Genetic cancer risk scam may disqualify seniors from legitimate tests
Many never receive the results from these companies but their Medicare accounts are billed for thousands of dollars (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - September 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

While modern life may exacerbate depression, it may also give us the tools to treat it
Worldwide, rates of depression increased by 15 percent between 2005 and 2015, according to the World Health Organization. Almost everyone has been touched by depression, if not their own then that of a friend or family member. As depression becomes our new normal, the question of how to diagnose, prevent, and treat it becomes ever more urgent, said a panel of experts at a Z ócalo/UCLA event titled “Is Depression a 21st-Century Epidemic?”Before a full audience at the House of Sweden in Washington, D.C., the event began with a question from moderator Amy Ellis Nutt, former science writer for the Washington...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 13, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Living With Cancer: Precision medicine for breast cancer diagnosis, treatment and prevention
Precision medicine for breast cancerPrecision medicine for breast cancer is an approach to diagnosis, treatment and prevention that considers the genes you're born with, and the genes or other markers present within the cancer cells. Cancer care is among the first medical specialties to apply precision medicine to tailor treatment to your genetic makeup and [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - September 13, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Genetic testing scam preys on seniors' cancer fears
One couple was promised their DNA test results in 4-6 weeks. Nearly a year later, they've received nothing but massive charges to their Medicare account. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - September 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

White couple gives birth to Asian daughter after alleged fertility clinic mix-up
A fertility clinic in New Jersey is being ordered to turn over a list of sperm donors after a white couple gave birth to an Asian baby. A recently filed lawsuit alleges Kristina Koedderich was given sperm from a man who was not her husband, and that the man passed on a genetic disorder. The couple is seeking monetary damages and information on their daughter's biological father. Meg Oliver reports. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - September 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

"Free" genetic testing scam exploits seniors' cancer fears and may be costing taxpayers millions
A CBS News investigation uncovered a new Medicare fraud that could potentially cost taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars. Recruiters are showing up at senior events promoting a genetic test they claim is completely paid for by Medicare. They promise the test will reveal information about their cancer risk. But the results often do not come in, and the bills can be in the thousands. Jim Axelrod reports. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - September 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A promising treatment for an incurable, deadly kidney disease
A potential treatment for polycystic kidney disease - a genetic disorder that causes the kidneys to swell with multiple cysts and can eventually lead to organ failure - has shown promising results in animal testing. A study describing the drug's development and testing appears today in Nature Communications. The study shows an approximately 50 percent reduction in kidney size in afflicted mice following treatment. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - September 12, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

World-leading Genomics project to give insights into health and diseases
In a major advance for public health and the UK’s global leadership in genomics, a£200m public-private collaboration will support the complete sequencing of the genetic code of all 500,000 participants in the UK Biobank health research resource. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - September 11, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Senior Citizens on Medicare Are Particularly Vulnerable to New Scams Involving Fraudulent Genetic Test Orders
Medical fraudsters are targeting Medicare recipients with schemes to persuade them to agree to genetic tests advertised as informing them if they are predisposed to specific chronic diseases or cancer Medicare scams involving orders for unnecessary, expensive testing are not new. However, clinical laboratory managers and anatomic pathologists need to be aware—particularly those working in […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - September 11, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Compliance, Legal, and Malpractice Digital Pathology Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Management & Operations anatomic pathology Anti-kickback Act clinical laboratory Dark Daily dark intel Source Type: news

What the Ingebrigtsen Brothers Can Teach Us About Nature, Nurture and Running
There ’s more than one right way to rear and shape young athletes. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gretchen Reynolds Tags: Athletics and Sports Running Youth Track and Field Genetics and Heredity Source Type: news

Lasker Awards Honor Advances in Modern Immunology
The prizes recognized the discoverers of B and T lymphocytes, pioneers in genetic engineering to fight breast cancer, and a nonprofit that helps get vaccines to the world ’s poorest children. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Knvul Sheikh Tags: Lasker Awards Breast Cancer Vaccination and Immunization Immune System Children and Childhood your-feed-science Herceptin (Drug) Third World and Developing Countries Lymph Nodes and Lymphatic System Genetics and Heredity Thymus Gland Source Type: news

How Bullying May Shape Adolescent Brains
This article was originally published on Undark. Read the original article. (Source: TIME: Science)
Source: TIME: Science - September 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Rod McCullom / Undark Tags: Uncategorized onetime psychology syndication Source Type: news

How Bullying May Shape Adolescent Brains
This article was originally published on Undark. Read the original article. (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - September 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rod McCullom / Undark Tags: Uncategorized onetime psychology syndication Source Type: news

Transgenic mosquitoes pass on genes to native species
Native species mating with genetically modified male Aedes aegypti mosquitoes may have led to a more robust mosquito population around Jacobina, Brazil. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - September 10, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA oncologist Dennis Slamon wins 2019 Lasker Award for clinical medical research
Physician-scientist Dr. Dennis Slamon, professor and chief of hematology/oncology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, has been awarded the 2019 Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award for the groundbreaking development of breast cancer drug Herceptin (trastuzumab), a lifesaving therapy for women with HER2-positive breast cancer. He shares the award with H. Michael Shepard, an American cancer researcher honored for work he completed at biotechnology company Genentech; and Axel Ullrich, a German cancer researcher from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry.The Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation honored Sl...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 10, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Two therapies cure rare genetic disease in mice
Most babies who are born with arginase deficiency — a rare genetic disease that leads to the accumulation of the amino acid arginine in the blood — don’t have symptoms at first. By the time they’re toddlers, however, their muscles stiffen. Seizures, tremors and developmental delays appear next, and over time the disease can lead to severe i ntellectual disabilities.UCLA scientists have developed two new approaches to deliver functioning copies of the arginase gene to mice with arginase deficiency. One approach, which must be administered every three days in mice, uses tiny nanoparticles to carry arg...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 10, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Too Little Sleep, or Too Much, May Raise Heart Attack Risk
Getting less than six hours of sleep a night, or more than nine hours, might increase the risk for heart attack. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nicholas Bakalar Tags: Sleep Heart Genetics and Heredity Source Type: news

New Chapter in WormBook, GENETICS
Check out the latest chapter in WormBook, GENETICS: Males, Outcrossing, and Sexual Selection in Caenorhabditis Nematodes by Asher D. Cutter, Levi T. Morran and Patrick C. Phillips. (Source: WormBase)
Source: WormBase - September 9, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Ranjana Kishore Tags: brief communication community external website news paper of interest wormbook Source Type: news

Who ’s Missing From Breast Cancer Trials? Men, Says the F.D.A.
Men do get breast cancer, but they account for fewer than 1 percent of patients and often receive inadequate care. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Roni Caryn Rabin Tags: Breast Cancer Clinical Trials Estrogen Mastectomy Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Genetics and Heredity Hormones Men and Boys your-feed-health Food and Drug Administration Annals of Oncology Cardoso, Fatima Source Type: news

Boy, four, has a rare condition which means he is extra sociable
Alex Vasey, from Aberdeen, suffers from Williams syndrome, a genetic disorder, which causes a range of health and developmental problems, including being over-friendly. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Amgen experimental lung cancer drug shows promise in study
More than half of patients with an advanced form of lung cancer initially responded to an experimental Amgen drug that targets a genetic driver of the disease. (Source: PharmaManufacturing.com)
Source: PharmaManufacturing.com - September 9, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Neural networks could reveal how the brain understands time
EU-funded researchers have developed a framework for understanding how we record memories by creating a model that simulates the behaviour of single neurons across different timescales. The research could help build on our understanding of how human memory works and lead to developments in the burgeoning field of artificial neural networks, as well as areas as far-reaching as genetics and ecology. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 9, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Amgen drug shrinks lung cancer tumors in half of patients: study
An experimental Amgen Inc drug that targets a specific genetic mutation reduced tumor size in around half of advanced lung cancer patients given the highest dose in a small, early-stage trial, the company said on Sunday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Top 7 most absurd lies told by the ALLOPATHETIC medical industrial complex
(Natural News) Did your medical deity (M.D.) tell you that all your health problems are genetic and that they “run in your family?” Then why do millions of Americans prevent and cure diabetes II, cancer, heart disease, and more by simply switching to a plant-based, organic food regimen? Maybe the “runs in the family” part... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Global Network Key to Strengthening Leprosy Organisations
Participants at the first Global Forum of People’s Organizations on Hansen’s Disease which began on Sept. 7 in Manila, Philippines, play a game to build better connectivity among themselves. Credit: Stella Paul/IPSBy Ben KritzMANILA, Sep 7 2019 (IPS) Organisations of people affected by Hansen’s Disease or leprosy agree that a global network of volunteer groups is key to eradicating the disease, but concrete steps need to be taken to move the idea from an often-discussed concept to a reality. “I don’t think anyone here is not convinced about the importance of a network,” Dr. Arturo Cunana...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ben Kritz Tags: Active Citizens Civil Society Conferences Development & Aid Featured Headlines Health Human Rights Regional Categories Global Forum of People’s Organisations on Hansen’s Disease Nippon Foundation Sasakawa Health Foundation Yohe Source Type: news

Gene set enrichment analysis to create polygenic scores: a developmental examination of aggression - Elam KK, Clifford S, Shaw DS, Wilson MN, Lemery-Chalfant K.
Previous approaches for creating polygenic risk scores (PRSs) do not explicitly consider the biological or developmental relevance of the genetic variants selected for inclusion. We applied gene set enrichment analysis to meta-GWAS data to create developme... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Genome-wide association studies identify polygenic effects for completed suicide in the Japanese population - Otsuka I, Akiyama M, Shirakawa O, Okazaki S, Momozawa Y, Kamatani Y, Izumi T, Numata S, Takahashi M, Boku S, Sora I, Yamamoto K, Ueno Y, Toda T, Kubo M, Hishimoto A.
Suicide is a significant public health problem worldwide, and several Asian countries including Japan have relatively high suicide rates on a world scale. Twin, family, and adoption studies have suggested high heritability for suicide, but genetics lags be... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

Scientist: DNA Samples Suggest Famed ‘Loch Ness Monster’ Might Be a Giant Eel. Or Maybe There’s Just Lots of Regular-Sized Eel in the Loch?
(NEW YORK) — A scientist who has collected DNA from Scotland’s Loch Ness suggests the lake’s fabled monster might be a giant eel. Neil Gemmell, from the University of Otago in New Zealand, says the project found a surprisingly high amount of eel DNA in the water. He cautioned, though, that it’s not clear whether that indicates a gigantic eel or just a lot of little ones. But he said at a news conference in Scotland on Thursday that the idea of a giant eel is at least plausible. ANDY BUCHANAN—AFP/Getty ImagesUniversity of Otago geneticist Neil Gemmell poses with a beaker of water on the shores...
Source: TIME: Science - September 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Malcolm Ritter / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime Scotland Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Scientists identify genetic components of left-handedness
In a genetic analysis of 400,000 people, scientists have, for the first time, identified four DNA regions associated with left-handedness. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics Source Type: news

At MIT, New DNA Microscopy Maps Cells and Their Genetic Sequences Using Chemicals Rather than Light
Genetic data captured by this new technology could lead to a new understanding of how different types of cells exchange information and would be a boon to anatomic pathology research worldwide What if it were possible to map the interior of cells and view their genetic sequences using chemicals instead of light? Might that spark […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - September 6, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Management & Operations anatomic pathology antibodie Source Type: news

How Should Scientists' Access To Health Databanks Be Managed?
Medical and genetic data from more than a million Americans are now in scientific databases. Some programs hoard the data, while others share widely with scientists, hoping to speed medical discovery.(Image credit: KTSDESIGN/Getty Images/Science Photo Library) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - September 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Richard Harris Source Type: news

Copy cats: pet-cloning in China – in pictures
As Chinesespending on pets increases by up to 27% year on year, a Beijing firm has created its first cloned kittenContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 6, 2019 Category: Science Authors: AFP/Getty Tags: Cloning China Photography Asia Pacific Genetics Science World news Source Type: news

Study shows how serotonin and a popular anti-depressant affect the gut ’s microbiota
In this study, we were interested in finding out why they might do so,” said Hsiao, UCLA assistant professor of integrative biology and physiology, and of microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics in the  UCLA College; and of digestive diseases in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.Hsiao and her research group reported in the journal Cell in 2015 that in mice, a specific mixture of bacteria, consisting mainly of  Turicibacter sanguinis and Clostridia, produces molecules that signal to gut cells to increase production of serotonin. When Hsiao’s team raised mice without the bact...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 6, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

MRC UK Brain Banks Network enhances human tissue database
The UK Brain Banks Network (UKBBN), an initiative led by UKRI’s Medical Research Council, has enhanced its human brain tissue database, a web-based interface that enables researchers to access details of tissue samples from across the network. The database now includes searchable genomic data which allows tissue samples to be selected on the basis of genetic risk, as well as clinical and pathological findings. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - September 5, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Scientists have identified the genes linked to left-handedness
For the first time, scientists have identified the genetic differences associated with left-handedness, a trait found in 10% of the human population. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - September 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Genetic Testing in Breast Cancer: The Rules Are Changing Genetic Testing in Breast Cancer: The Rules Are Changing
In this interview, Lidia Schapira talks with Allison Kurian about cancer genetics in patients with or at risk for breast cancer.Medscape Oncology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - September 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Expert Interview Source Type: news

At last, the benefits of being left-handed are confirmed
A new study has found that lefties ’ brains could be associated with better verbal skills, among other talents. I always knew I was specialBeing a leftie has a genetic component, is linked to better verbal skills and is associated with a lower risk of Parkinson ’s disease, according toa new study published in the journal Brain. Unfortunately for Guardian readers, that ’s leftie in the handedness sense, not political. Fortunately for me, I’m both.The study is a fascinating one, using thousands of brain scans and hundreds of thousands of sequenced genomes to look for associations between genes, brains...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alex Hern Tags: Science Genetics Source Type: news

ClinVar ’ s new XML aggregated by Variation ID
Now it’s easier than ever to access all data in ClinVar for a variant or set of variants across all reported diseases.  ClinVar’s new XML is organized by variant only (Variation ID), instead of the variant-disease pair. This reduces redundancy, … Continue reading → (Source: NCBI Insights)
Source: NCBI Insights - September 5, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: NCBI Staff Tags: What's New ClinVar MedGen medical genetics variation Source Type: news

Africa: Drug Resistance Puts Africa's Malaria Success in Peril
[SciDev.Net] Nairobi -Resistance to the world's most powerful malaria drug could emerge in Africa, a genetic study has shown. (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - September 5, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Left-handed people have BETTER verbal skills and their brain develops differently, study finds 
Four genetic regions have been discovered which cause left-handedness as well as contributing to superior verbal skills. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Genetic regions associated with left-handedness identified and linked with brain architecture in language regions
A new study has for the first time identified regions of the genome associated with left-handedness in the general population and linked their effects with brain architecture. The study, led by researchers funded by the MRC and Wellcome, linked these genetic differences with the connections between areas of the brain related to language. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - September 5, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Rock-paper-scissors: Engineered population dynamics increase genetic stability
Advances in synthetic biology have led to an arsenal of proof-of-principle bacterial circuits that can be leveraged for applications ranging from therapeutics to bioproduction. A unifying challenge for most applications is the presence of selective pressures that lead to high mutation rates for engineered bacteria. A common strategy is to develop cloning technologies aimed at increasing the fixation time for deleterious mutations in single cells. We adopt a complementary approach that is guided by ecological interactions, whereby cyclical population control is engineered to stabilize the functionality of intracellular gene...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Liao, M. J., Din, M. O., Tsimring, L., Hasty, J. Tags: Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

The formation of human populations in South and Central Asia
By sequencing 523 ancient humans, we show that the primary source of ancestry in modern South Asians is a prehistoric genetic gradient between people related to early hunter-gatherers of Iran and Southeast Asia. After the Indus Valley Civilization’s decline, its people mixed with individuals in the southeast to form one of the two main ancestral populations of South Asia, whose direct descendants live in southern India. Simultaneously, they mixed with descendants of Steppe pastoralists who, starting around 4000 years ago, spread via Central Asia to form the other main ancestral population. The Steppe ancestry in Sout...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Narasimhan, V. M., Patterson, N., Moorjani, P., Rohland, N., Bernardos, R., Mallick, S., Lazaridis, I., Nakatsuka, N., Olalde, I., Lipson, M., Kim, A. M., Olivieri, L. M., Coppa, A., Vidale, M., Mallory, J., Moiseyev, V., Kitov, E., Monge, J., Adamski, N. Tags: Anthropology, Genetics, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Structure elucidation of colibactin and its DNA cross-links
Colibactin is a complex secondary metabolite produced by some genotoxic gut Escherichia coli strains. The presence of colibactin-producing bacteria correlates with the frequency and severity of colorectal cancer in humans. However, because colibactin has not been isolated or structurally characterized, studying the physiological effects of colibactin-producing bacteria in the human gut has been difficult. We used a combination of genetics, isotope labeling, tandem mass spectrometry, and chemical synthesis to deduce the structure of colibactin. Our structural assignment accounts for all known biosynthetic and cell biology d...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Xue, M., Kim, C. S., Healy, A. R., Wernke, K. M., Wang, Z., Frischling, M. C., Shine, E. E., Wang, W., Herzon, S. B., Crawford, J. M. Tags: Chemistry, Microbiology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Molecular basis and biological function of variability in spatial genome organization
The complex three-dimensional organization of genomes in the cell nucleus arises from a wide range of architectural features including DNA loops, chromatin domains, and higher-order compartments. Although these features are universally present in most cell types and tissues, recent single-cell biochemistry and imaging approaches have demonstrated stochasticity in transcription and high variability of chromatin architecture in individual cells. We review the occurrence, mechanistic basis, and functional implications of stochasticity in genome organization. We summarize recent observations on cell- and allele-specific variab...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Finn, E. H., Misteli, T. Tags: Genetics, Molecular Biology, Online Only review Source Type: news

C. elegans as a model for studying human diseases
There is a growing body of literature showing that C. elegans is a great model that contributes to the study of human disease.  Recently Dr. Andy Golden alerted us to this bit of news: Check out the show ‘Diagnosis’ on Netflix by the New York Times (episode 4). There is a very rare disease caused by mutations in the human KCNMA1 gene. If you study slo-1, perhaps you can help these patients. (Source: WormBase)
Source: WormBase - September 4, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Ranjana Kishore Tags: brief communication news Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Clinical Trial Targets Latest Gene Therapy
Pioneering pulmonologists Dr. Steven Albelda and Dr. Daniel Sterman have worked for more than 20 years on developing gene therapy to effectively combat pleural mesothelioma cancer. The payoff may have finally arrived. Albelda and Sterman’s long-awaited, phase III clinical trial will open this month to evaluate the efficacy of TR002, a novel gene therapy drug, when used in combination with celecoxib and gemcitabine. TR002, a form of immunotherapy, is a genetically engineered adenovirus that triggers the anti-tumor effects of interferon, a naturally occurring protein that destroys cancer cells. “The hope is, if i...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 4, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Tagrisso approved in China as a 1st-line treatment for EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer
AstraZeneca today announced that it has received marketing authorisation from China's National Medical Products Administration (NMPA) for Tagrisso (osimertinib) as a 1st-line treatment for adults with locally-advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumours have the genetic mutations of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 19 deletions or exon 21 (L858R) substitutions. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - September 4, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured AstraZeneca Business and Industry Source Type: news

Genetic Testing Spots Clopidogrel Responders After PCI for STEMI Genetic Testing Spots Clopidogrel Responders After PCI for STEMI
Guidelines for the management of acute STEMI patients undergoing PCI may need to be revised after a genotype-guided protocol giving clopidogrel to responders reduced bleeding rates, say experts.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: 'Highly complex' gene interaction underlies same-sex sexual behavior
A large-scale study analyzing the genetic data of thousands of people indicates that the genetic factors underlying same-sex sexual behavior are complex. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Sexual Health / STDs Source Type: news