately it has evolved to atrophy, its active tissue replaced with fat tissue. This initially occurs immediately following childhood in a process called thymic involution, and then the remaining functional thymic tissue steadily declines over the course of later life. This places an ever-lower limit on the sup...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 24, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Recent Evidence for Exercise to Improve Cognitive Function via Increased BDNF
There is a fair amount of evidence from the past decade to show that exercise improves cognitive function in both young and old individuals. A subset of that data points towards increased levels of BDNF as one of the mediating mechanisms. A great deal more work is needed to flesh out the current understanding of the enormously complex biochemistry involved in the effects of exercise on the brain, of course, but that doesn't stop some researchers from optimistically considering pharmaceutical approaches to mimic some of the beneficial effects of exercise. The health advantages of high-intensity exercise are widely ...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 24, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

James Peyer at TEDxStuttgart: Can We Defeat the Diseases of Aging?
My attention was drawn today to a recently published presentation by James Peyer. He heads up Apollo Ventures, one of the new crop of investment concerns focused on funding companies that are developing means to treat aging. These include the Longevity Fund, first out of the gate some years ago, as well as Juvenescence and the Methuselah Fund, created this year, and a repurposing of existing funds, such as Michael Greve's Kizoo ventures. Apollo Ventures is the source of the Geroscience online magazine that helps to advance and explain the position taken on aging by this group; this is something that more investors should d...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 23, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Spurring Blood Vessel Growth via Signaling is Not as Simple as Hoped
This study shows that there are distinct steps and signals that control the process. First, VEGF activates Akt to induce endothelial cells to sprout. Then, R-Ras activates Akt to induce lumen formation. The second step involving Akt activation by R-Ras stabilizes the microtubule cytoskeleton in endothelial cells, creating a steady architecture that promotes lumen formation. We propose that VEGF and R-Ras activation of Akt signaling are complementary to each other, both are necessary to generate fully functional blood vessels to repair ischemic tissue. Our next step is to work toward promoting the combined signaling of Akt ...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 23, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

More Evidence Against a Late Life Mortality Plateau
It has been suggested that in very late life mortality rates flatten out and cease to increase. This effect has been observed in flies and other short-lived species, and insofar as aging is defined as an increase in mortality rate over time, it implies that old individuals cease to age. This isn't a desirable sort of agelessness, of course, as the plateaued mortality rates are very high; individuals are in poor health and do not live much longer. How might we interpret this? That all of the most harmful damage has already been done, and further accumulated damage doesn't much change the near future outcome? In human...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 23, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Recent Insight into the Processes of Rejuvenation that Act to Ensure the Offspring of Adult Parents are Born Young
Parents and their germline cells are biologically old, and yet developing offspring produced from the germline are biologically young. Therefore a form of cellular rejuvenation takes place somewhere between the start and the end of reproduction in multicellular organisms, whether they are nematode worms of a few hundred cells, or vastly larger and more complex species such as our own. New research on this topic from the usually secretive research groups at Calico was widely announced today; it is focused on the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, but the findings are probably of relevance to the processes of rejuvenation that...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 23, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Considering Age-Related Changes in Molecules in the Bloodstream in the Context of Cell Therapies for the Old
Parabiosis studies in which the circulatory systems of an old mouse and a young mouse are linked, and in which the old mouse shows a reversal of some measures of aging, have given rise to a broadening exploration of age-related changes in the molecules carried in the bloodstream. The high level picture of what is taking place here is this: reactions to rising levels of the forms of cell and tissue damage that cause aging include changes in the signal molecules released by cells into the surrounding environment. These are influential on stem cell function, chronic inflammation, and other line items known to be important in ...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 22, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs