What Clinical Symptoms Can An Infant with Polycythemia Have?
Discussion 1. What are indications for an exchange transfusion? 2. What are potential risks of partial exchange or exchange transfusion? 3. What are causes of anemia in different age groups? Related Cases Disease: Polycythemia | Blood and Blood Disorders Symptom/Presentation: Abnormal Laboratory Test | Respiratory Distress Specialty: Hematology | Neonatology Age: Premature Newborn To Learn More To view pediatric review articles on this topic from the past year check PubMed. Evidence-based medicine information on this topic can be found at SearchingPediatrics.com and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Infor...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - April 29, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Science Saturday: New genetic test classifies lymphomas
The current diagnostic tools in a pathologist's arsenal sometimes cannot provide a clear distinction between primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (one of the few lymphomas more common in younger women) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, the most common type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma overall. This may occasionally give rise to diagnostic inaccuracy in routine practice and could leave [...] (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - April 27, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Kids' cavities probably not caused by bad genes
(Reuters Health) - Environmental factors appear to play a bigger role than genetics in shaping children's risk for cavities, a study of Australian twins suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Whole Exome Sequencing Shows Promise in Diagnosing Unexplained Liver Disease Whole Exome Sequencing Shows Promise in Diagnosing Unexplained Liver Disease
Whole exome sequencing (WES) may identify genetic causes of idiopathic liver disease after an unrevealing conventional workup, researchers say.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - April 26, 2019 Category: Pathology Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

NLM Technical Bulletin, Mar-Apr 2019, #CiteNLM Wikipedia Edit-a-thon
The next National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) #CiteNLM Wikipedia Edit-a-thon will take place on May 6, 2019. During the all-day online event, we invite you to add citations and content to Wikipedia articles using trusted National Library of Medicine (NLM) resources like MedlinePlus, PubMed, and Genetics Home Reference. Participants can follow the hashtag #CiteNLM on Twitter throughout the day to ask questions, post photos, and share personal experiences. (Source: NLM Technical Bulletin)
Source: NLM Technical Bulletin - April 26, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

New CRISPR Genetic Tests Offer Clinical Pathologists Powerful Tools to Diagnose Disease Even in Remote and Desolate Regions
Researchers at UC Berkley developed new ways to use CRISPR as a genetic “search engine” in addition to a cut and paste tool Clinical pathology laboratory professionals have long been aware of the potential diagnostic properties related to CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) technology. Now, new tests using the gene-editing tool show that […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - April 26, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Source Type: news

Image of the Day: Color Grid
Researchers genetically engineered E. coli to produce colorful and fluorescent proteins originally from Cnidaria. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 26, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Image of the Day Source Type: news

Cavities? Blame Nurture, Not Nature
Environmental factors are more important than genetics in determining who gets cavities, a new study reports. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Genetics and Heredity Twins Teeth and Dentistry Multiple Births Fluorides Source Type: news

How does chronic edema impact health-related quality of life?
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Final results of the large, international LIMPRINT study have provided new data on the prevalence of chronic swelling and the devastating impact it can have on health-related quality of life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

TET proteins regulate factors essential for normal antibody production
(La Jolla Institute for Immunology) A report by researchers at la Jolla Institute for Immunology found that genetic deletion, or mutation, of TET2 and TET3 in mouse B cells damps down the generation of functional IgG antibodies, decreasing the effectiveness of immune responses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 26, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Large genome-wide association study is first to focus on both child and adult asthma
(University of Chicago Medical Center) Asthma, a common respiratory disease that causes wheezing, coughing and shortness of breath, is the most prevalent chronic respiratory disease worldwide. A new study, published April 30, 2019 in Lancet Respiratory Medicine, is the first large investigation to examine the differences in genetic risk factors for childhood-onset and adult-onset asthma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A Genetic Clue Behind ADHD? A Genetic Clue Behind ADHD?
Dr Alan Jacobs discusses results from a recent genome-wide association meta-analysis.Medscape Neurology (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - April 25, 2019 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Commentary Source Type: news

Machine Learning Can Speed Diagnosis of Genetic Diseases in Children
THURSDAY, April 25, 2019 -- A machine learning process and clinical natural language processing (CNLP) can rapidly diagnose rare genetic diseases, according to a study published in the April 24 issue of Science Translational Medicine. Michelle M.... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 25, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Qu é bec siblings with rare orphan disease lead to discovery of rare genetic diseases
(McGill University) Mutations in a gene involved in brain development have led to the discovery of two new neurodevelopmental diseases by an international team led by researchers at McGill University and CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New genetic test detects hundreds of harmful mutations among high-risk groups
(Nemours) Researchers at Nemours Children's Health System have developed a new low-cost genetic test that accurately identified more than 200 known disease-causing gene variations in two high-risk populations, the Old Order Amish and Old Order Mennonites of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The findings, published today in the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, could help reduce morbidity and mortality from these rare genetic disorders, and dramatically reduce costs of care through early diagnosis of newborns. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

High school students publish paper with RIT scientists analyzing rare bacterium
(Rochester Institute of Technology) Three high school students from an urban charter school in Rochester, N.Y., found a rare e-coli-killing bacterium on a door handle at Rochester Institute of Technology while gaining college experience through a senior capstone program. They genetically sequenced and analyzed the bacterium in the RIT Genomics Lab and are now co-authors with their RIT faculty mentor on a paper published in The American Society for Microbiology's Microbiology Resource Announcements. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ASHG announces 2019 winners of International DNA Day Essay Contest
(American Society of Human Genetics) As part of its celebration of National DNA Day, ASHG announced today the winners of its 2019 DNA Day Essay Contest, which encourages high schoolers and teachers worldwide to learn about human genetics and apply it to current issues. ASHG awarded first place to Sophia Chen at Lakeside School in Seattle; second to Yanna Bravewolf at The Potomac School in McLean, Va.; and third to Irene Calderon at The Summit Country Day in Cincinnati. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH awards University of Delaware's Lachke $1.7 million grant
(University of Delaware) UD biologist Salil Lachke has a growing portfolio of research focused on eye development and the genetic disorders that obstruct healthy eye development. Now the National Institutes of Health has announced $1.7 million in support for his work to understand the developmental disorders that cause anophthalmia (no eye) and microphthalmia (small eye) at birth. The new grant provides five years of support. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 25, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mobile game picks out players who are genetically at risk of Alzheimer's
When the app Sea Hero Quest was put to the test, a study by University College London and the University of East Anglia found it picks out players who are genetically at risk of Alzheimer's. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Did You Know The EEOC Enforces Complaints About Employers' Misuse of Genetic Information?
Examples of complaints filed under GINA include: seeking information in a fitness for duty exam that is not job-related; employers failing to post required information about GINA; and the AARP's lawsuit related allowing employer's to use wellness programs to obtain genetic information. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - April 24, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Eric Bachman, Contributor Source Type: news

Genetic testing in women diagnosed with breast cancer decreases cost of care nationwide
(Georgetown University Medical Center) A new study suggests that Oncotype DX-guided treatment could reduce the cost for the first year of breast cancer care in the US by about $50 million (about 2 percent of the overall costs in the first year). The study by Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center and National Cancer Institute researchers was published April 24, in JNCI. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Exposing cancer's metabolic addictions
(University of California - San Diego) University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers and collaborators describe a new set of 'rules' that predict how the tissue of origin influences critical aspects of the genetic makeup of tumors, with potentially important therapeutic implications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 24, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study merges big data and zebrafish biology to reveal mechanisms of human disease
(Vanderbilt University Medical Center) In a series of studies that volleyed between large databases and research in zebrafish, Vanderbilt investigators have discovered a link between vascular biology and eye disease.The research uncovered an unexpected role for the gene GRIK5, and it showcases a new paradigm for using biobanks, electronic health records and zebrafish to discover the genetic mechanisms that contribute to human disease. The findings were reported in the American Journal of Human Genetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Leading Doctors Discussed Creating Ethical Medical Miracles at the TIME 100 Summit
Speaking at the first Time 100 Summit in New York City on Tuesday, prominent geneticist George Church admitted that for about 10 years, he knew biological weapons could be specifically targeted to individual people. But he kept it to himself. Church, a professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School, participated in a panel discussing how to introduce breakthroughs in medicine, which can become life-saving miracles, in ethical and responsible ways. He discussed his decision not to share his knowledge widely as an example of a line he consciously decided not to cross for ethical reasons. “I kept that a secret and didn...
Source: TIME: Health - April 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized 2019 TIME 100 t100summit Source Type: news

Cancer patients could be matched to a personalised drug via a blood test  
A study by the Cancer Research UK Manchester Institute found analysing a 'small volume' of a patient's blood for 'faulty DNA' allowed doctors to gather genetic information about their tumour. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

When designing clinical trials for huntington's disease, first ask the experts
(IOS Press) Progress in understanding the genetic mutation responsible for Huntington's disease (HD) and at least some molecular underpinnings of the disease has resulted in a new era of clinical testing of potential treatments. How best to design clinical trials in which HD patients are willing to participate and comply is a question faced by researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Acupuncture equals disease prevention say new studies
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Well-recognized for its therapeutic effects, acupuncture is increasingly being appreciated for its ability to promote wellness and contribute to the prevention of a broad range of conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When is sexting associated with psychological distress among young adults?
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) While sending or receiving nude electronic images may not always be associated with poorer mental health, being coerced to do so and receiving unwanted sexts was linked to a higher likelihood of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms, according to a new study published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Wiley's new premier open research next journals now open for article submissions
(Wiley) John Wiley and Sons Inc., (NYSE: JW-A) (NYSE: JW-B) is now inviting original research articles for two newly formed open access journals, Genetics& Genomics Next and Neuroscience Next. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Simple sea anemones not so simple after all
(Ohio State University) New research on tube anemones is challenging everything that evolutionary biologists thought they knew about sea animal genetics. The mitochondrial DNA of the tube anemone, or Ceriantharia, is a real head scratcher, from its unexpected arrangement to its previously unimagined magnitude. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 23, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cannabis addiction influenced by genetic makeup
(University College London) Some people may be more genetically prone to cannabis addiction, finds a new UCL-led study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Genetic Score Might Help Predict Risk of Barrett's Esophagus New Genetic Score Might Help Predict Risk of Barrett's Esophagus
A new genetic risk score (GRS) might help predict the risk of Barrett's esophagus independently of most other risk factors, but the results are not conclusive, according to new research.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

Is Ghee Healthy? Here ’s What the Science Says
Ghee is a type of clarified butter used in the cuisines of India and the Middle East. Traditionally, it’s made by gently heating cow’s-milk butter until its water content evaporates and its milk solids can be skimmed and strained away, leaving behind only the liquid fat. “Clarified butter is very similar [to ghee], but it’s sometimes made using high heat, whereas ghee is simmered at 100 degrees or less,” says Chandradhar Dwivedi, a distinguished professor emeritus of pharmacology at South Dakota State University. While ghee takes longer to make than some other types of clarified butter, it ret...
Source: TIME: Health - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Prenatal Sequencing for Some Autism Genes May Soon Be Available
Two studies, taken together, imply that sequencing can identify a genetic cause for ultrasound abnormalities in roughly 10 percent of cases. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 22, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

What DNA methylation modifications and/or genetic variations interact with childhood maltreatment in the development of depression: a systematic review - Misra P, Liu S, Meng X.
BACKGROUND: Child maltreatment predicts a significant risk factor for depression. The relationship between child maltreatment and depression has been shown to vary as a function of genetic factors. There have been very few systematic reviews conducted to d... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Health Care Digest: Attacking a deadly infant virus, Medicaid's smoking gun and exporting genetic expertise
Editor's note: Our health care digest features  a roundup of local news items, musings from notable figures, insights from other publications and must-reads from our own newsroom. As always, we'd love to hear what you think and how we can improve. Please email health care reporter Hannah Norman (hnorman@bizjournals.com) or biotech reporter Ron Leuty (rleuty@bizjournals.com) with feedback, suggestions or possible news. In the grand scheme of biotech fundraising, $6 million is a pittance. Just… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 22, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Ron Leuty Source Type: news

Promise of liquid biopsy in cancer biomarker detection and prenatal screening
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) The promise and challenges of liquid biopsy, an emerging, noninvasive method for targeted disease diagnosis and detection of cancer biomarkers to enable improved and personalized therapy, is the focus of a new special issue of Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert Inc. publishers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Blood samples to help select the right early phase clinical trials for cancer patients
(Cancer Research UK) Scientists could help match cancer patients with no other treatment options to clinical trials with experimental medicines, by analyzing the genetic faults in a sample of their blood, according to research published in Nature Medicine today (Monday). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study Highlights Disparities in Genetic Testing in Ovarian and Breast Cancer
A study of genetic testing in ovarian and breast cancer patients found substantial disparities in testing rates for ovarian cancer patients. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - April 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Dave Levitan Source Type: news

New genomics tool ECCITE-seq expands multimodal single cell analysis
(New York Genome Center) ECCITE-seq (Expanded CRISPR-compatible Cellular Indexing of Transcriptomes and Epitopes by sequencing), developed by scientists at the New York Genome Center's Technology Innovation Lab, allows researchers to perform high-throughput measurements of multiple modalities of information from single cells. The technique, published today in Nature Methods, profiles different types of biomolecules from thousands of single cells in parallel, offering a breadth of information that can be used as readout in CRISPR-based pooled genetics screens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers find high-risk genes for schizophrenia
(Vanderbilt University Medical Center) Using a unique computational 'framework' they developed, a team of scientist cyber-sleuths in the Vanderbilt University Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics and the Vanderbilt Genetics Institute (VGI) has identified 104 high-risk genes for schizophrenia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Housecall: Genetic testing -- is it right for you?
THIS WEEK'S TOP STORIES Genetic testing: What is it, and do you need it? By examining your DNA, genetic testing can provide important information for diagnosing, treating and preventing illness. Genetic testing plays a vital role in determining the risk of developing certain diseases. Find out more about different types of genetic testing, the reasons [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - April 22, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Adam Pearson neurofibromatosis: What is the genetic disorder? Signs and symptoms revealed
ADAM PEARSON is appearing on BBC ’s Pointless this afternoon, as the British actor joins hosts Alexander Armstrong and Richard Osman. Pearson has the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis, but what is it, and what are the signs and symptoms? (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is apostasy heritable? A behavior genetics study - Freeman JA.
The present study explores whether genetic factors explain variation in the levels of apostasy - defined as a disengagement from religious belief, identity and/or practice - in a US-based sample during the transition from adolescence to early adulthood. I ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

NTU scientists discover sustainable way to increase seed oil yield in crops
(Nanyang Technological University) NTU Singapore scientists have developed a sustainable way to demonstrate a new genetic modification that can increase the yield of natural oil in seeds by up to 15% in laboratory conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A baby was born with nearly no skin. Doctors are fighting to keep him alive.
Doctors believe Ja’bari Gray was born with a rare genetic condition called epidermolysis bullosa that makes his skin appear translucent, or even non-existent. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - April 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lindsey Bever Source Type: news

Apr 19 2019 This Week in Cardiology Apr 19 2019 This Week in Cardiology
Anticoagulation for embolic stroke of unknown origin, added-sugar labels, AF-patient knowledge, LDL-C and hemorrhagic stroke, and genetic signals in cancer-care cardiomyopathy are discussed this week.theheart.org on Medscape (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - April 19, 2019 Category: Cardiology Tags: Cardiology Commentary Source Type: news

GSK cutting employees at its R & D unit in Collegeville
Months after new research and development head Hal Barron announced a new strategy for his unit, pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline has laid off employees in its two main R&D hubs — Collegeville, Pa., and Stevenage in the U.K. In 2018, Barron announced a new approach to R&D, prioritizing innovation and moving towards delivering a pipeline of medicines with a focus on immunology, genetically validated targets, and finding platforms and technologies that amplify its science. “As the business… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 19, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jeff Blumenthal Source Type: news

At-home genetic kits don't reveal all breast cancer risks
Millions of people have bought into the mail-in DNA testing craze, but a new study indicates consumers should be aware of the limitations of the health tests offered.   Those who expect 23andMe to detect most breast cancer risks are being cautioned after study findings determined almost 90 percent of participants with a BRCA mutation wouldn’t have received a positive from the company’s test, reports The New York Times. The test’s limited scope is to bla me, per The Daily Beast. The study,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 19, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Caitlin Mullen Source Type: news

The genetic relationship between alcohol consumption and aspects of problem drinking in an ascertained sample - Johnson EC, St Pierre CL, Meyers J, Aliev F, McCutcheon VV, Lai D, Dick DM, Goate AM, Kramer J, Kuperman S, Nurnberger JI, Schuckit MA, Porjesz B, Edenberg HJ, Bucholz KK, Agrawal A.
BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have begun to identify loci related to alcohol consumption, but little is known about whether this genetic propensity overlaps with specific indices of problem drinking in ascertained samples. METH... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news