Novartis C.E.O. Defends Company ’s Decision to Withhold False Data From the F.D.A.
Responding to the agency ’s stern rebuke, Vas Narasimhan, the company’s executive, tried to reassure investors that Novartis did not intentionally deceive the F.D.A. while seeking approval for its $2.1 million gene therapy. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katie Thomas Tags: Novartis AG Narasimhan, Vasant Food and Drug Administration Zolgensma Falsification of Data Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Genetic Engineering Spinal Muscular Atrophy Source Type: news

Blood test is '100 times more sensitive at picking up on tumours in early-stage breast cancer'
Scientists from Cambridge University developed a tool that detects 'tumour DNA' in individual patients. It identified genetic mutations that were specific to 33 breast-cancer sufferers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Middle Stone Age foragers resided in high elevations of the glaciated Bale Mountains, Ethiopia
Studies of early human settlement in alpine environments provide insights into human physiological, genetic, and cultural adaptation potentials. Although Late and even Middle Pleistocene human presence has been recently documented on the Tibetan Plateau, little is known regarding the nature and context of early persistent human settlement in high elevations. Here, we report the earliest evidence of a prehistoric high-altitude residential site. Located in Africa’s largest alpine ecosystem, the repeated occupation of Fincha Habera rock shelter is dated to 47 to 31 thousand years ago. The available resources in cold and...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ossendorf, G., Groos, A. R., Bromm, T., Tekelemariam, M. G., Glaser, B., Lesur, J., Schmidt, J., Akcar, N., Bekele, T., Beldados, A., Demissew, S., Kahsay, T. H., Nash, B. P., Nauss, T., Negash, A., Nemomissa, S., Veit, H., Vogelsang, R., Woldu, Z., Zech, Tags: Anthropology, Ecology reports Source Type: news

Synthetic sequence entanglement augments stability and containment of genetic information in cells
We present a generalizable strategy to preserve and constrain genetic information through the computational design of overlapping genes. Overlapping a sequence with an essential gene altered its fitness landscape and produced a constrained evolutionary path, even for synonymous mutations. Embedding a toxin gene in a gene of interest restricted its horizontal propagation. We further demonstrated a multiplex and scalable approach to build and test>7500 overlapping sequence designs, yielding functional yet highly divergent variants from natural homologs. This work enables deeper exploration of natural and engineered overla...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Blazejewski, T., Ho, H.-I., Wang, H. H. Tags: Genetics, Techniques reports Source Type: news

Overlapping genes for synthetic biology
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Mao, S. Tags: Genetics, Techniques twis Source Type: news

Woman, 35, is 'turning into a statue' due to a one-in-a-million condition
Rachel Winnard, 35, of Rochdale, Greater Manchester, suffers from the genetic disorder Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva, which causes bony bars to form within the body's muscles. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AstraZeneca's Lynparza helps prostate cancer patients live longer: study
AstraZeneca said on Wednesday its cancer drug, Lynparza, was successful in helping patients with metastatic prostate cancer and certain genetic mutations live longer without the disease worsening, compared with the standard of care. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Novartis Hid Manipulated Data While Seeking Approval for $2.1 Million Treatment
The failure to report the issue has not put patients at risk, the F.D.A. said, but the drugmaker could face criminal and civil penalties. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katie Thomas Tags: Novartis AG Food and Drug Administration Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Spinal Muscular Atrophy Genetics and Heredity gene therapy your-feed-healthcare Source Type: news

Mouse Genetics Shape the Gut Microbiome More than Their Environment
Neither the maternal microbiome nor housing conditions appear to permanently alter which microbes remain in the animals. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - August 6, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Study reveals 6 top exercises for offsetting 'obesity genes'
New research examines the effect of 18 different types of regular workout on people with a genetic predisposition to developing obesity. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity / Weight Loss / Fitness Source Type: news

Antibody blood tests could ELIMINATE “need” for many vaccines, but America’s #1 vax shill and pediatrician, Paul Offit, protects his wallet instead of children
(Natural News) Vaccinations bring with them serious risk that the medical community refuses to address or even test for in their secretive laboratories. With a 100 percent constant “green light” from the Centers for Disease Control, the “Pharma Five” (GSK, Merck, Sanofi, Pfizer and Novavax) are hard at work combining genetically modified bacteria and human... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CRISPR Gene Editing Is Being Tested in Human Patients, and the Results Could Revolutionize Health Care
It’s only been seven years since scientists first learned how to precisely and reliably splice the human genome using a tool called CRISPR, making it possible to think about snipping out disease-causing mutations and actually cure, once and for all, genetic diseases ranging from sickle cell anemia to certain types of cancer and even blindness. Doctors are plunging ahead in search of ways to use the relatively new technology to start treating patients. In China last November, scientist Jiankui He stunned—and dismayed—the genetic community when he announced he had already used CRISPR, which many believe sti...
Source: TIME: Health - August 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized crispr Genetics Source Type: news

Minnesota man, 23, born with rare disorder that left him with no teeth and the inability to sweat
Fashionista Joe Tou Voua Lee, 23, from Minnesota was born with ectodermal dysplasia, a rare genetic disorder that prevents the sweat glands, hair and teeth from forming properly. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Delinquent behavior: systematic review of genetic and environmental risk factors - Azeredo A, Moreira D, Figueiredo P, Barbosa F.
Delinquency refers to a juveniles' behavior pattern characterized by repeated offending, and is regarded mainly in its social, but also criminal aspects. Delinquent and non-delinquent individuals may be a product of the same society or even the same family... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

At Mexican Oil Company, Workers Offered ‘Health Incentive’ Bonus For Weight Loss, Trim Waistlines
(Bloomberg) — At Mexico’s state-run oil company, skinnier waists mean bigger bonuses. Under Petroleos Mexicanos’s new collective bargaining contract with its union, workers who meet certain body weight standards will receive a “health incentive” of 5,545.40 pesos ($287) a year. To qualify, they must have a body mass index, or BMI, of not more than 25 — or a maximum waist circumference of 90 centimeters (35 inches) for men and 80 centimeters (31 inches) for women. The so-called health bonus is a 4.6% increase from the last union contract. The policy runs counter to recommendations by heal...
Source: TIME: Health - August 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amy Stillman / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized Business Mexico onetime Source Type: news

High insulin levels may bring on pancreatic cancer
Researchers bred mice that were genetically unable to produce excess insulin with mice susceptible to cancer development. The resulting mice had the same pancreatic cancer mutation found in 90 percent of human patients. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - August 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hair Loss Not Just a Male Problem
Hair loss is just as common in women, and it can occur due to factors such as genetics, and the hairstyles and hair products used by women. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - August 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hair Loss Not Just a Male Problem
FRIDAY, Aug. 2, 2019 -- The sad sight of a receding hairline is not limited to men, a dermatologist says. Hair loss is just as common in women, and it can occur due to factors such as genetics, and the hairstyles and hair products used by... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 2, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

WormBase workshop talks at the 2019 IWM available on Youtube
Talks delivered at the WormBase workshop as part of the International C. elegans meeting at UCLA in June 2019 are now available on Youtube. Please note that these are recordings done at the workshop with external cameras and microphones, so apologies if they are not of the highest quality.  They are linked from their titles below– Introduction to the WormBase webpages and widgets WormBase data mining tools: SimpleMine, WormMine, BioMart WormBase ontologies and gene set enrichment analysis WormBase JBrowse: tutorial and demo Community curation Introduction to the Alliance of Genome Resources   (Source: WormBase)
Source: WormBase - August 2, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Ranjana Kishore Tags: brief communication meetings news tutorials IWM Source Type: news

Study identifies genetic differences that may increase risk of obesity, diabetes
In a Finnish study that included researchers from UCLA, the DNA from nearly 20,000 people was harnessed to identify genetic mutations that may increase the risk of diabetes, high cholesterol and other diseases and conditions.The findings, published in the journal Nature, suggest the potential for using genomic sequencing to uncover variations that may increase the risk for several common health problems, including heart disease, obesity and metabolic syndrome. The researchers also identified genetic differences that may result in below-average height and weight.The study authors — from UCLA, Washington University, th...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 2, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

People with genetic condition should be given aspirin daily to slash their risk of colorectal cancer
An estimated 200,000 people in the UK are born with Lynch syndrome. A study showed taking aspirin daily for two years could prevent a diagnosis of the killer disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study Shows Older Parents May Have Better Behaved Children
BOSTON (CBS) — If you worry you may have had children too late in life, a new study in the journal Child Development should bring you some comfort. Researchers have found older parents are more likely to have well-behaved children. While children born to older parents are at higher risk for genetic, neurological, and other health problems, but according to this study, they may have a behavioral advantage. Researchers looked at data on more than 32,000 Dutch children and found that when either their mother or their father was older, they were less likely to be defiant rule-breakers or physically aggressive. Older pare...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Parenting Source Type: news

A New Alzheimer ’s Blood Test Proved 94% Accurate in Finding Brain Changes Related to the Disease
In this study, the team took samples from 158 people over the age of 50, most of whom were cognitively normal at the start of the study, and followed them for about four years to see which participants developed Alzheimer’s. To verify the amyloid levels found in the blood test, the volunteers also had a PET scan of their brains and provided samples of cerebrospinal fluid, near the start and then again near the end of the study period. The blood samples were collected within 18 months of the first amyloid PET scan, and 88% of the time, the blood test matched the scan. That’s not accurate enough to use as a test ...
Source: TIME: Health - August 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Alzheimer's Brain embargoed study Source Type: news

Jeffrey Epstein Hoped to Seed Human Race With His DNA
Mr. Epstein, the accused sex trafficker, was fascinated by eugenics. He told scientists and others of his vision of using his New Mexico ranch to impregnate women. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: James B. Stewart, Matthew Goldstein and Jessica Silver-Greenberg Tags: Epstein, Jeffrey E (1953- ) Genetics and Heredity Child Abuse and Neglect DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid) Source Type: news

Somatic evolution and global expansion of an ancient transmissible cancer lineage
The canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) is a cancer lineage that arose several millennia ago and survives by "metastasizing" between hosts through cell transfer. The somatic mutations in this cancer record its phylogeography and evolutionary history. We constructed a time-resolved phylogeny from 546 CTVT exomes and describe the lineage’s worldwide expansion. Examining variation in mutational exposure, we identify a highly context-specific mutational process that operated early in the cancer’s evolution but subsequently vanished, correlate ultraviolet-light mutagenesis with tumor latitude, and d...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Baez-Ortega, A., Gori, K., Strakova, A., Allen, J. L., Allum, K. M., Bansse-Issa, L., Bhutia, T. N., Bisson, J. L., Briceno, C., Castillo Domracheva, A., Corrigan, A. M., Cran, H. R., Crawford, J. T., Davis, E., de Castro, K. F., B. de Nardi, A., de Vos, Tags: Genetics, Medicine, Diseases, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

China's CRISPR revolution
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Cohen, J. Tags: Asia/Pacific News, Genetics special/Feature Source Type: news

Fields of dreams
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Cohen, J. Tags: Asia/Pacific News, Ecology, Genetics special/Feature Source Type: news

The CRISPR animal kingdom
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Cohen, J. Tags: Asia/Pacific News, Genetics special/Feature Source Type: news

Inside the circle of trust
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Cohen, J. Tags: Asia/Pacific News, Genetics, Scientific Community special/Feature Source Type: news

The long shadow of a CRISPR scandal
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Cohen, J. Tags: Asia/Pacific News, Genetics, Scientific Community special/Feature Source Type: news

Parallel and idiosyncratic fish adaptation
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Evolution, Genetics twis Source Type: news

It's a dog's life
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Vignieri, S. Tags: Genetics, Medicine, Diseases twis Source Type: news

Contrasting genomic shifts underlie parallel phenotypic evolution in response to fishing
Humans cause widespread evolutionary change in nature, but we still know little about the genomic basis of rapid adaptation in the Anthropocene. We tracked genomic changes across all protein-coding genes in experimental fish populations that evolved pronounced shifts in growth rates due to size-selective harvest over only four generations. Comparisons of replicate lines show parallel allele frequency shifts that recapitulate responses to size-selection gradients in the wild across hundreds of unlinked variants concentrated in growth-related genes. However, a supercluster of genes also rose rapidly in frequency and dominate...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Therkildsen, N. O., Wilder, A. P., Conover, D. O., Munch, S. B., Baumann, H., Palumbi, S. R. Tags: Evolution, Genetics reports Source Type: news

Laboratory mice born to wild mice have natural microbiota and model human immune responses
Laboratory mouse studies are paramount for understanding basic biological phenomena but also have limitations. These include conflicting results caused by divergent microbiota and limited translational research value. To address both shortcomings, we transferred C57BL/6 embryos into wild mice, creating "wildlings." These mice have a natural microbiota and pathogens at all body sites and the tractable genetics of C57BL/6 mice. The bacterial microbiome, mycobiome, and virome of wildlings affect the immune landscape of multiple organs. Their gut microbiota outcompete laboratory microbiota and demonstrate resilience ...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Rosshart, S. P., Herz, J., Vassallo, B. G., Hunter, A., Wall, M. K., Badger, J. H., McCulloch, J. A., Anastasakis, D. G., Sarshad, A. A., Leonardi, I., Collins, N., Blatter, J. A., Han, S.-J., Tamoutounour, S., Potapova, S., Foster St. Claire, M. B., Yuan Tags: Immunology, Medicine, Diseases, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

NeuBase's newest advisors are former National Cancer Institute director and Harvard geneticist
Pittsburgh ’s newest publicly traded company has made two high-powered additions to its scientific advisory board. NeuBase Therapeutics Inc. said in a release that Dr. Samuel Broder and George Church bring expertise in genetics, genomics and oncology and will work closely with its management team. NeuBase (Nasdaq:NBSE) is a biotechnology company developing next-generation antisense therapies to address genetic diseases. Broder was director of the National Cancer Institute from 1989 through 1995… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 31, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Patty Tascarella Source Type: news

Uganda: Uganda to Breed Malaria-Fighting Mosquitoes
[Monitor] Government will establish an insectarium where research on genetically-modified mosquitoes will be conducted under a project to fight malaria in Africa. (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - July 31, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Older Parents May Have Better Behaved Kids
WEDNESDAY, July 31, 2019 -- Many people wait until they're older to have children, and that decision can raise the risk of problems like infertility and genetic abnormalities. But new research suggests there may be at least one benefit to having... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 31, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

The DNA test scam defrauding seniors
The Federal Trade Commission said Tuesday that it's been getting reports that scammers are pretending to sell genetic tests to elderly people, and claiming (falsely) that Medicaid covers them. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mother, 31, begs new Prime Minister Boris Johnson to pump cash into dementia research budget 
Carli Pirie, 31, Biggleswade, Bedfordshire, has a genetic fault which puts her at high risk of getting the disease while she is young. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Genetic testing: What secrets could it reveal about you?
Genome sequencing projects around the world are revealing promising new health insights. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - July 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Slow growth determines nonheritable antibiotic resistance in Salmonella enterica
Bacteria can withstand killing by bactericidal antibiotics through phenotypic changes mediated by their preexisting genetic repertoire. These changes can be exhibited transiently by a large fraction of the bacterial population, giving rise to tolerance, or displayed by a small subpopulation, giving rise to persistence. Apart from undermining the use of antibiotics, tolerant and persistent bacteria foster the emergence of antibiotic-resistant mutants. Persister formation has been attributed to alterations in the abundance of particular proteins, metabolites, and signaling molecules, including toxin-antitoxin modules, adenos...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - July 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Pontes, M. H., Groisman, E. A. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Veterans suffering from PTSD flashbacks may share 8 genetic variants, scientists discover
Researchers at two US VAs, Yale University and UC San Diego found that many veterans share eight genetic variants linked to higher risks for PTSD and flashbacks in a study over 165,000 soldiers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Doctors In The U.S. Use CRISPR Technique To Treat A Genetic Disorder For The 1st Time
For the first time, doctors have used the gene-editing technique CRISPR to treat a genetic disorder in the U.S. The patient, who has sickle cell disease, spoke with NPR about her treatment. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

White veterans have 8 genetic locations that reactivate PTSD symptoms
Researchers have pinpointed genetic factors that reactivate memories related to post-traumatic stress disorder, a new study says. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - July 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Geneticist Liane Russell Dies
She conducted innovative research in mutagenesis and teratogenesis related to radiation and chemical exposures, identifying risks to fetuses. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - July 29, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Study finds brain defects in people with a genetic risk for schizophrenia
FINDINGSAn international study led by researchers from the Jane and Terry Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA has found that people who are born with a genetic disease that greatly increases the risk of developing schizophrenia  have distinctive defects and deficiencies in the white matter of their brains. Researchers compared the brains of people with the genetic disorder, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, to the brains of healthy people and to the brains of people with the disease who do not have schizophrenia.The brain ’s white matter connects different regions of the brain and...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 29, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Your Apple Has 100 Million Microorganisms Living On It. Should You Care?
Fruit and vegetables are among the healthiest foods around, packed with plenty of vitamins, minerals and nutrients. But have you ever wondered about what else you might be eating when you bite into an apple? Gabriela Berg did. The head of the Institute of Environmental Biotechnology at Graz University of Technology in Austria has been studying the microbes that inhabit fruit for most of her professional career. This seemingly esoteric curiosity has recently taken on more practical health implications, as research into the human microbiome has uncovered the key role bacteria, viruses and other microorganisms that live on ou...
Source: TIME: Health - July 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Time Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition microbiome Source Type: news

Yale researchers find genetic clues to troubling PTSD symptom
new genome-wide survey of 165,000 U.S. military veterans has identified eight regions of the genome associated with post-traumatic stress disorder. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - July 29, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Sickle Cell Patient Reveals Why She Is Volunteering For Landmark Gene-Editing Study
Victoria Gray, 34, of Forest, Miss., hopes the gene-editing technique CRISPR will relieve her lifelong suffering caused by the genetic blood disorder that affects millions of people around the world.(Image credit: Meredith Rizzo/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

In A 1st, Doctors In U.S. Use CRISPR Tool To Treat Patient With Genetic Disorder
Victoria Gray, 34, of Forest, Miss., has sickle cell disease. She is the first patient ever to be publicly identified as being involved in a study testing the use of CRISPR for a genetic disease.(Image credit: Meredith Rizzo/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news