Aubrey de Grey Establishes the Longevity Escape Velocity Foundation
Aubrey de Grey, co-founder of the Methuselah Foundation and later the SENS Research Foundation (SRF), funding the latter organization with $13M of his own resources to add to the donations of philanthropists, has over the past year separated from the SRF, for reasons that I intend to neither discuss nor have a public opinion on. Per his presentation at the recent Longevity Summit Dublin, he has now founded the Longevity Escape Velocity (LEV) Foundation in collaboration with the Ichor Life Sciences principals to continue to bring funding into the programs that he believes need to happen in order to unblock important lines o...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 28, 2022 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Towards Direct Reprogramming of Heart Fibroblasts into Cardiomyocytes
A promising approach to inducing regeneration from injury and age-related fibrosis in the heart is the reprogramming of fibroblast cells into heart muscle cells, cardiomyocytes. Like all such efforts, much of the work lies in establishing the recipe of regulatory signals needed to produce the desired outcome. The research results reported here are an illustrative example, representative of programs taking place in many laboratories, in which scientists are attempting to improve on the discovered forms of reprogramming in order to make them efficient enough to be useful as a basis for regenerative therapies. Mammal...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 28, 2022 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Epigenetic Inheritance of Benefits Resulting from Parental Physical Fitness
This study used mice to evaluate how their lifestyles - eating fatty foods vs. healthy and exercising vs. not - affected the metabolites of their offspring. Metabolites are substances made or used when the body breaks down food, drugs or chemicals, or its own fat or muscle tissue. "We have previously shown that maternal and paternal exercise improve health of offspring. Tissue and serum metabolites play a fundamental role in the health of an organism, but how parental exercise affects offspring tissue and serum metabolites has not yet been investigated." Researchers used targeted metabolomics - the study of metaboli...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 28, 2022 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Stem Cell Derived Extracellular Vesicles Reduce Epigenetic Age in Mice
As a strategy, the measurement of epigenetic age to assess the outcome of therapy intended to slow or reverse aging has its issues. Since it remains unknown as to how near all of the epigenetic marks on the genome are caused by the underlying processes of aging, it is quite possible that any given epigenetic clock will underestimate or overestimate the effects of a given approach to therapy, based on the choice and weighting of epigenetic marks used in the clock. It is suspected that the existing clocks are strongly influenced by only some of the mechanisms of aging. Thus the assessment epigenetic age in a study of ...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 27, 2022 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

An Age of Metabolomics
Obtaining enormous amounts of data on the human metabolome now costs little. Databases of metabolomic data available for analysis have become vast, and continue to grow. Productive analysis trails far behind the production of data, unfortunately, as is true for all of the omics technologies. In this paper, researchers discuss the present state of metabolomic knowledge in the context of aging, and the path forward to producing useful understanding from this deluge of human data, contributing perhaps to the better development of treatments for aging. Aging is a fundamental part of the human experience, and it has lo...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 27, 2022 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Theorizing a Role for Prelamin A in Aging
Researchers here review the evidence for prelamin A to have a role in aging. This derives from research into the LMNA mutation that results in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, as normal prelamin A has some commonalities with the mutated lamin A, called progerin, that produces pathology in that condition. As is always the case, the mechanisms look plausible, but the question remains open as to whether this does in fact produce a meaningful contribution to aging. The only way to find out is to downregulate prelamin A efficiently without affecting other mechanisms of aging, and see what happens. Almost since the...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 27, 2022 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

More on the Debate Over the Classification of Aging as a Disease
Whether or not aging is clearly listed as a disease in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) maintained by the World Health Organization (WHO) only matters because medical research and development is heavily regulated. Since aging isn't classified as a disease, there is no clear roadmap to obtaining regulatory approval to treat aging with a working rejuvenation therapy, and therefore no investor is willing to commit to funding that work. What happens instead is that the range of biotech companies presently working to produce age-slowing and rejuvenating therapies pick a specific age-related disease to start wi...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 26, 2022 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Politics and Legislation Source Type: blogs

Implicating Cellular Senescence in the Fibrosis and Inflammation of NASH
Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, NASH, is a condition characterized by chronic inflammation and fibrosis in the liver. Fibrosis is a malfunction of tissue maintenance, the deposition of excessive, scar-like collagen that disrupts tissue structure and function. Like all fibrotic diseases, means of effectively reversing the progression of NASH are presently lacking. NASH is a lifestyle condition, a consequence of fatty liver and obesity, but losing weight and otherwise changing lifestyle will not significantly reverse established fibrosis and loss of liver function. Where fibrosis and inflammation characterize a condition, we m...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 26, 2022 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Relationships Between Strength Training and Aerobic Exercise and Late Life Mortality
Both strength training and aerobic exercise independently correlate with improved health and reduced mortality in later life. Animal studies demonstrate causation, in that we'd expect both strength training and aerobic activity to produce the result of improved health and reduced mortality. It is reasonable to proceed on the believe that this will hold up in humans. Meanwhile, here is yet another epidemiological study that shows correlation in a human population, noteworthy for assessing the effects of both strength training and aerobic activity separately in the same study. It is recommended that older adults (ag...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 26, 2022 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Back to Debating Limits to Human Life Span Again
While it is self-evident that longevity is limited in the practical sense, in that one or more degenerative processes of aging eventually make it so unlikely for survival to continue that everyone dies somewhere before age 120, that doesn't mean that longevity is limited in any other sense. If we alter the consequences of the underlying processes of aging, by repairing the damage that they cause, by changing the process, and so forth, then longevity will increase. While the authors of today's open access paper make generally sensible statements about the nature of aging, they seem far too skeptical that anything of practic...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 25, 2022 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Repeating the Point that Metformin Just Doesn't Look Good in Animal Studies
Based on studies conducted in mice, metformin is a terrible candidate drug for the treatment of aging. It may well benefit metabolically abnormal individuals, such as diabetics, but results for aged, metabolically normal mice are all over the map. Further, the gold standard, rigorous Interventions Testing Program found no benefit in their assessment. If the goal is to modestly slow aging, then rapamycin is way and far better: robust, replicated results on health and life span in animal studies. But the goal should not be to modestly slow aging! It should be to produce rejuvenation! The sizable fraction of academia and indu...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 25, 2022 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Aging Muscles
With advancing age, muscle tissue loses mass and strength, leading to sarcopenia and frailty. A range of mechanisms are thought to contribute to this progressive degeneration, but researchers here suggest that the preventative focus for muscle aging should be placed on ways to reduce oxidative stress and chronic inflammation. These two aspects of aging go hand in hand, linked by a number of different mechanisms, such as the level of damage and altered behavior of mitochondria in cells. Both oxidative stress and inflammation change cell behavior for the worse, and in muscle tissue it may be that reduced activity in the stem...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 25, 2022 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The Burden of Somatic Mutation with Age
Mutational damage occurs constantly to nuclear DNA throughout life. Little of that damage goes unrepaired, and little of the lasting breakage occurs in active parts of the genome. Where mutations go unrepaired in active parts of the genome, little of that occurs in important genes. Where it does occur in important genes, that only matters to the extent that (a) the mutation can spread, and (b) the mutation is potentially cancerous. Comparatively few cells in the body have the capacity to create many descendant cells through replication, as the Hayflick limit ensures that near all cells are limited in the number of times th...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 24, 2022 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Intermittent Hypoxia Doubles Nematode Life Span
A number of interventions can produce a doubling or greater extension of life span in the nematode C. elegans. Nematode worms demonstrate the plasticity of longevity in short-lived animals, far greater than is the case in long-lived mammals such as our own species. Interventions that alter metabolism in ways that upregulate cellular stress responses, and in doing so produce greatly extended nematode longevity, might be expected to only improve long-term health and add a few years of life in humans. We only have to look at the practice of calorie restriction to see a direct comparison and illustration of this point. Thus wh...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 24, 2022 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

A Subpopulation of Thymic Cells Can Restore Function to an Aged Thymus
You may recall that researchers have shown that endothelial progenitor cells can restore function to an atrophied thymus. Here, researchers identify a particular subset of functional cells in the thymus that can achieve the same result. The thymus loses active tissue with age, and this loss is a major contribution to the age-related decline of the immune system. The thymus is where thymocytes, created in the bone marrow, mature into new T cells of the adaptive immune system. Absent this supply of T cell reinforcements, the immune system becomes ever more crowded, year after year, with dysfunctional, broken cells. Restoring...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 24, 2022 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs